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A Guide to the Bernard S. Parker World War I Sheet Music Collection

Finding aid created by Jim Liversidge

University of Florida Smathers Libraries - Special and Area Studies Collections

August 2014



Descriptive Summary

Creator: Parker, Bernard S., 1939- (Collector)
Title: Bernard S. Parker World War I Sheet Music Collection
Dates: Circa 1914-1919
Abstract: Collection of 753 pieces of American (U.S.A.) sheet music pertaining to the First World War (1914-18), the 12-volume compact disk set of WORLD WAR ONE SONGS (produced by Old Time Victrola Music), and a copy of the two-volume 2007 McFarland publication WORLD WAR I SHEET MUSIC by Bernard Parker.
Extent: 6 Linear feet. 12 Boxes.
Identification: UFWWI
Language(s): English

Biographical/Historical Note

Bernard S. Parker, Ph.D. (1939 - ) is a retired philosophy professor and college president (Anna Maria College in Paxton, Massachusetts) who enjoys writing and travelling. As a longtime collector of World War I sheet music, he realized there wasn't a publication that listed and described all of the various types of sheet music written about the war. In order to remedy this glaring lack of research, Dr. Parker began an extensive three year project working with the noted World War One Sheet music collections of Craig Lacy and Lee Schreiner and his own collection, as well as extensive research in the Performing Arts Reading Room of the Library of Congress. The result was his two-volume WORLD WAR I SHEET MUSIC published in 2007 by McFarland and Company Publishers, considered the quintessential reference resource on the subject. According to Dr. Parker: "...Popular music and singing certainly played a significant role during World War I...Not only was it significant for the soldiers but also for the folks back home. Patriotic war songs published as sheet music both mirrored and shaped public attitudes toward the conflict..."

Dr. Parker is a member of the Society of the Descendants of the Founders of Hartford, Connecticut and is the author of PURITAN PARKER: HISTORICAL NARRATIVE OF SERGEANT WILLIAM PARKER, ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT AND A VETERAN OF THE PEQUOT INDIAN WAR OF 1637 (published in 2007). He is also active as a team leader for Habitat for Humanity's Global Village program, organizing several trips each year to build houses all over the world including Sri Lanka, Nepal, Romania, Zambia, Fiji Isalnds, Mongolia, Paraguay, Bolivia, Chile, Ethiopia and Uganda.


Scope and Content

The Bernard S. Parker World War One Sheet Music Collection consists of 753 pieces of sheet music (most are the larger format 11x14 inch size with a small assortment of 7x10 inch "War Editions"). The sheet music is organized alphabetically by title. Most were published betweeen 1914 and 1920, but a few date back to the late 19th Century.

In his two-volume WORLD WAR I SHEET MUSIC (McFarland and Company, Inc., Jefferson, North Carolina - 2007), Dr. Parker addresses the history of Tin Pan Alley, the founding of ASCAP (The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers) and the overall business of sheet music publishing in the early years of the 20th Century. He describes the songs of the First World War as "...highly structured and usually popular for a very short time if at all. The style format was inflexible and involved two verses and a chorus. Since the range of the subject matter was also quite narrow there were many duplicate titles and overused words and phrases..."

Along with the the overall patriotic theme ("I Love My U.S.A.," "Let's All Be Americans Now," "Our Country," The Statue of Liberty is Smiling," "The Flag That Never Retreated," etc.), the collection researcher will discover multiple pieces of sheet music dealing with separation emphasing mothers and sons, sweethearts, wives and husbands and babys and fathers ("Goodbye Mother Machree," "Rocked in the Cradle of Liberty," "Break the News to Mother," "I'm Going to Follow the Boys," "Just A Baby's Prayer at Twilight," "Please Bring My Daddy Back," etc.). The subject of life on the homefront is also generously represented with titles such as "Over Here," "The Service Flag," "We're With You Boys," "We'll Do Our Share," "When It Comes to a Lovingless Day," "The Man Behind the Hammer and Plow," etc. The war-torn map of Europe is depicted by songs spotlighting many countries involved in "The War to end all wars" ("Goodbye Broadway, Hello France," "Belgain Rose," "They're On their Way to Germany," "China We Owe A Lot To You," etc.)

Other subjects, musically rendered, include socialism ("Song of Freedon"), U.S. neutrality ("America First," The Neutrality March," etc.), Uncle Sam as a symbol ("My Life Belongs to Uncle Sam," "We're Uncle Sammy's Little Nephews," etc.), the American South ("For Dixie and Uncle Sam," "Dixie Volunteers," "Everything is Peaches Down in Georgia," etc.), tributes (and criticism) of various military leaders and statesmen ("When the Kaiser Does the Goose-Step to a Good Old American Rag," "Hello General Pershing," "Be Good to California Mr. Wilson," etc.), the battlefield ("Over the Top," "Keep the Trench Fires Going for the Boys Out There," "Rose of No-Man's Land," etc.) and the post-war period ("Homeword Bound," "I've Got My Captain Working for Me Now," "Tell Mother the World War is Won," etc.).

Popular performers of the period who introduced or promoted a song are included as full-cover models or in inset photographs on the sheet music covers (Al Jolson, Eddie Cantor, Irene Castle, Eva Tanguay, Blanche Ring Nora Bayes, etc.) as are many of the more well-known songwriters whose image would possibly increase sheet music sales (John Philip Sousa, George M. Cohan, Iriving Berlin, Joseph Howard, the Von Tilzer Brothers, etc.).

Graphic artists who sketched or painted the colorful scenes on each piece of sheet music were often unidentified, but a handful of image creators did sign their work and are well-represented throughout the collection (Norman Rockwell, Edward H. Pfeiffer, the Starmer Brothers, Albert Wilfred Barbelle, Andrea de Takacs, etc.).

The collection represents a country and culture at a crossroads and offers a myriad of research options. As Dr. Parker writes: "....The United States was rather naive as it entered World War I. There had been no great mobilization since the Civil War and the skirmishes in Cuba and Mexico were hardly on a par with the Great War. America learned how to do war as it happened, and popular songs appear to have had a significant impact ans served a useful purpose in bringing the nation together both before and after the war..."


Access or Use Restrictions

Access

The entire collection is open for research, but, if possible, researchers should contact the collection curator, Jim Liversidge, prior to requesting materials.


Related or Separated Material

Additional sheet music pertaining to the First World War, may be found in the general Belknap Performing Arts Sheet Music Collection in the University of Florida Popular Culture Collections under "Patriotic" and "War-Related" subject headings. The subject of World War One is also included in the Cinema,Theatre and Jim Liversidge collections in the University of Florida Popular Culture Collections. Please contact the curator for more detailed information. The Library of Congress also has a GUIDE TO HISTORIC SHEET MUSIC 1850-1920.


Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Bernard S. Parker World War I Sheet Music Collection, Special and Area Studies Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

Acquisition Information

Dr. Bernard S. Parker, who lived locally at the time, contacted Jim Liversidge (Curator of the Popular Culture Collections) in August of 2011 after discovering a copy of his two-volume SHEET MUSIC OF WORLD WAR ONE set included in the Popular Culture/Belknap Performing Arts Collection monograph reference collection. Dr. Parker was searching for a repository to house his personal collection of sheet music and after discussions with Jim Liversidge and the George A. Smathers Libraries Development office he delivered his gift to the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections on September 9. 2011.


Contents List

Background Information (Miscellaneous)



Box Folder
11 WORLD WAR I SHEET MUSIC - A two-volume (paperback) historical listing ("9,670 Patriotic Songs Published in the United States, 1914-1920, with More Than 600 Covers Illustrated") by retired philosophy professor and World War I sheet music collector BERNARD S. PARKER (McFarland and Company, Inc., Publishers - Jefferson, North Carolina and London, 2007). According to the book jacket: "This is a comprehensive catalog of the patriotic sheet music of World War I. The introductory text covers the sheet music publishing business of the time and describes how the music messages often paralleled Woodrow Wilson's policies. Nearly 10,000 songs are included with complete bibliographical data: title, authors of the lyrics and music when available, value based on auction prices and collector knowledge, publisher, folio size and cover description. Each entry in the catalog is assigned a letter and number for easy identification in the indexes. The letter is the first letter of the title of the song and the number is its place in that alphabetical list. Titles are arranged alphabetically. Included are 613 photos of outstanding sheet music covers." Author, Bernard S. Parker notes: "I am a retired college president who enjoys writing and traveling. My book on World War I Sheet Music was written under contract by the publisher because there was no book that listed all the American sheet music written about World War I. It was an interesting three year project that resulted in a one thousand page two volume work with over 500 illustrations." The two-volumes are dedicated "To my five grandsons - Parker Lee Knight, Mitchell Travis Parker, Harrison Brian Knight, Jack Wesley Parker and Clayton James Knight - May they have lives filled with music but never experience the horrors of war." A second set of the two-volume publication may be found in the general University of Florida POPULAR CULTURE COLLECTION/BELKNAP COLLECTION FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS monograph holdings under the call number: ML128.W2 P37 2007. This two-volume set donated to the University of Florida by BERNARD S. PARKER.
12 OLD TIME VICTROLA MUSIC PRESENTS WORLD WAR I SONGS #1-12 - A twelve-volume (1997) compact disk (CD) set of vintage World War I recordings produced ("All World War One Songs... were recorded on 60 minute cassette/CD from a 1918 hand cranked Victrola using special equipment to enhance and retain the characteristic Victrola sound..") by OLD TIME VICTROLA MUSIC (Mark Best - 4303 Soundview Lane - Chesterfield, Va. 23832). Many of the titles in THE BERNARD S. PARKER WORLD WAR I SHEET MUSIC COLLECTION are included in this CD collection ("The Girl Who Wears A Red Cross on Her Sleeve," "I Didn't Raise My Boy to be a Soldier," Wake Up America," "When Uncle Sammy Leads the Band," "Over There," "Laddie Boy," "They'll Be Mighty Proud in Dixie of Their Old Black Joe," "So Long Mother," "K-K-K-Katy," "When Yankee Doodle Learns to Parlez Vous Francais," "Hello Central, Give Me No Man's Land," "There's a Service Flag Flying at Our House," "Good-bye France," "It's Time For Every Boy to be A Soldier," "Till We Meet Again," etc.) performed by the great stars of the World War I era (Billy Murray, Arthur Pryor's Band, Al Jolson, Van and Schenck, Sir Harry Lauder, Sousa's Band, The Shannon Four, John McCormack, Marion Harris, Collins and Harlan, Geoffrey O' Hara, Campbell and Burr, Hugh Donovan and the Broadway Quartette, Irving Kaufman, William Sterling Battis, Elsie Baker, etc. This twelve-volume CD set donated to the University of Florida by BERNARD S. PARKER.
13 BERNARD S. PARKER WORLD WAR I SHEET MUSIC COLLECTION Images - A thumb drive (donated to the University of Florida by BERNARD S. PARKER) including digital images of the sheet music covers included in THE BERNARD S. PARKER SHEET MUSIC COLLECTION. The images were digitized to be used in his two-volume (paperback) publication of WORLD WAR I SHEET MUSIC (McFarland and Company, Inc., Publishers - Jefferson, North Carolina and London, 2007).



Sheet Music (Filed Alphabetically by Song Title)



Box Folder
2A-1 After the War is Over - Two pieces of sheet music (Echo Music Publishing Co., New York and Seattle -1917) with words and music by James W. Casey (Composer of SING ME A SONG OF THE SOUTH, IN THE HEART OF HAWAII, HAWAIIAN ECHOES, YOUR LOVE, etc.): " "A soldier boy in a foreign land, Was lonely as could be, Tho' danger lurk'd on every hand, His thoughts were a cross the sea. Then in the din of the cannon's roar, (Back to the one he was longing for,) Quickly he pencil'd a little note, This is the message he wrote. After the war is over, After the world's at rest, I'm coming back to you, dear, The one I love best..." Cover image by artist George Hager: Red, white and black image of a woman reading a letter. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Hawaii," "Come Along Ma Honey (Down Upon the Swanee)," "In the Heart of Hawaii," "Bow Down to Uncle Sam" and "Hawaiian Echoes."
2A-2 After the War is Over, Will There Be Any "Home Sweet Home" - Four pieces of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., New York -1917) with words by E.J. Pourmon and music by Joseph Woodruff ("Featured by J. Woodruff" with cover photograph): "Angels they are weeping o'er the foreign war, Transports are sailing from shore to shore. Brave heroes are falling to arise no more, But still bugle's calling every man to war. After the War is over and the world's at peace, Many a heart will be aching after the war has ceased..." Cover image by Pfeiffer Illustrating Co., NYC: Soldiers buried in cannon rubble while the smoke rises to reveal a wife and two children on the homefront. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "We're Going Over," "We're Going Over the Top" and "Before the World Began."
2A-3 Alcoholic Blues (Some Blues), The - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President - NYC - 1919) with words by Edward Laska and music by Albert Von Tilzer (older brother of Will Von Tilzer): "I love my country, deed I do, But oh, that war has made me blue. I like fightin', that's my name, But fightin' is the least about the fightin' game. When Mister Hoover said to cut my dinner down, I never even hesitate, I never frown, I cut my sugar, I cut my coal, But now they dug deep in my soul. I've got the blues - I've got the blues, I've got the alcoholic blues. No more beer my heart to cheer; Good-bye whiskey, you used to make me frisky. So long highball, so long gin. Oh, tell me when you comin' back agin? Blues, I've got the blues - since they amputated my booze. Lordy, lordy, war is hell, you know, I don't have to tell - Oh, I've got the alcoholic blues, some blues - I've got the blues..." Cover image by unknown artist: An owl in a battered top hat and a black cat sitting on a yellow crescent moon. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When Ireland Comes Into Her Own," "At the End of My Trail of Dreams," "Minnie, Shimme For Me" and "Don't Forget the Salvation Army (My Doughnut Girl)."
2A-4 All Aboard for Home Sweet Home - A single piece of sheet music (Al Piantadosi and Co., Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Addison Burkhart and music by Al Piantadosi and Jack Glogau: "Cheer up mothers, dry your tears He's coming back to you, sweethearts you'll soon hear the cheers, For your hero true, Battles roar he'll hear no more, Soon he'll sail from France's shore, When he's paid the debt, He owes to Lafayette, He will say Good-bye and cry. All aboard for Home Sweet Home again to the girl I left behind, I'll go sailing 'cross the foam again, What a welcome there I'll find, And the day that I return to her, I will make that girl my own..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Troops boarding a transport ship in Europe with an image of the Statue of Liberty in the clouds. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "It's A Long Ways Back to School Days," You May be a Doggone Dangerous Girl, But I'm A Desperate Guy," "Look Me up When You're In Dixie" and "Here Comes America."
2A-5 Allegiance - A single piece of "Patriotic Song" sheet music (D.W. Cooper Publishing, Boston - 1918) with words and music by Julia Smith ("Dedicated to That Spirit of Americanism As Typified By the Immortal Lincoln"): "We're on our way to the battlefield, We're on our way and we'll never yield. Hooray! Hooray! Hooray, we're on our way. While in the fray we are not to blame - The Stars and Stripes we will never shame...I pledge allegiance to my flag..." Cover image by artist E.S. Fisher: A Navy and Army figure stand at attention while the red, white and blue flag waves in the center. The PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE is printed in a pink box with a blank signature line at the bottom ("Sign Here"). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "There's a Picture in My Memory, And It Calls me Back to You," "101st Regiment U.S.A. March," "Battery March," "Society Buds" and "Fire Fly."
2A-6 Allied Victory March - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with music by Harry H. Zickel. Cover image by artist E. Tarmer: Allied troops marching through a victory arch. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Camouflage One Step."
2A-7 A-M-E-R-I-C-A - A single piece of sheet music (D.W. Cooper Publishing Co., Boston - 1917) with words and music by May Greene and Billy Lang: "We are proud of the stars in Old Glory! We are proud of our great history! It's been told both by song and by story. Why they call us the LAND OF THE FREE. So we know why our glorious Country - In all our hearts stands alone; For you and for me, it always will be America, our Home. America! From coast of Maine to California All our hearts are true, And beat with loyalty for dear old independence . Our U.S.A..." Cover image by photographer Cooledge: A photo of THE APPEAL TO THE GREAT SPIRIT statue (Museum of Fine Arts - Boston) by Ce.S. Dallin. Advertised song samples ("Two Gems That Are Heart Winners") on the back cover include: "When the Sun Sets in Galway" and "I'm Going Back to the Girl I Love."
2A-8 America Awake! - A single piece of sheet music (Liberty Publishing Co., Santa Barbara, California - 1918) with words and music by George Clinton Baker ("To Woodrow Wilson - Our illustrious President and intrepid Commander -in -chief: this song is faithfully dedicated."): "Old Bill the Hun once tried to run the world from pole to pole; His armies raided Belgium first with Paris for their goal: They got there most, when Caesar's Ghost! Their famous Prussians broke! As Hindenburg flashed back the word - THE YANKS HAVE GOT MY GOAT! - 'Twas our Uncle Sammie who cooked the Kaiser's goose! From Somewhere near Paree, he turned his DOUGHBOY'S loose..." Cover image for "The Yankee March Song" by unknown artist: Uncle Sam - with rifle - hovers over the American troops on the march with American flags waving. The back cover included "A few of the many letters received from well-known band leaders" (John Philip Sousa, William A. Santelmann - U.S Marine Corps Band, Eugene G. La Barre - Peoria Municipal Band Association, etc.) endorsing AMERICA AWAKE! ("The March Song Hit of the Hour").
2A-9 America First Is Our Battle Cry! 'Tis the Land We Love! - Two pieces of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co., Chicago and New York - 1916) with words by J. Will Callahan and music by Eddie Gray: "America will always hold a welcome hand To those who come across the sea from every land; She offers them the sacred rights of liberty Beneath the starry emblem of the brave and free...AMERICA FIRST is our battle cry, 'Tis the Land We Love..." Cover image: A reproduction of the portrait of George Washington ("First in War - First in Peace - First in the Hearts of his Countryman") by Gilbert Stuart. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "In the Land of Love With the Song Birds," "Dear Old Ma," "Just a Night in Dream Land" and Tambourines and Oranges."
2A-10 America, Here's My Boy - Four pieces of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Andrew B. Sterling and music by Arthur Lange: "There's a million mothers knocking at the nation's door, A million mothers, yes and there'll be millions more, And while within each mother heart they pray, Just hark what one brave mother has to say. AMERICA I RAISED A BOY FOR YOU. AMERICA YOU'LL FIND HIM STAUNCH AND TRUE, PLACE A GUN UPON HIS SHOULDER, HE IS READY TO DIE OR DO ..." Cover image for "The Sentiment of Every American Mother" by artist Andrea De Takacs: A mother stands in front of a map of the United States with her hand on the shoulder of her son (dressed in an infantry uniform and holding a rifle). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Before the World Began," "In the Sweet Long Ago" and "Tho' I'm Not the First to Call You SWEETHEART, Please Let Me Be the Last."
2A-11 America I Love You - Four pieces of sheet music (Bert Kalmar and Harry Puck Music Co., NYC - 1915) with words by Edgar Leslie and music by Archie Gottler (Featured by Murray Bennett - "The Hebrew Monologue Man' in vaudeville, Josie Heather - the vaudeville singer and entertainer, Madge Maitland - the vaudeville singing headliner and Eva Tanguay): "Amid fields of clover, 'Twas just a little over a hundred years ago, A handful of strangers, They faced many dangers to make their country grow - It's now quite a nation of wondrous population, and freedom from every king, It's your land it's my land, a great do or die land, and that's just why I sing. America I love you, You're like a sweetheart of mine, From ocean to ocean, For you my devotion is touching each bound'ry line..." Cover images surrounding photographs of the featured performers by artist Al Barbelle: Scenes from American history - the Pilgrims, the Liberty Bell, the Statue of Liberty, Westward expansion, etc. Advertised song samples on back cover include: "I'm a Lonesome Melody" and "The Letter That Never Reached Home." According to Wikipedia: "Eva Tanguay (August 1, 1878 - January 11, 1947) was a Canadian singer and entertainer who billed herself as THEGIRL WHO MADE VAUDEVILLE FAMOUS... While still a child she developed an interest in the performing arts, making her first appearance on stage at the age of eight at an amateur night in Holyoke. Massachusetts.Two years later, she was touring professionally with a production of a stage adaptation of the popular novel Little Lord Fauntleroy. Eva eventually landed a spot in the Broadway musical My Lady in 1901. The 1904 show The Chaperons led to her rise in popularity. By 1905, she was also performing in vaudeville as a solo act, where she would spend much of the remainder of her career...In 1953 Mitzi Gaynor portrayed Eva Tanguay in a fictionalized version of her life in the Hollywood motion picture, The I Don't Care Girl..."
2A-12 America, It's Up to You! - A single piece of sheet music (The Ford Publishing Co., Newark, NJ - 1917 - "You Can Afford A FORD Song, It Affords You The Most Exquisite Pleasure") with words and music by Charles A. Ford: "The shrill notes of a bugle are sounding, The call of the dreaded war; 'Tis your country that is calling To fight for what's worth fighting for. The pages of history are waiting For some hero to add his name, Quit thinking and debating, Just join in and gain the fame. America it's up to you And the world is waiting too; They want to see what's in you and me, So they'll know just what to do. Go shoulder a musket, a hoe or a rake, We each have a duty to undertake, Now it's up to you to go and do What they've done before for you..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: Lady Liberty with her arms on the shoulders of a sailor and an infantryman with a background of the map of the United States. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When You Write, Send a Letter of Cheer" and "Twas Good." Also included on the back cover is the poem AMERICA IT'S UP TO YOU ("To be recited after singing chorus"): "Now That we are in the fight - And Get in a sandy trench - For a cause we know is right - We leave the peaceful bench - Store our stencils, books and pencils - And put on a suit of blue - Forget our grieves, roll up our sleeves - And show what we can do. - America! It's up to you! - Washington and Andrew Jackson - They had the same attraction - Perry and Abe Lincoln, too. - Dewey at Manila Bay - Taylor at Monterrey - And Custer fought like (well) - What Sherman said it was - So it's up to you to go and do - What they've done before for you."
2A-13 America My Country - A single piece of sheet music (Red Wing Printing Company, Red Wing Minnesota - 1917) with words by Jens K. Grondahl and music by E.F. Maetzold: "America my country, I come at thy call, I plight thee my troth and I give thee my all; In peace or in war I am wed to thy weal - I'll carry thy flag thru the fire and the steel. Unsullied it floats o'er our peace-loving race, On sea nor land shall it suffer disgrace..." Cover image by an unknown artist: the song title in a pink and gray shield with the subtitle "The New National Anthem." According to the sheet music cover blurb: "AMERICA, MY COUNTRY is said to be the greatest patriotic song-poem of the war. Many have hailed it as the new National Anthem. It received the applause of Congress, when Hon. Isaac Siegel of New York quoted it in his patriotic speech at one of the tensest moments in American history, on the day war was declared. The National Editorial association sang it at Red Wing and Minneapolis. The late Col. B.B. Herbert, publisher of the National Printer-Journalist, greatly admired this song and gave it wide publicity. Men have enlisted because of it. You who believe in the sentiment it expresses sing it, play it and extend its influence to help arouse patriotism and MAKE THE WORLD SAFE FOR DEMOCRACY."
2A-14 America Needs You Like A Mother (Would You Turn Your Mother Down?) - A single piece of sheet music (Kalmar, Puck and Abrahams Consolidated Music Publishers, NYC - 1917) with words by Grant Clark and music by Jan Schwartz (Featured by Jimmy Hussey and Billy Worsley - with cover photograph): "America has been a mother - To the children of the world - She has taken to her bosom - Every homeless boy and girl - Now we find that she's in trouble - Danger's lurking all around - America, she needs you like a mother - Would you turn your mother down?" Cover image (surrounding the photograph of the performing artists) by an unknown artist: Silhouettes of American Eagles, shields and arrows. Advertised song sample on the back cover includes "Rolling Stones (All Come Rolling Home Again)." Jimmy Hussey and Billy Worsley were vaudeville song and dance men and comedians.
2A-15 America The Beautiful - A single piece of sheet music (Dr. Parke W. Hewins, Wellesley, Massachusetts - 1917) with words by Katharine Lee Bates and music by Parke W. Hewins: "O beautiful for spacious skies, For amber waves of grain, For purple mountain majesties above the fruited plain..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A framed black and white painting of George Washington with a red, white and blue flag of the United States below.
2A-16 American Legion Song, The - A single piece of sheet music (Vandersloot Music Publishing, Williamsport, Pennsylvania - 1920) with words by Ray Sherwood and music by Carl D. Vandersloot (Writers of "General Pershing" - "To Garrett Cochran Post No. 1 Penna."): "Men who have faced the roar and the rattle, Carried the scars of freedom's battle, Breaking the bonds of the tyrants of might, All for their flag and the cause that was right; Turned with their hearts to those that were needing, Banished the hunger stopped their bleeding, Here they rally near. Let's cheer! Fame and glory is the story, Yankee bunch that struck the punch That turned a world of tears to laughter, Fame and glory is the story, Side by side they'll hold with pride The honor that they've won. Onward with eyes a-gleaming, Onward with eyes a -gleaming And freedom's banners streaming, Forward march our Country's Legion, Rights of our nation's saving, They'll keep Old Glory waving..." Cover image by an unknown artist: The American eagle resting on a shield with American banners. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "A Thorn in My Heart," "The Great American," "Gee Whiz," "Let Me Dream," "Starlight O' Mine," "Then I'll Stop Loving You" and "When The Roses Bid Summer Good-bye."
2A-17 American Legion's March - A single piece of sheet music (Scheetz Music Publishers, Manheim, Pennsylvania - 1920) with music by Lincoln G. Scheetz and I.H. Meredith. Cover image by an unknown photographer: A photograph of "General Pershing reviewing Americans at Metz. Apr. 29, 1919." Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Marjorie," "Paradise of Love" and "Lin-Ora Waltz."
2A-18 American Troops On Parade, The - A single piece of sheet music (National Music Company, Chicago - 1914) with music ("The Great New American March") by Lew J. Novy ("Composer of THE WORLD'S CELEBRATED COMPOSITIONS - "The Angel's Request" - "Dream of Heaven" - "I Love the Cross" and Many other Beautiful Pieces for Pianoforte"). Cover image by an unknown artist: A black and white military bugler with tents in the background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Craze of an Indian," "Loretta Waltz," "Song of Mexico" and "Our Party Waltz."
2A- 19 Americans Come!, The - A single piece of sheet music (J. Fischer and Brothers, Birmingham, England - 1918) with words and music by Elizabeth A. Wilbur and Fay Foster ("To America's Soldiers and Sailors" - "To be sung with intense patriotic fervor"): "…Hasten, son, fling the window wide; let me kiss the staff the flag swings from And salute the Stars and stripes with pride, For God be praised the Americans come!" Cover image by an unknown artist: American troops marching with the flag of the United States. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Three Japanese Sketches" and "Two Japanese Sword Songs."
2A- 20 And He'd Say "Oo - La - La, Wee-Wee" - Four pieces of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., NYC - 1919) with words and music by Harry Ruby and George Jessel: "Willie Earl met a sweet young girl one day in France, Her naughty little glance put Willie in a trance; Willie Earl couldn't understand her you see , He only knew two words in French That he learned in the trench, They were OO-LA -LA and WEE -WEE. They would spoon beneath the moon above; It was fun to hear them making love..." Various cover images by artists Albert Wilfred Barbelle and F. E. Weatherly: An American soldier speaking to a French girl. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Just to Mend Mamma's Heart," "Daddy Long Legs," "Kid Days" and "In Room 202." Composer Harry Ruby was portrayed by Red Skelton in the 1950 MGM biopic THREE LITTLE WORDS. According to Wikipedia: "George Albert Jessel (April 3, 1898 - May 23, 1981), sometimes called 'Georgie" Jessel' was an American illustrated song 'model,' actor, singer, songwriter, and Academy Award-winning movie producer. He was famous in his lifetime as a multitalented comedic entertainer, achieving a level of recognition that transcended his limited roles in movies. He was widely known by his nickname, the 'Toastmaster General of the United States,' for his frequent role as the master of ceremonies at political and entertainment gatherings..."
2A-21 Any Old Place The Gang Goes, I'll Be There - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President - NYC - 1918) with words and music by William J. McKenna: "Mickey Fay, he marched away to the sound of a beating drum, A sergeant he, his company were all his pals and chums, His sweetheart Kate stood by the gate with tear dimmed eyes of blue, As Mike went by he heard her cry GOOD-BYE, GOOD LUCK TO YOU, WHERE SHALL I WRITE, she cried - And smiling Mike replied. Any old place the gang goes I'll be there - Nobody knows where we'll go - Divil a one of us cares - Give us a kiss for luck, dear, I'm off to do me share - any old place the gang goes - I'll be there..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: A girl in a green shamrock with soldiers in battle behind her. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I May Be Gone For a Long Time," "Sweet Emalina, My Gal," "You Never Can Be Too Sure About the Girls" and "If You Saw All That I Saw In Arkansas."
2A-22 Are We Downhearted? No! No! No! - A single piece of sheet music (F.B. Haviland Publishing Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Ray Sherwood and music by Will Donaldson ("Featured by the Sensation of Vaudeville - THE SHRAPNEL DODGERS"): "Are we downhearted? No! No! No! We are ready to go, go, go. Good-bye sweetheart, for a little while, Good-bye, mother, let me see you smile - Soon the bugle will blow, blow, blow. Duty calls we know - And we'll hang the Kaiser to a sour apple tree, Are we downhearted? No! No! No!" Cover image: A photograph of smiling soldiers "used by permission of the International Film Service." Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When It's Cherry Time in Tokio" and "My Broken Rosary."
2A-23 Are You Lending a Hand To Yankee Land? - A single piece of sheet music (Blanche M. Tice Music Publishing Co, Sioux City, Iowa - 1918) with words by J. Will Callahan and music by Blanche M. Tice: "Far away across the ocean, Heroes fight for you and me, Braving all with true devotion, dying for liberty; while the flag they are defending, Let me ask of you - Are you lending a hand to Yankee-land, The country that gave you birth?" Cover image by an unknown artist: A sketch of Uncle Sam surrounded by reaching hands. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Swells and Belles," "They Are Tenting Tonight in Far Off France," "When the Sun Sets in Ireland" and "Only a Memory of You."
2A-24 Are You The O'Reilly (Blime Me O'Reilly - You Are Looking Well) - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1915) with words and music by Pat Rooney (Original version) and P. Emmett (New version) - "The Tune That Took the Place of TIPPERARY in the Trenches - One of the GOOD OLD TIMERS Brought UP-TO-DATE" (Adapted from the original song "Is That Mr. Reilly?" By permission of F. Harding, owner of the copyright): "I'm Terence O' Reilly, I'm a man of renown, I'm a thoroughbred to the backbone; I'm related to O'Connor, my mother was queen of China, ten miles from Athlone; But if they'd let me be, I'd have Ireland free, On the railroads you would pay no fee, I'd have the United States under my thumb, And I'd sleep in the President's chair. Are you O'Reilly that keeps this hotel? Are you the O'Reilly they speak of so well? Are you the O'Reilly they speak of so highly? Gor blime me , O'Reilly, You are looking well..." Cover image: A reprint of a New York Tribune article from May 7, 1915 - "Atkins Plucks New War Song From American Chestnut Tree." Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I Want to Be There," "My Own Venetian Rose," "I'm Glad My Wife's in Europe," "Dancing the Blues Away," etc. According to the ANSWERS.COM Web Site: "Rooney, Pat[rick James], Jr. (1880-1962), singer. The tiny, pixieish performer, a native New Yorker, was the son of another famous vaudevillian, the first Pat Rooney (1844-92), who was also known for his song?and?dance routines. The younger Rooney and his wife, Marion Bent (1879-1940), became one of vaudeville's most?popular teams. Among his most applauded numbers was 'The Daughter of Rosie O'Grady,' to which he did a clog dance while nonchalantly keeping his hands in his pockets. He also appeared with his wife in musical comedy and revues, notably in Love Birds (1921). After arthritis forced his wife to retire, Rooney continued to perform alone. One of his memorable appearances was in Guys and Dolls (1950), in which he introduced 'More I Cannot Wish You.' His son, Pat Rooney III (1909-79), occasionally performed with him and sometimes did a solo song?and?dance act..."
2A-25 Army's Full of Irish, The (A Man From Erin Never Runs, He's Irish) - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, San Francisco, London - 1917) with words by Bert Hanlon and music by Walter Donaldson (Writer of "I've Got the Nicest Little Home in Dixie," "I've Got the Sweetest Girl in Maryland," and "Suki San - Where the Cherry Blossoms Fall"): "It's always taken an Irishman to prove that might was right, For there never was an Irishman who did not love to fight. There never was a battle that the Irish didn't win. There never was a battle that the Irish weren't in. There's thousands in every regiment - The Irish always go, They've heard there's fighting somewhere , and that's all they want to know..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Various soldiers in green uniforms labeled "Kelly," "O'Neil," "Pat," "Casey," etc. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Magic of Your Eyes." Composer Walter Donaldson was portrayed by Frank Lovejoy in the 1952 Warner Brothers' Gus Kahn biopic, I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS.
2A-26 At the Close of Wonderful Day (Liberty Forever) - A single piece of sheet music (Home Library Music Publishing Co., Joliet, Illinois - 1918) with words and music by Charles F. Binder: "Yea boys to the test, the bugle is calling; In ranks and in file pure life - blood installing, for winged Columbia, spotless and dear, Old Glory Thy Stars and Thy Stripes we revere. Away with life's sorrow and dread not tomorrow, good cheer, health and honor - You never can borrow - Courageously onward in battles appalling, Yea boys to the test, the bugle is calling. At the close of a wonderful day, In an old fashioned kind of way, Kiss her in vision and love her in deed, Fight for your country when in need, Wake and strive onward and wipe off her tear - Rocking the cradle of Liberty dear. Fight for your country boys, love, live or die, Fight for your country, boys love , live or die..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Laurel wreath and lyre.
2A- 27 A' Top of The World Our Flag - A single piece of sheet music (John D. McDonald, NYC - 1918) with words and music by John D. McDonald: "A' Top of the world in the blue tinted sky, The silvery stars sparkled with light - The lily white clouds with bright crimson were barred , As the day passed on into night - Thus our flag it was born in the heavens above on a day, when our country was new...So we'll fight for the stars in the blue - And we'll, fight for the bars in it too - It will wave o'er the land and the sea - Sweet emblem of our liberty..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A view of the globe with the United States prominently positioned and highlighted in pink, with a background of re, white and blue.
2A- 28 Au Revoir, But Not Good-Bye (Soldier Boy) - Three pieces of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President, NYC - 1917) with words by Lew Brown (Portrayed by Ernest Borgnine in the biopic THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE - 20th Century -Fox - 1956) and music by Albert Von Tilzer (older brother of Will Von Tilzer): "Au Revoir but not good-bye, soldier boy - Brush that tear drop from your eye, soldier boy - When you're on the deep blue sea, Will you some-times think of me? I'll be waiting anxiously, soldier boy - Tho' we're many miles apart, soldier boy - Keep my picture near your heart, soldier boy - When you've won your victory, God will bring you back to me, Au revoir but not good-bye, soldier boy..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: A soldier and his girl staring into each others eyes - a large red heart positioned in between the two. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I May Be Gone For a Long Long Time," "You Never Can Be Too Sure About the Girls," "If You Saw All That I Saw in Arkansas" and "Give Me the Moonlight, Give me the Girl."
2B-1 Baby's Prayer Will Soon Be Answered - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Billy Baskette and Van and Schenck:"Baby's been so lonesome , Since Daddy went away, But baby knew her prayers Would bring him back someday; And when the sun is sinking in the West she goes to bed, Two tiny hands folded, And a baby's prayer is said: Baby's prayer will soon be answered, Baby's little heart will soon be gay - For her Daddy's coming home, From far across the foam; This Angel waits and prays for him each day..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A young girl praying at her bedside with thoughts of a troop transport ship arriving past the Statue of Liberty. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Beautiful Ohio." According to Wikipedia: "Van and Schenck were popular United States entertainers in the 1910s and 1920s: Gus Van (born August Von Glahn, August 12, 1886 - March 12, 1968), baritone and Joe Schenck (pronounced "sha?k," born Joseph Thuma Schenck, c. 1891 - June 28, 1930), tenor. They were vaudeville stars and made appearances in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1918, 1919, 1920 and 1921. They made numerous phonograph records for the Emerson, Victor, and Columbia record companies..."
2B-2 Badge of Honor, The - A single piece of sheet music (Harry J. Lincoln Music Co., Philadelphia - 1918) with music (March Tow Step) by M. L. Breon (arranged by Harry J. Lincoln). Cover image by artist H. R. Smith: Uncle Sam holding a map of Oklahoma with the star of world peace with the words liberty, victory, honor, justice and equality. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "National Honor," "A Mile a Minute," "The New Liberty," "The Police Patrol," "Pride of the Century," "The Honey Moon," "McKinley's Memorial," "Our Defenders" and "Fuss and Feathers."
2B-3 Battery A March - Two pieces (various sizes) of sheet music (D.W. Cooper Music, Co., Boston, Massachusetts - 1916) with music (March and Two Step) by Bert Lowe. Cover image (on smaller copy) by artist V. C. Plunkett: Soldiers around an anti-aircraft gun with vintage aircraft flying above. Cover image (on larger copy) by an unknown artist: A cowboy straddling two horses. Advertised song samples on back cover include: "Society Buds" and "Flower of France Bloom Again" ("Come show the world what France can do").
2B-4 Battle in the Air, The - A single piece of sheet music (McKinley Music Co., Chicago, NYC - 1917) with music ("Descriptive Piano Solo") by Harold Spencer. Cover image by an unknown artist: A dogfight involving vintage World War I airplanes. Advertised song samples on back cover include: "Avalon," "The Hour of Memory," "Sweet Cookie Mine," "If You've Never Been in Dreamland, You've Never Been in Love," "Paradise Blues," "I Ain't Got Nobody," "Dreamy Lotus Land," "I Love That Lovable Melody," "Moonlight Blues" and "My Fox-Trot Girl."
2B-5 Battle in the Sky - A single piece of sheet music (Church, Paxson and Company, NYC - 1915) with music by J. Luxton. Cover image by E.H. Pfeiffer: Vintage World War I-era aircraft (including dirigibles) in battle. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Peach Blossoms," "Melodious Moments," "Petite Amour, Song Without Words," "Song of the Stars" and "When All is Quiet."
2B-6 Battle Song of Liberty, The - Two pieces of sheet music (Walter Jacobs Publishing, Boston - 1917) with words by F.E. Bigelow and music adapted by George L. Cobb ("The popular marching song of the U.S. Army and Navy set to the music of America's favorite march - OUR DIRECTOR"): "So here's to Uncle Sammy, faithful and true; Here's to our banner of red, white and blue; And here's to all good fellows on land and sea - Singing the Battle Song of Liberty..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: The Statue of Liberty surrounded by marching soldiers, warships at sea and battling aircraft. "MELODY - A Monthly Magazine for Lovers of Popular Music" and the song sample for "That's What the Red, White and Blue Means (To Ev'ry True Heart in the U.S.A.)" are advertised on the back covers.
2B-7 Be Good to California, Mr. Wilson (California Was Good to You) - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1916) with words by Andrew B. Sterling and music by Robert A. Keiser: "We thank you California for the thing that you have done, Tho' he's not a native son - You have treated him like one, The nation takes its hat off to the great and golden West, California you have stood a mighty test: Be good to California, Mr. Wilson, California was good to you, And don't forget 'twas votes for women, Helped to win the vict'ry, too, For when the tide was turning fast against you, She made your dream come true, Be good to California, Mr. Wilson, California was mighty good to you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A sepia-toned photograph of President Woodrow Wilson flanked by American eagles. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "She is the Sunshine of Virginia" and "I Lost My Heart in Honolulu."
2B-8 Belgium Dry Your Tears - A single piece of sheet music (Al Piantadosi and Co., Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Arthur Freed and music by Al Piantadosi: "Belgium we can hear you calling, Belgium dear your tears are falling, Still you've kept a brave heart true blue, We are filled with love for you, Clouds of fear soon pass away, Love's golden sun will come to stay: Belgium, Belgium dry your tears, We will be at your side, Into our hearts with a message you came, Every American loves your dear name, Mothers, sweethearts, brothers of war, It's you we're fighting for, And we'll never stop, Till we're OVER THE TOP, Belgium dry your tears..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Lady Liberty leading American marching soldiers past crying Belgium women and children. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "It's a Long Ways Back to School Days," "You May Be a Doggone Dangerous Girl, But I'm a Desperate Guy," "Look Me Up When You're in Dixie" and "Here Comes America."
2B-9 Belgian Rose - A single piece of sheet music (Garton Brothers Music Publishers, Boston - 1918) with words and music by George Benoit, Robert Levenson and Ted Garton ("The Song with An Appeal" - Featured by Louise Glaum - with cover photograph): "Rose of Belgium, drooping so low, Lift up your head, for we love you so. Robbed of your sunshine, you're fading away, But you'll live to bloom on a happier day. America is calling to you, Speaking in words divine. MY HOME SHALL BE THY HOME, AND ALL MY TREASURES THINE. Belgian Rose - my drooping Belgian Rose - For every hour of sorrow you've had, You'll have a year in which to be glad; You were not born in vain - for you will bloom again..." Cover image (of silent film star, Louise Glaum), with drooping roses, by an unknown photographer and artist. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Little Gypsy Wanda." According to Wikipedia: "Louise Glaum (September 4, 1888 - November 25, 1970) was an American actress. Best known for her role as a femme fatale in silent era motion picture dramas, she was credited with giving one of the best characterizations of a vamp in her early career..."
2B-10 Berlin Special, The - A single piece of sheet music (T.A. Parrish/Florintine Music Co., San Francisco, California - 1918) with words and music by T. A. Parish ("Dedicated to the boys OVER THERE"): "Yes we'll clear the right of way for the U.S. and her train, Way over in the land of France - that country then to gain, How the Dutchman he will go, resistance is in vain, As we go fighting through Belgium. Hurrah! Hurrah! We'll sound the jubilee, Hurrah! Hurrah! We'll set old Belgium free, How the Allied troops will go to the River Spree, As they go fighting for freedom..." Cover image by artist Jack Lustig: American troops chasing German troops across a battlefield with the American flag waving in the background.
2B-11 Billy Boy - A single piece of sheet music (Walton Publishing Co./Joseph W. Stern and Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Lester A. Walton and music by C. Lucky Roberts ("The latest and greatest patriotic song - Dedicated to Colonel William Hayward of the 15th New York Infantry"): "Tommy Atkins is a warrior bold - Merrie England loves him more than gold - And to France the hero of today is fighting in the trenches, miles away - Now Billy Boy has gone across the sea to help them in their fight for Liberty. Billy Boy, Billy Boy you're a soldier of renown - Billy Boy, Billy Boy in a uniform of brown - What a grand old sight - As you battle for the right - Billy Boy, Billy Boy with a heart so fond and true for the Red, White and Blue, you are loyal thro' and thro' - you put the BRAVE in bravery - you are my pride and joy - Now let the bugle blow, come on , let's go - ATTA BOY my Billy Boy..." Cover photograph of Col. William Hayward by an unknown photographer. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "My Sweet Egyptian Rose." According to the FOR LOVE OF LIBERTY.ORG web site: "...The first all-black fighting unit to arrive in France was New York's 369th Infantry. The Commander of the American Expeditionary Forces, General John, 'Black Jack' Pershing, bowed to political pressure back home and refused to use the men in combat. He assigned the 369th to the French High Command who dubbed them 'Les Enfants Perdus.... The Lost Children.' The unit's white commander, Colonel William Hayward would later write...The 369th Infantry would come to be known as the Harlem Hellfighters. Their motto was "God damn, let's go." Years later, a soldier, whose name has been lost to history, recounted his march to the front..."
2B-12 Bing! Bang! Bing 'Em On the Rhine - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with words and music by Jack Mahoney and Allan Flynn ("Comic Song - As sung by Blanche Ring" - with cover photograph): "They sang WE'LL MAKE THE KAISER WHISTLE YANKEE DOODLE DO - We'll crown the Crown Prince, too - As we crown'd a few - We'll make the world safe for democracy, you bet we will - But it won't be safe for Kaiser Bill - And when we all go swimming in the Rhine - We'll hang our clothes on Hindenburg's old line. We'll bing! Bang! Bing 'em on the Rhine boys - We'll show the Kaiser too what a Yankee bunch can do - When we swing right thru their line boys - We will shake 'em and we'll make 'em yelp! Help! When they hear those guns go bing-a-ling - This will be the Yankee countersign..." Cover photograph (of Broadway star, Blanche Ring) surrounded by clouds (featuring song lyrics) by artist William Austin Starmer. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Sweet Little Buttercup." According to Wikipedia: "Blanche Ring made her debut at sixteen in A Parisian Romance, with Richard Mansfield. Later she acted with Nat Goodwin and Chauncey Olcott. In 1902 she had great success with 'In The Good Old Summertime,' and followed this with another hit song, 'The Belle of Avenue A,' performed in Tommy Rot. Tommy Rot was staged at Mrs. Osborn's Playhouse in New York City. 'I've Got Rings On My Fingers' was introduced when Blanche performed in The Midnight Sons in 1909. Her recording of the song for Victor Records is listed as one of Billboard's top hits of that year..."
2B-13 Birth of a Nation, The - A single piece of sheet music (Daly Music Publisher, Inc., Boston and NYC - 1915) with words by Thomas S. Allen and music by Joseph M. Daly: " 'Twas in the year of seventy six - At Independence Hall - In Philadelphia hist'ry says - Within that famous wall - They Signed a declaration - On the fourth day of July - With thirteen stars upon the flag - And a motto DO OR DIE - 'Twas the birth of a nation called the U.S. A. - Then the Yankee Doodle spirit was born - And the soldiers there were minute men - That Paul Revere rode out to warn - Now the infants grown to be a great man - And they call him Uncle Sammy today - 'Twas the birth of a Nation and the best in creation - It's the Yankee Doodle USA..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Lady Liberty, ringing the Liberty Bell and holding the torch of freedom, hovers over a young saluting Uncle Sam (holding a rifle with bayonet) - "1776" rises from a red, white and blue cloud. Advertising song samples on the back cover include: "Don't Tell the Folks You Saw Me."
2B-14 Bon Jour, Ma Belle! - A single piece of sheet music (Oliver Ditson Company, Boston - 1916) with words by Guy Eden and music by A. H. Behrend: "…She was French and I was English, So what was a man to do? But I struggled to remember all the little French I knew - BON JOUR , MA BELLE - We meet again, encore. Ecoutez whilst I whisper c'est tu only que j'a dore..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A couple meeting in a garden. Advertised song samples on back cover include; " Sweetheart - Do You Remember?"
2B-15 Boy That is Somewhere in France, The - A single piece of sheet music (Charles E. Roat Music Co., Battle Creek, Michigan - 1918) with words and music by George W. Robinson: "There is a gray haired mother, There is a sweetheart, too - Dreaming tonight of a boy gone to fight for the right and the red, white and blue. He may be a fallen hero, Perhaps he'll be spared by chance, But while he's away they'll be praying each day, For the boy that is somewhere in France..." Cover image by artist (Mark?) Brown: A soldier walks through a European village watched over by a sword-carrying guardian angel. Advertised song samples on back cover include: "Our Soldier Boys," "Stand by Uncle Sam," "How I Love a Summer Day" and "You've Got a Naughty Winky Baby Stare."
2B-16 Boys of the U.S.A., The - A single piece of sheet music (Koninsky Music Co., Troy ,NY - 1917) with music ("March and Two Step") by Julius K. Johnson ("Composer of BOY SCOUTS PARADE, KING OF THE AIR and other famous marches"). Cover image by an unknown artist: Cavalry soldiers charging as the American flag waves overhead. A photograph of composer Julius K. Johnson is also featured on the cover. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "In Yucatan."
2B-17 Boys Who Fight For You, The - A single piece of sheet music (Fisk Publishing Co., San Francisco - 1918) with words and music by Ralph Hyatt: "Many hearts are saddened now because they've lost their joys, in California. There are griefs well-mixed with pride in their soldier boys, Who've left their native homes. They are all such handsome lads, Never know a care, Never have a fear, Never take a dare - When their country calls on them they gladly do their share - To serve the land they love. If you can't fight , Just do what's right - To support the boys who go to fight for you, Remember that freedom for us all may stand behind the bugle call - So have a heart, and do your part - Give your money, Save your food in every way - Make ev'ry boy who fights for you, Proud of the old U.S.A." Cover image by an unknown artist: Marching troops (with the American flag flying) as an aerial dog fight takes place overhead.
2B-18 Boys Who Won't Come Home, The - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President - NYC - 1919) with words by Harry Hamilton and music by Ed Thomas: "The flags were waiving gaily all along the village street, The air was filled with music and the sound of marching feet. The boys had come back home again, Their fighting days were done, And ev'ry heart was filled with pride for the glory they had won. A gray haired mother tried to smile, Amid the cheers and cries, She murmur'd softly as she gazed with sad and tear dimmed eyes. My boy was one of those who went away, He was my pride and joy - I loved him just as every other mother loves her boy - he gave his life to uncle Sam, He's sleeping o'er the foam - So while you're cheering don't forget the boy's who won't come home..." Cover image by artist E.E. Waton: A grieving mother sits by the fireplace hearth. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "He's Had No Lovin' For a Long, Long Time."
2B-19 Bravest Heart of All, The - Two pieces of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., NYC and Detroit - 1917) with words by Raymond Egan and music by Richard A. Whiting: "I saw a mother and a baby on an ocean pier today. I heard the baby cry for daddy, when the big ship sail'd away. As the steamer slowly vanish'd bound for France across the sea, The mother clasp'd the baby and she whisper'd tenderly - My little laddie boy - oh my laddie boy - you're only five years old today - you have your daddy's eyes - bluer than the skies, And they sparkle when you play. Mother loves her little shaver. he's the sunshine Heaven gave her, Just to cheer away all the tears that stray - Since your daddy sail'd away - My little laddie dear - there's a day I fear - When you will be so brave and tall - Some day you'll be a man sir and then you'll answer to dear Old Glory's call - Like your dad you'll sail away, With a heart so brave and gay. But when you depart, then your mother's heart , Will be the bravest heart of all..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A mother and young son wave to a departing troop transport ship. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Star Dance Folio."
2B-20 Break the News to Mother - Three pieces of sheet music (Charles K. Harris Publishers, NYC , Chicago and Toronto - 1897) with words and music by Charles K. Harris (From the sheet music cover: "This song was originally published in 1897 during the Spanish-American War, when it was virtually taken up and sung by the entire nation. The author and composer...since the outbreak of the present war, has been besieged by requests for copies of his one-time famous song, the human heart-appeal of which has kept it alive for these many years..."): "While the shot and shell were screaming up on the battlefield, The boys in blue were fighting their noble flag to shield. Came a cry from their brave Captain LOOK BOYS! OUR FLAG IS DOWN; WHO'LL VOLUNTEER TO SAVE IT FROM DISGRACE? I WILL, a young voice shouted, I'LL BRING IT BACK OR DIE, Then sprang into the thickest of the fray, Saved the flag but gave his young life - All for his country's sake, They brought him back and softly heard him say JUST BREAK THE NEWS TO MOTHER, SHE KNOWS HOW DEAR I LOVE HER - AND TELL HER NOT TO WAIT FOR ME - FOR I'M NOT COMING HOME - JUST SAY THERE IS NO OTHER CAN TAKE THE PLACE OF MOTHER - THEN KISS HER DEAR SWEET LIPS FOR ME - AND BREAK THE NEWS TO HER..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A photograph of a dying soldier, surrounded by three of his battlefield comrades. The image is framed by a military drum. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I Miss the Old Folks Now," "Dry Your Tears," "Yankee," etc.
2B-21 Bring Back a Belgian Baby To Me - A single piece of sheet music (Sherman, Clay and Co., San Francisco - 1918) with words and music by Ben Black ("Writer of MY PAVO REAL GIRL and GOOD-BYE DADDY DEAR"): "…Please do this favor daddy dear for me, When you come back from far across the sea: Bring back a Belgian baby to me, I think they're just as sweet as can be; One who's lost a father or mother, a sister or a brother, I'm sure we could love each other. They don't know what the war's all about, They're just as innocent as they can be. So bring back a Belgian baby to me..." Cover image by artist W.R. DeLappe: A young girl talking with her father (who is in a military uniform). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Dream Girl," "While the Incense is Burning," "In Dear Old Sunny Spain" and Good-Bye Daddy Dear."
2B-22 Bring Back My Daddy To Me - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc. NYC - 1917) with words by William Tracey and Howard Johnson and music by George W. Meyer ("Featured by Made Evans - Famous Child Star - WORLD PICTURES"): " A sweet little girl with bright golden curls, Sat playing with toys on the floor, Her dad went away, to enter the fray, At the start of this long bitter war; Her mother said ,'Dear your birthday is near, tomorrow your presents I will buy.' The dear little child quickly looked up and smiled, And said with a tear in her eye: 'I don't want a dress or a dolly, 'Cause dollies get broken 'round here, don't want the skates, the books or the slates, you bought for my birthday last year, If you'll bring the present I ask for , Dear Mother , how happy I'll be; you can give all my toys, To some poor girls and boys, But bring back my Daddy to me!' " Cover image (A black and white photograph of silent film star Madge Evans surrounded by silhouettes of fighting soldiers) by an unknown photographer and artist. Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SING song folio ("They can't stop our singing army! Send a copy of this book...to your Sammy 'over here' of 'over there' Send one to your Jackie afloat or ashore..."). According to Wikipedia: "As a child film actress, Madge Evans had quite a prolific career appearing in dozens of films. She appeared with Marguerite Clark in The Seven Sisters (1915), a film with a large female ensemble that had been played on stage with Clark's rival Mary Pickford and Laurette Taylor in the cast. She was featured with Robert Warwick in Alias Jimmy Valentine (1915), a still extant film that has seen release on home video/DVD. At 14, she was the star of J. Stuart Blackton's rural melodrama On the Banks of the Wabash (1923). She co-starred with Richard Barthelmess in Classmates (1924)..."
2B-23 Bring Back, Bring Back Bring Back The Kaiser to Me - A single piece of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing, Co., NYC, Chicago, Frisco, Sidney and London - 1917) with words by Adele Rowland and Eddie Moran and music by Harry Von Tilzer ("A Patriotic Plea - Featured with tremendous success by the co-author Adele Rowland" - with cover photograph): ".. I don't care for a diamond ring - A string of pearls - you do not need to bring a motor car - When you come back from afar - Please do not bring a sable coat to me - But I would happy, happy be - if you see Gen'ral Pershing , tell him I will jump with glee - If he will bring back, bring back, bring back the Kaiser to me..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A photograph of silent film actress Adele Rowland with a caricature of Kaiser Wilhelm on a string held up by Uncle Sam. Advertised song samples on back cover include: "Tho I Had a Bit O' the Divil in Me, She Had the Ways of an Angel, Had She" and "Since Mary Ann McCue Came Back From Honolu." According to the IMDb Web Site: "Adele Rowland was born on July 10, 1883 in Washington, District of Columbia, USA. She was an actress, known for She's Everywhere (1919), The Blonde from Singapore (1941) and For the Love of Mary (1948). She was married to Conway Tearle and Charles Ruggles. She died on August 8, 1971 in Los Angeles County, California, USA." According to another Wikipedia entry: "...Adele Rowland was the former wife of actor Charles Ruggles and was well known at the time for introducing to America the song 'Pack Up Your Troubles In Your Old Kit Bag And Smile, Smile, Smile' which she sang in the 1915 musical Her Soldier Boy..."
3C-1 Camp Custer - A single piece of sheet music (Charles E. Roat Music Co., Battle Creek, Michigan - 1917) with music by Edward A. Schroeder ("March - One Step - Dedicated to the Boys of Michigan and Wisconsin"). Cover image (color-tinted photograph of George Armstrong Custer) by an unknown photographer. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "How I Love a Summer Day," "Panama Orchids," "Rose Tints," etc.
3C-2 Cheer Up Father, Cheer Up Mother - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Com., Detroit and New York, 1918) with words by Alfred Bryan and music by Herman Paley: "You have a boy over there - Your heart is fill'd with despair - But could you only see him tonight - He wears a smile - that's cheery and bright - Tho' he's very faraway - Don't you seem to hear him say - Cheer up father, cheer up mother, cheer up sister, cheer up brother - I'll be coming back to you someday - And when the bands are playing - You'll be HIP - HOORAYING - Keep smiling all your cares beguiling - Dry your tears away - For the more you miss me - All the more you'll kiss me - When your boy comes home someday..." Cover image by artist E.E. Waton (A mother and father sit and worry about their boy in uniform - pictured in a gray haze above them). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Bing! Bang! Bing 'Em On the Rhine," etc.
3C-3 Cheer Up, Mother - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words and music by Mary Earl (Pen name for Robert King - "Writer of MY SWEETHEART IS SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE and LAFAYETTE - WE HEAR YOU CALLING): "Good-bye mother mine, Time to fall in line - said a soldier unafraid, When they march away you'd not have me stay while my country needs my aid, Other mother's sons bravely shoulder guns - They are going why not I? Let me see you smile for a smile's worthwhile when it's time to say good -bye: Cheer up, mother, smile and don't be sighing - dry the tear drop in your eye, We'll come back with colors flying , After the war clouds roll by..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle (A worried mother saying good-bye to her smiling uniformed son). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Good-Bye, Ma! Good -bye, Pa! Good-bye, Mule - Long Boy ("...Now one of the biggest hits on the market and is also known to our soldier boys in camp..."). "One Day in June," "Chin-Chin Chinaman" ("...It is the big noise of the season and should be on every piano...."), "Liberty Bell (It's Time to Ring Again), etc. According to The List of Robert King's Work Web site: "Robert A. King [born Robert Keiser] was a prolific American composer and songwriter of popular music; born and died in New York. He published using both names, anonymously and also used a pseudonym, MARY EARL. His total output will probably never be known. He worked at Ditson's music store as a child before entering Tin Pan Alley at the publisher, Leo Feist, where he produced his first hit Anona (1903). In 1918, he was contracted to Shapiro-Bernstein Music Publishers to write 4 songs per month. These included the hits Beautiful Ohio (1918) and Dreamy Alabama (1919). Of ragtime interest, is his very early Everything is Ragtime Now (1899) written as Robert Keiser."
3C-4 China We Owe A Lot To You - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by Howard Johnson and music by Milton Ager: "When I woke up the other morn, I found a new Republic had been born, There was to be democracy in China; We congratulate her, But we know old China, too, Did an awful lot for me and you, Now her freedom's won, Let's thank her for what she's done. China, away out near Asia Minor, No country could be finer beneath the sun; You gave us silk to dress our lovely women, 'Twas worth the price, And when we couldn't get potatoes, you gave us rice. We mix chop suey with your chop sticks, You've taught us quite a few tricks we never knew, We take our hats off to one thing we've seen, Your laundries keep our country clean, China , We owe a lot to you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A colorfully - dressed Mandarin surrounded by paper lanterns and incense. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "If I Had a Son for Each Star in Old Glory" ("Here's a MOTHER'S song of patriotism that is setting the U.S.A. aflame. It is the prize song of the war...a stirring march and a corking one-step.") and "I Called You My Sweetheart."
3C-5 Columbia - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome J. Remick and Co., Detroit and New York - 1917) with words and music by Seneca G. Lewis ( Featured by "Miss Hazel Dawn" - with cover photograph - "The author has assigned and the publisher contracts to duplicate to THE NEW YORK SUN'S TOBACCO FUND all royalty earnings of the patriotic march COLUMBIA to provide smokes for our soldiers in France during the war and to be used subsequently for such war relief measures as this paper may designate."): "Hail! Hail! Columbia - Land of the Free - Cradle of Liberty - We honor thee Columbia - Mid all our wanderings - Near and afar - Your light shall ever be our guiding star..." Cover image (A black and white photograph of actress Hazel Dawn dressed as Lady Liberty) by photographer Ira L. Hill ("By permission of THE THEATRE MAGAZINE). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "So Long, Mother" ("Al Jolson's Mother Song"), etc. According to Wikipedia: "Hazel Dawn was a member of the original Ziegfeld Follies in 1907. She went to Wales with her family at the age of eight when her father served as a Mormon missionary there. Dawn studied violin and voice in London, England, Paris, France, and Munich, Germany. She was especially impressed by the attentiveness of teachers she studied under in Paris. Her sister was an opera singer and went on to sing with the Opera Comique in Paris. She met producer Ivan Caryll at a party in London. Caryll suggested the name Hazel Dawn, considering Tout to be impossible. Dawn met composer Paul Rubens who offered her a part in Dear Little Denmark at the Prince of Wales Theatre (1909), where she made her theatrical debut. She then starred in The Balkan Princess in 1910 as Olga. She achieved a great success with her performance in Ivan Caryll's The Pink Lady (1911). The show ran for a year on Broadway and then toured, making Dawn famous, even though she was not the star. In the production she introduced My Beautiful Lady, which she sang and played on her violin. The Little Cafe (1913) was produced by the New Amsterdam Theatre and adapted from a book by C.M.S. McLellan. One reviewer found the play lacking when compared to The Pink Lady, but he enjoyed the song, Just Because It's You. Dawn performed it in the third act. He wrote: Dawn was radiantly beautiful and sang far better than did other members of the cast. The Little Cafe was a place in Paris where large crowds assembled to admire the renowned beauty of the owner's daughter. She starred in the operetta, The Debutante (1914), at the National Theater in Washington, D.C., Under the management of John C. Fisher. Harry B. Smith penned the book and play adaptation. The setting of the operetta is in London and Paris, with Dawn depicting a young American girl who is pursued by a nobleman, who desires her fortune. She plays the violin during a scene where she runs away to Paris and makes her musical debut before an appreciative audience. In December she appeared in The Debutante at the Knickerbocker Theatre. She continued performing for Ziegfeld until 1927, when she married..."
3C-6 Columbia's Call - Two pieces of sheet music (Walter Jacobs Publishing, Boston - 1917) with words by George L. Cobb and music by Bob Wyman: "From Maine to Frisco, from South to North, Sons of the Nation now to war march forth; One flag, one country, one purpose all - To crush a foreign foe and answer Columbia's call ..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Lady Liberty overseeing depictions of a soldier, sailor, various workers across the nation and military ships at sea. The sheet music includes back-cover advertisements for THE TUNEFUL YANKEE - "A Monthly Magazine devoted to the interests of popular music" and MELODY - "A monthly magazine for lovers of popular music."
3C-7 Come On Over Here, It's A Wonderful Place - A single piece of sheet music (William Jerome Publishing Corporation, NYC - 1916) with words by William Jerome ("William Jerome's biggest song hit since BEDELIA") and music by Seymour Furth (Featured by Eddie Cantor): "Bedelia McCarthy, she came from Tralee - From cute little Ireland over the sea - She's now doing well in the land of the free - Three cheers fro the Red, White and Blue, Hip! Hip! She's now the head girl in a famous big store - In fact she's the smartest young girl on the floor - She wrote to her dearest girl friend Maggie Moore and said to the fair Marguerite. Come over, come over, come on over here, It's a wonderful place...A real hearty welcome from each one you meet and gold pieces layin' all over the street.." Cover image by an unknown artist and photographer: A photo of Broadway star Eddie Cantor backed by the Statue of Liberty and the NYC skyline. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-I." According to Wikipedia: "EDDIE CANTOR (January 31, 1892 - October 10, 1964), born Edward Israel Iskowitz, was an American 'illustrated song' performer, comedian, dancer, singer, actor and songwriter. Familiar to Broadway, radio, movie and early television audiences, this 'Apostle of Pep' was regarded almost as a family member by millions because his top-rated radio shows revealed intimate stories and amusing anecdotes about his wife Ida and five daughters. Some of his hits include 'Makin' Whoopee,' 'Ida,' 'If You Knew Susie,' 'Ma! He's Makin' Eyes at Me,' 'Margie' and 'How Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down on the Farm (After They've Seen Paree?)' He also wrote a few songs, including 'Merrily We Roll Along,' the Merrie Melodies Warner Bros. cartoon theme. His eye-rolling song-and-dance routines eventually led to his nickname, 'Banjo Eyes' In 1933, the artist Frederick J. Garner caricatured Cantor with large round eyes resembling the drum-like pot of a banjo. Cantor's eyes became his trademark, often exaggerated in illustrations, and leading to his appearance on Broadway in the musical Banjo Eyes (1941). His charity and humanitarian work was extensive, and he is credited with coining the phrase and helping to develop The March of Dimes..."
3C-8 Come On Papa - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Edgar Leslie and Harry Ruby ("Successfully Introduced by Eddie Cantor in Ziegfeld Follies"): "Sweet Marie in gay Paree, Had a motor car; It filled her heart with joy , To drive a Yankee boy; On the sly, she'd wink her eye, If one came her way, She'd stop her motor car, And then she'd say: Come on papa, Hop in ze motor car, Sit by mamma, And hold ze hand..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A black and white publicity photograph of Edie Cantor backed by a couple embracing in an automobile while Paris pedestrians react from the sidewalk. Advertised sample songs include; "Waltzing the Scales." According to Wikipedia: "EDDIE CANTOR (January 31, 1892 - October 10, 1964), born Edward Israel Iskowitz, was an American 'illustrated song' performer, comedian, dancer, singer, actor and songwriter. Familiar to Broadway, radio, movie and early television audiences, this 'Apostle of Pep' was regarded almost as a family member by millions because his top-rated radio shows revealed intimate stories and amusing anecdotes about his wife Ida and five daughters. Some of his hits include 'Makin' Whoopee,' 'Ida,' 'If You Knew Susie,' 'Ma! He's Makin' Eyes at Me,' 'Margie' and 'How Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down on the Farm (After They've Seen Paree?)' He also wrote a few songs, including 'Merrily We Roll Along,' the Merrie Melodies Warner Bros. cartoon theme. His eye-rolling song-and-dance routines eventually led to his nickname, 'Banjo Eyes' In 1933, the artist Frederick J. Garner caricatured Cantor with large round eyes resembling the drum-like pot of a banjo. Cantor's eyes became his trademark, often exaggerated in illustrations, and leading to his appearance on Broadway in the musical Banjo Eyes (1941). His charity and humanitarian work was extensive, and he is credited with coining the phrase and helping to develop The March of Dimes..." Composer Harry Ruby was portrayed by Red Skelton in the 1950 MGM biopic THREE LITTLE WORDS.
3C-9 Comprenez-Vous Papa - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and New York - 1918) with Words by Alfred Bryan and music by Ray Lawrence: "When Sammy stroll'd along the boulevard one night - The boulevard so bright - His heart was feeling happy - His big strong arm around Miss Josephine so tight - She tried to make him understand - As she cried with delight - Compranay voo papa - I want ze little kiss from you - Compranay voo, ha - ha ...I'm off ze noodle Mister Yankee Doodle - doo..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A French woman and a U.S. soldier beneath a huge orange moon. Advertised sample songs on the back cover include: "Madelon, I'll be True the Whole Regiment."
3C-10 Comrades Of The Legion - A single piece of sheet music (Sam Fox Publishing Co., Cleveland and New York - 1920) with music by John Philip Sousa - Lieut. Com. U.S.N.R.F. ("Dedicated to THE AMERICAN LEGION"). Cover image by artist C. H. Trotter: A black and white photograph of John Philip Sousa (in uniform) backed by the image of two men (in civilian clothes) observing a battle from afar. Advertised song samples include: "Sabre and Spurs - March of the American Cavalry." According to the JOHN PHILIP SOUSA Web Site: "John Philip Sousa was born in 1854 in Washington, D.C. and died in 1932. He worked as a theater musician and conducted the U.S. Marine Band before starting his own civilian band in 1892. Sousa toured with his band for 40 years and was indisputably the most famous musical act in the world. He composed 136 marches, 15 operettas, 70 songs and many other pieces."
3C-11 Cootie Tickle, The - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1919) with words by Jack Yellin and music by Abe Olman ("Over here it's the Shimmie Dance - By the writers of JOHNNY 'S IN TOWN, LAND OF LULLABY, etc."): "You've heard of the Shimmie dance, But do you know it started back in France? I learn'd from a soldier man, How this funny little dance began; At a ragtime jubilee, The soldiers gave one night in gay Paree, A 'culled gent' by accident - Introduced this novelty: Mose began BALLIN' THE JACK - Just then up and down his back , He felt a cute little Cootie, wigglin' wigglin' in its track, That's what made him shake and twist, He did something just like this - And everyone began to wiggle with 'im - Their shoulders movin to the raggy rhythm; It's THE COOTIE TICKLE back in France, Over here it's the Shimmie Dance..." Cover image by artist "R.S." - An intricate image of blossoming flowers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Dreaming Sweet Dreams of Mother" and "In Cleopatra's Land." According to Wikipedia: "...The earliest recorded uses of the term (Cootie) in English are by British soldiers during the First World War to refer to lice..."
3D-1 Daddy's Prayer, A - A single piece of sheet music (Harold Freeman Music Co., Providence, Rhode Island - 1918) with words and music by Harold B. Freeman ("The companion song to the famous MY MOTHER'S LULLABY"): "A Little girl sat on her father's knee just at the close of day - She looked up and said When I go to bed, Have I got to kneel and pray? And then Daddy kissed her and held her near, And a tear was in his eye - he said Don't forget brother is far away, And you'll pray the same as I . Bring back my wandering boy tonight , My soldier so dear to me - The boy who was once my joy and light, The pride of my life to be - Now somewhere in France, 'mid shot and shell, He's fighting over there - I'm here all alone Dear God bring him home - That was a Daddy's Prayer..." Cover image by artist E.S. Fisher: A little girl sits on her father's knee. Advertised song samples on back cover include: "My Mother's Lullaby" ("... This is Harold Freeman's masterpiece - the greatest song that he has ever written...").
3D-2 Dear Old Pal of Mine - Four pieces of sheet music (G. Ricordi and Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Harold Robe and music by Gitz Rice ("Sung by Mr. John McCormack At All His Engagements"): "All my life is empty, Since I went away, Skies don't seem to be so clear, May some angel sentry, Guard you while I stray, And fate be kind to join us some sweet day. Oh, How I want you, Dear old pal of mine, each day and night I pray you're always mine. Sweetheart may God bless you, Angel hands caress you, While sweet dreams rest you, Dear old pal of mine..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A sepia-toned image of Lieutenant Gitz Rice - First Canadian Contingent ("One night at Ypres, while doing sentry duty in the front lines, the composer, then a private, was inspires by the thought, 'Oh, how I miss you, dear old pal of mine,' to write this song"). Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Little Mother of Mine." According to the LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA Web Site: "The name of Lieutenant Gitz Ingraham Rice is most closely associated with the patriotic songs he wrote during the First World War, and with the concert parties that became a big part of building the morale of Canadian troops in the trenches in Europe...Rice was one of the many Canadian soldiers and army officers who soon found themselves taking on the additional important service of organizing and performing in home-grown stage shows, to entertain their fellow soldiers on the front lines between battles. The forerunner of these military 'concert parties' was the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Comedy Company, for which Rice sometimes played the piano. This first entertainment troupe was formed in May 1916. Rice and the other soldiers who took part in the Princess Pat's Comedy Company and similar troupes, were better suited to these activities than were professional entertainers, as they did not require extra pay and they were already trained for the dangers of the front lines. The soldier-entertainers wrote and rehearsed new material during lulls in active duty..." According to Wikipedia: "John McCormack was a world-famous Irish tenor, celebrated for his performances of the operatic and popular song repertoires, and renowned for his diction and breath control. He was also a Papal Count..."
3D-3 Dixie is Dixie Once More (Dancing Mose is Back in Civy Clothes) - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1919) with words by William Tracey and music by Maceo Pinkard: "Listen Buddy, listen to that joyful throng, Shufflin' 'long hear their song, "Tain't no use of asking what it's all about, Why don't you run down and find out, There's joy on the old Swanee Shore, 'Cause Dixie is Dixie once more. Dancing Mose is back in civvy clothes - See him jazzin' around Shimmee Sam is doing a new kind of dance , Called the Franco Dixie, He brought it from France, Hey! Alexander's got his ragtime band, Back in Melody Land, Banjos are a strummin' So tuney, So tuney, Darkies are hummin' So crooney, So crooney, Just the same as in the days of yore, Dixie is Dixie once more..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: An orange sun rising over the southern cotton fields. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Mammy O'Mine," "Hearts," "Longing," "Peggy," etc.
3D-4 Dixie Volunteers, The - Two pieces of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder, Co., NYC - 1917) with words and music by Edgar Leslie and Harry Ruby ("As Introduced by Eddie Cantor in Ziegfeld Follies"): "let's all give three cheers, For the Dixie Volunteers, See those great big Southern Laddies, Just like their dear old daddies, They are proud to go , And they want the world to know, They're coming! They're coming! From the land of Old Black Joe, Peaceful sons have shouldered guns, And now they're going to be, Fighting men like Stonewall Jackson and like Robert E. Lee, When they hit that line, And they cross the River Rhine..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A black and white publicity photograph of Broadway star Eddie Cantor backed with smiling infantry soldiers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Sweetie" and "Paddle Addle in Your Little Canoe" ("The latest dance craze"). According to Wikipedia: "EDDIE CANTOR (January 31, 1892 - October 10, 1964), born Edward Israel Iskowitz, was an American 'illustrated song' performer, comedian, dancer, singer, actor and songwriter. Familiar to Broadway, radio, movie and early television audiences, this 'Apostle of Pep' was regarded almost as a family member by millions because his top-rated radio shows revealed intimate stories and amusing anecdotes about his wife Ida and five daughters. Some of his hits include 'Makin' Whoopee,' 'Ida,' 'If You Knew Susie,' 'Ma! He's Makin' Eyes at Me,' 'Margie' and 'How Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down on the Farm (After They've Seen Paree?)' He also wrote a few songs, including 'Merrily We Roll Along,' the Merrie Melodies Warner Bros. cartoon theme. His eye-rolling song-and-dance routines eventually led to his nickname, 'Banjo Eyes' In 1933, the artist Frederick J. Garner caricatured Cantor with large round eyes resembling the drum-like pot of a banjo. Cantor's eyes became his trademark, often exaggerated in illustrations, and leading to his appearance on Broadway in the musical Banjo Eyes (1941). His charity and humanitarian work was extensive, and he is credited with coining the phrase and helping to develop The March of Dimes..." Composer Harry Ruby was portrayed by Red Skelton in the 1950 MGM biopic THREE LITTLE WORDS.
3D-5 Don't Be Anybody's Soldier Boy But Mine - Two pieces of sheet music (Ted Brown Music Co., Chicago - 1918) with words by Joe Lyons and music by Frank Magine: "There are many ways we can say good-bye, When a soldier goes away; Smiles and words of praise, or perhaps a sigh, But I heard a little maid say. Don't be anybody's soldier boy but mine, Keep a little th't for me each day , each weary day..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier waving good-bye to his girl sadly standing by a picket fence. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Somewhere a Heart is Breaking and Calling Me Back to You."
3D-6 Don't Bite The Hand That's Feeding You - A single piece of music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1915) with words by Thomas Hoier and music by Jimmie Morgan ("Originally Introduced by Ed Morton" - with cover photograph): "Last night as I lay a sleeping, A wonderful dream came to me, I saw Uncle Sammy weeping - For his children from over the sea: They had come to him, friendless and starving , When From tyrant's oppression they fled, But now they abuse and revile him, Till at last in just anger he said: If you don't like your Uncle Sammy, Then go back to your home o'er the sea, To the land from where you came, Whatever be it's name; But don't be ungrateful to me! If you don't like the stars in Old Glory, If you don't like the Red, White and Blue, Then don't act like the cur in the story, Don't bite the had that's feeding you..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A black and white publicity photograph of vaudeville's "Singing Cop" - Ed Morton. Advertised song samples inside the sheet music include: "Down Among the Sheltering Palms," "My Pretty Firefly," "I Want to Go to Tokio," etc. The "World's Best Music Folios" are advertised on the back cover. According to Wikipedia: "Eddie Morton was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of a Scottish immigrant. From about 1898 until about 1905, he worked for the Philadelphia Police Department, leading to his later billing as 'The Singing Cop.' He then became a variety performer, and in 1907 appeared at the Madison Square Roof Garden in New York City in the cast of The Maid and the Millionaire, a musical comedy. The following year he toured as part of M. M. Thiese's Rollickers burlesque show, and then became a popular attraction in the vaudeville shows run by Benjamin Franklin Keith and Sylvester Z. Poli. He first recorded, as a gruff-voiced comic baritone, in 1907, and over the next few years recorded for Victor, Columbia, Edison, Zonophone and other companies. His successes included 'That's Gratitude,' 'Just a Friend of the Family,' 'The Right Church, But The Wrong Pew,' 'You Ain't Talking To Me,' 'The Party that Wrote Home, Sweet Home Never Was a Married Man,' 'What's the Matter with Father?,' and 'Oceana Roll,' first released in 1911 on the flip side of 'Alexander's Ragtime Band' by Collins and Harlan. As a Tin Pan Alley 'song plugger,', many of his songs also featured in the repertoires of rival performers Arthur Collins and Bert Williams, including 'coon songs.' He also wrote some of his own comic material. Morton did not record after 1917, but continued as a popular vaudeville attraction until 1926. He then retired to run a golf club and a restaurant, Ed Morton's Little Bit of Broadway, at Wildwood, New Jersey. He died of a heart attack in 1938 at the age of 67..."
3D-7 Don't Cry Frenchy - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., NYC - 1919) with words by Sam M. Lewis and Joe Young and music by Walter Donaldson: "They met while clouds were hanging over Flanders, A soldier's glance; a war romance; But now he's leaving her alone in Flanders, And he softly whispers to his maid of France: Don't cry Frenchy, don't cry, When you kiss me good - bye, I will always keep the fleur de lis, dear, You gave to me, dear, So dry your eye..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A French woman waves goodbye to a troop transport ship. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "That Tumble-Down Shack in Athlone." Composer Walter Donaldson was portrayed by Frank Lovejoy in the 1952 Warner Brothers, Gus Kahn biopic, I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS.
3D-8 Don't Forget The Salvation Army (My Doughnut Girl) - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President - 1919) with words by Elmore Leffingwell and James Lucas and music by Roberty Brown and William Frisch ("This song officially endorsed and adopted by THE SALVATION ARMY"): "Pennies , nickels, dimes and quarters, hear them ring - Oh what joy and oh what bliss those coins can bring - For now our boys are landing at our shores ev'ry day - This is what you're bond to hear them say: Don't forget the Salvation Army, Always remember my doughnut girl - She brought them doughnuts and coffee - just like an Angel , she was their best pal - As brave as a lion but meek as a lamb - She carried on beside Uncle Sam - So don't forget the Salvation Army, Remember my doughnut girl..." Cover image by artist E.E. Waton: A smiling red, white and blue Salvation Army girl offering doughnuts. A letter from Salvation Army Commander, Evangeline Booth is reprinted on the back cover of the sheet music: "To the Great and Mighty Public Everywhere: If the Salvation Army Doughnut, originated by the faithful women who have consecrated their lives to the service of others - rolled out by hands that work for no reward but the consciousness of having met a human need, and dipped as deep into pure and unselfish devotion as into the sizzling grease which makes each doughnut crisp and savory - has brought any little cheer and comfort to the soldier and sailor boys of the great and free nation they have with their blood and brave hearts saved from destruction, then i want to say that we shall in nowise lose our reward; for has not God given to us the blessing promised to those who give the 'cup of cold water' in his name? And if setting the sweet music the world-famed story of the doughnut, made at the Front 'as Mother would have made it,' can add anything to lighten the hearts of those who hear it, or induce more smiles, and impart at the same time the solemn message of what it means to serve our fellowman, then the Salvation Army is profoundly and everlastingly grateful. "According to Wikipedia: "Evangeline Booth was the 4th General of The Salvation Army from 1934 to 1939. She was its first female General."
3D-9 Don't Forgert Your Old Mother - A single piece of sheet music (Imperial Music Company, Roanoke, Virginia - 1916) with words by H.H. Schultz and music by Courtney a and J. E. Allemong: "Don't forget your dear old mother, With her wrinkled faded brow, Was as fair and just as handsome, In her youth as you are now. Don't forget that she is ageing , And her days have oft' been sad, While her tireless fingers labored, That your heart she might make glad..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A elderly mother sadly stares out her son's bedroom window - a toy drum and rifle placed by the window.
3D-10 Don't Steal My Yankee Doodle Dandy - A single piece of sheet music (A.J. Stasney Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Bud Green and music by Ed Nelson: "Girls of France, I've got a message for you Girls of France, Although I never saw you I've heard that you have wonderful eyes, You've got a way the boys idolize, Now my Yankee Doodle is over the sea, And this is the message from me: Don't steal my Yankee Doodle Dandy, With your Mon cheri and your Wee wee, wee, You can both promenade on the Grand Boulevard, But if he starts a slight flirtation, Don't lead him to temptation He's my Yankee Doodle Dandy And I want him for myself someday..." Cover image by Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A young girl in the U.S.A. sits by a lake gazing at the moon - an American soldier and a French girl embrace in the circle of the moon. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "It's Never Too Late To Be Sorry."
3D-11 Don't Take My Darling Boy Away - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President - NYC - 1915) with words by Will Dillon and music by Albert Von Tilzer (older brother of Will Von Tilzer): "A mother was kneeling to pray. For loved ones at war far away - And there by her side, Her one joy and pride, Knelt down with her that day. Then came a knock on the door, Your boy is commanded to war, No, Captain please, Here on my knees , I plead for one I adore. Don't take my darling boy away from me, Don't send him off to war, You took his father and brothers three, Now you come back for more; Who are the heroes that fight your wars, Mothers who have no say, But my duty's done, so for God's sake leave one, And don't take my darling boy away..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: A soldier standing, at the door, points to a young man as the young man's mother kneels pleading. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Pigeon Walk" ("The Greatest Instrumental Number in Years.").
3D-12 Don't Try To Steal The Sweetheart Of A Soldier - Two pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., NYC and Detroit - 1917) with words by Alfred Bryan and Music by Van and Schenck (Featured by Tom Kelly): "He marched off and left his girl behind him - On the battlefield of France you'll find him - Are you on the square with his sweetheart fair, While he's over there? - 'All is fair in love and war' they say, But would you steal his girl away? Don't try to steal the sweetheart of a soldier, It's up to you to play a manly part - Though he's over there and she's over here - Still she's always in his heart..." Cover images include a color-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillian Tom Kelly ("The Fashion-Plate Comedian") by an unknown photographer and the image of a couple in a garden with the silhouette of a soldier floating in a cloud by an unknown artist. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Smiles." According to Wikipedia: "Van and Schenck were popular United States entertainers in the 1910s and 1920s: Gus Van (born August Von Glahn, August 12, 1886 - March 12, 1968), baritone and Joe Schenck (pronounced "sha?k," born Joseph Thuma Schenck, c. 1891 - June 28, 1930), tenor. They were vaudeville stars and made appearances in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1918, 1919, 1920 and 1921. They made numerous phonograph records for the Emerson, Victor, and Columbia record companies..."
3D-13 Down In The U-17 - A single piece of sheet music (F.J.A. Forster Music Publisher, Chicago, Illinois - 1915) with words by Roger Lewis and music by Ernie Erdman ("A Musical Torpedo"): " The U-Seventeen was a big submarine, With a jolly old musical crew; On the ocean they'd float in their funny old boat, And none of them ever felt blue. They all loved the life on the billowy sea, And dangers the ocean would bring, So out there each night when there wasn't a fight they'd lock up the hatches and sing: Oh we'll glide like a fish - and then we'll rock like a bear, We sleep up on the ocean bed but what do we care. We're built like a whale - so we'll dance on our tail, We'll wobble like a jelly fish and crawl like a snail. Oh, we'll rock and we'll reel and then we'll twist like an eel, Dancing in that old submarine..." Cover image by artist James Harvey Dulin: A submarine moving under the sea while the crew sing and dance, inside. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Way Down in Aransaw."
3D-14 Down The Trail Of The Old Dirt Road - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Richard Howard and music by Nat Vincent: "…Down the Old Dirt Road there are tramping, To the land of Somewhere far away, Every step that they take, There's a heart here will break, But they'll come back to mend them some day, Wear a smile on your faces, Just to help them lift a heavy load, And you'll never forget how they marched , you can bet, Down the Trail of the Old Dirt Road..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle Soldiers marching down the "Old Dirt Road." Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Three Wonderful Letters from Home," "Lafayette! We Hear You Calling," "A Little Bit of Sunshine From Home," etc.
3D-15 Dream Of A Soldier Boy, The - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, San Francisco, London - 1917) with words by Alfred Dubin ("Author of ALL THE WORLD WILL BE JEALOUS OF ME, 'TWAS ONLY AN IRISHMAN'S DREAM, etc.") and music by James V. Monaco ("Composer of I'M GOING TO FOLLOW THE BOYS, AFTER A THOUSAND YEARS, etc."): "Over the foam, far away from his home, A soldier was facing the foe. One night he lay a dreaming beneath the stars aglow. When he woke by the dawn's early light, Then he told of his dream in the night. All the nations were kind to each other, Ev'ry law was a golden rule, Ev'ry mother and son were together that day, And ev'ry gun was laid away. Ev'ry soldier was back with his sweetheart, All the world seemed to smile with joy; And God turned the trenches to gardens again, That's the dream of a soldier boy..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A production still from the "Greater Vitagraph Players" featuring Edward Earle ("Greater Vitagraph Star"). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I'm Longing Always Dear, For You." According to Gary Brumburgh on the IMDb Web Site: "Canadian native Edward Earle was born in Toronto on July 16, 1882, and was raised and schooled there. His stage career took form in Canada with an early emphasis on musical comedy, and he later toured in vaudeville and stock in association with Belasco, DeWolf Hopper Sr., Marie Cahill and the Schuberts, among other theatrical illuminaries. Making his Broadway debut in the comedy "The Triumph of Love" in 1904, his work on the stage eventually led to film parts in 1914. Earle entered via the Edison film company and emerged a star not long after, distinguishing himself at other studios as well, including Vitagraph, Famous Players, Metro, Warners and Columbia, with a tally of over 400 silent and talking films by the time he retired four decades later. Tawny blond, blue-eyed, well-built and with a clean-cut handsomeness, Earle was a natural for dashing, romantic silent film leads. He gained initial film attention starring in Edison's 'Olive's Opportunities' one-reeler series paired opposite Mabel Trunnelle in 1914 and 1915. Adding dash and verve to such silents as Ranson's Folly (1915), a western also showcasing Ms. Trunelle; The Innocence of Ruth (1916); The Light of Happiness (1916) and The Gates of Eden (1916), all opposite a dramatic Viola Dana, he went on to dress up everything from stalwart war dramas For France (1917) to mystery comedies The Blind Adventure (1918). From 1917 through 1919, he and Agnes Ayres enjoyed great success in a series of two-reeler shorts based on the works of O. Henry. Earle ventured into the 1920s with such stylish movie showcases as East Lynne (1921), False Fronts (1922) and The Dangerous Flirt (1924), but then began to falter into second leads and support roles, which including the George Arliss starrer The Man Who Played God (1922), the Marie Prevost comedy How to Educate a Wife (1924), little Baby Peggy's showcase The Family Secret (1924), Colleen Moore's comedy romance Irene (1926), the John Gilbert/Joan Crawford sea tale Twelve Miles Out (1927), and Conrad Nagel's part talking prohibition tale Kid Gloves (1929). Come the advent of sound Earle was offered character parts and by the end of the pre-Code talkies era was relegated to bit and unbilled extra parts in Shirley Temple, Laurel and Hardy and Marx Bros. flicks. He continued to appear throughout the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s and tended to be more visible in oaters and serial cliffhangers. Extremely athletic with a daredevil instinct, he tried his hand as an artist, aviator and automobile racing car driver. Retiring in the early 1960s, Earle eventually retired to the Woodland Hills, California Motion Picture Country Home, where he passed away from complications of old age at age 90 in 1972."
3D-16 Dreaming Of Home Sweet Home - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Ballard MacDonald and music by James F. Hanley ("Writers of INDIANA"): "One by one the shades of night are creeping, All alone my silent watch keeping, Gazing in the campfire's glow, Dreaming of the loved ones I know. First of all I can see my mother, And her head is bending low, While my daddy holds her hand, Tries to make her understand, It was best for her boy to go, Then a girl with a heart that's longing , Who'll be true tho' her sweetheart may roam, Oh! how real they seem in the campfire's gleam, When I'm dreaming of Home Sweet Home.." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A soldier gazes into the campfire as the smoke encircles his thoughts of his home, parents and girl. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Three Wonderful Letters from Home," "Lafayette! We Hear You Calling," "A Little Bit of Sunshine From Home," etc.
3E-1 Each Stitch Is A Thought of You, Dear - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Al Sweet and music by Billy Baskette ("Dedicated to that Army of Noble Women - Mothers - Wives - Sisters and Sweethearts who are doing their bit for the boys OVER THERE"): "By the lamplight's glow in the evening - Sits a mother old and grey, Silently knitting with fingers worn, For her boys so far away; Tho' her heart is heavy with sorrow, And her brow all wrinkled with care, With ev'ry stitch that is fashioned, She breathes a gentle pray'r: Each stitch is a thought of you, dear, Woven with loving care, I'm knitting my heart in each garment, dear, To send to you somewhere; My hands are old and worn, dear, The stitches may not be true; But there's love in each one, a mother's love for her son, Each stitch is a thought of you..." Cover image by artist Henry Hutt: An elderly mother knitting while her 4-star (4 sons in the service) flag hangs beside her. Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SING song folio ("They can't stop our singing army! Send a copy of this book...to your Sammy 'over here' of 'over there' Send one to your Jackie afloat or ashore...").
3E-2 Ev'ry Girl In Town Likes My Boy (Since He Came Back From France) - A single piece of sheet music (William C. Loveday Music Publisher, Boston, Massachusetts - 1919) with words and music by William C. Loveday ("Featured by Allie Bagley with Hoyt's Revue" - with cover photograph): "…Ev'ry night he goes calling, I'm afraid that he's falling, It seems that I haven't a chance to love him, Ev'ryone says he's a hero - I know they'll steal him away - If he acted this way - when he was over the sea - he must have made ev'ry girl in Paree - Ev'ry girl in town likes my boy - Since he came back from France..." Cover publicity photograph (of actress Allie Bagley) by an unknown photographer.
3E-3 Everything Is Peaches Down in Georgia - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Grant Clarke and music by Milton Ager and George W. Meyer ("WAR EDITION - To co-operate with the government and to conserve paper during the War, this song is issued in a smaller size than usual. Save! Save! Save is the watchword today. This is the spirit in which we are working and your co-operation will be very much appreciated. Leo Feist, Inc."): "Ev'rything is peaches down in Georgia, What a peach of a clime, For a peach of a time - Believe me, Paradise is waiting down there for you - I've got a peach of a Pa, peach of a Ma, Oh, what a peach of a couple they are! There's a preacher preaches down in Georgia, Always ready to say: Will you love and obey? I bet you'll pick yourself a peach of a wife, Settle down to a peach of a life, ev'ry thing is peaches down in Georgia..." Cover image by an unknown photographer and artist: A peach branch with the blooming photo faces of various young women. Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SING song folio ("Send one to him - it's like a handclasp from home...").
3F-1 Farewell, Little Girl of Mine - A single piece of sheet music (The Sydney P. Harris Co., NYC and Detroit - 1917) with words and music by Sydney P. Harris (A "March Ballad" by the "Writer of MEET ME AT TWILIGHT and I'M WAITING 'MID THE ROSES."): "Hark! Dear, the bugle's calling, calling sweetheart for me. Soldiers in line are falling, to fight for liberty. Soon we will all be marching, marching to victory, Farewell, little girl of mine, Don't sigh, don't cry, Just one more kiss before we must say good-bye. Sweetheart, I'll be dreaming, dreaming of you. Farewell, little girl of mine, Farewell to you..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A soldier kissing his girl good-bye as the troops march to battle. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: MEET ME AT TWILIGHT and I'M WAITING 'MID THE ROSES.
3F-2 Father Will Be With Us Soon - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Ballard MacDonald and music by Nat Osborne (from "The Sensational Army Production - ATTA BOY - played and produced by the soldier boys of Q.M.C. Camp Meigs" staged by Dan Dody in Washington, DC - under the command of Col. D.H. Gienty): "Johnny my boy, you're my pride and joy, those were father's words to me. I wish that I had your chances to try in the cause of Liberty. Give me a gun and then show me a 'Hun,' and I'll prove Uncle Sammy was right; I'd do and I'd dare anything 'Over There,' But alas I am too old to fight. Go my son over the foam, I'll be here to welcome you home. But father will be with us soon, He was just forty in June. Judging by all of the things he told me , He ought to be equal to General Lee; He claimed he was brave as a lion, Now he's singing a different tune. For thousands of excellent reasons he'll find, Showing just why he should be left behind, I'll bet the poor geezer is out of his mind..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: Two young girls looking up, in awe, at an older than average soldier. Advertised song samples on the back cover include other musical highlights from ATTA BOY - "The Sensational Army Production" including: "Strolling 'Round the Camp With Mary," "The Magic in Your Big Blue Eyes" and "With the Rose, I Send This Heart of Mine."
3F-3 Fatherland, The Motherland, The Land Of My Best Girl, The - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1914) with words by Ballard MacDonald and music by Harry Carroll: "I'm blue thru and thru, And I don't know what to do, In my heart a battle's raging, all my sympathies engaging, My mother comes from sunny France , My daddy from Berlin, And just across the Channel lies the land my girl lives in. There's the Fatherland, the Motherland, and the land of my best girl..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A civilian sits in a chair thinking about soldiers pillaging his girl's village. THE GEM DANCE FOLIO FOR 1915 ("Containing All the Year's Song Successes...") is advertised on the back cover.
3F-4 Fight Is On, The - A single piece of sheet music (Vandersloot Music Publishing Co., Williamsport , Pennsylvania - 1917) with music by Carl D. Vandersloot (March Two-Step). Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: Soldiers charging on the battlefield while bombs explode in the sky. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Sunrise Echoes," "Garden of Memories," "Christmas Chimes," etc.
3F-5 Finest Flag That Flies, The - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph H. Hughes Publishing, Saginaw, Michigan - 1917) with words by Joseph H. Hughes and music by Harry Richardson: "…You may be in darkest Turkey, you may be in sunny Spain - You may be in dear old London, But You'll long for home again, And no matter where you wander, You will ever realize that our dear old land of Uncle Sam has the finest flag that flies..." Cover image (of the Stars and Stripes) by an unknown artist. The back cover features the poem, "America, Hear Me, I Love You" by Joseph H. Hughes with a dedication from the poet/composer: "UNITED WE STAND - Our country - My country; Your country - through our beloved President, with the aid of Congress, has declared war on a foreign foe, who knew no right, but might, and in taking the lives of our people while professing friendship for our nation, our self -respect would not permit us to stand these wrongs any longer. Realizing there are a few in this great land who do not understand that after becoming American citizens they can have but one flag, one country, this song is dedicated by me..."
3F-6 Flag That Has Never Retreated, The - A single piece of sheet music (Frederick L. Hogan Publishing, Lynn, Massachusetts - 1918) with words and music by Frederick L. Hogan ("Dedicated to the Rank Staff Assn. of Peter Woodland Lodge/Knights of Pythias - Lynn, Massachusetts"): "…You're the flag that has never retreated. The Old Red, White and Blue. Your defenders were never defeated, to Vict'ry carried through. For the cause of right and justice you've ever been unfurled, As a champion of Freedom, you're around the world. Oh! It's proudly we hail thee - Peerless emblem of the U.S.A." Cover image (of the Stars and Stripes) with quotation ("The American Soldier Understands Attack Not Retreat" - Major General Bundy - U.S.A.) by an unknown artist. According to Wikipedia: "...In 1917, General Omar Bundy assumed command of the 1st Brigade, 1st Expeditionary Division, and in June he sailed for France. As a division and corps commander during World War I, he participated in the occupation of the Toulon and Troyon Sectors near Saint-Mihiel, served in the Aisne-Marne operations, and took part in the occupations of Chateau-Thierry. Following the war, he commanded Fort Lee, Virginia, the 7th Corps Area, the Philippine Division, and the 5th Corps Area. For his services in World War I, General Bundy was awarded the French Legion of Honor, Commander, and the French Croix de Guerre with Palm. However, his bravery in battle has never been officially recognized by the U.S. government..."
3F-7 Flow'r Of France Bloom Again - A single piece of sheet music (D.W. Cooper Music Co., Boston, Massachusetts - 1919) with words and music (French version by Henri Herigault Pelletier) by Robert Levenson ("Writer of MY BELGIAN ROSE"): "Flower of France, With your petals all gone. Flower of France, Come see it is dawn! The sunshine that you've missed for so long Is coming back to make you strong, Your long night is thru' can't you see, You must now bloom a new Fleur de-lys..." Cover image by artist V.C. Plunkett: Lady Liberty hovers over a bombed out French village. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Daddy's Coming Home, "Battery A" and "101st Regiment U.S.A."
3F-8 Follow Me To Germany (And Victory) - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with words by William J. Hart and music by Edward G. Nelson: "Handsome Harry Vance now somewhere in France - Mighty glad to do his share - Over There - He's a bear - Always in the fray fighting ev'ry day - Still he's well and able - he sent to me a cable - And this is what he had to say - Follow me to Germany - 'Mid a good old Yankee Doodle victory - Johnny get yourself a gun and fall in line - You can help us chase the Hun across the Rhine - Pretty soon we will be in Berlin - Got a sneaky feeling we're goin' to win - Hurry over never fear - Grab the Kaiser by the ear - Take him for a souvenir 'mid a Yankee Doodle cheer - Follow me to Germany and victory..." Cover art by an unknown artist: A young soldier marching to war gesturing to join him. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Smiles."
3F-9 For Dixie And Uncle Sam - Two pieces of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC, Chicago and London - 1916) with words by J. Keirn Brennan and music by Ernest R. Ball ("Nora Bayes' Big Hit" - with cover photograph -by the "Writers of A LITTLE BIT OF HEAVEN, SURE THEY CALL IT IRELAND, GOOD-BYE, GOOD LUCK, GOD BLESS YOU, IRELAND IS IRELAND TO ME, YOU'RE THE BEST LITTLE MOTHER THAT GOD EVER MADE, etc."): "...Your Granddad fought in the war of Sixty-One, he wore a suit of grey. Your Daddy, too, in a suit of navy blue, To Cuba sailed away. Though the one wore grey and the other blue, The blood of both's in you, So I'm giving you up to Old Glory, And I'm mighty proud that I am! You're all I've got, but be Johnny on the spot, For Dixie and Uncle Sam..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A black and white publicity photograph of Nora Bayes surrounded by an elderly mother waving to marching soldiers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Rosary For You." According to Wikipedia: "...Nora Bayes was performing professionally in vaudeville in Chicago by age 18. She toured from San Francisco, California to New York City and became a star both on the vaudeville circuit and the Broadway stage. In 1908, she married singer-songwriter Jack Norworth. The two toured together and were credited for collaborating on a number of compositions, including the immensely popular 'Shine On, Harvest Moon,' which the pair debuted in Florenz Ziegfeld's Follies of 1908. Bayes and Norworth divorced in 1913. After America entered World War I Bayes became involved with morale boosting activities. George M. Cohan asked that she be the first to record a performance of his patriotic song 'Over There.' Her recording was released in 1917 and became an international hit. She also performed shows for the soldiers. Bayes made many phonograph records (some with Norworth) for the Victor and Columbia labels. From 1924 through 1928, her accompanist was pianist Louis Alter, who later composed the popular songs 'Manhattan Serenade,' 'Nina Never Knew' and 'Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans?' Bayes established her own theater, 'The Nora Bayes Theater' on West 44th Street in New York...Bayes was portrayed by Ann Sheridan in the 1944 musical biopic Shine On, Harvest Moon, which focused on her relationship with Norworth (Dennis Morgan) and ignored her other husbands. She was also portrayed by Frances Langford in the movie Yankee Doodle Dandy, where she and James Cagney (as George M. Cohan) perform Over There. The 1980 Garson Kanin novel Smash is about an attempt to make a Broadway musical out of Nora Bayes' life. The novel serves as the inspiration for the 2012 television series Smash, although the subject of the show's fictional musical is not Bayes but Marilyn Monroe..." Composer Ernest R. Ball was portrayed by Dick Haymes in the biopic, WHEN IRISH EYES ARE SMILING (20th Century-Fox - 1944).
3F-10 For Freedom And Humanity - A single piece of sheet music (Church, Paxson and Company, NYC - 1917) with words by Peter McAvoy and music by Henry Haaf: "…Our Nation's blood runs red and warm, To dear old glory we'll be true! Then a rouse and strike at the foe of ev'ry land as we fight for humanity, And beat down the hand that aims a blow at the shrine of liberty - It's for human rights that our nation always fights as our sires fought till our land was free - And our starry flag will always stand for freedom and humanity..." Cover art by an unknown artist: American Eagle and shield. Advertised sample songs on the back cover include: "By the Sea," "Little Soldier March," "Battle in the Sky," etc.
3F-11 For God, America And You - A single piece of sheet music (Louis J. Fay Publishing - "The Birthplace of Ballads" - Boston, Massachusetts - 1917) with words and music by Lewis J. Fay and Bennie Mc Laughlin ("Willa Holt Wakefield's Tremendous N.Y. Success!"): "Our President had called for a million volunteers - Our flag had been insulted as it had not been in years - A mother old with heart of gold which cannot be denied - Gave up her son her only one - Then said with Yankee pride: Your great granddaddy was at Valley Forge - Your granddad was with Scott - And your own dear dad when but a lad - At Fred'ricksburg was shot - In the fight with Spain, we were right there again - With hearts from fear so free - So go my dear boy go give battle to the foe - For God For America and Me..." Cover image by artist C. Jewett: A soldier charges to war from his Southern mansion ("As in 1776, 1861, 1898 - NOW 1917"). Willa Holt Wakefield was a refined pianologist and vocalist know for her "parlor entertainments" in vaudeville - billed as "a society woman hailing from one of the best families in Georgia."
3F-12 For It Is My Land And Your Land - A single piece of sheet music (G.C. Mills Publishing, Scarsdale, NY - 1918) with words and music by Joy Mills: "… For it is my land and your land no matter whether right or wrong - Our foe men or traitors we'll fight a hundred million strong - And this shall be our name in story - We fought for home for love for glory - Freedom, God and right..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A blue star window flag.
3F-13 For the Freedom of the World - Two pieces of sheet music (Sam Fox Publishing Co., Cleveland, Ohio - 1917) with words by Edmund Vance Cooke and music by J.S. Zamecnik ("To the Allies, each and every nation, To the splendid soldiers in the trenches and to the brave women at home; To all who have offered their sacrifice for the freedom of the world is this song dedicated"): "The trumpets call, our banners all are flying; Drums are sounding, hearts are bounding, We march to save where men are bravely dying, By the tempest tossed and whirled. Though mothers moan and sweethearts may be sighing , We struggle till the foeman's flag is furled; For the land which gave us birth, For the peoples of the earth, And the freedom of all the world..." Cover art by an unknown artist: Lady Liberty blowing a trumpet and leading troops into battle. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "One Fleeting Hour" ("The Song That Made Dorothy Lee").
3F-14 For the Glory of The Grand Old Flag - A single piece of sheet music (Thompson Publishing Company, Toronto and NYC - 1918) with words and music by Gordon V. Thompson ("Writer of WHEN YOU WIND UP THE WATCH ON THE RHINE, WHEN YOUR BOY COMES BACK TO YOU and I WANT TO KISS DADDY GOOD-NIGHT"): "All dangers braving, Our boys are saving - The flag that's waving - In skies above; Our hearts are sighing - Because they're dying - To keep it flying, The flag we love! For the glory of the grand old flag, Loyal hearts will never faint or fag, Of it's glorious name, It's victorious fame, No son of Freedom needs to ever boast or brag! For the glory of the grand old Flag. And the story of a shell-torn rag, We will dare and die - While it waves on high for the glory of the grand old flag..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Lady Liberty and her trumpet leading the charge to war with "The Story of the Song" ("Somewhere in France they were ordered to go 'Over the Top.' The crash of explosives was such that the very earth shivered with the shock. Machine guns sputtered their deadly hail. Jack Johnstons's burst with the crash of doom. Death reached its octopus-hands everywhere. They hesitated just a second then one brave hero pulled out a tattered Flag of Freedom and exclaimed 'Come On Boys!' For the glory of the Grand Old Flag. They went over the top and won: but this lad never came back. They buried him with his flag on his breast. On the wooden cross they wrote FOR THE GLORY OF THE GRAND OLD FLAG. Somewhere a sweetheart is lonely tonight. Somewhere a Mother weeps. Cheer Up! Be Brave! Remember 'twas for the glory of the Grand old Flag!")
3F-15 For You And the Grand Old Flag - A single piece of sheet music (Songland Publishing Co., Brooklyn, NY - 1915) with words by Charles Coleman and music by T. Jay Flanagan ("The Tremendous Patriotic Song Hit" by the "Writers of YOUR MOTHER IS YOUR BEST FRIEND, IT'S THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME and WHERE IS MY MAMA" ): "Hark hear the Bugle calling, Calling for me to go, Sweetheart your tears are 'tis of thee - Sweetheart please wait for me, I wish I was in Dixie I do, I do, With you and the grand old flag!" Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier embraces his girl - both are wrapped in the flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "In Dreamy Panama."
3F-16 For Your Boy And My Boy - Three pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., NYC and Detroit - 1918) with words by Gus Kahn and music by Egbert Van Alstyne: "Hear the bugle call - The call to arms for Liberty - See them one and all - They go to fight for you and me - Heroes we will find them - Ev'ry mother's son - We must get behind them 'Till their work is done - For your boy and my boy and all of the boys out there - Let's lend our money to the U.S.A. And do our share - Ev'ry bond that we are buying - Will help to hold the fighting line - Buy Bonds for your boy and mine..." Cover images by unknown artists: An American soldier throws a hand grenade while a German soldier peers from a trench/ Lady Liberty places her hand on the shoulder of a bugler ("Buy Bonds! Buy Bonds! Hear the Bugle Call!"). The back cover promotes the "Fourth United States Liberty Loan - Buy Bonds For Your Boy and My Boy - The safest investment in the World - a Liberty Bond! If you can't jab a bayonet, grab a bond! Between meals buy War Savings Stamps! And at meals save food ! Put America first! We'll Win the War - With Bread and Lead." Danny Thomas portrayed lyricist "Gus Kahn" and Dick Simmons portrayed composer "Egbert Van Alstyne" in the biopic I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS (Warner Brothers - 1952).
3F-17 For Your Country And My Country - Two pieces of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder, Co., NYC - 1917) with words and music by Irving Berlin ("The Official Recruiting Song"): "We know you love your land of Liberty - We know you love your U.S.A. - But if you want the world to know it - Now's the time to show it - Your Uncle Sammy needs you one and all - Answer to his call - It's your country and my country - with millions of real fighting men - It's your duty and my duty - To speak with the sword not the pen - if Washington were living today - With sword in hand he'd stand and say - For your country and my country - I'll do it all over again..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: Uncle Sam beating a drum as an eagle flies, soldiers march and ships sail. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Just a Baby's Prayer at Twilight (For Her Daddy Over There)."
3F-18 France We Have Not Forgotten You - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Grant Clarke and Howard E. Rogers and music by Milton Ager: "From across the sea, sad voices are calling - Calling you and me - To lighten their pain - Oh, Sister France we know you're worn and weary - We hear your plea and answer thee, 'tis not in vain! - France, we have heard you calling, France, while the shells are falling, We know what we owe to you - Tho' your head is bowed in sorrow - In the vision of tomorrow - Oh, can't you see victory is shining through? America is coming..." Cover image by an unknown artist: The Statue of Liberty against a red, white and blue (French flag) background. Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SING song folio ("There songs are the songs you'll learn to love in the days to come - why not learn to sing them now?").
3F-19 Freedom For All Forever - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - San Francisco - Boston - London - 1918) with words and music by B.C. Hilliam ("Writer of AFTER THE WAR and EVERYBODY'S WAITING FOR A SOMEBODY ELSE"): "Hark! In the Street there's the tramp of feet, See there's the flag on high! Oh! how can we tell of the hearts that swell - As the troops go marching by ...Let the call go forth through the whole wide world, Freedom for all forever! Over land and over sea, Peace and lasting liberty. Pray, pray for the Allied lands! Aid, aid with your hearts and hands; Fight, fight till your proud flag stands For Freedom, For all Forever..." There is no cover image beyond the song title and publishing information. The story of the song is included on the second page: "A competition was recently conducted by the Newspaper Enterprise Association, which serves some 300 newspapers throughout the country, and a prize was offered for the best American war slogan...Miss Marion I. Coop of San Diego, California was unanimously judges the best. her slogan was FREEDOM, FOR ALL, FOREVER, which instantly commends itself as an inspiration..." Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Can't Yo' Heah Me Callin, Caroline."
3F-20 Frenchy Come To Yankeeland - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President - NYC - 1919) with words and music by Sam Ehrlich and Con Conrad ("Writers of OH! FRENCHY"): "You remember Rosie Green who went across the sea - And fell in love with soldier Jean, a chap from Gay Paree - She just returned so angry and they say she's feeling blue - Because her "Frenchy' taught another girl to parle vous - But Rosie got a lonesome spell today - Then quickly sent this cablegram away - Frenchy - come over Frenchy - I'm sorry dearie - I made you cry - But when you smiled at K-K-K-K - Katy - I was angry and said good -bye - Bring all the kissing that you promised - Your little Rose in No-Man's Land - And pack Up your La La's in your old kit bag - And Frenchy come to Yankeeland..." Cover image by artist E.E.Waton: A young girl dreams of a French Soldier (pictured in a red white and blue heart). Advertised song samples on the back cover include:"Minnie, Shimme for Me."
3F-21 From the North, South, East and West - A single piece of sheet music (T.B. Harms and Francis Day and Hunter, NYC - 1918) with words and music by Harry Lauder ("Sung by Harry Lauder" - with cover photograph): " "The camp was miles and miles and miles and miles and miles away and all the boys were very tired and weary - They'd been marching, marching, marching, marching all the day - Singing all the songs to keep them cheery - They sang the Swanee River fifty thousand times or more - The Sergeant Major said he never heard such songs before, Of all the songs he ever heard the one he liked the best, Was the North, South, East and West - From the North and the South and the East and the West - Marching with the President we'll never, never rest, We're going to do our very, very, very, very best - From the North, South, East and West..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A black and white publicity photograph of Harry Lauder. According to Wikipedia: "Sir Henry 'Harry' Lauder was an international Scottish entertainer, described by Sir Winston Churchill as 'Scotland's greatest ever ambassador!' When World War I broke out, Lauder was in Melbourne on one of his Australian tours. During the war, he led successful fundraising efforts for war charities, organized a tour of music halls in 1915 for recruitment purposes, and brought his piano to the front lines where he entertained troops in France...He suffered personal tragedy during the war, when his only son, John (1891-1916), a captain in the 8th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, was killed in action on December 28, 1916 at Poiziers. Harry wrote the song 'Keep Right on to the End of the Road' in the wake of John's death. He had a monument for his son built in the little Lauder cemetery in Glenbranter (John Lauder was buried in France). Winston Churchill stated that Lauder, '...by his inspiring songs and valiant life, rendered measureless service to the Scottish race and to the British Empire...' "
4G-1 Gee! What A Wonderful Time We'll Have When The Boys Come Home - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1917) with words and music by Mary Earl (Pen name for Robert King - "Writer of MY SWEETHEART IS SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE"): "Gee! What a wonderful time we'll have when the boys come home - The girls will be dressed in their Sunday best when the boys come home - The flags will fly and the bands will play - We'll all turn out with a smile so gay - And ev'ryone shouting HIP HIP HOORAY! - When the boys come home..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle (Soldiers marching through a city street). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Indiana," "Lookout Mountain," "Hawaii and You," "When Scanlon Sang Movourneen More Than Twenty Years Ago," "They're Wearing 'Em Higher in Hawaii," etc. According to The List of Robert King's Work Web site: "Robert A. King [born Robert Keiser] was a prolific American composer and songwriter of popular music; born and died in New York. He published using both names, anonymously and also used a pseudonym, MARY EARL. His total output will probably never be known. He worked at Ditson's music store as a child before entering Tin Pan Alley at the publisher, Leo Feist, where he produced his first hit Anona (1903). In 1918, he was contracted to Shapiro-Bernstein Music Publishers to write 4 songs per month. These included the hits Beautiful Ohio (1918) and Dreamy Alabama (1919). Of ragtime interest, is his very early Everything is Ragtime Now (1899) written as Robert Keiser."
4G-2 General Pershing ("Lafayette, We Are Here") March - A single piece of sheet music (Cressey and Allen Publishers, Portland, Maine - 1918) with music by Cora E. Edgerly ("Personally approved and accepted by General Pershing"). Cover image by Clinedinst Studio: A blue-tinted photograph of General Pershing. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Military Hesitation Waltz" and "Roses in Bloom." According to Wikipedia: "John Joseph 'Black Jack' Pershing (September 13, 1860 - July 15, 1948), was a general officer in the United States Army who led the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Pershing is the only person to be promoted in his own lifetime to the highest rank ever held in the United States Army-General of the Armies (a retroactive Congressional edict passed in 1976 promoted George Washington to the same rank but with higher seniority). Pershing holds the first United States officer service number (O-1). He was regarded as a mentor by the generation of American generals who led the United States Army in Europe during World War II, including George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar N. Bradley, and George S. Patton. A somewhat controversial figure, his tactics have been harshly criticized both by commanders at the time and by modern historians. His reliance on costly frontal assaults, long after other allied armies had abandoned such tactics, has been accused of causing unnecessarily high American casualties..."
4G-3 General Pershing Song - A single piece of sheet music (Vandersloot Music Publishing Company - Williamsport, Pennsylvania - 1918) with words by J. R. Shannon and music by Carl D. Vandersloot ("Founded on the Melody of the famous GENERAL PERSHING MARCH"): "Hear the bugles sounding o'er the sea - Like heartthrobs of the free - The pulse of Liberty - Uncle Sammy's boys are on their way with Pershing's mighty band - Proclaiming Freedom's hand - All the world's eyes are upon you and your brave boy's Gen'ral John - Victorious we know you'll be as you march bravely on - 'Neath the Starry Spangled Banner you are sure to win the day - So Onward Christian Soldiers! We're with you in the fray - There's no mother on this side of the great ocean - Who could not gladly give her cherished sons to you - And you can count upon a hundred million people - All for you - brave and true, who'll die or do - When the dawn of peace again shall hover o'er us - And true Democracy shall be an endless chain - BLACK JACK Pershing will be honored by all nations - And Old Glory will still wave without a stain..." Cover image (with red-tinted photograph of General Pershing by Underwood and Underwood, NYC) by artist William Austin Starmer (American Eagles and palm fronds). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Longing for My Dixie Home," "Love's Melody" and "Cradle Time." According to Wikipedia: "John Joseph 'Black Jack' Pershing (September 13, 1860 - July 15, 1948), was a general officer in the United States Army who led the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Pershing is the only person to be promoted in his own lifetime to the highest rank ever held in the United States Army-General of the Armies (a retroactive Congressional edict passed in 1976 promoted George Washington to the same rank but with higher seniority). Pershing holds the first United States officer service number (O-1). He was regarded as a mentor by the generation of American generals who led the United States Army in Europe during World War II, including George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar N. Bradley, and George S. Patton. A somewhat controversial figure, his tactics have been harshly criticized both by commanders at the time and by modern historians. His reliance on costly frontal assaults, long after other allied armies had abandoned such tactics, has been accused of causing unnecessarily high American casualties..."
4G-4 General Wood's Grand March - A single piece of sheet music (McKinley Music Co., Chicago, NYC - 1919) with music ("Dedicated to General Leonard F. Wood U.S.A.") by Harold Spencer ("Writer of GENERAL PERSHING'S GRAND MARCH and FOUR-LEAF CLOVER MARCH'). Cover image by an unknown artist: An American Eagle and shield. Advertised song samples on back cover include: "Oasis: A Desert Romance," "Weeping Willow Lane," "Sweet Hawaiian Moonlight" and "Hawaiian Rose." According to the U.S. ARMY CENTER OF MILITARY HISTORY Web Site: "LEONARD WOOD was born in Winchester, New Hampshire, on October 9, 1860; was educated in local schools and at Pierce Academy in Middleboro, Massachusetts; attended Harvard Medical School and received his doctor of medicine degree via internship at Boston City Hospital, 1884; received an interim appointment as contract surgeon with the Army, 1885; received an appointment as assistant surgeon in the regular establishment and served in Arizona as a medical and provisional troop officer in the final Apache operations, 1886; was later awarded the Medal of Honor for distinguished conduct in the Geronimo campaign; served as staff surgeon at department headquarters in Los Angeles and in the field in Arizona, 1887-1889; married Laura Condit Smith, 1890; was promoted to captain, January 1891; was assigned to Army headquarters in Washington, D.C., as assistant attending surgeon, 1895, with responsibility for the care of senior government officials including the president; was appointed colonel of the 1st Volunteer Cavalry (Roosevelt's 'Rough Riders'), May 1898, and led it in the Cuban operations at Las Guasimas and San Juan Hill, June 1898; for his gallant services, was promoted to brigadier general (July 1898) and major general (December 1898) of volunteers; was successively military governor of the city of Santiago, Santiago Province, and Cuba, 1898-1902, receiving reappointments to brigadier general (April 1899) and major general (December 1899) of volunteers; was promoted to brigadier general in the regular service, February 1901, and major general in August 1903; was transferred to the Philippines and served as governor of Moro Province, 1903-1906; commanded the Philippines Division, 1906-1908; commanded the Department of the East, 1908-1910; served as special ambassador to Argentina for its centennial celebration, 1910; was chief of staff of the United States Army, April 22, 1910-April 20, 1914; was a leading advocate of national preparedness, initiated the Plattsburg (New York) officer training camps, streamlined Army staff and administrative procedures, and pressed for increases in officer strength; commanded the Department of the East, 1914-1917; organized the new Southern Department, 1917; commanded the 89th Division and Camp Funston, 1917; visited Europe to observe allied operations, 1917-1918; trained the 10th Division at Camp Funston, 1918; was an unsuccessful candidate for the Republican nomination for president, 1920; commanded the Central Division (Sixth Corps Area), 1919-1921; served on a special mission to the Philippines, 1921; retired from active service, October 1921; was governor general of the Philippines, 1921-1927; died in Boston, Massachusetts, on August 7, 1927."
4G-5 Gim'Me A Kiss, Mirandy ('Cause I'm Goin Over There) - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - San Francisco - Boston - London - 1917) with words by Forrest S. Rutherford ("To the Boys GOIN OVER THERE") and music by Althea J. Rutherford ("This composition won the prize in the contest for the best marching song offered by the New York Herald"): " A raw recruit from old Mizoo enlisted in the ranks - They slipped some Khaki breeches upon his spindle shanks - Then all dressed up he went to woo Mirandy down the way - And when she cut the little curl this raw recruit did say - Aw gimme a kiss Mirandy 'cause I'm goin' over there - I need a little bracer now besides a lock of hair - I know you're not the slacker kind - You've got the goods for fair! So gimme a kiss Mirandy 'cause I'm going over there..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A sailor kissing a girl as the Navy ships sail away. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Rosary for You," "There's a Long, Long Trail," "Evening Brings Rest and You" and "Too-Ra-loo-ra-loo-ral - That's and Irish Lullaby."
4G-6 Girls of France - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Alfred Bryan, Edgar Leslie and Harry Ruby: "…Girl's of France, girls of France - We're mighty proud of you - When shadows fell and all was dark - You led your sons like Joan of Arc - We know our brothers will never feel blue - They'll find a sister in each one of you - Brave and true, Beautiful too, Wonderful girls of France..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A young girl dressed in a white nurse's uniform with a background of marching soldiers passing through a bombed-out village. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "I Hate to Lose You, I'm So Used to You Now." Composer Harry Ruby was portrayed by Red Skelton in the 1950 MGM biopic THREE LITTLE WORDS.
4G-7 Give a Little Credit to the Navy - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with words by Bud de Sylva and Gus Kahn and music by Albert Gumble ( Featured by Del Chain and Sidney Phillips - "Dedicated to Commander William Buel Franklin, U.S.N.R.F. Commanding U.S. Naval Training Camp, Pelham Bay Park, NY, NY"): "Give a little credit to the Navy - We took the boys across without a single loss - Ev'ry soldier is a fighting bear - But don't forget it - Give us credit - We took 'em over there Mothers of soldiers, sweethearts and wives - We'll take care of your boys - Though it cost us our lives - So give a little credit to the Navy..." Cover image (with blue-tinted photographs of Commander William Buel Franklin and vaudevillians Del Chain and Sidney Phillips) by artist William Austin Starmer: Sailing Navy ships. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "You Don't Know." Danny Thomas portrayed composer "Gus Kahn" in the biopic I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS (Warner Brothers - 1952) and Gordon MacRae portrayed composer "B.G. 'Buddy' de Sylva" in the biopic THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE (1956 - 20th Century-Fox).
4G-8 Glory of Peace, The - A single piece of sheet music (Stanley H. Frazier Publishing, Cainesville, Missouri - 1919) with words and music by Mr. and Mrs. Stanley H. Frazier ("International War Song"): "…Oh, hark, be still what sounds are passing 'tis the echo of the war - Dawning light from out the shadow of the darkest clouds appear - Hark be still what sounds are coming 'tis the murmur of sweet peace - Martial strains may no more battles bring - Silver chimes of peace ever ring..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Trumpeting angels hover over scenes of soldiers marching to a European village and diplomats and military leaders at the peace table.
4G-9 God be With Our Boys To-Night - A single piece of sheet music (Boosey and Co., NYC - Toronto - London, 1917) with words by Fred G. Bowles and music by Wilfred Sanderson ("Sung by Mr. John McCormack"): "…Brave ones who answer'd your Country's call - How could we let you go - Out of the sunshine of your souls - Save that we love you so - There is a place within our hearts - No one on earth may fill - Some day at last you'll come back to us - Watching and longing still - O, waiting heart, I can not tell - How dark and long the lane - Only I know that time will bring - Our dear ones back again - Safe to a home of peace and light - Across the furthest sea - May God be with our boys to-night - Wherever they may be..." Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When You Come Home," "Calling Me Home to You" and "Keep on Hopin'." According to Wikipedia: "John McCormack was a world-famous Irish tenor, celebrated for his performances of the operatic and popular song repertoires, and renowned for his diction and breath control. He was also a Papal Count..."
4G-10 God Bless America - A single piece of sheet music (H. Leander D' Entremont Publishing, Salem, Massachusetts -1919) with words and music by H. Leander D' Entremont ("A National Anthem"): ""God bless America - The land of liberty - From shore to shore - May our flag glorious - ever victorious - be guardian over us - For evermore...God bless our President - The faithful President - Of this country - That he be ever right - Grant him wisdom and light - To make the future bright - For Liberty..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A black and white unfurled American flag.
4G-11 God Send My Boy Safe Home Again - Two pieces (various colors) of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co., Chicago and New York - 1917) with words by Clara S. Armstrong and music by Henry S. Sawyer: "A brave boy had enlisted - In answer to the call - An only child, her only son - A widowed mother's all - The order came - BE READY, WE SAIL AT BREAK OF DAY - As he knelt beside his mother - He heard her bravely say - God send you safely back again to me - Thro' terrors of war and dangers of sea - I pray that my sacrifice be not in vain - God send my boy safe home again..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A handwritten letter page ("My son - I am proud to be the mother of a boy who is mentally, physically and morally fit to join our great Army of Liberation in its fight that the world may be made safe for democracy. You would be unworthy of American citizenship if you were not willing to give 'the last full measure of devotion' to the land which gave you birth, for the freedom which you and yours, for generations, have enjoyed in this land of the free, if you were unwilling to uphold the principles for which your great grandfather freely gave his life. Uphold, as I know you will, the traditions of American manhood, and be worthy the uniform you wear. God send my boy safe home again. Your devoted Mother."). Advertised song samples on the back cover Include; "There's a Little Blue Star in the Window," "I'm Hitting the Trail to Normandy," "Old Glory Goes Marching On," "Will the Angels Guard My Daddy Over There?," "When a Boy Says Good-Bye to His Mother and She Gives Him to Uncle Sam," "Let the Chimes of Normandy Be Our Wedding Bells," "When the Kaiser Does the Goose-Step To a Good Old American Rag" and "A-M-E-R-I-C-A."
4G-12 God Spare Our Boys Over There - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by William Jerome and J.F. Mahoney ("The Army and Navy Song Prayer"): "The voice of the country called forth ev'ry son - And nobly they echoed the answer as one - The flame in their hearts dried the nation's sad tears - Let us pray night and day thru our hopes and fears - God spare our boys over there - Keep them in your tender care - Mothers are kneeling, loved ones appealing - Angels, protect them somewhere - Hear our fervent pray'r - On bended knee, hear our hearts' rosary - And spare our boys over there..." Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SING song folio ("They can't stop our singing army! Send a copy of this book...to your Sammy 'over here' of 'over there' Send one to your Jackie afloat or ashore...").
4G-13 Going Up (You Start to Sway) - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons - NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1917) with words by Otto Harbach and music by Louis A. Hirsch (from The Musical Play GOING UP produced by George M. Cohan and Sam Harris on Broadway): "...You start to sway - And then you shut your eyes - You're on your way - That leads to Paradise - All you can do is to cling as you swing - And you wing higher and higher - Ev'ry tingling nerve on fire now - You want to shout out loud , you don't know how - You're in a golden cloud - You're going up, going up - Like a rocket gone insane - Sailing in an aeroplane..." Cover image by an unknown artist Women cavorting on a biplane. According to Wikipedia: "GOING UP is a musical comedy in three acts with music by Louis Hirsch and book and lyrics by Otto Harbach and James Montgomery. Set in Lenox, Massachusetts, United States at the end of World War I, the musical tells the story of a writer turned aviator who wins the hand of the high society girl that he loves by his daring handling of the joystick of a biplane. Popular songs included 'Hip Hooray,' 'If You Look in Her Eyes,' 'Kiss Me,' 'Going Up,' 'Do It for Me,' 'The Tickle Toe,' and 'Down! Up! Left! Right!.' The musical was a hit on Broadway in 1917 and again the following year in London. Revivals and a film adaptation followed..." The stars of the show included Ruth Donnelly, Donald Meek, Ed Begley, Frank Craven, Edith Day, Bobby Watson, etc. James Cagney and Richard Whorf portrayed "George M. Cohan" and "Sam Harris" in the biopic YANKEE DOODLE DANDY (Warner Brothers - 1942).
4G-14 Good Bye, And Luck Be With You Laddie Boy - Three pieces (various covers) of sheet music (The Gus Edwards Music House, NYC - 1917) with words by Will D. Cobb and music by Gus Edwards ("Writers of GOOD -BYE DOLLY GRAY and GOOD-BYE LITTLE GIRL GOOD-BYE"): "…Good-bye and luck be with you Laddie boy - Laddie boy whatever your name may be - There's a look in your eye - As you go marching by - That tells me you will dare and do and die - And when you hear those shells begin to sing - There'll be someone somewhere who cares will murmur this prayer - may you win your share of glory - and comeback to tell the story - Good-by and good luck Laddie boy..." Cover images by unknown artist include: A bugler and marching troops and a young girl kissing a soldier. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "When the Right Little Boy Rolls Around," and "What Will Become of Your Little Doll Girl" ("Nora Bayes is making this song the hit of the country and it's by Gus Edwards..."). Gus Edwards was portrayed by Bing Crosby in the biopic THE STAR MAKER (Paramount - 1939) and by Hal March in the biopic THE EDDIE CANTOR STORY (Warner Brothers - 1953). According to Wikipedia: "...Nora Bayes was performing professionally in vaudeville in Chicago by age 18. She toured from San Francisco, California to New York City and became a star both on the vaudeville circuit and the Broadway stage. In 1908, she married singer-songwriter Jack Norworth. The two toured together and were credited for collaborating on a number of compositions, including the immensely popular 'Shine On, Harvest Moon,' which the pair debuted in Florenz Ziegfeld's Follies of 1908. Bayes and Norworth divorced in 1913. After America entered World War I Bayes became involved with morale boosting activities. George M. Cohan asked that she be the first to record a performance of his patriotic song 'Over There.' Her recording was released in 1917 and became an international hit. She also performed shows for the soldiers. Bayes made many phonograph records (some with Norworth) for the Victor and Columbia labels. From 1924 through 1928, her accompanist was pianist Louis Alter, who later composed the popular songs 'Manhattan Serenade,' 'Nina Never Knew' and 'Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans?' Bayes established her own theater, 'The Nora Bayes Theater' on West 44th Street in New York...Bayes was portrayed by Ann Sheridan in the 1944 musical biopic Shine On, Harvest Moon, which focused on her relationship with Norworth (Dennis Morgan) and ignored her other husbands. She was also portrayed by Frances Langford in the movie Yankee Doodle Dandy, where she and James Cagney (as George M. Cohan) perform Over There. The 1980 Garson Kanin novel Smash is about an attempt to make a Broadway musical out of Nora Bayes' life. The novel serves as the inspiration for the 2012 television series Smash, although the subject of the show's fictional musical is not Bayes but Marilyn Monroe..."
4G-15 Good-Bye - Farewell Raus Mit Kaiser Bill - A single piece of sheet music (Success Music Co., Akron, Ohio - 1917) with words by G.H. Carey and music by C.H. Driskell (Author of STARS AND STRIPES FOR ME, SOME ONE ELSE, BOY OF MINE and others"): "Uncle Sam is calling us to battle - To battle for the good old U.S.A. - Put on your fighting armor and be ready - To the tune of HAIL COLUMBIA march away - Way down South in Dixie hear them calling - Calling ev'ry man to line up with a will - While the band plays MARCHING THROUGH GEORGIA - Good-bye, Farewell, Raus mit Kaiser Bill - When the Kaiser hears the strains of YANKE DOODLE - As the boys in khaki charge along the line - his dream of being king of all will vanish - As he takes his farewell journey down the Rhine - For COLUMBIA THE GEM OF THEOCEAN - The Stars and Stripes will wave from ev'ry hill - TRAMP, TRAMP, TRAMP, THE BOYS ARE MARCHING - Good-bye, Farewell, Raus mit Kaiser Bill..." Cover image by an unknown artist: An American soldier chases Kaiser Wilhelm with a bayoneted rifle as a ship's cannon fire in the background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Stars and Stripes for Me." According to Wikipedia: Wilhelm II or William II (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, three notable contemporary relations being his first cousins King George V of the United Kingdom, founder of the House of Windsor, Marie of Romania, Queen consort of Romania and the Czarina Alix of Hesse, consort of his second cousin Tsar Nicholas II of the House of Romanov, the last ruler of the Russian Empire before the Russian Revolution of 1917 which deposed the monarchy. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose 'New Course' in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to the First World War. Bombastic and impetuous, he sometimes made tactless pronouncements on sensitive topics without consulting his ministers, culminating in a disastrous Daily Telegraph interview that cost him most of his power in 1908. His top generals, Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, dictated policy during the First World War with little regard for the civilian government. An ineffective war leader, he lost the support of the army, abdicated in November 1918, and fled to exile in the Netherlands..."
4G-16 Good-Bye France (You'll Never Be Forgotten By the U.S.A.) - Two pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words and music by "Sergeant" Irving Berlin: "I can picture the boys 'over there' - Making plenty of noise 'over there' - And if I'm not wrong - It won't be long - Ere a certain song will fill the air - It's all very clear - The time's drawing near - When they'll be marching down to the pier singing - Good-bye France - We'd love to linger longer but we must go home - Folks are waiting to welcome us across the foam - We were glad to stand side by side with you - Mighty proud to have died with you - So good-bye France - You'll never be forgotten by the U.S.A." Cover images by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: An American soldier shakes hands with a French soldier while the Statue of Liberty glows in the background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Bring Me a Rose" and "That Tumble-Down Shack in Athlone."
4G-17 Good-Bye Germany - Two pieces (various covers and slight changes to the lyrics) of sheet music (Lincoln McConnell Publishing, Thomasston Georgia - 1917/Ted Brown Music Co., Chicago - 1918) with words by J. Edwin McConnell and Lincoln McConnell and music by J. Edwin McConnell: "Uncle Sam is now fixed up for war - Uncle Sam is angry to the core - For that war mad bully o'er the sea - Dares to murder people of the U.S.A. - My country is a land of the noble, true and brave - And tho' your submarine sharks may fill the whole wide ocean - Germany you'll have to pay - Good - bye Germany - So long Germany - You've brought the eagle down on your head - For you've riled old Uncle Sam and the people of his land - From east to west you'll find your foes and way down yonder where the cotton grows the people are shouting for war - And they're counting on you - When Uncle Sam goes after you the whole big world knows you are thru - Good - bye Germany..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A German soldier is trampled by the boots of Uncle Sam. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Somewhere a Heart is Breaking and Calling Me Back to You."
4G-18 Good-Bye, Good Luck, God Bless You - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - London - 1916) with words by J. Keirn Brennan and music by Ernest R. Ball ("Writers of A LITTLE BIT OF HEAVEN, IRELAND IS IRELAND TO ME, IN THE GARDEN OF THE GODS, IF IT TAKES A THOUSAND YEARS, etc. etc."): "Good-bye. good luck, God bless you, - Is all that I can say - But when you leave my heart will grieve - Forever and a day - Though other arms caress you - I cannot bid you stay - Good-bye, good luck, God bless you - is all that I can say..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A tinted photo image of a young couple (The man is composer/performer Ernest R. Ball) on their front step. The back cover advertises "Beautiful Irish Ballads That Are Being Sung by the Worlds Greatest Artists including John McCormack, Chauncey Olcott, Orville Harrold, George MacFarlane and Hundreds of Others." Song samples include: "Mother Machree," "A Little Bit of Heaven," "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" and "Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ral-That's An Irish Lullaby." According to Wikipedia: "Ernest Roland Ball (July 22, 1878 - May 3, 1927) was an American singer and songwriter, most famous for composing the music for the song 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling' in 1912. He was not himself Irish. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Ball received formal music training at the Cleveland Conservatory. His nascent career was much buoyed by James J. Walker, then a state senator of New York, who asked Ball to write music for some lyrics he wrote. Ball did, and the song 'Will You Love Me In December as You Do In May?' became a hit. Walker later became known as 'Dapper Jimmy Walker,' Mayor of New York City, a fortunate event for Ball's career. Ball accompanied singers, sang in vaudeville and wrote sentimental ballads, mostly with Irish themes. He collaborated with Chauncey Olcott on many songs including 'When Irish Eyes are Smiling,' for which Olcott composed lyrics. He became a charter member of ASCAP in 1907, and wrote many American standards. He was also a fine pianist, and his playing is preserved on several piano roll recordings he made for the Vocalstyle company, based in his home state of Ohio. He died in his dressing room at the Yost Theatre in Santa Ana, California while on tour with 'Ernie Ball and His Gang' an act starring Ball and a male octet. Ball was posthumously inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970. A 1944 musical Irish Eyes Are Smiling told the story of Ball's career and starred Dick Haymes and June Haver."
4G-19 Good-Bye, Ma! Good-Bye, Pa! Good-bye, Mule With Yer Old Hee-Haw! (Long Boy) - Three pieces of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1917) with words by William Herschell and music by Barclay Walker (SEE, ALSO: "LONG BOY" BOX 6 - FOLDER L-23): "He was just a long, lean country gink - From way out West where th' hoptoads wink - He was six feet two in his stocking feet - An' kept gittin' thinner th' more he'd eat - But he was as brave as he was thin - When th' war broke out he got right in - unhitched his plow, put th' mule away - Then th' old folks heard him say - Good-bye Ma! Good-bye Pa! Good -bye Mule, with yer old hee-haw! - I may not know what th' war's about - But you bet, by gosh, I'll soon find out - An' O my sweetheart don't you fear - I'll bring you a King fer a souvenir - I'll git you a Turk an' a Kaiser, too - An' that's about all one feller could do..." Cover image by artist Gaar Williams: A country boy in uniform marches away as his family and farm animals look on. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "One Day in June," "Chin-Chin Chinaman," "Liberty Bell (It's Time to Ring Again)," etc.
4G-20 Good-Bye Mary - A single piece of sheet music (D.W. Cooper Music Co., Boston, Massachusetts - 1917) with words by Harry Bewley and music by Jimmy McHugh: "Young Mickey Finn, who'd always grin one day was feeling sad - For quite awhile he lost his smile - Oh my, but he felt bad - It wasn't fight, that gave delight to him, he lov'd a fray - He had to part from his sweetheart - he wondered how he'd say - Good-bye Mary - Don't you sigh because I'm leaving - Don't cry Mary - Brush the teardrops from your Irish eyes of blue - Sure it's a long way Mary - Twice as far as Tipperary - So just send me away with an Irish smile - It will cheer me dear for a long while, so good-bye Mary dear - I'm leaving..." Cover image by photographer WHITE OF BOSTON: A smiling unidentified young girl. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "When the Sun Goes Down in Switzerland," "Like a Rose You Have Faded Away," "Somewhere in Georgia - Underneath the Sunny Southern Skies" and "Caroline - I'm Coming Back to You."
4G-21 Good-Bye My Soldier Boy - Two pieces of sheet music (Gregg Publishing Co., Indianapolis, Indiana - 1917) with words and music by Calla Gowdy Gregg: "Hear the war drums beat and the marching feet - I must say good-bye sweet Mary - Tho' I leave you now, hear my parting vow - I will come back, my girl, to you - In our country's need, for our help, she pleads - We must answer duty's call! - Mary's voice came, soft and low, - Tho' I hate to see you go, I will wait, soldier boy, for you - Here they come, those fighting Sammies - They are heroes, every one - From those of the snowy Northland - To the boys 'neath the Southern sun - Go and fight for God and freedom - And we'll wait for you with joy - 'Till you come back with victory! - Good- bye my soldier boy..." Cover images by an unknown artist: A soldier hugs his girl.
4G-22 Good-Bye Old Khaki Lid - A single piece of sheet music (F.B. Haviland Publishing Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Lee M. Walker and music by Arthur Lamont ("Dedicated to Lieutenant William C. Barthman - 105 Machine Gun Battalion -- 27th Division!"): "Good - bye Marie with your 'wee-wee' - I'm going to leave you now - Good-bye dear cooties, through it all - You've stuck to me somehow - I'm going to shed my khaki lid - I've thrown away my gun - And I'm on my way to old Broadway - To have a lot of fun - So good-bye old khaki lid - The war is over - That's what the Yankees did - When they went over - You've been a good old pal at that - But now I want a swell new hat..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: Hands tossing khaki army hats in the air. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Tiger Rose Waltzes." According to the dmna.ny.gov/historic Web Site: William C. Barthman was one of the heroes of the Battle of Vierstraat Ridge, Belgium (August 31 - September 2, 1918).
4G-23 Good-Bye Sally, Good Luck To You - Two pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Chief Yeoman George Jeffrey and Sergeant Samuel Habelow Publishing, Boston, Massachusetts - 1919) with words and music by Sergeant Sam Habelow (Arranged by Joseph Solman for the "Ex-Service Men's $20,000 Fund for The Salvation Army"): "Johnny Doughboy was no slowboy 'over there' in France - He never missed a chance to catch ze pretty maidens glance - he'd 'oo-la-la' and 'parlez vous' wit every girl he'd meet - But when it came the day he had to sail away - To an 'Amy Lassie' I heard Johnny say - Good-bye Sally - I'm leaving today - So-long Sally - I'm sailing away to the land that gave me birth - To the grandest place on earth - I'll tell the folks back home about the 'Good' you done - We owe a lot to you - 'Tho the others used me fine Sally you're the one for mine - Good-bye Sally - Good-luck to you..." Cover images by photographer Col. E.J. Parker and an unknown artist: A photograph of a female Salvation Army member meeting a U.S. Army soldier in France/A sketch of a female Salvation Army member saying good-bye to a U.S. soldier before he boards a transport ship.
4G-24 Good-Bye, That Means You Little Mother, May God Send you Back Your Boy - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Andrew B. Sterling and music by Arthur Lange ("By the Writers of AMERICA HERE'S MY BOY"): "Ten million Men answered a mighty nation's call - Ten million men for love of country gladly give up all - Ten million men to do or die will proudly march away - That means ten million hearts will beat, ten million tongues will say - Good-bye - that means you little girl - But he knows that your heart is true - Good-bye that means you little wife - But you're proud he's a soldier, too - Good-bye parts a sister and brother - And a dad from his pride and joy - Good-bye that means you little mother - And may God send you back your boy..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: A soldier waves goodbye to his loved ones pictured in a shadow map of the United States. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When the Parson Hands the Wedding Band From Me to Mandy Lee."
4G-25 Good-Bye Broadway, Hello France - Five pieces of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by C. Francis Reisner and Benny Davis and music by Billy Baskette ("The Big Song Hit of the PASSING SHOW OF 1917 at the N.Y. Winter Garden - Successfully Introduced by Al Herman"): "Good-bye New York town, good-bye Miss Liberty - Your light of freedom will guide us across the sea - Ev'ry soldier's sweetheart bidding good-bye - ev'ry soldier's mother drying her eye - Cheer up we'll soon be there - Singing this Yankee air - Goodbye Broadway, Hello France - We're ten million strong - Good-bye sweethearts, wives and mothers - It won't take us long - Don't you worry while we're there - It's for your we're fighting too - So Good-bye Broadway, Hello France - We're going o square our debt to you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: An American and French soldier, standing on their respective shores, shake hands across the Atlantic Ocean. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "If I Had a Son for Each Star in Old Glory," "I Called You My Sweetheart," etc.
4G-26 Good Luck to the U.S.A. - A single piece of sheet music (Frederick V. Bowers, Inc. - "Bowers' Songs Touch the Heart" - NYC - 1917) with words by Arthur J. Lamb and music by Frederick V. Bowers ("Respectfully Dedicated to My Friend, Frank N. Cobb"): "A maiden way down in Dixie - To her sweetheart said 'Good-bye' - I love my country too - Go forth to do or die - I'll think of you ev'ry night - And you think of me - There's a little girl in Dixie who waits for you - Go fight for Liberty - Good luck to the boys of the U.S.A. - And the fairest flag that flies - For it has ne'er been defeated, it is the emblem we prize - The Army and Navy forever, they must win the day - By land or sea - Go fight my love for me - Good luck to the U.S.A." Cover image by an unknown artist: Army and Navy troops march away as the civilians cheer them on. Advertised song samples on the back cover include songs SUNG BY FREDERICK V. BOWERS (Composer and minstrel singer): "Kuu Loke Ula Ula (My Red, Red Rose)," "Where the Rippling Waters Flow Down to the Hill," "Like A Ship That Drifted Away," etc.
4G-27 Good Morning Mr. Zip - Zip - Zip! - Two pieces of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Robert Lloyd - "Army Song Leader" ("Written around a Fort Niagara Fragment"): "We come from ev'ry quarter - From North, South, East and West - To clear the way to freedom - For the land we love the best - We've left our occupations and homes , so far and dear, But when the going's rather rough - We raise this song of cheer - Good morning, mister Zip, Zip, Zip - With your hair cut just as short as mine - Good morning Mister Zip, Zip, Zip - You're surely looking fine - Ashes to ashes and dust to dust - If the camels don't get you - The Fatimas must - Good morning Mister Zip, Zip, Zip..." Cover image by artist Henry Hutt: A bust of a very young soldier. The sheet music is labeled "War Edition" with the following message: "To co-operate with the government and to conserve paper during the War, this song is issued in a smaller size than usual. Save! Save! Save is the watchword today. This is the spirit in which we are working and your co-operation will be very much appreciated. Leo Feist, Inc." Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "If He Can Fight Like He Can Love, Good Night Germany" and "K-K-K-Katy."
4G-28 Good Old U.S.A., The - A single piece of sheet music (F.B. Haviland Publishing Co., NYC - 1916) with words by Jack Drislane and music by Theodore Morse ("Writers of KEEP ON THE SUNNY SIDE, KEEP A LITTLE COSY CORNER, LONGING FOR YOU, etc." - Featured by Elsie Tuell - with cover photograph): "...makes no difference where you wander - Makes no difference where you roam - You don't have to stop and ponder - For a place to call your home - When they ask 'Where were you born, lad?' - Speak right up, Be proud to say - That your home's the land of Uncle Sam - The Good Old U.S.A." Cover image (including photographs of the composers and vaudeville singer Elsie Tuell) by artist "E.P.C." - Lady Liberty and Uncle Sam holding hands over a map of the U.S.A. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "After All That I've Been To You."
4G-29 Goodby Mother, Goodby Sweetheart - A single piece of sheet music (Jones, Hoyt and Le Suer, Haverhill, Massachusetts - 1918) with words by F.P. Hoyt and E.W.Jones and music by F.J. Le Suer: "There's a little gray haired mother by a quaint old fireside - There's a little gold haired lassie and she's weeping by her side - They are waiting there to say goodby to a soldier boy so true - They are praying he will return from across the ocean blue - Goodby mother, goodby sweetheart - Don't you see I'm called away - Your tears are falling - My country 's calling for me to fight for her today - I know your heart will yearn for your boy to return - But soon I will come back to you - I'll be thinking day and night and I'll fight with all my might - For my mother and sweetheart true..." Cover image by an unknown artist: An elderly mother and young woman gaze into a hearth fire with the image of a soldier emerging from the fire.
4G-30 Goodbye, Mother Machree - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1918) with words by J. Keirn Brennan and music by Ernest R. Ball (Writers of A LITTLE BIT OF HEAVEN, SHURE THEY CALL IT IRELAND, GOODBYE, GOOD LUCK, GOD BLESS YOU, TURN BACK THE UNIVERSE AND GIVE ME YESTERDAY, I'M GOING BACK TO CALIFORNIA, SOMEWHERE IN IRELAND, YOU BROUGHT IRELAND RIGHT OVER FOR ME, I'M FROM OHIO, DEAR LITTLE BOY OF MINE, etc."): "Now the time has come to leave mother mine - You must promise not to grieve mother mine - On the day the war is through - I'll come sailing back to you - Back to where the home lights shine - Goodbye, Mother Machree - Dry your tears and keep on smiling - Now don't you fear - I'll soon be here - For your love will guide me, dear - Keep the home fires burning - The latch-string out for me - When the clouds roll by - To your arms I'll fly - Goodbye, Mother Machree..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A staged color - tinted photo of "Mrs. Jane Jennings and Walter McGrail - Vitagraph Stars - Reproduced by permission" - McGrail, a soldier, is comforting Jennings, his "mother"). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Rosary for You." According to Wikipedia: "Ernest Roland Ball (July 22, 1878 - May 3, 1927) was an American singer and songwriter, most famous for composing the music for the song 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling' in 1912. He was not himself Irish. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Ball received formal music training at the Cleveland Conservatory. His nascent career was much buoyed by James J. Walker, then a state senator of New York, who asked Ball to write music for some lyrics he wrote. Ball did, and the song 'Will You Love Me In December as You Do In May?' became a hit. Walker later became known as 'Dapper Jimmy Walker,' Mayor of New York City, a fortunate event for Ball's career. Ball accompanied singers, sang in vaudeville and wrote sentimental ballads, mostly with Irish themes. He collaborated with Chauncey Olcott on many songs including 'When Irish Eyes are Smiling,' for which Olcott composed lyrics. He became a charter member of ASCAP in 1907, and wrote many American standards. He was also a fine pianist, and his playing is preserved on several piano roll recordings he made for the Vocalstyle company, based in his home state of Ohio. He died in his dressing room at the Yost Theatre in Santa Ana, California while on tour with 'Ernie Ball and His Gang' an act starring Ball and a male octet. Ball was posthumously inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970. A 1944 musical IRISH EYES ARE SMILING told the story of Ball's career and starred Dick Haymes and June Haver." According to the IMDb Web Site: "Jane Jennings is an actress, known for The Inner Chamber (1921), Emblems of Love (1924) and The Darling of the Rich (1922)...Walter McGrail was born on October 19, 1888 in Brooklyn, New York, as Walter B. McGrail. He was an actor, known for Special Agent K-7 (1936), The Old Code (1928) and A Service of Love (1917). He died on March 19, 1970 in San Francisco, California, USA."
4H-1 Hats Off To Dear Old Glory and Hurrah For Uncle Sam - A single piece of sheet music (The McIntyre Music Publishers, Syracuse, NY - 1915) with words and music by Charles M. McIntyre ("A Military Hit"): "There is a day in the year - That ev'ry Yankee holds dear - In all our United States - In the South and the North - On the glorious 'Fourth' - Our Independence celebrate - We have a grand old man - Who we call our Uncle Sam - The peer of all kings - When his spirit commands - We'll rise and stand - Let everybody sing - Hurrah for Uncle Samuel - For he is a grand old man - Where e'er you be on land or sea - He will protect you and me..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Uncle Sam waving a flag as youngsters parade beside him - a battleship floats in the background.
4H-2 He Sleeps Beneath the Soil of France - A single piece of sheet music (Tell Taylor Music Publisher, NYC - Chicago - 1917) with words and music by Tell Taylor - with cover photograph): Upon the battlefield so gray - A wounded soldier lay - He knew that he was going to die - There on that summer's day - Tell mother I'm not coming home - and tell her not to cry - I've done the best I knew how - I'll meet her bye and bye - He sleeps beneath the soil of France - So many miles away - he left behind the one he loves - And a mother old and gray - He fought because he knew 'twas right for liberty - And now he's sleeping over there - beneath the soil of France..." Cover image (including a photograph of Tell Taylor by an unknown photographer) by an unknown artist: A mother and father (and pet dog) sit mourning by the glow of a fireplace. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When the Maple Leaves Were Falling," "When the Harvest Time is Over" and "I Love You Best of All." According to Wikipedia: "William 'Tell' Taylor (aka Tellie né Tell Roberts; born October 28, 1876 to Jane Roberts, on a farm near the Village of Vanlue, Amanda Township, Hancock County, Ohio - November 23, 1937 Chicago) was an American traveling vaudeville performer, tenor vocalist, playwright, music publisher, composer, and lyricist who had written over 200 popular songs. By far his biggest hit was 'Down by the Old Mill Stream' from 1910, one of the most commercially successful Tin Pan Alley publications of the era. The song was published by Forster Music Publisher, Inc. of Chicago. Taylor performed vaudeville theaters and founded a Chicago music publishing house bearing his name. His other notable songs include 'He Sleeps Beneath the Soil of France,' 'I Love You Best of All,' 'If Dreams Come True,' 'Little Old Home in the Valley,' 'Rock Me to Sleep in the Old Rocking Chair,' 'Some Day," and 'When the Maple Leaves Were Falling.' Taylor also wrote the Broadway comedies Tiger Lillee and In New York Town...Before launching his Chicago publishing firm in 1907, Taylor had co-founded one of the original Tin Pan Alley publishing houses in New York City with fellow composer, Ernest R. Ball, and former New York City Mayor who then was a state senator, James J. Walker. In 1918, Earl Kelly Smith (1886-1954), who had been affiliated with Taylor's Chicago publishing house since 1908, opened a branch in New York City. In Chicago, Taylor composed songs and ran his own sheet music publishing firm from 1907 to 1922..."
4H-3 He's A Soldier of the U.S.A. - A single piece of sheet music (Harold Rossiter Music Company, Chicago - NYC - 1914) with words by Dan J. Wall ("Writer of CALL ON ME, GAL OF MINE" - "Respectfully Dedicated to my brother, Private A.V. Wall, of the U.S.A.") and music by James White ("Composer of FLOATING DOWN THE RIVER and AT THE MILLION DOLLAR TANGO BALL"): "...He's a soldier - Let him have the way - He's a soldier of the Blue and Gray - Oh how we will miss him if he falls in battle's fray - God bless you soldier boy of he U.S.A." Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers on a battlefield as bombs burst in the sky. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: ""Sing to me Mother, Sing Me to Sleep" ("The greatest HOME song written in recent years") and "In the Valley of Broken Hearts" ("The big ballad success with a story of real HEART INTEREST").
4H-4 He's Doing His Bit (For the Girls) - A single piece of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing, Co., NYC, Chicago, San Francisco, Sidney and London - 1917) with words by Bert Hanlon and music by Harry Von Tilzer (Older brother of composer Albert Von Tilzer - Musical composition "Introduced by Florence Tempest - Late of Tempest and Sunshine" - with cover photograph): " Now little Willie Newton knew his country was recruitin' - But he thought he owed a duty over here - So when they started calling - little Willie started stalling - He discovered he had trouble with his ear - He cheers whene'er the banner unfurls - And he hasn't claimed exemption from the girls - He's doing his bit for the girls - The lovely, lovely girls - Rose and Fay, Lilly and May with dark or golden curls - When his pals are fighting in the trenches nowadays - Willie's doing picket duty in the cabarets - He's routing and scouting for girls - For sweet petite young girls - He buys them rubies, motorcars and pearls - Now Willie is a pacifist and gentle don't you see - But when he sees a woman he's as wild as can be - He watches hard and stands on guard - He's doing his bit for the girls..." Cover image (including a photograph of vaudevillian Florence Tempest dressed as a man) by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A couple embracing in the glow of moonlight as the troops march by the open window. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Just As Your Mother Was" and "There's Someone More Lonesome Than You." Florence (or Florenze Tempest) and her sister, Marion Sunshine, were vaudeville and Ziegfeld stars. She is best remembered as "America's most lovable impersonator of boy parts" (male impersonator - "Our American Boy"). According to J.D. Doyle on the Queer Music Heritage Web Site: "...Florenze Tempest...and her sister started out on the stage quite young, as a duo, Tempest and Sunshine, with Tempest always playing the boy roles. Under the stage name Florenze Tempest she flourished from around 1910 through the end of that decade, performing in musicals with the appropriate sheet music being sold..."
4H-5 He's Got Those Big Blue Eyes Like You, Daddy Mine - Three pieces of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London -1918) with words and music by Lew Wilson and Alfred Dubin ("Writer of ALL THE WORLD WILL BE JEALOUS OF ME"): "Our soldiers in the trenches received the mail today - From sweethearts, wives and mothers in the good old U.S.A - There's one whose heart is dancing his eyes light up with joy - He reads the letter over and he shouts "Boys, it's a little boy!' - He's got those big blue eyes like you Daddy - the kind of eyes that seem to speak - And when he smiles he looks like you, Daddy - Yes, even to the dimple in his cheek - I've named him after you, for I know you'd want me to - He reminds me of you all the time - When he grows up to be a man - I'll give him up to Uncle Sam - Just like I did with you, Daddy mine!" Cover image: A color-tinted photograph of "Mae Marsh (hugging a baby) - Goldwyn Pictures Star - Reproduced by permission" by an unknown photographer. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Rosary for You," "Evening Brings Rest And You," etc. According to Tony Fontana on the IMDb Web Site: "Mae Marsh's father was an auditor for the railroad who died when she was four. Her family moved to San Francisco, where her stepfather was killed in the 1906 earthquake. Her great-aunt then took Mae and her sister to Los Angeles. With her show business background, Mae's aunt took them to the various movie studios for work as extras. Mae was a little freckle-faced girl, who came to work one day as an extra at Biograph to substitute for her sick sister. She had blue eyes and her hair color was indeterminate, but she had definite screen presence. She began her film career working for Mack Sennett and D.W. Griffith. Her first leading role was as the bare-legged prehistoric girl in Man's Genesis (1912). By 1913 Mae was being groomed as the successor to Mary Pickford. Most of her film roles were dramatic or tragic, or a combination of both. She appeared in Griffith's The Birth of a Nation (1915) and Intolerance: Love's Struggle Throughout the Ages (1916). After that film, Samuel Goldwyn signed her to a contract at $2500 per week - far exceeding the $35 per week she got in 1915. Goldwyn was at his best when it came to publicity. It was he who gave Mae the title 'The Whim Girl.' Other than the publicity, her film career with Goldwyn was a disappointment and she retired on the eve of her marriage in 1918. During the 1920s Mae did a few movies in Hollywood and England, but stayed retired for the most part. It was not until the Wall Street 'crash' in 1929 that began the Great Depression that she returned full-time to the screen, as she, like many others, was wiped out financially. After her financial situation improved, she returned to films sporadically, usually out of boredom. She worked in a dozen movies during the 1930s and took a number of roles in the 1940s and 1950s. She was a favorite of director John Ford and appeared in many of his films, such as The Grapes of Wrath (1940), How Green Was My Valley (1941), My Darling Clementine (1946) and The Quiet Man (1952), and she had a role in A Star Is Born (1954).
4H-6 He's Had No Lovin' For A Long, Long Time - Two pieces of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation, NY C - 1919) with words by William Tracey and music by Maceo Pinkard: "Now That it's over and peace is declared - Our nation is wild with joy - Ev'ry young girlie is getting prepared - To welcome her soldier boy - Listen, girls, he's been true blue - Now the rest is up to you - Oh you know he's had no loving for a long, long time - he's got to have a lot of it now - Just hide away the service flag you waved for him - And give him all the kisses that you've saved for him - Since he went away - He's been busy each day - His medals will tell you just how - And just to make up for the fun he's been missin' - Your boy's entitled to some huggin' and kissin' - He's had no lovin' for a long, long time - And he's got to have a lot of it now..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: A young woman, with arms outstretched, welcoming her soldier home. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Watch, Hope and Wait, Little Girl (I'm Coming back to You)."
4H-7 He's Well Worth Waiting For - A single piece of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co., NYC - Chicago - San Francisco - Sidney - London - 1918) with words by Garfield Kilgour and music by Harry Von Tilzer: "…She's going to wait and watch for his returning from over there - he's gone to fight for right and bravely do his part - And all the while a smile of hope is in her heart - She's going to keep the love-light brightly burning - Each night her pray'r will reach that foreign shore - She's going to wait although her heart may ache - She's going to wait and watch for his return for he's well worth waiting for..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A sad young woman waits for her soldier to return. His portrait is framed by American Eagles and a blue service-star flag hangs below. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: " A Little Good for Nothing's Good for Something After All" and "Bye and Bye."
4H-8 He Was A Soldier From the U.S.A. (Fighting for His Native Land!) - A single piece of sheet music (Buck and Lowney "Publishers of Music That Sells" - St. Louis, Missouri - 1914) with words ("Poem") by J. Fred Lawton and music by Howard Kocian ("Respectfully dedicated - "To the men who are fighting across the sea - To the woman who weeps and waits - To the land of peace and the home of the free - To our own United States"): "On a crowded pier, as the night drew near - Stood a woman bent in years - By a maiden fair - With golden hair - And their eyes were filled with tears - A young man pressed them to his breast - And whispered 'Have no fear - When the war is through - I'll return to you - Sweetheart and mother dear' - he was a soldier from the U.S.A. - Fighting for his Native Land - he was a soldier boy who sailed away - By his country's flag to stand - He left a sweetheart 'neath the Stars and Stripes - And a mother old and gray - They are dreaming tonight of the battleground - And their boy from the U.S.A." Cover image by an unknown artist: An elderly mother and a young girl read letters at a kitchen table while in their minds (pictured above) a battle rages and a bleeding soldier lays dying on the battlefield. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Skylark Love."
4H-9 Heaven's Artillery - A single piece of sheet music (Vandersloot Music Publishing, Co., Williamsport, Pennsylvania - 1914) with music ("March Two-Step") by Harry J. Lincoln ("Composer of MIDNIGHT FIRE ALARM MARCH, VALLAMONT REVERIE and other hits"). Cover image by artist Whittmar: Soldiers with rifles and cannons fire from a frame of smoke and clouds as a streak of lightning strikes the center of the image. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "National Federation March," "Peace on Earth March," "General Pershing March," etc.
4H-10 Hello Central! Give Me No Man's Land - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Sam Lewis and Joe Young and music by Jean Schwartz ("As Introduced by Al Jolson in SINBAD at the Winter Garden, New York" with cover photograph): " "When the gray shadows creep - And the world is asleep - In the still of the night - Baby creeps down a flight - First she looks all around - Without making a sound - Then baby toddles up to the telephone - And whispers in a baby tone - Hello Central give me No Man's Land - My daddy's there, my mamma told me - She tiptoed off to bed - After my pray'rs were said - Don't ring when you get my number - or you'll disturb mamma's slumber - I'm afraid to stand here at the 'phone - 'Cause I'm alone - So won't you hurry - I want to now why mamma starts to weep, When I say 'now I lay me down to sleep' - Hello Central give me No Man's Land..." Cover image (with a photograph of "The World's Greatest Entertainer" Al Jolson) by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: The silhouette of a toddler on the phone while bombs burst over a European battlefield. advertised song samples on the back cover include; "When Alexander Takes His Ragtime Band To France." According to Wikipedia: "AL JOLSON (born Asa Yoelson; May 26, 1886 - October 23, 1950) was a Jewish Lithuanian-born American singer, film actor, and comedian. At the peak of his career, he was dubbed 'The World's Greatest Entertainer.' His performing style was brash and extroverted, and he popularized a large number of songs that benefited from his 'shamelessly sentimental, melodramatic approach.' Numerous well-known singers were influenced by his music, including Bing Crosby, David Bowie, Bob Dylan and others, Dylan once referred to him as 'somebody whose life I can feel.' Broadway critic Gilbert Seldes compared him to the Greek god Pan, claiming that Jolson represented 'the concentration of our national health and gaiety'..."
4H-11 Hello! Gen'ral Pershing (How's My Daddy To-Night?) - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Lew Porter: "Shades of night are falling - Slumberland is calling - Baby longs for Daddy o'er the sea - To the telephone she toddles all alone - "Central, connect Gen'ral Pershing with me' - With eyes a -glist'ning - Mother is list'ning - As baby cries tenderly - Hello! Gen'ral Pershing - How's my Daddy tonight - Is he allright? - Oh! Won't you tell me - At home we miss him so - It seems so long ago - Since he went over there - With you to do his share - But you can keep my Daddy - Till the war has been won - Then send him home - Across the foam - We're oh! so lonely and we dream about him - But while you need him we must do without him - Hello! Gen'ral Pershing - God bless you..." Cover image by artist Andre De Takacs: A portrait of General John Pershing. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "We Don't Want the Bacon," "Three Wonderful Letters From Home," "Dreaming of Home Sweet Home," etc. According to Wikipedia: "John Joseph 'Black Jack' Pershing (September 13, 1860 - July 15, 1948), was a general officer in the United States Army who led the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Pershing is the only person to be promoted in his own lifetime to the highest rank ever held in the United States Army-General of the Armies (a retroactive Congressional edict passed in 1976 promoted George Washington to the same rank but with higher seniority). Pershing holds the first United States officer service number (O-1). He was regarded as a mentor by the generation of American generals who led the United States Army in Europe during World War II, including George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar N. Bradley, and George S. Patton. A somewhat controversial figure, his tactics have been harshly criticized both by commanders at the time and by modern historians. His reliance on costly frontal assaults, long after other allied armies had abandoned such tactics, has been accused of causing unnecessarily high American casualties..."
4H-12 Here's To the Land of the Stars and the Stripes - A single piece of sheet music (Paine Publishing Company, Dayton, Ohio - 1917) with words by Willis N. Bugbee and music by Edna Randolph Worrell: "This country of ours that we cherish so well - Has never a castle grand - No ruins or relics of centuries past - No king or queen to command - But better than all 'tis the land of the free - A kingdom is naught but a sham - And we feel in our hearts there's no spot quite so good - As the land of our dear Uncle Sam - Then, here's to the land of the stars and stripes! - Oh, here's to the Land of the Free! - With its rocks and its rills and its acres abroad - That stretch from the plains to the sea! - Yes, here's to the land of the Glorious West! Where dear uncle Sam holds sway! We'll live for it, cheer for it, fight for it, too - We'll stand by its colors for aye..." advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Red Cross Maid And The Soldier Brave," "The Bonniest Girl of the U.S.A.," "Little Red Cross Nurses," "The Red Cross Girl is the Girl For Me," "Together We Go to the Front Today," etc.
4H-13 Here's To Your Boy and My Boy - A single piece of sheet music (George Fairman Publisher, NYC - 1918) with words and music by George Fairman: "Just a little toast to our absent ones - To the boys who are over there - To the ones who are fighting for you and me - And their loved ones everywhere - For they're all good fellows trying hard to do their share - Here's to your boy and my boy - And their sweethearts so true - May good luck be with them in all that that they say and do - Here's to their dear sweet mothers who pray all the time - here's to your wish and my wish - For your boy and mine..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Lady Liberty with arms outstretched. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "President Wilson's Wedding March."
4H -14 His Buttons Are Marked "U.S." - Two pieces (various covers) of sheet music ("Published at THE BOND SHOP by Carrie Jacobs-Bond and Son, Chicago" - 1918 - originally written in 1902) with words by Mary Norton Bradford and music by Carrie Jacobs-Bond ("To Catherine and Dorothy Yates"): "My daddy's all dressed up today - He never looked so fine - I thought, when I first looked at him - My daddy wasn't mine - He's got a dandy, fine new suit - The old one was so old - It's brown, he wears an eagle, too - I guess it must be gold - But my daddy just belongs to my dear mother - and I guess the folks are blind who cannot see - That his buttons are marked 'U.S.' - and that spells 'us,' I guess, - So he just belong to mother dear and me..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers marching by a little girl (waving a blue star service flag), from her home steps, as her father waves back from the military formation. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "A Hundred Year's From Now," "A Song of the Hills," "To-Day," etc.
4H-15 Home Coming Week in France - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with words and music by Seneca G. Lewis: "Have you heard about the grand review to be held in gay Paree - What you might call Old Home Coming Week for the Sons of Liberty - All the races and ranks - All the aces and tanks - Will be back from the watch on the Rhine - And in that parade of Democracy's hosts - Here is what you will see in the line - There's the grand old flag you're a high flying flag - Hear that color'd ragtime band - It's a long way to Tipperary - That's the music from the Strand - All the way from the streets of Cairo see those Arabs prance and dance - It's all for one and one for all - At old Home Coming Week in France..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Troops, representing various nations, marching in front a tank, flying aircraft, flags and the Eiffel Tower. The back cover presents a "Facsimile of Affidavit" dealing with the NEW YORK SUN "smoke fund" - signed by composer Seneca G. Lewis ("To whom it may concern...Royalties and profits from the above compositions , as well as contributions from other sources, already forwarded to Mr. Ervin Wardman, publisher of the New York Sun and the smoke fund of other newspapers...") and "America's Problem - Ships and Food - To send - The most food possible in Least Shipping Space/Solution - Eat More Fish, Cheese, Eggs, Poultry and Save Beef, Pork and Mutton for Our Fighters..."
4H-16 Homeland (I Can Hear You Calling Me) - A single piece of sheet music (A.J. Stasney Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by J.E. Dempsey and music by Joseph A. Burke: "Where the breezes sweet with new mown hay - Play all the day - In dreams I stray - America - I can hear you calling me from far away - Where fond hearts pray - My U.S.A. - It's a long, long way from sunny France to my own native land - Yet, ev'ry word you say I understand - Oh! Homeland I hear you calling me - Home of the free - Across the sea - My land of Liberty - Telling me not to forget - Our old-time debt - To Lafayette - For it was France who helped to break our chains and set us free - The Stars and Stripes must dry the tears of Normandy - All through the rush and the rattle - The roar of the battle - Dear old Homeland I can hear you calling me..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A decorated soldier surrounded by the bombed out ruins of France. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "A Soldier's Rosary."
4H-17 Homeward Bound ( by Allen/Lakant) - A single piece of sheet music (Rayner Dalheim and Co., Chicago, Illinois - 1919) with words by Hans Allen and music by B.F. Lakant ("The American Triumphal Song - Dedicated to our American Soldier Boys"): "We're homeward bound, oh homeward bound! - Sing out, sing out the joyful sound! For victory has brought to us - Our brave and gallant leader Foch - But Pershing glory be to him! His name resound, yes let it ring - For mighty fine too is his name - And just and right is now his fame - America our country dear - Our song of triumph now do hear - Hurrah! Hurrah! - In freedom's cause! We prize thee more than iron cross - We're homeward bound! Yes homeward bound - Oh, listen to the joyful sound - We'll meet again, our brethren all - So glad we heard our country's call..." Cover image by and unknown artist: The troops preparing to board a transport ship.
4H-18 Homeward Bound ( by Jounson/Goetz/Meyer) - Five pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by Howard Johnson and Coleman Goetz and music by George Meyer ("Successfully Introduced by EMMA CARUS, DOOLEY AND NELSON, THE KLEIN BROTHERS, LEWIS AND DODY and MISS PIELERT OF PIELERT AND SCOFIELD" with cover-inset photographs): "Somewhere far away - Somewhere in the fray - Many boys are over the sea - Fighting for you - Fighting for me - They're all proud to carry a gun - Their work will soon be done - Homeward Bound - Someday they'll hear that welcome sound - For while the shot and shell are flying - For the ones at home they're sighing - And tho' the skies seem grey - There's bound to be a brighter day - For when the Dove of Peace flies over the land - They all will hear the General give the command - We are HOMEWARD BOUND - That's a wonderful, wonderful sound..." Cover images (with various artist photographs) by an unknown artist: Transport ships heading into a U.S. port. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "At the Darktown Strutter's Ball," "In the Land of Wedding Bells," "Over There," "It's A Long Way to Berlin," "Hello Broadway, Goodbye France," "Mother, Dixie and You," etc. According to Wikipedia: "EMMA CARUS (March 18, 1879 - November 18, 1927) was a contralto singer from New York who was in the cast of the original Ziegfeld Follies in 1907. Her given name was Emma Carus. She frequently sang in vaudeville and sometimes in Broadway features. One columnist described her as a sort of combination of Sophie Tucker and Fay Templeton with a little of Eva Tanguay and Eddie Foy thrown in for good measure..." According to Richard M. Roberts on the SilentComedyMafia.com Web Site: "... BILLY DOOLEY was an eccentric dancer and trick cyclist who had been touring in vaudeville with Frances Lee when they were both hired by Al Christie in the mid-twenties to appear in comedies. Most of his Christie comedies appear to be extant, usually in the truncated home-movie and television versions put out by Hollywood Film Enterprises in the 1940's and 50's. When Christie let his silent comics go in 1929, Dooley continued to work in supporting roles in talkies until he died. Interesting later parts include playing Jean Harlow's goofy reappearing-when-she-doesn;t-want-to-know-him husband in BOMBSHELL (1933) and a nice comedy bit in SIX DAY BICYCLE RIDER (1934) with Joe E. Brown. Grapevine...Before doing the vaudeville act with Frances Lee, Dooley had been partnered with comic EDDIE NELSON, who was known as 'the Sunkist Comedian' and did some shorts for Jack White in 1925..." THE KLEIN BROTHERS (Al and Harry) were stars of Shubert vaudeville ("Jest Moments"). LEWIS AND DODY ("The Two Sams") were popular vaudeville song and dance comedians. PIELERT AND SCOFIELD were comedy jugglers, singers and dancers in vaudeville.
4H-19 How 'Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down On The farm (After They've Seen Paree?) - Three pieces of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., NYC- 1919) with words by Joe Young and Sam M. Lewis and music by Walter Donaldson: "…How ya gonna keep 'em down on the farm - After they've seen Paree? - How 'ya gonna keep 'em away from Broadway - Jazzin' a roun' - And paintin' the town? How 'ya gonna keep 'em away from harm? - That's a mystery - They'll never want to see a rake or a plow - And who the deuce can parlez vous a cow? - How'ya gonna keep 'em down on the farm - After they've seen Paree..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: Returning soldiers cavorting with women and cider, on the farm, while an older farmer looks on in amazement (or disgust?). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Don't Cry Frenchy, Don't Cry," "The Music of Wedding Chimes," "My Barney Lies Over the Ocean (Just The Way he Lied To Me)," etc. Composer Walter Donaldson was portrayed by Frank Lovejoy in the 1952 Warner Brothers' Gus Kahn biopic, I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS.
4H-20 Hurrah! For the Liberty Boys, Hurrah! - A single piece of sheet music (Plaza Music Co., NYC/E.T. Paull Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by E.T. Paull ("America's Patriotic March Song" - by the "Author of NAPOLEONS LAST CHARGE, BATTLE OF NATIONS, PAUL REVERE'S RIDE and BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG"): "Tramp, tramp, tramp the boys are marching - For Freedom, liberty and right - Tramp, tramp, tramp the boys are on their way - They're going to win this fight - Banners waving in the bright blue sky - Far across the sea - Uncle Sammy's boys will win or die - For the flag of the free - Hurrah! Hurrah! for the Liberty boys - Hurrah! - Marching on to war - Hurrah! Hurrah! for the liberty boys - Hurrah! As their forefathers did before..." Cover image: A blue-tinted photograph of victorious troops marching through NYC by photographers Underwood and Underwood, NYC. Advertised song samples on the back cover include various titles composed by E.T. Paull.
5I-1 I Ain't Got Weary Yet (Je M'en Fais Pas Encore) - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Howard Johnson (French text by Louis Delamarre) and music by Percy Wenrich ("Latest hit by the writers of the war song classic WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE"): "Johnny Dunn grabbed his little gun, sailed away just to fight the Hun - 'Over there,' fighting everywhere, Johnny did his share - One day he got a letter from his wife - She asked Johnny how he liked the life - Johnny wrote back 'Dear, they work you hard over here.' But I ain't got weary yet - No, I ain't got weary yet, Ben digging in the trenches all day long - All the time I'm singing this song; - 'Cause I ain't got weary yet - And I never will, you bet..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A silhouette of soldiers in battle with circled scenes of wartime-army life (Digging trenches, a military hospital and a soldier on the town). The back cover features an advertisement for the SONGS OF CHEER folio ("For Camp, Fireside, Liberty and Community Singing - A Pocket Book of Songs - the soul of America's war-time spirit...").
5I-2 I Cannot Bear To Say Goodbye - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Anita Owen: "There's no use crying - There's no use sighing - There's no use feeling bad - I hate to leave you - I hate to grieve you - I hate to see you sad - I want your laughter - Though tears come after - I want to see you smile - For I'm going to miss you - Just let me kiss you -'Twill comfort me awhile - I cannot bear to say goodbye - I cannot bear to see you cry - For I am going 'over there' because I want to do my share - I'll keep your image in my heart - And pray we'll meet to never part - Though duty calls and fate says love must wait - I cannot bear to goodbye..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A soldier and his girl say goodbye under the shade of a tree. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Oh! How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning."
5I-3 I Didn't Raise My Boy To Be A Soldier - Eight pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1915) with words by Alfred Bryan and music by Al Piantadosi ("A Mother's Plea for Peace - Respectfully Dedicated to every Mother - Everywhere - By the Writers of GOOD LUCK, MARY" - Featured by THE AMERICAN COMEDY FOUR, CHIEF TENDEHOA, MAE FRANCIS, GENE GREENE, McCORMACK and IRVING and WILL J.WARD - with cover-inset photographs): "I didn't raise my boy to be a soldier - I brought him up to be my pride and joy - Who dares to place a musket on his shoulder - To shoot some other mother's darling boy - Let nations arbitrate their future troubles - It's time to lay the sword and gun away - Ther'd be no war today - If mothers all would say - I didn't raise my boy to be a soldier..." Cover image (with inset photographs) by an unknown artist: A mother, in a chair, hugs her young son (as she imagines the terrors of war). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "There's a Little Spark of Love Still Burning," "On the Shores of Italy," "When You Wore a Tulip and I Wore A Big Red Rose," "The High Cost of Loving," etc. According to the Oxford Scholarship.Com Web Site; "In July and August 1914, the Six Brown Brothers toured the British Isles in a show called All American Vaudeville, headlined by the AVON COMEDY FOUR (aka AMERICAN COMEDY FOUR) and featuring Josie Heather, (J. Francis) Dooley and (Corinne) Sales, Charles and Fannie Van, the Four Bards, Ethel Mae Barker, and The Stanleys...The tour was successful, but the outbreak of the First World War cut it short and led the entertainers to return to the United States. According to the Fulton History.Com Web Site: CHIEF TENDEHOA - "Ruler of the Black Feet Indians" was a vaudeville performer billed as "America's Greatest Indian." MAE FRANCIS was a singer in vaudeville (no other biographical information found). According to Wikipedia: "GENE GREENE was an American entertainer, singer and composer, nicknamed 'The Ragtime King.' He was a vaudeville star and made some of the earliest sound recordings of scat singing in 1911 for Columbia Records and Victor Records and was a popular ragtime performer...Greene was born in Aurora, Illinois and moved to Chicago as a young child. He began his professional career in the late 1890s with his future wife Blanche Werner. They performed in vaudeville first as Manjonita and Eugene and then as Greene and Werner. Greene began performing as a solo act around 1909. He toured England in 1912 and 1913 and Australia in 1913 and 1914. His pianist was on these tours was Charley Straight. Greene continued to be a popular vaudeville performer in the United States and Canada until his death backstage immediately after a vaudeville performance at the Grand Opera House in New York in 1930. Greene was closely associated with the song 'I Didn't Raise My Boy to Be a Soldier' by Alfred Bryan and Al Piantadosi. This song was one of the extremely few anti-war music-hall songs during the First World War, most music-hall songs being fiercely pro-war. This reflected the views of Chicago's large German population at the time, but the song was also well-known, and controversial, in Britain. Recordings of Greene are scarce in the compact disc era..." McCORMACK AND IRVING were a song and dance team in vaudeville (no other biographical information found). According to VARIETY: WILL J. WARD was the singing comedian with one of Gus Edwards' vaudeville companies.
5I-4 I Don't Know Where I'm Going, But I'm On My Way - A single piece of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing, Co., NYC - Chicago, San Francisco, Sidney - London - 1917) with words and music by George Fairman: "Goodbye everybody - I'm off to fight the foe - Uncle Sammy is just calling me , so I must go - Gee, I'm feeling fine, don't you wish you were me? - For I'm sailing tomorrow, over the deep blue sea - And I don't know where I'm going but I'm on my way - For I belong to the Regulars - I'm proud to say - And I'll do my duty-uty night or day - I don't now where I'm going, but I'm on my way..." Cover image by artist E..H. Pfeiffer: A soldier, with his rifle, stands on the shore with navy ships off the coast and the American flag waving behind him. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Says I To Myself, Says I" and "Give Me the Right to Love All the While."
5I-5 I Don't Want To Get Well - Three pieces of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by Harry Pease and Howard Johnson and music by Harry Jentes: "I just received an answer to a letter that I wrote - From a pal who marched away - he was wounded in the trenches somewhere in France and I worried about him night and day - 'Are you getting well' was what I wrote - This is what he answered in his note: I Don't want to get well - I don't want to get well - I'm in love with a beautiful nurse - Early every morning, night and noon - The cutest little girlie comes and feeds me with a spoon - I don't want to get well... I'm glad they shot me on the fighting line, fine - The doctor says that I'm in bad condition , but Oh, Oh, Oh I've got so much ambition - I don't want to get well..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier, in bed, is comforted by a Red Cross nurse as the battle rages outside the hospital window. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Hawaiian Butterfly," "Hong-Kong," "It's A Long Way to berlin," "Homeward Bound," etc.
5I-6 I Don't want To Go To War - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., NYC - Detroit - 1914) with words by Ed Madden and music by Henry I. Marshall: "Goodness mercy! - Listen Percy - Hear the bugles call! - Find a place to crawl - From the cannon ball - I'm so nervous, Lord preserve us! - Must we volunteer? - I'll keep in the rear - I'll wave the flag and cheer - 'Hooray! go'way! - Come back some other day!' - I don't want to go to war!" Cover image by artist Joan Frew: A bow with tassels against a green, red and white pattern. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "At the Ball, That's All."
5I-7 I Dreamt My Daddy Came Home - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Joe Darcey and music by Lew Porter ("In a school yard one day - Little children at play - One girlie looking sad - While all others were glad - 'Why are you sad my little one?' - Teacher gently sighs - 'I had a dream, a wonderful dream' - Little girl replies - I dreamt last night - That my daddy came home - And everything was bright and gay - My mother wept with joy - My granddad said 'My boy' - We've been so lonesome - Since you went away - And then I hear - My darling Daddy telling stories from o'er the foam - But when my mother spoke, 'twas then that I awoke - From a wonderful dream - I dreamt my daddy came home..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A sleeping child dreaming of her mother, father (in uniform) and her, at the dining room table, smiling as they examine war souvenirs. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Baby's Prayer Will Soon Be Answered," "The Statue of Liberty is Smiling," "Why Shouldn't They Be Good Enough Now," etc.
5I-8 I Hear My Country Calling - A single piece of sheet music (George Boyden Music Publisher, Boston, Massachusetts - 1917) with words and music by George Boyden: "Sometimes the heart within us - Prompts us to nobler deeds - Sometimes the God above us - Points to our country's needs - I live in a land of heroes - I boast of a love that's true - So mine is a duty to pay in full - To my flag that I love and you - I can hear my country calling - And I'm mighty proud to go - Tho' my leaving makes you sad dear - For your tears have told me so - When I come back you'll be waiting - For your soldier boy I know - I can hear my country calling..." Cover image by photographer White of Boston: A photograph of a soldier and his young girlfriend backed by an artist's rendering of a military campsite with a guard on duty as a vintage military plane flies overhead.
5I-9 I Love Her (Ooh La La La) - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Lew Porter ("Writer of HELLO! GEN'RAL PERSHING - HOW'S MY DADDY TO-NIGHT"): "Jack McCoy was a sailor boy - Who sailed across the sea - Landed in Paree - And he learned to Oui Oui Oui - Met a sweet little girl petite - Who stole his heart away - If you ask why he'll wink his eye - And then you'll hear him say - I love her Ooh la-la-la...And her sweet Parisian way - Ev'ry time she smiles her naughty eyes - The world becomes a heaven and my poor heart cries - I love her Ooh la-la-la...And when she does Comme Ci Ca - She's got a way that will make you delighted - and ev'ry day I get so excited - When she whispers Papa come and kiss your Mama..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A photograph of "Corporal Jimmie Shea - U.S. Tank Corps" backed by an artist's rendering of an American soldier, smoking a cigarette and observing a young French girl, with her foot up on a bench, adjusting the bow on her shoe. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Good-Bye Slim," "Dreaming of Home Sweet Home," "At the Dixie Military Ball," "I've Got a Ten Day Pass for a Honeymoon," etc. According to the usgennet.org Web Site: Jimmie Shea is noted as the composer of the song "The Yanks With Tanks" (The Official Song of The U. S. Tank Corps) in 1918 (No other biographical information was found).
5I-10 I Love My U.S.A. - A single piece of sheet music (Eastern Music Co., Providence, Rhode Island - 1916) with words and music by Joe Cronson ("Harmonized by Charles Ruddy"): "Last night as I lay dreaming - I'll tell you the things I saw - I dream't that they came to our hometown - And said boys you've got to go to war - We all got up and said we're ready - As they gave us our uniforms of blue - Then we shouted loud - America - We'll fight and we'll die for you - When we left our hometown right after sundown - Saying our last good-byes - I heard a laddie say - When he went on his way - As the tears rolled from his big blue eyes - Gee! - It's great to be a soldier - And you don't know how proud I am - That means a true American - in the land of old Uncle Sam - My country 'tis of thee - It's for peace on earth we pray - I'll give my life for you - Red, White and Blue - For I love my U.S.A." Cover image by an unknown photographer : An American flag formed by humans dressed in red, white and blue on the steps of a government building in an unknown city. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "That Barbershop Melody."
5I-11 I May Be Gone For A Long, Long Time - Four pieces of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President, NYC - 1917) with words by Lew Brown (Portrayed by Ernest Borgnine in the biopic THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE - 20th Century -Fox - 1956) and music by Albert Von Tilzer (Older brother of Will Von Tilzer) - ("Grace La Rue's Instant Success in Raymond Hitchcock's and E. Ray Goetz's New Musical Review HITCHY-KOO"): "...Duty calls and I must obey, but I'll always hope and pray - While I'm sailing far across he sea will you always think of me? - I may be gone for a long, long time...But when I go you will know that - I'll always pine for the day when you'll be mine - Be true to me for a long, long time, rain or shine, sweetheart mine - And I'll be just as true to you - As to the Red White and Blue - Though I'm gone for a long, long time..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: A woman (Grace La Rue?) gazes over the ocean. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When The Sun Goes Down in Dixie And the Moon Begins to Rise." According to Wikipedia: "GRACE LA RUE (April 23, 1882 - March 13, 1956) was an American actress, singer, and Vaudeville headliner. Stella Grace La Rue was born in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1882 to Mrs. Lucy L. Parsons. La Rue was a stage name, more exotic than her original surname of Parsons. She began her career as part of the team Burke and La Rue, with her first husband Charles Burke. One of their numbers was a minstrel piece entitled 'Grace La Rue and her Inky Dinks.' She soon broke away from the act - and Burke - to appear in musical comedy. La Rue performed in a number of productions on Broadway debuting in The Tourists in 1906. She also appeared in The Blue Moon (1906), Molly May (1910), Betsy (1911), and the 1907 and 1908 Ziegfeld Follies...La Rue made her debut as a Vaudeville single act in November 1912 at Poli's in Springfield, Missouri. As part of the act she sang an aria from Madame Butterfly, and a duet with a phonograph recording of Enrico Caruso. Variety gave her a good review commenting that the act gave La Rue the 'opportunity to display her Parisian cultivated voice.' La Rue made her debut at the Palace Theatre on August 4, 1913. Her act featured the song 'You Made Me Love You (I Didn't Want to Do It),' from the show Honeymoon Express, a musical she had appeared in with Al Jolson. Later that year, she brought her Vaudeville act to Britain, appearing at the London Palace on August 4, 1913...In 1919, La Rue made her screen debut opposite American stage and film actor Hale Hamilton in the melodrama That's Good. She married Hamilton on May 29, 1920, amid a whirl of controversy surrounding a lawsuit filed by Hamilton's first wife. In 1922-23, La Rue appeared in Irving Berlin's second Music Box Revue at the Music Box in New York. In 1924, she appeared at the Coliseum in London with Hamilton. For the rest of the decade she worked mainly in the United States alternating between Vaudeville and in musical comedies and revues. One of her last big time appearances was in the 1928 Greenwich Village Follies at the Winter Garden in New York. She appeared in a 1929 Vitaphone short called Grace La Rue: The International Star of Song. By the early 1930s, she had retired to California, where she made a brief appearance in the 1933 Mae West film She Done Him Wrong. Grace La Rue died in Burlingame, California on March 13, 1956." According to Wikipedia: HITCHY-KOO was the first in a series of revues from 1917 to 1920 produced on Broadway by, and starring, Raymond Hitchcock.
5I-12 I May Stay Away A Little Longer - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President, NYC - 1917) with words by Lew Brown (Portrayed by Ernest Borgnine in the biopic THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE - 20th Century -Fox - 1956) and music by Albert Von Tilzer (Older brother of Will Von Tilzer): "I write these lines to tell you - I'm far across the foam - I feel so all alone, when I think of you and home - You know how much I miss you and how far you and I yearn - You ask me if I know when I return - I cannot tell you where we go from here - And this is all that I can write you dear - I may stay away a little longer...I hope that your love keeps growing stronger while I'm away from you - So give all my love to dear old Mother, to Dad and Brother and Sister, too - I may stay away a little longer..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: A soldier writes a letter in his tent while dreaming of his girl (shown knitting). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Sweet Emalina, My Gal," "Give Me the Moonlight, The Girl (And Leave the Rest to Me)," etc.
5I-13 I Miss You, Miss America - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co. - "The House of Hits" - NYC - 1916) with words by L. Wolfe Gilbert ("Author of MY LITTLE DREAM GIRL, MY SWEET ADAIR, MY OWN IONA, etc.") and music by Lee S. Roberts ("Composer of GOOD OLD DAYS, IN ALABAM, etc."): "...I missed you Miss America - You will be my sweetheart 'till I die - Have you missed me Miss America? - Have I caused one tear or sigh? - All night and day I've longed for you - And my feelings no one knew - How I missed Miss America - Gee I'm glad that I've come back to you..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A young woman (wearing red, white and blue) flies in an individual flying machine. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Pray for the Lights to Go Out," "Tennessee Blues," etc.
5I-14 I Want To Be a Soldier For the U.S.A. - A single piece of sheet music (A.R. Rocheleau Publishing, Manchester, NH - 1918) with words by E.C. Hardy and music by A.R. Rocheleau ("This song has been acknowledged by everybody as the most original Soldier Song that has been written in years."): "Some say we must fight if we should hold our own - Still not hasty must we be - Ev'ry man of courage is prepared to fight for our flag and liberty - I'll place a gun on my shoulder - For Yankee Doodle Do - I want to be a soldier for the U.S.A. - To do and to die, boys - In the midst of the battle's hot fray - Our enemy has dared us - And we'll make them pay - We'll stay over there until the boys have won the day..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A soldier charging on the battlefield as bombs explode around him. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "She Has Left The Old Homestead Forever."
5I-15 I Want To Be Loved By a Soldier - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Henry Fink and music by Abner Silver ("Introduced with Great Success by Mollie King - Star of the Screen"): "I know a girl who's very fond of a military man - She loves to have some soldiers lover every now and then - She wants a man with gallant ways the kind you see in photoplays - Ev'ry day you'll hear this girlie say - I want to be loved by a soldier - Won't someone show me the way - I want someone to please me - I want someone to squeeze me , ev'ry night and day - I find there's something about them - That carries me away - And if they'd only want to give me a chance - I'd even follow some young fellow to France ..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: a photograph of silent film star Mollie King surrounded by flowers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Before The World Began." According to Denny Jackson on the IMDb Web Site: "Mollie King was born in New York City on April 16, 1895. Acting had always not been far from Mollie mind since she was living in New York. After all, this city was the hub of the entertainment industry long before Hollywood came along. She made her debut, at the age of 21, in 1916's A CIRCUS ROMANCE. That same year, Mollie also made A WOMAN'S POWER, ALL MAN, and THE SUMMER GIRL. After five more films in 1917, she would not be seen again until SUSPICIOUS WIVES in 1921. Newer, fresher talent was constantly coming in, therefore Mollie's acting ability was not in as much demand. After 1924's PIED PIPER MALONE, she was finished with filmmaking. She had quit at the age of 29. Mollie did live to see her golden years in peace. On December 28, 1981, she died in Fort Lauderdale, Florida at the age of 86."
5I-16 I Wonder Where My Buddies Are To-Night - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1921) with words by Billy Rose (Portrayed by James Caan in the Fanny Brice biopic sequel FUNNY LADY - Columbia Pictures - 1975) and Raymond B. Egan and music by Richard A. Whiting ("A Post-War Memory Fox Trot Ballad - Featured by Don George" with cover photograph): "Somewhere out in France a voice was calling - And we answered with a big parade - Over here a million tears were falling - Over there the final price was paid - Now a million soldier boys are wond'ring - What's become of all the friends they made? - I wonder were my buddies are tonight - I wonder how they're doing now? I wonder if they're being treated right? - My doughboy pals - And Red Cross gals - you'll find a cross where Goldberg and O' Leary - Fought side by side and died at Chateau Thierry - The world forgets perhaps - But when day has sounded 'taps' - I wonder where my buddies are tonight..." Cover image (featuring a publicity photograph of singer/composer Don George) by an unknown artist: A former soldier (in business suit with pipe), at work, thinks about the battles and the Red Cross nurse. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Horses," "Somebody's Lonely," etc.
5I-17 I Wouldn't Steal The Sweetheart Of A Soldier Boy - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., NYC - Detroit - 1916) with words by Alfred Bryan and music by Herman Paley: "By the campfire gleaming, soldier boy is dreaming - Little girl is blue - Someone else is telling tales of love compelling - But her heart is true - 'Tell me who's your sweetheart' he sighs, 'pretty maid?' - 'Just a soldier boy she murmurs low - Stranger gently answers 'don't you be afraid' - Tells her as he turns to go - I wouldn't steal the sweetheart of a soldier boy - While he is fighting far away - They say that all is fair in love and war - But I don't see it just that way - I seem to hear him saying - 'Love be true - Wait till I come back to you ' - I wouldn't steal the sweetheart of a soldier boy - And break a soldier's heart in two..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier reads a letter, by the campfire , as the image of his girl rises from the smoke of the fire. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Whole World Loves a Lover."
5I-18 I'd Be Proud To Be The Mother Of A Soldier - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1915) with words and music by Charles Bayha: "Seated 'round the table were Mother and Dad - And their darling lad - He was all that they had - 'It's not right that men should fight' - He wisely shook his head - 'Each soldier brave, his nation's slave, goes out to die' he said - His mother sadly smiled and sighed - And as she took him in her arms replied - You'd do the same thing if it should come tomorrow - You'd do the same thing altho' you'd cause me sorrow - Just like your Dad before, you'd march away to war - And the same as any other leave your sweetheart and your mother - Now that the others are fighting - I pray for peace, it's true - But it would be a different story - If they trampled on OLD GLORY - I'd be proud to be the mother of a soldier..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: An elderly mother, sadly but proudly, places her hand on the shoulder of her young son (in uniform with sword) with the lyrics of the song quoted above: "It would be a different story - If they trampled on OLD GLORY - I'd be proud to be the mother of a soldier..." . THE GEM DANCE FOLIO OF 1915 is advertised on the back cover.
5I-19 I'd Feel At Home If They Let Me Join The Army - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick And Co., NYC and Detroit - 1917) with words by Jack Mahoney and music by Albert Gumble ("Popular Edition"): "Some men are getting married so they won't be call'd to war - But if they want to dodge it what do they get married for - It takes about a year or more to train a soldier right - A year of married life will make them all know how to fight - Oh give me a gun and away I'll run - To fight the foreign foe - I'm not afraid the shot and shell will harm me - For ever since I took a wife - I've been in battles all my life and I'd feel at home if they'd let me join the army..." Cover image by artist "Emmons" - A bespectacled (and puzzled) soldier with arms outstretched. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "It's Time For Every Boy To Be A Soldier."
5I-20 I'd Like To See The Kaiser With A Lily In His Hands - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Henry Lewis, Howard Johnson and Billy Frisch ("Henry Lewis' Big Song Hit in Lee and J.J. Shubert's Winter Garden Production DOING OUR BIT" with cover photograph of Henry Lewis): "...I'd like to see all mothers free from sorrow - I'd like to see poor Belgium free from pain - I'd like to see this cruel conflict ended - I'd like to see my Daddy once again - I'd like to see the Yankees win this battle - I'd like to see France get back her promised land - I'd like to see this whole big world united - And I'd like to see the Kaiser with a lily in his hand..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A publicity photograph of comedian Henry Lewis. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "We Stopped Them AT the Marne," "Where Do We Go From Here," etc. According to Wikipedia: WILHELM II or William II (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, three notable contemporary relations being his first cousins King George V of the United Kingdom, founder of the House of Windsor, Marie of Romania, Queen consort of Romania and the Czarina Alix of Hesse, consort of his second cousin Tsar Nicholas II of the House of Romanov, the last ruler of the Russian Empire before the Russian Revolution of 1917 which deposed the monarchy. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose 'New Course' in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to the First World War. Bombastic and impetuous, he sometimes made tactless pronouncements on sensitive topics without consulting his ministers, culminating in a disastrous Daily Telegraph interview that cost him most of his power in 1908. His top generals, Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, dictated policy during the First World War with little regard for the civilian government. An ineffective war leader, he lost the support of the army, abdicated in November 1918, and fled to exile in the Netherlands..." HENRY LEWIS was a popular vaudeville and Broadway singer and comedian of he early 20th Century (No other biographical information found). DOING OUR BIT, a musical revue in 2 acts, opened at the Winter Garden Theatre in NYC on October 18, 1917 and closed on February 9, 1918. The show starred Ed Wynn, HENRY LEWIS, The Duncan Sisters, Eduardo Cansino (Father of Rita Hayworth), etc.
5I-21 I'll Come Back To You When It's All Over - Two pieces of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Lew Brown (Portrayed by Ernest Borgnine in the biopic THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE - 20th Century -Fox - 1956) and music by Kerry Mills ("Composer of GEORGIA CAMP MEETING, RASTUS ON PARADE, etc.") - Featured by Joe Burns and Murray Kissen and Al Herman ("At Your Service The First-Aid Heart Soothing Love Ballad"): "...I'll come back to you when it's all over - Back to you and fields of clover - We'll start our sweetheart days all over - If your heart still beats as true - There is a duty that ev'ry man should do - My life defends it, but my heart belongs to you - So pray for the day when its all over - "Cause I'm coming back to you..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A color-tinted photograph of a young girl in a sailor suit (with publicity photographs of BURNS AND KISSEN and AL HERMAN). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "It's A Long Way To Berlin," "Homeward Bound," "Over There," etc. JOE BURNS AND MURRAY KISSEN were popular lyricists and performers (No other biographical information was found). According to the Wordpress,com Web Site: "AL HERMAN was a Scottish-born blackface vaudeville monologist, billed variously as 'The Assassin of Grief and Remorse' and 'The Black Assassin of Grief.' His highest stage credit was an appearance in the 1921 edition of The Greenwich Village Follies. In the 20s he wrote and directed a handful of comedy shorts and participated in an early Lee DeForest talkie experiment. From the 30s through the 50s he worked mostly as a bit player in Hollywood films (e.g., 'reporter' in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town)."
5I-22 I'll Love You More For Losing You A While - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., NYC and Detroit- 1918) with words by Raymond Egan and music by Richard A. Whiting: "…We learn to love the flowers when the snows are here - And winter only makes the summer rose more dear - All the gray in the sky is not there to make you sigh - But it floats above to make you love the sun when clouds roll by - Altho' each day that you're away will be a trial - 'Twill make the day when you return to me worthwhile and tho' this goodbye kiss breaks my heart remember this - I'll love you more for losing you awhile..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Military gloves and hat sit on a table while a couple (in silhouette) embrace in the mirror. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "On The Road To Home Sweet Home."
5I-23 I'll Return Mother Darling, To You - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co., Chicago and NYC - 1915) with words by Casper Nathan and music by E. Clinton Keithley: "A mother was saying 'Good-bye' to her boy - Who was ready to start for the war - She cried as she said - 'You're my pride and joy - are we parting for evermore?' - He whispered 'The war will be over someday - Though I know that your heart will yearn - Have cheer, mother dear - Soon the spring will be here - That's time when I will return' - When the roses of springtime are blooming - I'll return, mother darling, someday - At the end of the winter of sadness - Then I'll kiss your tears away - Just forget that your boy is a soldier - To my country and home I'll be true - When birds sweetly sing - I'll return in the Spring - I'll return, mother darling, to you..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A color-tinted photograph of a sad mother and son (in uniform) embracing. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Tambourines and Oranges," "My Keepsake is a Heartache," "Dear Old Ma," etc.
5I-24 I'm A Long Way From Tipperary - Two pieces of sheet music (Will Rossiter - "The Chicago Publisher" - 1914) with words by Roger Lewis and music by Ernie Erdman ("Writers of DOWN AT THE BARBECUE, FLOATING DOWN THE RIVER, YOU CAN'T EXPECT KISSES FROM ME and THE VIOLIN MY GREAT GRAND-DADDY MADE") - "Featured by Carl McCullough and Florence Moore of Montgomery and Moore" (with cover publicity photographs): 'Tommy was a soldier who had joined the volunteers - And when he marched away to war his eyes filled with tears - For way back home in Ireland - He'd left his sweet Colleen - The pride of Tipperary - His little Irish Queen - And ev'ry night by campfire bright , of her he'd dream and sing - I'm a long way from Tipperary - I'm a long way from Mary dear - And I long for My Irish Fairy - And her sweet voice that brings me cheer - She has promised that we would marry - And I hope that the day is near - I'm a long, long way for Tipperary - But I wouldn't care if Mary dear were here..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: Photos of vaudevillians Carl McCullough and Florence Moore backed by an artists rendering of soldiers at rest on the battlefield dreaming of the girl they left behind. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Ship of Dreams." CARL McCULLOUGH was a vaudevillian known as "The Joy Germ" (No other biographical information was found. According to Wikipedia: "FLORENCE MOORE (November 13, 1886 - March 23, 1935) was an American vaudeville, Broadway performer, and actress in silent films. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Moore began singing in the choir of Saint Clement's Church, Philadelphia at the age of thirteen. She began touring with the stock company of her brother Frank Moore. Florence got her first opportunity in Moscow, Idaho, when a male member of the cast failed to appear. Thereafter she was a regular with the company, playing the role of a Chinese without pay. Her first Broadway appearance came in 1912, as Clorinda Scribblem in Hanky Panky. During the next twenty years she participated in numerous productions. As a comedian she performed in musical comedies, revues on Broadway, and headlined as a vaudeville actress while touring America. While working in The Champagne Girls, Florence met and married William J. Montgomery and they became part of a popular vaudeville team. She divorced Montgomery and married John O. Kerner. Later she was separated from Kerner. Records show that she was also married to Jules I. Schwob. To theatregoers in New York, New York Florence is perhaps best known for being the first female emcee at the Palace Theatre, as well as her performance in Parlor, Bedroom and Bath. The production debuted in New York and played for two years on the road. Her final appearance on the New York stage came in 1932, in a revival of Cradle Snatchers. She starred in the role of Mary Boland which had been created seven years earlier. As a motion picture actress Moore had a brief career. Films in which she appeared are The Old Melody (1913) opposite King Baggot, The Weakness of Strength (1916), and The Secret of Eve (1917) opposite Olga Petrova. She belonged to the Actors' Equity Association and the Twelfth Night Club. Florence Moore died in the Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital in Darby, Pennsylvania in 1935, aged forty nine. Death followed an operation for cancer. "
5I-25 I'm Coming Back To You - A single piece of sheet music (Dixon-Lane Publishing Co., Chicago and St. Louis - 1919) with words by Erwin F. Klein and Jacob Louis Klein and music by Harold Dixon: We placed our flag of honor across the mighty sea - And gave the best we had in us and gave it willingly - For right and justice must prevail our cause was firm and true - And thru' the darkness of the nights my tho'ts were all of you - I'm coming back to you sweetheart and to the land that gave me birth - To the flag that stands for liberty the greatest flag on earth - Now peace is reigning ev'rywhere and hearts are beating true - We placed our flag across the sea and I'm coming back to you..." Cover image by an unknown artist : A soldier smokes a cigarette and dreams of his girl (who appears in the smoke from the cigarette). Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "In The Sweet Land of Dreams."
5I-26 I'm Glad I Can Make You Cry - Three pieces of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Charles R. McCarron and Carey Morgan ("Introduced in Gus Hill's Minstrels - Sung by Nat Mortan, Bessie Hamilton and Howard and Lewis " with cover photographs): "…I'm glad that I can make you blue - I'm glad that I can worry you - I'm glad that I can make you grieve - Your jealousy is sweet to me - Sometimes I flirt to make you mad - And when you hurt it makes me glad - It proves that you love me when you sigh - I'm glad I can make you cry..." Cover image (With photograph of "Alice Joyce and Evart Overton - Reproduced by Permission of Vitagraph Co. of America") by artist William Austin Starmer: Photographs of artists backed by art deco flowers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Indianola," "Has Anybody Seen My Corinne?," "Those Draftin' Blues," "Tishomingo Blues," etc. According to Frank Cullen in VAUDEVILLE: OLD AND NEW: GUS HILL was an amateur wrestler/ Indian club twirler/comedian and producer who introduced the "Columbia Wheel" form of theatrical booking to burlesque and vaudeville. NAT MORTAN was a vaudevillian and burlesque singer and comedian billed as "The Human Clarinet." No biographical information was found for BESSIE HAMILTON or HOWARD AND LEWIS ("Howard" is possibly Willie Howard).
5I-27 I'm Goin' To Fight My Way Right Back To Carolina - A single piece of sheet music (McCarthy and Fisher Music Publishers, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Billy Baskette and Jessie Spiess: "I've got to leave my Caroline - A little card said it was time - And Mister Local Board said I must drop all things and fall in line - Now I don't want sympathy - But I want the world to see - They surely called up on the right man, when they called on me - I'm goin' to fight my way back to Carolina - I'm goin' to run every Hun, ev'ry son of a gun, I see - Depend on me - 'Cause I'm in this thing to win - And I know that it's no sin - To grab a little German - Any little Herman, and carve my name on him - And I am satisfied that Carolina loves me - I left my heart with her in Dixieland - She'll understand - That I may come back with something missin' - But that won't keep us from huggin' and kissin' - When I fight my way right back to my Caroline..." Cover image by artist Andre de Takac: An American soldier (with a bayoneted rifle) breaks through a paper map of Europe. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Lorraine (My Beautiful Alsace Lorraine)."
5I-28 I'm Going Back To Tipperary, Where The Sweet Red Roses Grow - A single piece of sheet music (J.W. Dick Publishing, NYC - 1915) with words and music by John W. Dick ("Companion song to IT'S A LONG WAY TO TIPPERARY - Featured by Jeanette Childs"): "In the trenches with Allies - A soldier received a note - From his sweetheart in Tipperary - And this is the way she wrote - Sure you've been at the front for a week or two - And the war's not ended what is wrong with you - Hurry back, back, back to Tipperary where the sweet red roses grow - I'm going back, back, back to Tipperary where the sweet red roses grow - Where there's a girl, girl, girl a bit contrary who is waiting there I know - And when the war, war, war's over - I'll not tarry for my heart is all aglow..."Cover image (With a publicity photograph of Jeanette Childs) by an unknown artist: A soldier (in kilts) kneels to fire his rifle backed by the image of a red rose. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Who Will Wipe Away Your Tears." According to The Toronto World (1918): JEANETTE CHILDS was "a clever character comedienne" in vaudeville.
5I-29 I'm Going To Be A Soldier And Fight For The U.S.A. - A single piece of sheet music (Haller and Stafford Publishing, NYC - 1917) with words and music by Haller and Stafford: "Yankee boys you've got to do great fighting - Fighting for Uncle Sam - We were tread on by a foreign nation - And they want to rule ev'ry land - The rights of the seas are shattered - And all that's noble and great - They never would listen to reason - Our freedom is at stake - I'm going to be a soldier and fight for the U.S.A. - So will men of nationality who came over here to stay - I'm bound to fight when the cause is right for 'My Country 'tis of thee' - Ev'ry Mother's son will shoulder a gun - To defend our Liberty..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Cavalry soldiers riding to battle (with a round inset image of a soldier kissing his girl). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Always Think Of Mother." According to Wikipedia: "GLADYS LESLIE (March 5, 1899 - October 2, 1976) was an American actress in silent film, active in the 1910s and 1920s. Though less-remembered than superstars like Mary Pickford, she had a number of starring roles from 1917 to the early 1920s and was one of the young female stars of her day. Leslie began her movie career around 1915, acting in short films produced by the Edison Company. By 1917, she was making films with the Thanhouser Company in New Rochelle, New York, including The Vicar of Wakefield (1917). The New York Herald's review of that film dubbed her the 'Girl With A Million Dollar Smile,' and caused studio head Edwin Thanhouser to decide she was ready for leading roles. Soon she was starring in the lead role in 1917's An Amateur Orphan, but was quickly wooed over to Vitagraph Studios and starred in a number of Vitagraph releases in 1918 and 1919. Leslie and another young female Vitagraph star, Bessie Love, starred in numerous films in young girl-type roles that were popular at the time. Leslie's similar appearance to Mary Pickford was also often noted. Leslie's association with Vitagraph ended by 1920 and she continued to make films with a number of different studios. Her first non-Vitagraph picture in 1920 was A Child for Sale, directed by Ivan Abramson, where she played a starring role. And in 1923, she had the lead female role in Haldane of the Secret Service featuring Harry Houdini..."
5I-30 I'm Going To Follow The Boys - Two pieces of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1917) with words by Howard Rogers and music by James V. Monaco ("Composer of THE DREAM OF A SOLDIER BOY, AFTER A THOUSAND YEARS, etc."): "…I'm going to follow the boys over there - Anywhere, I don't care - I'm just dying for one little dance - But all my dancing partners are 'Somewhere in France' - I never nursed anyone, I'll admit - But I'm strong to do my bit - And if one little kiss or more can help them win the war - Why, I'm going to follow the boys..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: "A color tinted photograph of "Gladys Leslie (in a military uniform) - Greater Vitagraph Star - Reproduced by Permission." Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Evening Brings Rest and You" and "I'm Longing Always Dear, For You." According to Wikipedia: GLADYS LESLIE (March 5, 1899 - October 2, 1976) was an American actress in silent film, active in the 1910s and 1920s. Though less-remembered than superstars like Mary Pickford, she had a number of starring roles from 1917 to the early 1920s and was one of the young female stars of her day. Leslie began her movie career around 1915, acting in short films produced by the Edison Company. By 1917, she was making films with the Thanhouser Company in New Rochelle, New York, including The Vicar of Wakefield (1917). The New York Herald's review of that film dubbed her the 'Girl With A Million Dollar Smile,' and caused studio head Edwin Thanhouser to decide she was ready for leading roles. Soon she was starring in the lead role in 1917's An Amateur Orphan, but was quickly wooed over to Vitagraph Studios and starred in a number of Vitagraph releases in 1918 and 1919. Leslie and another young female Vitagraph star, Bessie Love, starred in numerous films in young girl-type roles that were popular at the time. Leslie's similar appearance to Mary Pickford was also often noted. Leslie's association with Vitagraph ended by 1920 and she continued to make films with a number of different studios. Her first non-Vitagraph picture in 1920 was A Child for Sale, directed by Ivan Abramson, where she played a starring role. And in 1923, she had the lead female role in Haldane of the Secret Service featuring Harry Houdini..."
5I-31 I'm Hitting The Trail To Normandy, So Kiss Me Good-Bye - Two pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Snyder Music Co./McKinley Music Co., NYC and Chicago - 1917) with words and music by Charles A. Snyder and Oscar Doctor ("Featured by Paul Elwood" - with cover photograph): "…For I'm hitting the trail to Normandy - So kiss me good-bye - When we've carried the flag to victory - Then back to your arms I'll fly - So just smile all the while when I'm over the sea - And honey, keep your love and kisses waiting for me - For I'm hitting the trail to Normandy - So kiss me good-bye..." Cover images (including a publicity photograph of vaudevillian Paul Elwood) by unknown artists: A soldier kissing his girl. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "God Speed You Soldier Boy," "Uncle Sam Please Keep Your Eye On That Gal Of Mine," "There's A Little Blue Star In The Window," etc.
5I-32 I'm Proud To Be The Sweetheart Of A Soldier - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Mary Earl (Pen name for Robert King): "There's a hero o'er the ocean - There's another here at home - And she makes each letter cheery - That she sends across the foam - Tho' her little heart is aching - Still she smiles her tears away - The whole day long she sings love's song - And you'll hear her fondly say - I'm proud to be the sweetheart of a soldier - Tho' I cried when he marched away - For he's doing his share with the boys somewhere over there, over there in the fray - I treasure ev'ry letter that he sends me - And they fill my heart with joy - For he's fighting o'er the sea - And I'm mighty proud to be - The sweetheart of a soldier boy..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: Framed in an orange heart, a young woman (in a sailor suit) proudly holds up a photo of her boyfriend (in a U.S. Army uniform). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Good-Bye Ma! Good-Bye Pa! Good-bye Mule (Long Boy)," Chin-Chin Chinaman," etc. According to The List of Robert King's Work Web site: "Robert A. King [born Robert Keiser] was a prolific American composer and songwriter of popular music; born and died in New York. He published using both names, anonymously and also used a pseudonym, MARY EARL. His total output will probably never be known. He worked at Ditson's music store as a child before entering Tin Pan Alley at the publisher, Leo Feist, where he produced his first hit Anona (1903). In 1918, he was contracted to Shapiro-Bernstein Music Publishers to write 4 songs per month. These included the hits Beautiful Ohio (1918) and Dreamy Alabama (1919). Of ragtime interest, is his very early Everything is Ragtime Now (1899) written as Robert Keiser."
5I-33 I'm Sorry I Made You Cry - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by N.J. Clesi ("War Edition"): "I'm sorry dear, so sorry dear - I'm sorry I made you cry - Won't you forget, won't you forgive? - Don't let us say goodbye - One little word, one little smile - One little kiss, won't you try? - It breaks my heart to hear your sigh - I'm sorry I made you cry..." over image by an unknown photographer: A black and white photo of a couple embracing ("Posed by June Elvidge and John Bowers - Used by permission of WORLD FILM CORPORATION"). Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SING song folio ("They can't stop our singing army! Send a copy of this book...to your Sammy 'over here' of 'over there' Send one to your Jackie afloat or ashore..."). According to Wikipedia: "JUNE ELVIDGE (June 30, 1893 - May 1, 1965) was an early 20th-century film actress from St. Paul, Minnesota. She was of English and Irish descent. Elvidge debuted in Passing Show of 1914 produced by Sam Shubert at the Winter Garden Theatre in New York City. She is noted for playing roles as a vamp in silent movies such as The Lure of Woman (1915) and The Poison Pen (1919). She appeared in westerns such as The Price of Pride (1917) and The Law of the Yukon (1920). She acted in seventy motion pictures before the beginning of the sound era. After the conclusion of her movie career in 1924 Elvidge toured America on the Orpheum Circuit, Inc., in vaudeville. She retired from show business in 1925. Elvidge died in 1965 at the Mary Lee Nursing Home in Eatontown, New Jersey. She was 72 years old, the widow of Britton Busch, a stockbroker." According to the IMDb Web Site: " JOHN BOWERS began working in films from 1916, becoming a star within five years of his debut. His frequent co-star was Marguerite de la Motte, whom he later married. The advent of sound effectively ended his career. Shortly after attending a party, the distraught 50-year-old Bowers committed suicide by rowing into the Pacific Ocean and drowning himself. It is commonly believed that his demise was the inspiration for the similar death of fictional film star Norman Maine in both the 1937 and 1954 versions of A STAR IS BORN."
5I-34 I'm Writing To You Sammy - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation, NYC - 1917) with words by Lew Brown (Portrayed by Ernest Borgnine in the biopic THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE - 20th Century -Fox - 1956) and music by Al Harriman: "…I'm writing to you Sammy and you're somewhere in France - I'm writing to you Sammy, I know I'm taking a chance - Before you went away - I know I heard you say - 'Don't forget to write your Sammy, care of eh U.S.A.' - But I'm beginning to wonder - If you really knew - They're calling all our soldiers by the name of Sammy, too - So ev'ry boy in your company may read my letter through - But I can tell you the answer - Whether it got to you..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: A smiling soldier framed in a white star. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "You Never Can be Too Sure About The Girls, " and "You Can't Get Away From The Blarney," etc.
5I-35 It's Time For Every Boy To Be A Soldier - Three pieces of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1917) with words by Alfred Bryan and music by Harry Tierney: "Most ev'ry fellow has a sweetheart - Some little girl with eyes of blue - My daddy also had a sweetheart - And he fought to win her, too - There'll come a day when we must pay the price of love and duty - Be there staunch and true - It's time for ev'ry boy to be a soldier - To put his strength and courage to the test - It's time to place a musket on his shoulder - And wrap the Stars and Stripes around his breast - It's time to shout those noble words of Lincoln - And stand up for the land that gave you birth -'That the nation of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth' " Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier stands, at ease, in front of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington DC - with round framed- inset images of President Abraham Lincoln and President Woodrow Wilson. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Somewhere On Broadway," "Where The Black-Eyed Susans Grow," etc.
5I-36 I've Got A New Job - Two pieces of sheet music (A.J. Stasny Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Sam Landers and music by Ed Nelson: "Last night I met on old friend, Willie Brown - I noticed on his face he wore a frown - I asked the reason why he felt so blue - He said,'I lost my job and I don't know what to do' - By chance again I met him yesterday - This time he wore a smile and he felt gay - I told him it looked strange to see the sudden change - Then he answered me this way - Oh! I've got a new job - A wonderful job - I'm so happy I could jump with joy - I'm full of ambition since I got this position - Believe me I'm the lucky boy - I'm not a butcher , a baker, nor a travelling man - And I don't have to sit up all night to worry or plan - Oh! I've got a new job - A wonderful job - I'm a soldier for Uncle Sam..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: Framed by a white cloud, a smiling soldier stands at attention as the silhouettes of horse-drawn cannons pass by in the background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Rose Dreams" and "Just You."
5I-37 I've Got My Captain Working For Me Now - A single piece of sheet music (Irving Berlin, Inc., NYC - 1919) with words and music by Irving Berlin: "Johnny Jones was a first class private - In the army last year - Now he's back in business in his father's place - Sunday night I saw him with a smiling face - When I asked why he felt so happy - Johnny chuckled with glee - He winked his eye and made this reply 'Something wonderful has happened to me ' - I've got the guy who used to be my Captain working for me - He wanted work so I made a clerk in my father's factory - And bye and bye, I'm gonna have him wrapped in work up to his brow - I make him open the office ev'ry morning at eight - I come around about four hours late - Ev'rything comes to those who wait - I've got my Captain working for me now..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A smiling army veteran. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Hand That Rocked The Cradle Rules My Heart."
5I-38 I've Got The Army Blues - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co., NYC - 1916_ with words and music by L. Wolfe Gilbert and Carey Morgan ("The writers of MY OWN IONA"): '…I've got the Army Blues - Waiting for some hometown news - Oh gee, I'm sad - I've got an aching heart - Goodness when we had to part - I felt so bad - My old daddy and mama too - My own sweetie was feeling blue - I've got the Army Blues (Rifle o my shoulder) The Army Blues (Boys are getting bolder) - Right about face, face about, forward march - I've got the Army Blues..."Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: Block-shaped soldiers marching. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Shades Of Night," "Under the Rambling Roses," "After Dinner Trot," etc.
5I-39 I've Got The Profiteering Blues - Two pieces of sheet music (Irving Berlin, Inc., NYC - 1920) with words by Al Wilson and music by Irving Bibo: "I'm feeling sad - I'm feeling bad - I went to see my doctor today - The doctor said your trouble's gone to your head and you must take my advice right away - I know just what's wrong with you - Medicine will never do - I've had a lot of patients with the same complaint - When he told me what was wrong - I thought that I would faint - I've got the profiteering blues - High prices make me sick for all my clothes are worn through - I'll have to dress like Adam but what else can I do - I've got the profiteering blues - I can't afford a pair of shoes - Ev'ry time I get a raise I laugh with glee then along comes my landlord and takes it from me - It seems the more I make the more they take - I've got the profiteering blues..." Cover image by an unknown artist ("R.S"): A wealthy gentleman (in top hat, white tie and tails and with diamond shirt studs) winking as he holds two large and overflowing bags of gold coins. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Nobody Knows (And Nobody Seems To Care)," "Rings," "I'm Gonna Spend My Honeymoon in Dixie," I Left My Door Open And My Daddy Walked Out," etc.
5I-40 If He Can Fight - Like He Can Love, Goodnight, Germany - Three pieces (various sizes) of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Grant Clarke and Howard E. Rogers and music by George W. Myer ("Featured by Ray Samuels, Bobbie Nash and Primrose Semon"): "Little Mary's beau said 'I've got to go - I must fight for Uncle Sam' - Standing in the crowd- Mary called aloud - "Fare thee well my lovin' man' - All the girls said 'Ain't he nice and tall' - Mary answered 'yes, and that's not all' - If he can fight like he can love - Oh , what a soldier boy he'll be - If he's just half as good in a trench - As he was in the park on a bench - Then ev'ry Hun had better run - And find a great big linden tree..." Cover images (with publicity photographs of Ray Samuels, Bobbie Nash and Primrose Semon) by an unknown artist: background images of growing roses. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "We'll Knock the Heligo - Into Heligo - Out Of Heligoland," "Bring Back My Daddy To Me," "I'll Come Back To You When It's All Over," "Over There," etc. RAY SAMUELS was a popular singer and dancer (sometimes with her husband, Al Samuels) in vaudeville. PRIMROSE SEMON was known as "The Titian Clown" and "The Fastest Soubrette of Them All" in burlesque and vaudeville. No biographical information was found for BOBBIE NASH.
5I-41 If I'm Not At Roll Call, Kiss Mother Good-Bye For Me - Four pieces (various covers and sizes) of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC/George L. Boyden Music Publishers, Boston/Garton Brothers Music Publishers, Boston - 1918)with words and music by George Boyden ("War Edition Trench Song - Featured by Millicent Pauline Clark at Red Cross Benefit Concerts"): "Twas just before the battle boys - That day I'll ne'er forget - For in the trench near me there stood calmly waiting - As brave a young lad as I've met - Tho death was near he had no fear - 'Twas very plain to see - For just before blowing the charge on his bugle - he smilingly said to me - If I'm not at the roll call - After fighting is done - Won't you be kind to my mother - Just for her soldier son - Tell her I know she loves me - And prays for me constantly - Angels attend her good comrade befriend her - And kiss her goodbye for me..." Cover images by artist E.H. Pfeiffer and photographs by Boston Photo Eng. Co.: Soldiers in a battlefield trench thinking about their mothers with the image of a soldier hugging his elderly mother appearing above the trench/ A color-tinted photograph of vaudeville singer Millicent Pauline Clark (in a red, white and blue dress holding a flag). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "We Won't Be With You Tomorrow," "I Hear My Country Calling," "God Spare Our Boys Over There," "My Little Gypsy Wanda," etc.
5I-42 If I Could Peep Thru The Window Tonight - A single piece of sheet music (McCarthy and Fisher Music Publishers, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Joe McCarthy, Gus Van and Joe Schenk: "In the gloaming he is dreaming - While the big red moon is beaming - Just a soldier boy who's played his part - Somewhere o'er the foam - Tonight he thinks of home - Here's the one and only longing in his heart - If I could peep thru the window tonight - And see all the folks back home - The sweetest old lady - The best in the world - The kindest hearted daddy - And my little girl - To hear them say the Rosary - And know each pearl's a pray'r for me - I'd give the world for that wonderful sight - Just to peep thru the window tonight..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: Viewed through a window, a mother, father and girlfriend of a soldier sadly sit around the dining room table. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Lorraine (My Beautiful Alsace Lorraine)."
5I-43 If I Had A Son For Each Star In Old Glory (Uncle Sam, I'd Give Tehm All To You) - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by J.E. Dempsey and music by Joseph A. Burke (Featured by Monte Austin - with cover photograph): "Uncle Sam is that somebody calling ? - Someone calling you from far away - Don't you hear that gentle mother's voice? Listen, this is what she seems to say - 'While I'm only one of a million other mothers - I speak for all the U.S.A.' - Though God never made men for soldiers - Now the clouds of war have burst - We must pray for the best, and prepare for the test - Our country must come first - Tho I've but one boy to offer - he's yours when you call - That's all a mother can do - But if I had a son for each star in old glory, Uncle Sam - I'd give them all to you..." Cover image (featuring a publicity photograph of burlesque singer Monte Austin) by an unknown artist: A mother sits and sadly stares at a framed photograph of her son in the military. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Keep Your Eye On The Girlie You Love" and "When the Day is Done."
5I-44 If This Should Be Our Last Good-Bye - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Bernie Grossman and music by Alfred Solman: "Soldier lad, all she had - He had been her joy, her care - Tear-stained face, fond embrace - Sends him forth to do his share - The bugle calls, he can no longer stay - Here's all he has to say - If this should be, dear, our last good-bye - If for the old flag, I chance should die - Let me thank you, mother dear, for all you've done - I am proud to be your son - I can't repay you all that I owe - But in your own heart, I'm sure you know - That I will dare and do, for country, God and you - If this should be our last good-bye..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: In his front yard, a soldier embraces his mother as the troops march by in the background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Johnny Get a Girl" and Dear Old Dreamy Honolulu Town."
5I-45 If We Had A Million Like Him Over There - A single piece of sheet music (McCarthy and Fisher Inc. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words and music by Billy Baskette (A musical tribute to George M. Cohan): "There's a little Yankee in the U.S.A. - Proud of it I am to speak of him this day - He's hailing from Rhode Island - And his heart is Irish true - He'll do his best for Sammy and he'll do his best for you - I'll bet you all the time that you've been knowin' - That I'm speaking of the Yankee Georgie Cohan - We need a million Yankees like him on the other side - A million like him ev'ry Yankee true and tried - We need that little Yankee doodle -doodle do or die - When that grand old flag is waving over you and I - When we say 'So Long Mary,' we need that Irish pep - Ev'ry soldier man must have a fighting 'rep' - We'd make a dandy showing - With the likes of Georgie Cohan - If we had a million like him over there..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: Composer and performer George M. Cohan, in white, tie and tails, kicks a German soldier in the backside. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When you Find There's Someone Missing (When The One You Love is Gone)."
5I-46 In Rank And File - A single piece of sheet music (De Luxe Music Co., NYC - No date listed) with music by Gustave Lange (March - "In Reih' und Glied"). Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier, holding a sword and pistol, leads the charge backed by the American flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Royal March Medley," "A Plantation Medley," The College March Medley," etc.
5I-47 In The Land O' Yamo Yamo (Funiculi - Funiculi - Funicula) - A single piece of sheet music (McCarthy and Fisher, Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by Joe McCarthy and music by Fred Fisher (Portrayed by S.Z. "Cuddles" Sakall in the Fred Fisher biopic OH, YOU BEAUTIFUL DOLL - 20th Century-Fox - 1949): "There's a place that you never can trace in geography - Come on with me - Come on and see - If you haven't been there I'm sure you'll declare that you ought to be - It's so much like Napoli - In the land of Yamo, Yamo - Funiculi, Funiculi, Funicula - Lights are blinking - While you're drinking - It's the place where the good fellows are - Goodbye to all your sorrows - You never hear them talk about the war - In the land of Yamo, Yamo..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: An Italian woman dances with a tambourine as an Italian musician plays a guitar in the background.
5I-48 In The Navy - A single piece of sheet music (Jack Mendelsohn Music Co., Boston - 1918) with words and music by Richard Howard (With cover photograph): "They've called us to the colors - A pal of mine and me - They put him in the army but they sent me off to sea - Now I'm glad that we are fighting for the cause I know is right - And just as soon as I get a chance to him I'm going to write - In the Navy! - In the Navy! - It's the finest kind of life I ever knew - Tho' I'm only on the job - As an ordinary gob - I'm tickled to death to know that I am a bluebird - In the Navy - It's the gravy - Oh! I'll anchor here until my life is through - Now they say the life's the oysters in the Army - But in the Navy it's the oyster stew..." Cover image by photographer "White of Boston": A blue-tinted publicity photograph of composer/performer Richard Howard (In a Navy uniform) with a printed autograph ("Yours until the ship sinks - Richard Howard."). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Mother, I'm Dreaming Of You."
5I-49 In Time Of Peace, Prepare For War - A single piece of sheet music (Will Rossiter - "The Chicago Publisher" - 1915) with words by Eddie Cavanaugh ("Author of YOU CAN'T PUT THE BEAUTY BACK ON THE ROSE") and music by Bob Allan ("Writer of IRELAND I HEAR YOU CALLING"): "Here's to the country, the greatest of all - The land of liberty - Heroes have fought and laid down their lives - For the home of the brave and the free - Let the old stars and stripes wave forever - Be an emblem of love, peace and rest - Be prepared to defend its honor - Should we be put to the test - In time of peace, prepare for war - So we'll never have to bow our heads in shame - John Hancock said in seventy -six - Let there never be a blemish on our name - So united we stand, divided we fall - Let peace be ours evermore - Make our army and our navy the greatest of them all - in time of peace, prepare for war..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A reproduction THE SPIRIT OF "76" painting by artist Archibald Willard (copyright by Fishladler and Schwartz, Co.) backed by a blue sky with clouds, an eagle and the American flag. Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers include: "Loveland Days," "You're the Dawn Of A Perfect Day,' "I'm A Long Way From Tipperary," and "My Ship O' Dreams" (with words by silent film star Francis X. Bushman).
5I-50 Indianola - Two pieces of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Frank H. Warren (French lyrics by C. Helene Barker) and music by S.R. Henry ("Composer of BY HECK") and D. Onivas ("Instrumental Novelty and Fox Trot'): "Bug-A-Boo was a Redman who - Heard the call of war - Swift to the tent of his love he went - Sighing for his little Indianola - Come be the bride of a Chief he cried - Keep me wait no more - Come and help me make my warpaint fit - I do my heap big bit - Me hear cannon roar - Me help Yankee win war - Me much like to kill - Scalp old Kaiser Bill - Me go fight in France - Me do a big war dance - Me love a maiden so - Wed Chief 'fore he go - Indianola's lover grunted twice - Huh! Huh! Indianola think her Chief much nice - Huh! Huh! - Indianola ask her dad's advice - Chief keep pleading - Me hear the great big cannon roar - Me want to help Yank man win war - Me like to fight and to heap much kill - Got to go and tomahawk Kaiser Bill - Me go along to fight in France - Me once again do big war dance - Me love Indianola maiden so - Come and marry Bug-A-Boo 'fore he go..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A blue-tinted Indian chief in headdress and blanket. Advertised song samples on back cover include: "Kentucky Dream."
5I-51 Is There A Letter For Me - A single piece of sheet music (Charles K. Harris Publisher, NYC - Chicago - Toronto - 1918) with words and music by Charles K. Harris: "Somewhere in France there's a lonesome young lad - Wearing his heart away - Watching the mailman with sad hungry eyes - For letters to brighten his way - There's a look of surprise - There is pain in his eyes - As he pleads with the mailman each day - Is there a letter awaiting me - Look! Mister mailman and see - And if you find one all tear-stained and torn - 'Tis from my mother who writes me each morn (Bless her,) - She's never failed me since I've been away - Something has happened maybe - Tears dim his eyes as he pleadingly cries - Tell me is there a letter for me?" Cover image by an unknown photographer: A color-tinted photograph of a soldier watching (dreaming?) of his mother as she sits on the porch reading/writing a letter. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "My Little China Doll," "Songs of Yesterday," etc.
5I-52 It Don't Seem The Same Since The Boys Marched Away - A single piece of sheet music (Brosseau Music Corporation, NYC - 1918) with words and music by Y.O. Brosseau: "My beau has gone away - He left the other day - He's fighting over there somewhere in France - Each day I watch the mail - he promised without fail - He'd write to me each time he had a chance - I don't know what to do - I feel so awf'ly blue - I always try to smile but want to cry - One thing he left with me - And that's the memory of the last time he came to say goodbye - But it don't seem the same since the boys marched away - Ev'ry day I miss him more - I am loyal and true - To the Red, White and Blue - But I miss one soldier boy who went to war - All the days are so drear - Ev'ry night seems a year - I can only hope and pray - That my lonesomeness and yearning hastens the returning of a soldier boy who marched away..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A young woman sits and sadly stares at a picture of marching soldiers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Get A Liberty Bond," "I Want A Beau," "Way Down in Georgia," etc.
5I-53 It Must Be The Spirit of 76 - A single piece of sheet music (William Jerome Publishing Corporation, NYC - 1917) with words by William Jerome and music by Arthur N. Green: "A patriotic feeling has been creeping - A creeping into ev'ry Yankee heart - It came into our houses while we were sleeping - And woke us from our slumber with a start - What is it that whispers prepare - It must be the spirit of seventy-six - That's guiding this nation today - From Frisco to Maine - It's crossing the plain - It's floating down Broadway and each country lane - An old-time but new, still it always rings true - That whispers come boys let us mix - Gee it's raising the dust - So we know that it must be the spirit of seventy-six..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier and sailor (Wearing a cap labeled "Maine") stand before artist Gilbert Stuart's painting of President George Washington. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "If I Catch The Guy Who Wrote Poor Butterfly."
5I-54 It's A Grand Old Flag To Fight For - A single piece of sheet music (MacPherson and Fraser Publishing, Boston - 1918) with words by John H.G. Fraser and music by Duncan E. MacPherson ("A March Song - Successfully Introduced by Sergt. George 'Doddy' Connors of Camp Devans"): "The U.S.A. is in the fray and a little while will do - To show the Germans many things of war they never knew - Across the sea our sons will be in the fight for freedom's cause - Against the violators of all international laws - It's a grand old flag to fight for - Our glorious stars and stripes - We'll march back home victorious - As we did from other fights - Side by side with France and Britain stand the U.S.A. - And with all our might we're in this fight - To crush German tyranny.." Cover image (featuring a black and white publicity photograph of George 'Doddy' Connors in uniform) by artist F. Gentsch: The silhouette of marching troops backed by the American flag. A letter on THE WHITE HOUSE stationary (February 12, 1918) to the Hon. Calvin D. Paige - House of Representatives is reprinted on the cover: "My dear Mr. Paige: May I not thank you for your courtesy in bringing to my attention the song, IT'S A GRAND OLD FLAG TO FIGHT FOR by Mr. Fraser and Mr. MacPherson? It is very delightful to see such assurances of patriotic feeling. Cordially and sincerely yours, WOODROW WILSON." Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "My Estelle." According to Wikipedia: "FORT (Camp) DEVENS is a reservist United States military installation in the towns of Ayer and Shirley, Massachusetts. It was named after jurist and Civil War general Charles Devens...Although closed in 1996, the fort was reopened the next day as the Devens Reserve Forces Training Area..." Biographical information for GEORGE 'DODDY' CONNORS was not found.
5I-55 It's A Long Way From Berlin To Broadway - A single piece of sheet music (Harold B. Freeman Company - Music Publishers, Providence, Rhode Island - 1917) with words and music by Harold B. Freeman: "Kelly was an Irishman fighting in the fray - A thousand miles away from dear old U.S.A. - In New York a grey haired mother just received a note - It wasn't very long - For this is all he wrote - It's a long way from Berlin to Broadway - But I'll soon be on my way - We've captured the Rhine and it's called Brandywine - Ever since we went away - We will hock Kaiser Bill in the morning - That's one bill we'll never pay - We'll soon take a trip up on a big battleship and hit the trail for old Broadway..." Cover image by an unknown artists: Two mythological griffins face each other. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Mother's Lullaby."
5I-56 It's A Long Way To Berlin, But We'll Get There - Four pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by Arthur Fields and music by Leon Flatow ("The Big Song Hit Featured by Henry Bergman in THE PASSING SHOW OF 1917" - Also featured by Maurice Burkhart, Ed Morton and Willie Weston): " Ruben Plank, a husky Yank - Came in to town one day - And said 'I can't resist, I really must enlist by heck - I'll help to get that Kaiser Bill I hear so much about' - He passed the test, throughout his chest - And started in to shout - It's a long way to Berlin, but we'll get there - Uncle Sam will show the way - Over the line, then across the Rhine - Shouting Hip! Hip! Hooray! We'll sing Yankee Doodle 'Under the Linden' - With some real live Yankee pep! - Hep! It's a long way to Berlin, but we'll get there - And I'm on my way by heck, by heck..." Cover images include: A sepia-toned publicity photograph of actor and singer Henry Bergman by photographer Strauss Peyton of Kansas City, Missouri/Various publicity photographs of performers Maurice Burkhart, Ed Morton and Willie Weston backed by the image of marching troops by an unknown artist. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: ""Goodbye Broadway, Hello France," "Mother, Dixie And You," "Hawaiian Butterfly," "Homeward Bound," "Bring Back My Daddy To Me," etc. THE PASSING SHOW OF 1917 - A Shubert musical revue starring HENRY BERGMAN (No biographical information found) and Marilyn Miller opened at the Winter Garden Theatre in NYC on April 26, 1917 and closed on October 13, 1917. According to the WORDPRESS.COM Web Site: "MAURICE BURKHART is a long-forgotten vaudevillian, but in his day he recorded for all of the major labels and in 1913 was the opening act for headliner Eva Tanguay at New York's Park Theater. Burkhart was also a song-plugger for the music publishing firm of Berlin, Waterson and Snyder, and as a result he recorded many of Irving Berlin's early songs..."According to Wikipedia: "ED MORTON (May 15, 1870 - April 11, 1938), usually credited as Eddie (or Ed) Morton, was an American singer and comedian who recorded during the ragtime era. Known as 'The Singing Cop,' he has been described as 'one of the most extraordinary performers of the early recording industry.' From about 1898 until about 1905, he worked for the Philadelphia Police Department, leading to his later billing as 'The Singing Cop.' He then became a variety performer, and in 1907 appeared at the Madison Square Roof Garden in New York City in the cast of The Maid and the Millionaire, a musical comedy. The following year he toured as part of M. M. Thiese's Rollickers burlesque show, and then became a popular attraction in the vaudeville shows run by Benjamin Franklin Keith and Sylvester Z. Poli. He first recorded, as a gruff-voiced comic baritone, in 1907, and over the next few years recorded for Victor, Columbia, Edison, Zonophone and other companies. His successes included 'That's Gratitude,' 'Just a Friend of the Family,' 'The Right Church, But The Wrong Pew,' 'You Ain't Talking To Me,' 'The Party that Wrote Home, Sweet Home Never Was a Married Man,' 'What's the Matter with Father?' and 'Oceana Roll,' first released in 1911 on the flip side of 'Alexander's Ragtime Band' by Collins and Harlan. As a Tin Pan Alley 'song plugger,' many of his songs also featured in the repertoires of rival performers Arthur Collins and Bert Williams, including 'coon songs.' He also wrote some of his own comic material. Morton did not record after 1917, but continued as a popular vaudeville attraction until 1926. He then retired to run a golf club and a restaurant, Ed Morton's Little Bit of Broadway, at Wildwood, New Jersey. He died of a heart attack in 1938 at the age of 67..." WILLIE WESTON was a popular singer, comedian and songwriter who toured the Orpheum vaudeville circuit, many times.
5I-57 It's A Long Way To The U.S.A. And The Girl I Left Behind - Two pieces of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Val Trainor and music by Harry Von Tilzer: "While the cannon shells were screaming - 'Mid the battles loudest roar - Wounded Yankee boy was dreaming - Of his childhood home once more - To his pal he's softly saying - Tell the little girl for me - Night and day how I was praying - Her dear face once more to see - It's a long, long way to the U.S.A. and the girl I left behind - And if you get back someday - Give my love to her and say - That her boy was true - Tell dear mother too - Just to always treat her kind - It's a long, long way to the U.S.A. and the girl I left behind..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: Soldiers resting and thinking about the girls they left behind (depicted in rising smoke from a campfire). Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "There's Someone More Lonesome Than You' and "Just As Your Mother Was."
5I-58 It's For You, Old Glory, It's For You - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and CO., Chicago and NYC - 1918) with words by Paul B. Armstrong and music by F. Henri Klickman: "A hundred million loyal hearts are beating firm and strong - It's for you Old Glory, it's for you - A hundred million pray'rs ascend for strength to conquer wrong - It's for you, Old Glory, it's for you - Holy emblem of eternal truth and freedom's guiding light - Ever champion of the weak oppress'd, the foe of tyrant's might - And willing be our sacrifice for honor, truth and right - It's for you Old Glory, it's for you...Starry emblem of the Red, the White, the blue - Take our honor, lives and all - We'll be ready at the call - It's for you, Old Glory, it's for you..." Cover image by an unknown artist : A soldier (with rifle) heading into battle - backed by the American flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "There's A Little Blue Star In The Window," "Old Glory Goes Marching On," "When A Boy Says Good Bye To His Mother And She Gives Him To Uncle Sam," "When The Kaiser Does The Goose-Step To An Good Old American Rag," etc.
5I-59 It's Not Your Nationality (It's Simply You) - Two pieces of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1916) with words by Joe McCarthy and music by Howard Johnson (Featured by Claire Rochester - with cover photograph): "Ev'rybody has a native land in the North, South, East and West - And it's only right your native land should be the place you love the best - Now it makes no diff'rence what you are, don't wait for fame to come - Just go and get it and they'll give you credit - No matter where you're from - It's not your nationality - It's what you do - It's not your personality that always pulls you through - Bismarck made his mark in Germany, we know - And Georgie Cohan was a Yankee in the growin' - But he made a bunch of dough - Just think of Rockefeller and what he can buy - He started from the cellar but he climbed away up high - So if you've got the spirit - Never mind your name - Folks will hear it if you play the game - It's not your nationality - It's simply you ..." Cover image (with publicity photograph of vaudevillian Claire Rochester) by an unknown artist: Various women, in costumes from different countries (led by the U.S.A.), parade in front of a copy of the sheet music for this song. according to Wikipedia: "CLAIRE ROCHESTER was from Atlanta, Georgia, where her father was a judge of the court of appeals. Her mother was Mrs. Jannie Bryant Rochester, formerly of Gordon County, Georgia. She was a descendant of the founder of Rochester, New York, Nathaniel Rochester. Claire Rochester moved north to study at the Boston Conservatory of Music. Lew Fields offered her the most money and she became the prima donna in his production of All Aboard. High class vaudeville promoters competed for her services and she headlined as a two-a-day attraction following her stint with Fields. In March 1916 she was among the entertainers in the Midnight Frolic produced by Flo Ziegfeld. The New Amsterdam Roof also featured performances by Will Rogers, the Dolly Sisters dancers, and Oscar Shaw. One of the venues where she appeared was the Hippodrome Theatre, New York City. In August 1917 she was a part of a musical revue presented there which was staged by R.H. Burnside. Rochester was active in the Liberty Bond movement during World War I. A car enthusiast, she took part in an automobile tour from New York to San Francisco in 1917, to raise money for the war effort. She drove an Apperson Roadaplane on a previous coast-to-coast trip, establishing a record run. Claire Rochester Miller died April 16, 1921 in Memphis, Tennessee."
5I-60 It's The Wrong, Wrong Way To Tickle Mary - A single piece of sheet music (Buck and Lowney "Publishers of Music That Sells" - St. Louis, Missouri - 1915) with words by J. Will Callahan and Billy Green and music by Charley Brown: "Mary Green was a village queen with a bashful little beau - He'd look down at the carpet and he'd answer 'yes' and 'no' - He'd never try to squeeze her, he'd never steal a kiss - So in dismay she went one day - And told her daddy this - Next day the bashful lad got this advice from Dad - It's the wrong, wrong way to tickle Mary - It's the wrong, wrong way to win her hand - She is like her mother, so contrary - And she 's hard to understand - When her mother was a miss, her old daddy told me this - Show your colors in the good old fashioned way - It's the wrong, wrong way to tickle Mary - So get wise, boy today..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A fashionably-dressed young woman ignores many disembodied hands offering expensive gifts. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Girl Of The Limberlost," "The Locomotor Roll," "Apple Sass Rag," "Safety First," etc.
6J-1 Ja-Da (Ja Da, Ja Da Jing Jing Jing!) - Three pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music Bob Carleton - U.S.N.R.F. (United States Naval Reserve Forces - "The sale of this song will be for the benefit of the Navy Relief Society - The Society that guards the home of men who guard the seas"): "You've heard all about your raggy melodies - Ev'rything from opera down to harmony - But I've a little song that I will sing to you - It's going to win you thru and thru - There ain't much to the words but the music is grand - And you'll be singing it to beat the band - Now you've heard of your 'Will O' The Wisp' - But give a little listen to this - It goes Ja-Da, Ja-Da- Ja Da Ja Da Jing Jing Jing - Ja Da - Ja Da - Ja Da, Ja Da, Jing, Jing, Jing - That's a funny little bit of melody - It's soothing and appealing..." Cover images (including a black and white photograph of "Carleton, Sobol and Rosenberg - The Ja-Da Trio" by an unknown photographer) by artist "R.S.": A dancing parrot. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Chong (He Comes From Hong Kong)," "Alabama Lullaby," etc. According to Wikipedia: "Robert Louis Carleton (aka BOB CARLETON) (November 8, 1894 or 1896, Missouri - July 13, 1956, Burbank, California) was an American pianist and composer of popular music. He composed over 500 songs, including the World War I hit, 'Ja-Da' in 1918. His surname is often misspelled as "Carlton." He made a brief appearance as a pianist in the 1946 film Bringing Up Father..."
6J-2 Jerry Mon Cheri - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with words by Stanley Murphy and music by Harry Tierney ("Song - "Pronounced MOH SHERRY"): "Jerry McSherry was a number one top sergeant who sail'd for gay Paree - Across the briny sea - Jerry was very attractive to the ladies in his uniform that fit him to a 'T' - He reach'd the Champs Eleysee - He saw the Bois Boulogne - He said if I'm not crazy - Here's just where I belong - He met a lonely 'lily' and lov'd her for a day - Then he heard her singing as he march'd away - Jerry Mon Cheri - I'm very fond of you la-la - Jerry mon cheri - I love your Yankee eyes so blue-la-la - I love your hank- panky, swanky, Yankee way - Oh how I love to hear you say oh boy, oh boy, oh joy, oh Jerry mon cheri - I don't sail across the sea - My heart is bumping and jumping for thee - Be what you call my sweet 'papa' - I'll teach you love - 'Come see come saw - Oh Jerry mon cheri - Won't you stay in gay Paree..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A soldier waves to a young woman (who is backed the shadow of a large red heart). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Bing! Bang! Bing 'Em On The Rhine."
6J-3 Jerry You Warra A Warrior In The War - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1919) with words by Daniel O' Neil and music by Billy Baskette (Featured by Mrs. Bert Fitzgibbons - with cover photograph): "Ireland where the shamrocks scent the air - Ireland has an angel waiting there - Twilight on the Shannon when the church bells start to ring - You can hear the lassie sing - Barney Carney from Killarney said he'd love me true - But I'm waiting here for you - Jerry, wild as any huckleberry - Cheeks as red as any cherry and eyes of true blue - Jerry, tell me why you are contrary - You know you promised when you warra warrior in the war - A warrior yes indeed you warra, Jerry - If you have to take a ferry - Come on back to County Kerry - Irelands waiting for you - The Shannon ripples a rhyme - It's calling you all the time - We'll be merry when Jerry comes home..." Cover image (including a green-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillian Mrs. Bert Fitzgibbons by an unknown photographer) by an unknown artist: Coastal scenes of Ireland. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Chong (He Comes From Hong Kong)," "Alabama Lullaby," etc.
6J-4 Jim, Jim, I Always Knew You'd Win - Two pieces of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing, Inc., NYC -Chicago - San Francisco - Sidney - London - 1918) with words by Ben Ryan and Bert Hanlon and music by Harry Von Tilzer: "The beat, the beat, the beat of feet on the street - The Yanks, the ranks, the Joes and the Jims and the Hanks - Ev'ry lad in khaki clad - hep, pep, right in step - Ev'ry heart is glad - ' here they come' a mother cries 'and there's my darling Jim - Like all the rest, he did his best and then she said to him - Jim, Jim, I always knew that you'd win - Jim, Jim, I knew you'd make 'em give in - I got the helmet that you captured from the Hun - You showed daddy you're a fightin' son of a gun - Jim, Jim , you chased them back to Berlin - It takes a yank to finish anything that he'll begin - The debt we owed to France is paid and friends of all the world you've made - Jim, Jim. I always knew that you'd win..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A soldier marches away as he waves to his mother. Song samples on the back cover include; "When I Send You A Picture of Berlin (You'll Know It's Over, 'Over There' I'm Coming Home)."
6J-5 Joan Of Arc They Are Calling You - Six pieces of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1917) with words by Alfred Bryan and Willie Weston and music by Jack Wells (French version by Liane Held Carrera): "While you were sleeping - Your France is weeping - Wake from your dreams, Maid of France - Her heart is bleeding - Are you unheeding? - Come with the flame in your glance - Through the Gates of Heaven, with your sword in hand - Come your legions to command - Joan of Arc, Joan of Arc - Do your eyes from the skies see the foe? - Don't you see the drooping Fleur de-lis? - Can't you hear the tears of Normandy? - Joan of Arc, Joan of Arc - Let your spirit guide us through - Come lead your France to victory - Joan of Arc, they are calling you..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A silhouette of Joan of Arc (on horseback) leading the troops in a charge. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Mammy's Chocolate Soldier," "You Don't have To Come From Ireland To Be Irish," "Girls of France," "Meet Me At The Station Dear" and "For Me And My Girl."
6J-6 Johnny's In Town - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1919) with words by Jack Yellin and music by George W. Meyer and Abe Olman: "Down in our alley - Each Susie and Sally - Is rolling her eyes - Up to the skies - Looking so spooney - I thought they were looney - 'Till one of the girls put me wise - Their little secret is out - Here's what the fuss is about - Johnny's in town, Johnny's in town - And oh, dearie, oh dearie, he's been aroun' - He knows French and ev'rything - You should hear him when he goes 'Oo-la-la-la!' - I'm glad he's here , he's such a dear - And I haven't seen him in a year - Oh, just think of it Clarice - He spent two months in Paris - And oh! oh! Johnny's in town..." Cover image by artist R.S. - A winking soldier waves as women swoon in the background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Dreaming Sweet Dreams of Mother" and "In Cleopatra's Land."
6J-7 Just A Baby's Letter Found In No Man's Land - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Bernie Grossman and music by Ray Lawrence: "Somebody wrote a letter to someone far away - Somebody waited for an answer all thro' each long, long day - Amid the roar and rattle - There lying on the ground - After a weary battle - That letter someone found - Just a baby's letter found in No Man's Land - To a soldier daddy over there - Filled with crosses ate the ending - Meaning kisses baby's sending - Just four tender words - I love you daddy - In a simple baby hand - That was just a baby's letter someone found in No Man's Land..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier reads a letter from a baby to daddy (as the battle rages in the background). Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Say A Prayer For The Boys Out There" and "There's A Service Flag Flying At Our House."
6J-8 Just A Baby's Prayer At Twilight (For Her Daddy Over There) - Three pieces of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., NYC- 1918) with words by Joe Young and Sam M. Lewis and music by M.K. Jerome: "I've heard the pray'rs of mothers - Some of them old and gray - I've heard the pray'rs of others - For those who went away - Oft times a pray'r will teach one - The meaning of goodbye - I felt the pain of each one - But this one made me cry - Just a baby's pray'r at twilight, when lights are low - Poor baby's years are filled with tears - There's a mother at twilight, who's proud to know - her precious little tot - Is daddy's forget-me-not - After saying 'good-night mama,' she climbs upstairs - Quite unawares - And says her pray'rs -'Oh, kindly tell my daddy that he must take care' - That's a baby's pray'r at twilight for daddy 'over there.' " Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A young girl kneels on her bed (with her doll nearby) praying. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Whose Little Heart Are You Breaking Now?," They Were All Out Of Step But Jim," "I Hate To Lose You, I'm So Used To You Now," etc.
6J-9 Just As The Sun Went Down - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1898) with words and music by Lyn Udall: "After the din of the battles roar - Just at the close of day - Wounded and bleeding up on the field - Two dying soldiers lay - One held a ringlet of thin gray hair - One held a lock of brown - Bidding each other a last farewell - Just as the sun went down - One thought of mother at home alone - Feeble and old and gray - One of the sweetheart he left in town - Happy and young and gay - One kissed a ringlet of thin grey hair - One kissed a lock of brown - Bidding farewell to the Stars and Stripes - Just as the Sun went down..." Cover image by artist Walter M. Dunk: A deserted and smoking battlefield littered with cannons, shells and helmets. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Rosary For You."
6J-10 Just Like Washington Crossed The Delaware, Genreal Pershing Will Cross The Rhine - Two pieces of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Howard Johnson and George W. Meyer and "theme suggested by" Kate Elmore and Sam Williams: "Looking backward through the ages - We can read on hist'ry's pages - Deeds that famous men have done - We are told of great commanders - Wellington and Alexanders - And the battles they won - Take our own great Revolution - That began our evolution - Washington then won his fame - Today across the sea - They're making history - The Yankee spirit still remains the same - Just like Washington crossed the Delaware - So will Pershing cross the Rhine - As they follow after George - At dear Valley Forge - Our boys will break that line - It's for your land and my land - And the sake of Auld Land Syne - Just Like Washington crossed the Delaware, Gen'ral Pershing will cross the Rhine..." Cover image (with a photograph of General John Pershing by an unknown photographer): A reproduction of the famous painting of "Washington Crossing the Delaware" by artist Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze. Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS SING song folio ("They can't stop our singing army! Send a copy of this book...to your Sammy 'over here' of 'over there' Send one to your Jackie afloat or ashore..."). According to Wikipedia: "John Joseph 'Black Jack' Pershing (September 13, 1860 - July 15, 1948), was a general officer in the United States Army who led the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Pershing is the only person to be promoted in his own lifetime to the highest rank ever held in the United States Army-General of the Armies (a retroactive Congressional edict passed in 1976 promoted George Washington to the same rank but with higher seniority). Pershing holds the first United States officer service number (O-1). He was regarded as a mentor by the generation of American generals who led the United States Army in Europe during World War II, including George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar N. Bradley, and George S. Patton. A somewhat controversial figure, his tactics have been harshly criticized both by commanders at the time and by modern historians. His reliance on costly frontal assaults, long after other allied armies had abandoned such tactics, has been accused of causing unnecessarily high American casualties..."
6J-11 Just Try To Picture Me Back Home In Tennessee - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., Music Publishers, NYC - 1915) with words by William Jerome and music by Walter Donaldson (Portrayed by Frank Lovejoy in the 1952 Warner Brothers' Gus Kahn biopic, I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS.). The song was "Successfully Introduced by Al Jolson" (with cover photograph): "I'm so happy, oh, so happy - Don't you envy me? - I leave today at three - For sunny Tennessee - Dad and mother, sis' and brother - Waiting for me there - And at the table - Next to Mable - There's an extra chair - Back home in Tennessee - Just try to picture me - Right on my mother's knee - She thinks the world of me - All I can think of tonight - Is the field of snowy white - Banjos ringing , darkies singing - All this world seems bright - The roses round the door - Make me love mother more - I'll see my sweetheart Flo - And friends I used to know - Why they'll be right there to meet me - Just imagine how they'll greet me - When I get back...To my home in Tennessee..." Cover image by photographer Strauss Peyton: A publicity photograph of Broadway star Al Jolson. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Along The Rocky Road To Dublin." According to Wikipedia: "AL JOLSON was a Jewish Lithuanian-born American singer, film actor, and comedian. At the peak of his career, he was dubbed 'The World's Greatest Entertainer.' His performing style was brash and extroverted, and he popularized a large number of songs that benefited from his 'shamelessly sentimental, melodramatic approach.' Numerous well-known singers were influenced by his music, including Bing Crosby, David Bowie, Bob Dylan and other. Dylan once referred to him as 'somebody whose life I can feel.' Broadway critic Gilbert Seldes compared him to the Greek god Pan, claiming that Jolson represented 'the concentration of our national health and gaiety.' "
6K-1 K-K-K-Katy - Four pieces (various sizes) of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by ("Army Song Leader") Geoffrey O' Hara ("The sensational stammering song success sung by soldiers and sailors"): "Jimmy was a soldier brave and bold - Katy was a maid with hair of gold - Like an act of fate - Kate was standing at the gate - Watching all the boys on dress parade - Jimmy with the girls was just a gawk - Stuttered ev'ry time he tried to talk - Still that night at eight - He was there at Katy's gate - Stuttering to her this love sick cry - K-K-K-Katy, beautiful Katy - You're the only g-g-g-girl that I adore - When the m-m-m-moon shines -Over the cow-shed - I'll be waiting at the k-k-k-kitchen door..." Cover images by artist William Austin Starmer: A soldier holding the hands of a girl (wearing a bonnet) with the moon and cowshed in the background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "If He Can Fight Like He Can Love, Good Night Germany." Cover image by
6K-2 Keep The Home Fires Burning ('Till The Boys Come Home) - Three pieces of sheet music (Chappell and Co., LTD., NYC - 1915) with words by Lena Guilbert Ford and music by Ivor Novello: "They were summoned from the hillside - They were called in from the glen - And the Country found them ready - At the stirring call for men - Let no tears add to their hardship -As the soldiers pass along - And although your heart is breaking - Make it sing this cheery song - Keep the home-fires burning - While your hearts are yearning - Though your lads are far away - They dream of home - There's a silver lining - Through the dark cloud shining - Turn the dark cloud inside out - Till the boys come home..." Advertised song samples on the inside and back cover include: "Land of Long Ago," "Knitting," "God Bring You Safely To Our Arms Again," "Waiting (When I Hear the Gate Swinging)," etc. According to Wikipedia: IVOR NOVELLO was a Welsh composer and actor who became one of the most popular British entertainers of the first half of the 20th century. He was born into a musical family and his first successes were as a songwriter. His first big hit was 'Keep the Home Fires Burning,' which was enormously popular during the First World War. After the war, Novello contributed numbers to several successful musical comedies and was eventually commissioned to write the scores of complete shows. His 1917 show, Theodore and Co, was a wartime hit. He wrote his musicals in the style of operetta and often composed his music to the librettos of Christopher Hassall. In the 1920s, he turned to acting, first in British films and then on stage, with considerable success in both. He starred in two silent films directed by Alfred Hitchcock, The Lodger and Downhill, both in 1927. On stage, he played the title character in the first London production of Liliom (1926). Novello briefly went to Hollywood, but he soon returned to Britain where he had more successes, especially on stage, appearing in his own lavish West End productions of musicals. The best known of these were Glamorous Night (1935) and The Dancing Years (1939). From the 1930s, he often performed with Zena Dare, writing parts for her in his works. He continued to write for film, but he had his biggest late successes with stage musicals: Perchance to Dream (1945), King's Rhapsody (1949) and Gay's the Word (1951)..."
6K-3 Keep The Love-Light Burning In The Window 'Til The Boys Come Marching Home - A single piece of sheet music (D.W. Cooper Publishing Co., Boston, Massachusetts - 1917) with words and music by Jack Caddigan and Jimmy McHugh: "As the shadows fall there's a bugle call, martial music fills the air - There's the tramp of feet on the city street, soldier boys are everywhere - There's a tear dimmed eye, there's a mother's sigh, there's a sweetheart's fond goodbye - As they march away to face the fray to dare to do or die - Keep the love-light burning in the window 'till the boys come home marching home - Your heart may yearn but they'll return tho'on battlefields they roam - There's a silver beacon shining through the darkest clouds of war..." Cover image by artist W.C.H. :A home in a rustic setting. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When The Sun Goes Down In Switzerland," "Like A Rose You Have Faded Away," "Caroline I'm Coming Back To You," etc.
6K-4 Keep The Trench Fires Going For The Boys Out There - Two pieces of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Eddie Moran and music by Harry Von Tilzer: "Uncle Sammy's boys are somewhere over there in France - Someone's going to know they're in a fight - Uncle Sammy's boys are not afraid to take a chance - When they're fighting for a cause that's right - But while Uncle Sammy's boys are fighting brave and true -There's something that we have got to do - Keep the trench-fire's going for the boys out there - Let's play fair, do our share, our boys are fighting for you and me, can't you see? - For you and me and Liberty - Let's make a showing while they're o'er the foam - Do your bit and bring them home - Keep the trench-fires going for the boys out there - Let ev'ry son of Uncle Sammy do his share..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: Soldiers sitting, talking and writing letters around a campfire (with photograph images of two women inset on the top and bottom). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "There's Someone More Lonesome Than You' and "Just As Your Mother Was."
6K-5 Keep Your Head Down "Fritzie Boy" - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Lieut. Gitz Rice ("Songs by Lieutenant Gitz Rice" with cover photograph - Song "Inspired by a brave Tommy and written at the Battle of Ypres - 1915"): "Over in the trenches - Up to their eyes in clay - Billy and Jack and Jimmie and Joe are singing all the day - When they see a German -Sticking up his snout - They give him a chance to get out of France when they all shout! - Keep your head down Fritzie Boy - Keep your head down, Fritzie Boy - Last night in the pale moonlight, I saw you - I saw you - You were fixing your barb' wire - When we open'd 'rapid fire! - If you want to see your 'Vater in the Vaterland' keep your head down Fritzie Boy..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A printed - autographed and signed ("Faithfully yours, Gitz Rice, Lieut.") black and white photograph of Gitz Rice (in uniform). Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "The Radiance In Your Eyes." According to the Wordpress.com Web Site: Lt. GITZ RICE (1891-1947)... made an entire career out of entertaining the troops in World War One. The Canadian soldier had been sent to France, and seen action, and in his spare time he wrote patriotic songs and organized entertainments for his fellow troops. After the war, he pretty much did the same thing in vaudeville - recreating those moments, uniform and all, touring the big time first with Irene Bordoni in 1919, and Frank Fay in 1920. In the late 20s, he toured with a group of male singers attired as Royal Canadian Mounties. He retired in 1930 but re-emerged during the Second World War to do his musical duty once again..." according to Wikipedia: The First BATTLE OF YPRES, also called the First Battle of Flanders...was a First World War battle fought for the strategically important town of Ypres in western Belgium in October and November 1914. The German and Western Allied attempts to secure the town from enemy occupation included a series of further battles in and around the West Flanders Belgian municipality..." According to Wikipedia: "Tommy Atkins (often just TOMMY) is slang for a common soldier in the British Army. It was already well established in the 19th century, but is particularly associated with World War I. It can be used as a term of reference, or as a form of address. German soldiers would call out to 'Tommy' across no man's land if they wished to speak to a British soldier. French and Commonwealth troops would also call British soldiers 'Tommies.' In more recent times, the term Tommy Atkins has been used less frequently, although the name 'Tom' is occasionally still heard, especially with regard to paratroopers..." According to Wikipedia: "VATERLAND means 'Fatherland' in some West Germanic languages..."
6K-6 Khaki Bill - A single piece of sheet music (C.L. Barnhouse Publishers, Oskaloosa, Iowa - 1917) with words and music by Harry L. Watson ("March Song - To the 'Khaki Bills' of the U.S.A."): "Banners flying, sweethearts sighing - Boys go marching along singing liberty's song - Khak, khak, khaki! - Hep, hep, step spry! - Hear the voice of freedom shouting - Hear the bugles call - Admiration of our nation - Soldiers loyal and true to Red, White and Blue - Oh, hear the bugles calling you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Sketches of various soldiers ("Goodbye - Charley, Jack and Joe, Tom, Dick, Harry, Terry, Roe."). Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Alpine Sunset," "The Jubilator," "Red, White and 'Blues,' etc.
6K-7 Khaki Sammy - A single piece of sheet music (G. Schirmer, NYC and Boston - 1917) with words and music by John Alden Carpenter ("Dedicated to Miss Nora Bayes"): "All the way from Illinois - To a little old town in France - All the way from Illinois - To make those Deutschers dance - Ev'ry girl has got a boy - From Iowa(y) or Illinois - A mixing with the hoi-polloi - Horse foot, marines - They're swallowing beans - In a little old town in France - Oh, you Sammy! - Khaki Sammy - When I see the sun -A - shining on his gun - I have to run and sing out - Oh, You Sammy! - Swagger Sammy! Sure he's gone and got me hypnotized for fair - When in Flanders - he meanders - For his luck to try, with a twinkle in his eye - It's then that I'll be cheering for my Sammy, dear old Sammy! You can gamble on your Sammy over there!" Cover image by an Unknown artist: A soldier saluting. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When The Boys Come Home" ("Words by the late JOHN HAY, private secretary to President LINCOLN and Secretary of State during the McKinley and Roosevelt administrations"), etc. According to the All Music Web Site: "NORA BAYES was one of those rare female triple-threats in vaudeville entertainment: a singer, comedienne, and songwriter of tremendous ability, she was easily the most popular female entertainer in vaudeville for much of the first quarter of the 20th century. Born Leonora Goldberg in 1880, she began her career in entertainment in Chicago during 1899, when she was 19 years old. Bayes was married five times, but it was her second husband, Jack Norworth, who had been her stage partner and who she married in 1908, who was the most important of them musically -- together they composed the song 'Shine On, Harvest Moon,' which became an overnight hit and one of the most popular songs of the 20th century. Curiously, Bayes' singing ability, as she would have been the first to admit, was nothing special, but she had extraordinary stage presence, which came over exceptionally well on the vaudeville stage, and it compensated for any vocal shortcomings. Additionally, she could 'act' a song -- especially a comedic one -- for all it was worth. She was called 'the life of every production with which she is connected' by contemporary reviewers. Bayes recorded for both Victor and Columbia Records during the late teens and early '20s. Among her biggest successes was the cheerful ethnic popular song 'Has Anybody Here Seen Kelly,' which came from Lew Fields' 1910 production of The Jolly Bachelor, which knocked critics and audiences alike off their feet. The accompanying record, cut the same year for Victor, was also a hit. Bayes' later successes included the World War I patriotic anthem 'Over There,' 'Tomorrow I'll Be in My Dixie Home Again,' 'How Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down on the Farm,' 'The Argentines, The Portuguese, and the Greeks,' and 'The Japanese Sandman.' " NORA BAYES was portrayed by Frances Langford in the 1942 George M. Cohan biopic YANKEE DOODLE DANDY and by Ann Sheridan in the 1944 Nora Bayes/Jack Norworth biopic SHINE ON, HARVEST MOON.
6K-8 Kid Has Gone To The Colors, The - A single piece of sheet music (Seidel Music Publishing Co., Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana - 1917) with words by William Herschell and music by Leon E. Idoine: "The kid has gone to the colors - And we don't know what to say - The kid we have loved and cuddled - Stepped out for the flag today - We tho't him a child, a baby - With never a care at all - But his country call'd him man-size - And the kid has heard the call..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier is flanked by his proud parents. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Belfry Chimes," "The Air Line," "Lavender and Cream," etc.
6K-9 Kiss That Made Me Cry, The - Four pieces of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Joe Burns and Arthur Fields and music by Archie Gottler: "Soldier boy fought for Old Glory - Now he is safely home - I begged to hear his story - Of hardships across the foam - He said The saddest day - Was when I sailed away - I held back each tear as I kissed mother dear - I held back the tears when I kissed Dad - I held back each tear as I kissed wifey dear - But oh, how it made me sad - I tried to be brave as we parted - I held back each tear with a sigh - But when I had to kiss my baby - That's the kiss that made me cry..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A father (in uniform) hugs his child. The back cover features an advertisement for the SONGS OF CHEER folio ("For Camp, Fireside, Liberty and Community Singing - A Pocket Book of Songs - the soul of America's war-time spirit...").
6L-1 Laddie In Khaki (The Girl Who Waits At Home) - A single piece of sheet music (Chappell and Co., NYC - 1915) with words and music by Ivor Novello ("Composer of TILL THE BOYS COME HOME"): "There is a girl who waits at home - Who's full f charm and grace - Tho' her heart is sadden'd, yet - She keeps a smiling face - Ask her whom she's thinking of - All the live-long day - With a smile that lights her face - She will softly say - Laddie in Khaki - I'm waiting for you! - I want you to know that my heartbeats true - I'm longing and praying - And living for you - So come back little Laddie in Khaki..." Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers include: "Waiting (When I Hear The Gate A - Swinging)" and "Roses Of Picardy." According to Wikipedia: IVOR NOVELLO was a Welsh composer and actor who became one of the most popular British entertainers of the first half of the 20th century. He was born into a musical family and his first successes were as a songwriter. His first big hit was 'Keep the Home Fires Burning,' which was enormously popular during the First World War. After the war, Novello contributed numbers to several successful musical comedies and was eventually commissioned to write the scores of complete shows. His 1917 show, Theodore and Co, was a wartime hit. He wrote his musicals in the style of operetta and often composed his music to the librettos of Christopher Hassall. In the 1920s, he turned to acting, first in British films and then on stage, with considerable success in both. He starred in two silent films directed by Alfred Hitchcock, The Lodger and Downhill, both in 1927. On stage, he played the title character in the first London production of Liliom (1926). Novello briefly went to Hollywood, but he soon returned to Britain where he had more successes, especially on stage, appearing in his own lavish West End productions of musicals. The best known of these were Glamorous Night (1935) and The Dancing Years (1939). From the 1930s, he often performed with Zena Dare, writing parts for her in his works. He continued to write for film, but he had his biggest late successes with stage musicals: Perchance to Dream (1945), King's Rhapsody (1949) and Gay's the Word (1951)..."
6L-2 Laddies From Missouri, The - A single piece of sheet music (Robertson-Criss Publishing Co., Springfield, Missouri - 1918) with words by Allie Toland Criss and music by R. Ritchie Robertson ("Dedicated to my own laddie and all other laddies who are doing their bit for Missouri A.T.C."): " 'Tis good-bye to old Missouri, you're the fairest state of all - But across the hills and prairies we have heard our country's call - 'Tis a call to fight for freedom and the dear old U.S.A. - So we have joined the colors and we are right here to say - We will keep Old Glory flying and we'll never let it trail - With the stars and stripes above us old Missouri will not fail - We're the laddies from Missouri and we're facing toward Berlin - We are out to show the Kaiser that we're in the fight to win..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers charging on a battlefield.
6L-3 Lafayette (We Hear You Calling) - Two pieces of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Mary Earl ((Pen name for Robert King - "Writer of MY SWEETHEART IS SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE"): "Out of the ages - From hist'ry's pages - There comes a silent plea - Yet we can hear it - Lafayette's spirit - Calling from over the sea - For there's a debt unpaid - To France who needs our aid - Lafayette, we hear you calling - Lafayette, 'tis not in vain - That the tears of France are falling - We will help her to smile again - For a friend in need is a friend indeed - Do not think we shall ever forget - Lafayette, we hear you calling - And we're coming, Lafayette..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A silhouette of a stature of the Marquis de La Fayette. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Chin-Chin Chinaman," "One Day In June," etc. According to The List of Robert King's Work Web site: "Robert A. King [born Robert Keiser] was a prolific American composer and songwriter of popular music; born and died in New York. He published using both names, anonymously and also used a pseudonym, MARY EARL. His total output will probably never be known. He worked at Ditson's music store as a child before entering Tin Pan Alley at the publisher, Leo Feist, where he produced his first hit Anona (1903). In 1918, he was contracted to Shapiro-Bernstein Music Publishers to write 4 songs per month. These included the hits Beautiful Ohio (1918) and Dreamy Alabama (1919). Of ragtime interest, is his very early Everything is Ragtime Now (1899) written as Robert Keiser." According to Wikipedia: "Marie-Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier de La Fayette, Marquis de La Fayette, in the U.S. often known simply as LAFAYETTE, was a French aristocrat and military officer born in Chavaniac, in the province of Auvergne in south central France. Lafayette was a general in the American Revolutionary War and a leader of the Garde nationale during the French Revolution. In the American Revolution, La Fayette served as a major-general in the Continental Army under George Washington. Wounded during the Battle of Brandywine, he still managed to organize a successful retreat. He served with distinction in the Battle of Rhode Island. In the middle of the war, he returned to France to negotiate an increase in French support. On his return, he blocked troops led by Cornwallis at Yorktown while the armies of Washington and those sent by King Louis XVI under the command of General de Rochambeau, Admiral de Grasse, and Admiral de Latouche Tréville prepared for battle against the British..."
6L-4 Last Long Mile, The - Two pieces of sheet music (T.B. Harms, Co., NYC - 1917) with words and music by Emil Breitenfeld ("A train of mirth melody in three sections from Henry W. Savage's musical comedy special TOOT TOOT - Adapted from the Rupert Hughes Farce EXCUSE ME"): "Oh they put me in the army and they handed me a pack - They took away my nice new clothes and dolled me up in kack - They marched me twenty miles a day to fit me for the war - I didn't mind the first nineteen but the last one made me sore - Oh, it's not the pack that you carry on your back - Nor the Springfield on your shoulder - Nor the five inch crust of khaki colored dust that makes you feel your limbs are growing older - And it's not the hike on the hard turnpike that wipes away your smile - Nor the socks of sister's that raise the blooming blisters - It's the last long mile..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier and a woman (in a white fur) are followed by a smiling African-American train porter carrying a large red, white and blue hat box (with blue bow). Advertised song samples on the back cover include additional selections from "The Latest JEROME KERN Musical Comedy TOOT TOOT Offered By Henry W. Savage:" "If," "When you Wake Up Dancing," "Let's Go" and "Girlie." TOOT-TOOT! - a musical comedy in two acts and 4 scenes starring Donald MacDonald - premiered on Broadway at the George M. Cohan Theatre on March 11, 1918 and closed on April 13, 1918.
6L-5 Let Lovelight Be Always Shining (For the Loved Ones Away) - A single piece of sheet music (H.C. Weasner and Co., Buffalo, NY - 1918) with words and music by H.C. Weasner ("Composer of JUST A DREAM OF MOTHER, MOTHER'S OLD SWEET LULLABY, etc." - "Dedicated to my friend John G. Gowans"): " When twilight shades are softly falling - And nature seems to be at rest - 'Tis then we love to dream of love-days - Days of old that we loved best - How around the fireside oft we'd gather - With the loved ones gone away - Soon we know that they will be returning - As we wait we'll smile and say - Let lovelight be always shining - For the loved ones away - Each cloud has a silver lining - That brightens the way - And when they will be returning - Let no tears remain - But smile up and show the lovelight - When they come home again..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers gathered on the campground under a full moon. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Light Of Another Day."
6L-6 Let Our Battle Cry Be On To Berlin - A single piece of sheet music (Roger Graham Publishing, Chicago - 1917) with words by Walter Hirsch and music by Howard Steiner ("Successfully featured by Willie Howard in the Winter Garden SHOW OF WONDERS" - with cover photograph of The Howard Brothers - Willie and Eugene): "Many brave hearts are a sailing - Far across the briny Sea - Sweethearts and mothers waiting for a victory - 'My country 'tis of thee' rings in ev'ry heart - They turn their eyes to foreign shores - They a cry 'Just let us start' - Let our battle cry be 'On to Berlin, on to Berlin' - Let the whole world know we're there - Show the Kaiser that we have some engineers - Yankee boys are ready to do and dare - We're goin' to down the German army when we begin, when we begin - For we're fighting for the right - Napoleon bridges the Rhine for France, all our boys will take a chance - Let our battle cry be 'On to Berlin." Cover image by artist "N" - A blue-tinted publicity photograph of vaudeville and Broadway stars Willie and Eugene Howard pictured in a shield with a red, white and blue background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Down On Bull Frog's Isle." According to Wikipedia: "WILLIE HOWARD (April 13, 1883 - January 14, 1949) and EUGENE HOWARD (July 7, 1880 - August 1, 1965), sometimes billed as the Howard Brothers, were Silesian-born American vaudeville performers of the first half of the 20th century. They were two of the earliest openly Jewish performers on the American stage. After performing in amateur night competitions, the brothers began separate professional theatre careers. Soon they were appearing together in burlesque and vaudeville, where, over the course of a decade, they established their reputation. The brothers were hired by the Shubert family in 1912 to perform in a series of successful revues on Broadway over the next decade called The Passing Show. These were followed by another popular series of Broadway revues in the 1920s and 1930s called George White's Scandals. They appeared in a few additional Broadway musicals, notably Girl Crazy. In between these Broadway seasons, the brothers continued to be in great demand on the vaudeville circuit and made a few (mostly short) films. In the 1940s, Willie continued to star in revues and musicals and to perform in vaudeville and night clubs..." THE SHOW OF WONDERS - A musical revue produced by J.J. Shubert and starring WILLIE AND EUGENE HOWARD, Marilyn Miller, Lew Clayton, Ernest Hare, etc. - opened at Broadway's Winter Garden Theatre on October 26, 1916 and closed on April 21, 1917.
6L-7 Let The Flag Fly! - A single piece of sheet music (Globe Music Company, NYC - 1917) with words and music by L. Wolfe Gilbert ("Suggested by the slogan of the NEW YORK WORLD - LET THE FLAG FLY!" - "Let Every Day Be Flag Day' - L. Wolfe Gilbert - with cover photograph): "We had hoped that we won't - We had prayed the we don't - Have to join all this ugly war and strife - But our cause it is, it is just - And we find that we must - Then defend your home and country with your life - Right here we all belong - Our country right or wrong - Hearken ye all to my song - Let the flag fly, let the flag fly - Give the stars and the stripes to the breeze - From the northeast corner of the coast of Maine - To sunny Southland and western plain - On ev'ry mountain side, in ev'ry lane - Let her fly from on high to the sky - Ev'ry flag day's a holiday - Let's have one ev'ry day - Showing to each passer-by - From ev'ry window, ev'ry steeple - They'll know we're united people - Let the old flag fly..." Cover image by U.& U. Photographs: A blue-tinted photograph of troops parading down a city street. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Shades Of Night" and "Out Of The Cradle Into My Heart." According to Wikipedia: THE NEW YORK WORLD was a newspaper published in New York City from 1860 until 1931. The paper played a major role in the history of American newspapers. It was a leading national voice of the Democratic Party. From 1883 to 1911 under publisher Joseph Pulitzer, it became a pioneer in yellow journalism, capturing readers' attention and pushing its daily circulation to the one-million mark..."
6L-8 Let Uncle Sammy Do Itq - A single piece of sheet music (Leonard Oden Publishing, Dallas, Texas - 1917) with words and music by Leonard Oden: "Uncle Sam's been good to you - Patient all the while - Tried to reason this with you - As we reason with a child - All he asks 'Don't sink a ship' - This was all he'd cry - You don't wake up to this tip - Now we wait to sing this lullaby - If you don't like the way this war is run - Let Uncle Sammy do it - Let Uncle Sammy do it - If you think you have not had enough fun - Lead Uncle Sammy to it - Lead Uncle Sammy to it - The old man was good to you - But now you have played untrue - Then you wonder and you wonder - Who we 'Am' - Leave it to our Uncle Sam..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A sketch of Uncle Sam/Sammy marching with a sword and rifle. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "All Hail America" - "New national anthem endorsed by the Texas Senate - April 23, 1917 - as a state and a national anthem."
6L-9 Let's All Be Americans Now - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1917) with words and music by Irving Berlin, Edgar Leslie and George W. Meyer: " Peace has always been our pray'r - Now there's trouble in the air - War is talked of ev'rywhere - Still in God we trust - Now that war's declared - We'll show we're prepared - And if fight we must - It's up to you - What will you do? - England or France may have your sympathy over the sea - But you'll agree - That now is the time - To fall in line - You swore that you would so be true to your vow - Let's all be Americans now..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbell: A solder stands with his rifle at ready before a silhouette of marching troops. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "The Dixie Volunteers."
6L-10 Let's Be Ready,That's The Spirit of '76 - A single piece of sheet music (Rubey Cowan Music Publishing Co., NYC - 1916) with words and music by Charles Bayha and Rubey Cowan ("Respectfully dedicated to Miss Marjorie Sterrett, Founder of MARJORIE'S BATTLESHIP FUND" - Featured by vaudevillian Wellington Cross of Cross and Josephine - with cover photograph ): " Some want peace and notes they will write for it - Others want it so bad they'll fight for it - Peace at any price - May be good advice - But our Fore-Fathers thought a diff'rent way - Just remember you're an American - Don't forget that they were the very men - Who fought side by side - And who gladly died - To put us where we are today - So Let's be ready - Let's be ready, that's the Spirit of seventy -six..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A reproduction THE SPIRIT OF "76" painting by artist Archibald Willard against a red, white and blue cloud formation. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "What's The Good of Moonlight (When You Haven't Goat a Girl to Love?)." WELLINGTON CROSS was a popular song and dance man and comic in vaudeville who teamed with Lois Josephine and, for a short time, baseball legend Babe Ruth (No other biographical information found). According to Wikipedia: "THE MARJORIE STERRETT BATTLESHIP FUND was established in 1917 by the Tribune Association. It was initiated by a contribution which accompanied the following letter, printed on February 4, 1916: 'To the Editor of the New York Tribune, 'Dear Sir: I read in your paper every morning a lot about preparedness. My grandpa and my great grandpa were soldiers. If I was a boy I would be a soldier, too, but I am not, so I want to do what I can to help. Mama gives me a dime every week for helping her. I am sending you this week's dime to help build a battleship for Uncle Sam. I know a lot of other kids would give their errand money if you would start a fund. I am 13 years old, and go to Public School No. 9, Brooklyn. Truly Yours, MARJORIE STERRETT - I am a true blue American and I want to see Uncle Sam prepared to lick all creation like John Paul Jones did. P.S.-Please call the battleship America.' The letter was written during the buildup to America's entry into World War I, and it generated a huge response. Former president Theodore Roosevelt responded immediately with a handwritten letter and a dollar contribution; within a few days he met with Marjorie in Manhattan. The Tribune printed the name of every contributor, and newspapers across the country reprinted Marjorie's letter and received additional donations..."
6L-11 Let's Help The Red Cross Now - A single piece of sheet music (Metropolis Music Co., NYC- 1917) with words and music by Ted S. Barron ("Composer of L-I-B-E-R-T-Y, GEORGIA MOON, ON HONOLULU BAY, etc. - Sincerely dedicated to the American Red Cross"): A soldier boy lay dying 'neath the flag he fought to shield - So far away from home and Mother dear - When suddenly a vision fair - Came across the battlefield - And knelt beside him calmly without fear - She took him in her arms so tenderly - For she was just a Red Cross nurse you see - Let's help the Red Cross now - When shot and shell are flying - They help the sick and dying - Cooling each fevered brow - So why not - Let's help the Red Cross now - We all can help somehow - When the fight starts they'll be in it - Do your share and help them win it - Come on let's help the Red Cross now..." Cover image by artist Penny Ross: A Red Cross Nurse comforts a wounded soldier and a frightened woman while raising her hand in greeting -backed by a large Red Cross symbol. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "L-I-B-E-R-T-Y."
6L-12 Letter From No Man's Land, A - A single piece of sheet music (Harold Freeman Music Co., Providence, Rhode Island - 1918) with words and music by Harold B. Freeman ("A song that the whole world will love!!!"): "A little gray mother sat all alone - Dreaming the hours away - She'd given her youngster to Uncle Sam - To fight for the U.S.A. - And there came a ring at the doorbell - The postman had left a note - She vanished her fears and she smiled thro' her tears - At the simple words he wrote - Perhaps all the words were not spell'd right - Or the meaning was not very clear - A frayed little scrawl, but she read it all - It started with Mother dear - But she didn't cry at the lines that he penned - She felt mighty proud that his life she could lend - And she kissed each cross, there at the end - Of a letter from No Man's Land..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A soldier writes a letter by the campfire - the smoke from the campfire encircles the image of his mother reading the letter. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "My Mother's Lullaby." According to Wikipedia: "...The British Regular Army did not widely employ the term, NO MAN'S LAND, when they arrived in France in 1914. The terms used most frequently at the start of the war to describe the area between the trench lines included 'between the trenches' or 'between the lines'. The term 'no man's land' was first used in a military context by soldier and historian Ernest Swinton in his short story The Point of View. Swinton used the term in war correspondence on the Western Front, with specific mention of the terms with respect to the Race to the Sea in late 1914. The Anglo-German Christmas truce of 1914 brought the term into common use, and thereafter it appeared frequently in official communiqués, newspaper reports, and per personnel correspondences of the members of the British Expeditionary Force. In World War I, no man's land was often ranged from several hundred yards to in some cases less than 10 yards. Heavily defended by machine guns, mortars, artillery and riflemen on both sides, it was often riddled with barbed wire and rudimentary improvised land mines, as well as corpses and wounded soldiers who were not able to make it across the sea of explosions and fire. The area was usually devastated by the warfare, carnage and remains of the artillery. It was open to fire from the opposing trenches and hard going generally slowed down any attempted advance. However, not only were soldiers forced to cross no man's land when advancing, and as the case might be when retreating, but after an attack the stretcher bearers would need to go out into it to bring in the wounded. No man's land remained as a feature of the battlefield until near the end of World War I, when open warfare became possible..."
6L-13 Letter That Never Reached Home, The - Two pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Kalmar, Puck and Abrahams Consolidated, Inc. Music Publishers, NYC - 1916) with words by Edgar Leslie and Bernie Grossman and music by Archie Gottler ("By the writers of AMERICA, I LOVE YOU"): "Just after the fray where brave soldiers lay - Up on the field their comrades came to carry them away - They picked up a note some poor fellow wrote - They read it with a tear-dimmed eye 'twas a soldier's last good-bye - Just an old-fashioned letter that lay on the ground - It came from a soldier boy's heart - Before he ever could send it he had to end it 'I love you' was all he could start - It was found without address not even a name, so his message will never be known - Only God in His Might, knows who's waiting tonight for the letter that never reached home..." Cover images by unknown artists: A young woman sadly waits for a letter she'll never receive. Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers include: "As We Sat At The Saturday Evening Post" and "I'm A Lonesome Melody."
6L-14 L-I-B-E-R-T-Y - A single piece of sheet music (Metropolis Music Co., NYC- No date listed) with words and music by Ted S. Barron ("The Song of Our Land" by the "Composer of GEORGIA MOON, LULL ME TO SLEEP, etc."): Lyric pages missing. Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: The Statue of Liberty in a red, white and blue glow. Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers include: "Georgia Moon," " That's Why I Came Back To You," "You're Some Girl," "Lull Me To Sleep," "In the Shadow Of The Dear Old Blarney Stone," etc.
6L-15 Liberty Bell (It's Time To Ring Again) - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1917) with words by Joe Goodwin and music by Halsey K. Mohr: "You have rested Liberty Bell - For a hundred years and more - End your slumber, Liberty Bell - Ring as you did before - It's time to wake 'em up - It's a cause worth ringing for - Liberty Bell, it's time to ring again - Liberty Bell, It's time to swing again - We're in the same sort of fix - We were in Seventy-Six - And we are ready to mix and rally 'round you, like we did before - Oh! Liberty Bell - Your voice is needed now - Liberty Bell - We'll hear your call, one and all - Though you're old and there's a crack in you - Don't forget Old Glory's backin' you - Oh! Liberty Bell, it's time to ring again..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A silhouette of Betsy Ross sewing the first American flag as George Washington watches (The traditional story/legend behind the creation of the flag) - The liberty bell is framed in a circle above their heads. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Three Wonderful Letters From Home," "A Little Bit Of Sunshine From Home," "Beautiful Ohio, " etc.
6L-16 Liberty Bond Magee - A single piece of sheet music (Kerry Mills, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Charles McNaughton and John Barclay ("The Big Van and Schenck Song" - with cover photograph): "A Friend of mine named Mike McGee - Was wed a year last May - And when the U.S.A. said he must go away - He said my country's calling me, to go I'm simply wild - When patriotic Wifie said "What shall we name the child?" - So they christened the baby Chateau Thierry, Verdun, K.of C. Hoover, Pershing, Haig, Clemenceau, Belgium, Foch, Paree - Also, Lafayette, Red Cross, Y.M.C.A., Parlez vous ypres, Wilson, Roye, At-A-Boy, Liberty Bond McGee..." Cover image (with publicity photograph of vaudevillians Van and Schenck by an unknown photographer) by artist Andrea De Takacs: A wide-eyed baby. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Teach Me To Be A Brave Soldier " and "Snooky Hollow." According to Wikipedia: "VAN AND SCHENCK were popular United States entertainers in the 1910s and 1920s: Gus Van (born August Von Glahn, August 12, 1886 - March 12, 1968), baritone and Joe Schenck (pronounced 'sha?k;' born Joseph Thuma Schenck, c. 1891 - June 28, 1930), tenor. They were vaudeville stars and made appearances in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1918, 1919, 1920 and 1921. They made numerous phonograph records for the Emerson, Victor, and Columbia record companies. With Schenck on piano, the duo sang and performed comedy routines. Van was especially adept at dialect humor, and could imitate any number of regional and continental accents. One of the team's typical novelty hits was Pastafazoola, in praise of Italian food and sung in the appropriate style. Van's hearty baritone and Schenck's high tenor harmonized well, and the team became known as 'the pennant-winning battery of songland.' They performed on radio shows and appeared in early talking motion pictures, including several musical shorts-in both Vitaphone and MGM Movietone-and one feature, the MGM film They Learned About Women (1930). During the First World War, they recorded humorous songs such as 'I Don't Want to Get Well' which told the tale of a wounded soldier who did not want to recover, as he was comfortable in hospital and in love with a nurse. After Schenck's death in 1930 of heart disease, Van continued to perform as a solo artist on stage, screen, and radio. He appeared in many New York-produced Soundies in 1941. Schenck was buried in The Cemetery of the Evergreens in Brooklyn."
6L-17 Liberty Waltz - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) composed by Oscar Duryea with music by J. Bodewalt Lampe. Cover image by an unknown artist: The Liberty Bell backed by the blue-tinted world globe and red and white stripes (faded). Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Camouflage One Step."
6L-18 Li'l Liza Jane - A single piece of sheet music (Sherman, Clay and Co., San Francisco - 1916) with words and music by Countess Ada De Lachau: "I'se got a gal an' you got none Li'l Liza Jane - I'se got a gal an' you got none Li'l Liza Jane - Ohe, Liza, Li'l Liza Jane…Gwine ter th'ow the dice away, Li'l Liza Jane - When you name the happy day Li'l Liza Jane..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Three soldiers with a harmonica, ukulele and banjo sit and sing on a wooden bench. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "While The Incense is Burning (I Dream of You)."
6L-19 Little Bit Of Sunshine (From Home), A - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words by Ballard MacDonald and Joe Goodwin and music by James F. Hanley (Featured by "W.J. Reilly - U.S.S. Michigan" - with cover photograph in uniform): "Say neighbor, did you write to say 'Hello' - To Frank and Jim and Joe - The boys who had to go - Well, neighbor, don't you think it's time you did? - For a long, long way from home today - There's some poor lonesome kid (Remember) - Just a bit of sunshine - A little bit of sunshine - Will drive the clouds away - You've got lots of time, so spend it - Write a cheery note and send it - It may help some fellow on his way - There is a pen and paper handy - Send 'em cigarettes and candy - Help those Yankee Doodle Dandies o'er the foam - For a friendly sort of letter makes a fellow feel much better - It's a little bit of sunshine from home..." Cover image (with publicity photograph of vaudevillian W.J.Reilly by and unknown photographer) by artist Albert Wilfred Barbell: Soldier and sailors reading letters from home - backed by envelopes and crossed fountain pens. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "One Day in June," "Liberty Bell (It's Time to Ring Again), etc. W. J. REILLY was a gunner on the U.S.S. Michigan who also performed as a singer and piano player in vaudeville (No other biographical information found).
6L-20 Little French Mother, Good Bye! - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1919) with words and music by Jack Caddigan and Chick Story ("By the writers of ROSE OF NO MAN'S LAND, SALVATION LASSIE OF MINE, IN THE OLD SWEET WAY, etc."): "Where the shadows gathered on that foreign shore - There they met to say good-bye and meet no more - As he took her in his arms to kiss away a tear - Softly he whispered in her ear - Little French mother, good-bye, good-bye - Dry up the tear in your eye - Don't cry - I knew from the start that some day we'd part - But down in my heart - Oh, I wish I could stay a little longer - Little French mother, don't sigh, don't sigh - A million others love you just the same as I - You did all a mother could , you're the flow'r of womanhood, little French mother, good-bye..." Cover image by artist Norman Rockwell: A soldier saying goodbye to his mother in a rustic cabin. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Chong (He Came From Hong Kong)" and "Alabama Lullaby."
6L-21 Little Good For Nothing's (Good For Something After All), The - A single piece of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co., NYC - Chicago - San Francisco - Sidney - London - 1918) with words by Lou Klein and music by Harry Von Tilzer (Sheet music cover "Specially posed by Laurette Taylor - America's Greatest Actress"): It's funny how a nickname clung to little Mary Brown - They called her good-for-nothing, a tomboy 'round the town - As she grew up where'ere she'd go they'd call her by that name - But if she's good-for-nothing angels must be just the same - They always called her little good-for-nothing - Just because like other children she was wild - Tho' she wasn't all to blame - Still she couldn't bear the name that clung to her since she was but a child - But now she's over there, she joined the Red Cross - Giving up her life at duty's call - And the ones that used to sneer are the first ones now to cheer - The little good-for -nothings good for something after all..."Cover image by (with photograph of stage actress Laurette Taylor by an unknown photographer) by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A sketch of a Red Cross nurse attending to a wounded soldier. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "On The South Sea Isle" and "There's Someone More Lonesome Than You." According to Wikipedia: "LAURETTE TAYLOR (April 1, 1883[1] - December 7, 1946) was an American stage and silent film star...Taylor began attracting critical acclaim virtually from her first known performance on Broadway in The Great John Ganton in 1908 and building her reputation in such stage productions as The Ringmaster, Alias Jimmy Valentine, Seven Sisters, Lola Lola, The Bird of Paradise, and Peg o' My Heart, which ran on Broadway from December 20, 1912 to May 1914 (a total of 603 performances) cemented her fame and reputation with audiences as a skilled actress. She toured the nation with the play, which reopened on Broadway at the Cort Theater on February 14, 1921, and ran for another 692 performances. She achieved great success starring in such other productions as Out There, One Night in Rome, The Wooing of Eve and the special production, Laurette Taylor in Scenes From Shakespeare. In the latter production, she performed scenes from Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, and The Taming of the Shrew. Few of Taylor's performances survive on celluloid. In 1924, Taylor starred in Happiness, directed by King Vidor, which told of the adventures of a young shopgirl, 'Jenny Wray,' who learns that riches do not necessarily lead to happiness. The cast included Hedda Hopper and Pat O'Malley. The same year, Taylor starred in another screen version of Manners' dramatic play, One Night In Rome, in which she played the dual roles of Duchess Mareno/Madame Enigme. Taylor seems to have enjoyed making One Night in Rome as she kept a personal print of the movie to always show guests at her home, re-running it over and over again. Taylor's outsized personality, mercurial moods, and eccentricities became legendary. Her friend Noël Coward spent a weekend at the home of Taylor and, inspired by that remarkable visit wrote, in just three days, his devastating, witty comedy of manners Hay Fever (1925). The play, a widely praised comedic dissection of a family whose theatrical excesses drive their unsuspecting visitors to distraction, was a major hit from the moment of its August 6, 1925 debut. It also caused a serious and permanent rift in the friendship of Taylor and Coward. She suffered from severe alcoholism for many years, a condition which sharply limited her appearances from the late 1920s throughout her career. In 1938, she headed the cast in a revival of Outward Bound and did not appear again until her re-emergence in Williams' The Glass Menagerie in 1944; her performance received unanimously rapturous reviews...
6L-22 Little Grey Mother, Who Waits All Alone, The - Three copies of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - San Francisco - London - 1915) with words by Bernard Grossman and music by Harry De Costa ("March Ballad" - Sheet music cover features a photograph of "Mrs. Mary Maurice - Vitagraph Player By Permission Vitagraph Company of America"): "The toys that brought joy to her little boy - Are scattered about on the floor - The sword that his father before him had used - Is gone from its place by the door - The lad, like his dad, now is sleeping - Faraway, night and day, someone's weeping - There's a little grey mother who waits all alone - Ina chill, dreary spot that was once Home, Sweet Home - While Gen'rals are saying 'This fight must be won!' She's sadly praying 'Please send back my son..." " Cover image: A photograph of silent film star Mary Maurice by an unknown photographer. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Mother Machree," "A Little Bit Of Heaven," etc. According to Wikipedia: MARY MAURICE...was an American actress, who appeared 139 films between 1909 and 1918. This Vitagraph 'mother lady' was a Philadelphian. During her long stage career, she appeared in support of Booth, Barrett, Jefferson, Modjeska and her last engagement was with Robert B. Mantell. She did not mind admitting that she was past sixty, but she had the heart of youth and was the best loved of screen mothers. She played in both The Goddess and The Battle Cry of Peace. She, Russell Bassett, Sarah Bernhardt, W. Chrystie Miller, Ruby Lafayette, Kate Meek, the veteran character actor Matt B. Snyder and Harold Lloyd regular Anna Townsend were the eight oldest people working in film during the 1910s..."
6L-23 Long Boy - Two pieces of sheet music (The Beardsley -Woods Publishing Co., Indianapolis, Indiana - 1917) with words by William Herschell and music by Barclay Walker (SEE, ALSO: "Good-Bye, Ma! Good-Bye, Pa! Good-bye, Mule With Yer Old Hee-Haw! - Long Boy" BOX 4 - Folder G-19): "He was just a long, lean country gink - From way out West where th' hoptoads wink - He was six feet two in his stocking feet - An' kept gittin' thinner th' more he'd eat - But he was as brave as he was thin - When th' war broke out he got right in - unhitched his plow, put th' mule away - Then th' old folks heard him say - Good-bye Ma! Good-bye Pa! Good -bye Mule, with yer old hee-haw! - I may not know what th' war's about - But you bet, by gosh, I'll soon find out - An' O my sweetheart don't you fear - I'll bring you a King fer a souvenir - I'll git you a Turk an' a Kaiser, too - An' that's about all one feller could do..." Cover image ("Scenery") by artist Gaar Williams: A country boy in uniform marches away as his family and farm animals look on.
6L-24 Look What My Boy Got In France - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President, NYC - 1918) with words by Will Dillon and music by Con Conrad: "Mrs. Maloney was very high toney - She yelled to the neighbors - 'My Johnny is home - I've something to show you - Begorrah, I know you'll be proud of the boy that went over the foam - They made him a Captain, he's on a furlough - He brought back a prize, what it is I don't know - Oh! Look what my boy got in France - Oh! Look what my boy got in France - They pinned something on him for he's a hero - Whatever he did at all - Sure I don't know - My Johnny brought home a young wife - Now he's decorated for life - Ev'ry time she starts to Parlez vous - My old man does the 'Hoochy Koo' - Look what my boy got in France..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A young girl (framed by a life preserver) holds a large medal. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Oh! Frenchy."
6L-25 Lorraine (My Beautiful Alsace Lorraine) - A single piece of sheet music (McCarthy and Fisher, Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by Alfred Bryan ("Writer of JOAN OF ARC") and music by Fred Fisher ("Composer of PEG O' MY HEART" - Portrayed by S.Z. "Cuddles" Sakall in the Fred Fisher biopic OH, YOU BEAUTIFUL DOLL - 20th Century-Fox - 1949): "Beside a campfire gleaming - A grenadier was dreaming - His thoughts went back again to other years - Night shadows found him, and as they gathered him tenderly he murmured through his tears - Lorraine, Lorraine - My beautiful Alsace Lorraine - You're in my heart forever to remain - I see our village steeple - Your quaint old-fashioned people - And I wouldn't care if I could be there again - Lorraine, Lorraine - Heart of France - Part of France - Someday when all my worries are through - I'm coming to you - Lorraine, Lorraine - O welcome me home once again - To live and die in my Alsace Lorraine..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: A French soldier (with rifle) marches into battle backed by Lady Liberty, his young girlfriend and the red white and blue ("Tricolour") French flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When You Find There's Someone Missing (When The One You Love Is Gone)." According to Wikipedia: "The Imperial Territory of ALSACE-LORRAINE...was a territory created by the German Empire in 1871 after it annexed most of Alsace and the Moselle region of Lorraine following its victory in the Franco-Prussian War. The Alsatian part lay in the Rhine Valley on the west bank of the Rhine River and east of the Vosges Mountains. The Lorraine section was in the upper Moselle valley to the north of the Vosges Mountains. The Imperial territory of Alsace-Lorraine was made up of 93% of Alsace (7% remained French) and 26% of Lorraine (74% remained French). For historical reasons, specific legal dispositions are still applied in the territory in form of a local law. In relation to its special legal status, since its reversion to France following World War I, the territory has been referred to administratively as Alsace-Moselle..."
6L-26 Love The Whole United States - A single piece of sheet music (Tell Taylor Music Publisher, NYC - Chicago - 1913) with words by Roger Lewis and music by Ernie Erdman (Featured by Hamlin and Owen - with cover photograph): " A soldier from the South and a soldier from the North who fought each other back in sixty-two - Met on the street one day - One wore a suit of grey - The other wore a tattered suit of blue - One said he loved the South the best, the other said the North - They argued till the tears came to their eyes - But Dixie's son, a boy in blue, said 'Gentlemen the war is through - So love the flag no matter where it flies - I love the whole United States - From Boston Massachusetts to Frisco's golden gates - The cotton fields of Dixie - The maple trees of Maine - The mountains of Virginia - I love them all the same - I love the fields of Illinois and Georgia where my sweetheart waits - Ev'ry city large and small in Yankee land - I love them all - I love the whole United States..." Cover image (with a blue-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillians Hamlin and Owen) by artist Andrea De Takacs: Two veterans of the Civil War (North and South) shake hands in front of a map of the United States (framed in a red heart with an American eagle above their heads). Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Mother Of Mine," "Way Down South," etc. RICHARD HAMLIN ("The Medley Man in Brown") and GARRY OWEN (comedian) were popular performers in vaudeville (No other biographical information found).
6M-1 Madelon (I'll Be True To The Whol Regiment) - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC/L. Bousquet, Paris - 1918) with words by Louis Bousquet and music by Camille Robert ("English version of the celebrated French soldier's song QUAND MADELON SONG - English version by Alfred Bryan"): "There is a tavern way down in Brittany - Where weary soldiers take their liberty - The keepers daughter whose name is Madelon - Pours out the wine they laugh and 'carry on' - And while the wine goes to their senses -Her sparkling glance goes to their hearts - Their admiration so intense is - Each one his tale of love imparts - She coquettes with them all, but favors none at all - And here's the way they banter ev'ry time they call - O Madelon you are the only one - O Madelon for you we'll carry on - It's so long since we have seen a miss - Won't you give us just a kiss - But Madelon she takes in all the fun - She laughs and says 'You see it can't be done - I would like, but how can I consent - When I'm true to the whole regiment..' ." Cover image by an unknown artist: A young "keeper's daughter" (wearing apron) serves the soldiers in her father's tavern. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Till We Meet Again."
6M-2 Man Behind The Hammer And The Plow, The - A single piece of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co., NYC - Chicago - San Francisco - Sidney - London, 1917) with words and music by Harry Von Tilzer ("A Song Every American Should Learn"): "America, the world is calling you - America, it needs you badly, too - The Nations o'er the sea - Cry out for Liberty - The Stars and Stripes and make them free - The Sons of Uncle Sam can win the fray - And here's the man that has to save the day - It's the man behind the Hammer and the Plow who made this country what it is today - It's the man behind the Hammer and the Plow - The gift of God's Creation, the builders of the nation - Mechanic and the Engineer, all honest Sons of Toil - The backbone of the world today - The man who tills the soil - It's up to him to win the battle now - The man behind the Hammer and the Plow..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A full page "Proclamation By the President (Woodrow Wilson) To The People (April 16, 1917)" is reprinted on the back cover ("...This let me say to the middlemen of every sort, whether they are handling our foodstuffs or our raw materials of manufacturing or the products of our mills and factories: The eyes of the country will be especially upon you. This is your opportunity for signal service, efficient and disinterested...").
6M-3 March Militare - A single piece of sheet music (Knight-Campbell Music Co., Denver, Colorado - 1918) with music by W. H. Graham ("Regimental March of the 341st Field Artillery - Awarded Regimental Prize in National March Contest held at Camp Funston, Kansas - Lieut. John Philip Sousa, Judge"). Cover image by photographer, Anderson, Kansas City: A blue-tinted photograph of THE BAND OF THE 341ST FIELD ARTILLERY. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Here Comes Uncle Sam," "Chevalier March," "Postal Alliance March," etc.
6M-4 Marine's Hymn (From The Halls Of Montezuma), The - Three pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Music Sales Corporation, NYC/U.S. Marine Corp., Philadelphia - 1919) with arrangements by Luis Guzman - U.S. Marine Band and A. Tregina - U.S. Marine Band ("Song of the Soldiers of the Sea"): "From the Halls of Montezuma - To the shores of Tripoli - We fight our country's battles - On the land as on the sea - First to fight for right and freedom - And to keep our honor clean - We are proud to claim the title of United States Marines..." Cover images by unknown artists: The Eagle, Glove and Anchor symbol and scenes of U.S. Marine Corps. history ("Printed for complimentary distribution by UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS PUBLICITY BUREAU"). According to Wikipedia: "The MARINES' HYMN is the official hymn of the United States Marine Corps. It is the oldest official song in the United States Armed Forces. The MARINES' HYMN is typically sung at the position of attention as a gesture of respect. However, the third verse is also used as a toast during formal events, such as the birthday ball and other ceremonies. The lyrics are contained in the book 'Rhymes of the Rookies' published in 1917. The author of these poems was W.E. Christian. The book is available online in several formats. The book consists of a series of poems regarding military life prior to World War I. Some of the lyrics were popular phrases before the song was written. The line 'To the shores of Tripoli' refers to the First Barbary War, and specifically the Battle of Derna in 1805. After Lieutenant Presley O'Bannon and his Marines hoisted the American flag over the Old World for the first time, the phrase was added to the battle colors of the Corps. 'The Halls of Montezuma' refers to the Battle of Chapultepec, during the Mexican-American War, where a force of Marines stormed Chapultepec Castle. While the lyrics are said to date from the 19th century, no pre-20th century text is known. The author of the lyrics is likewise unknown. Legend has it that it was penned by a Marine on duty in Mexico. The unknown author transposed the phrases in the motto on the Colors so that the first two lines of the Hymn would read: 'From the Halls of Montezuma, to the Shores of Tripoli,' favoring euphony over chronology. The music is from the Gendarmes' Duet (the 'bold gendarmes') from the 1867 revision of the 1859 opera Geneviève de Brabant by Jacques Offenbach, which debuted in Paris in 1859..."
6M-5 Marseillaise, La - A single piece of sheet music (Century Music Publishing Company, NYC - 1917) with words and music by Rouget De Lisle ("The Marseillaise - French National Hymn" written in 1886 - Arranged by M. Greenwald - "Liberte - Egalite - Fraternite"): " Ye sons of France awake to glory! - Hark, hark, what myriads bid you rise! - Your children, wives and grandsires hoary - Behold their tears and hear their cries - Shall hateful tyrants mischiefs breeding, - With hireling hosts a ruffian band - Affright and desolate land - While peace and liberty lie bleeding - To arms, to arms, ye brave - The avenging sword unsheathe! - March on, march on, all, all hearts resolved - On victory or death..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A French and an American soldier stand guard before the French flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Up In A Swing," "Madame Pompadour," "Star Of Hope," etc. according to Wikipedia: ""LA MARSEILLAISE...is the national anthem of France. The song was written and composed in 1792 by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle during the French Revolutionary Wars, and was originally titled 'Chant de guerre pour l'Armée du Rhin.' The French National Convention adopted it as the Republic's anthem in 1795. It acquired its nickname after being sung in Paris by volunteers from Marseille marching on the capital. The song is the first example of the 'European march' anthemic style. The anthem's evocative melody and lyrics have led to its widespread use as a song of revolution and its incorporation into many pieces of classical and popular music. Cerulo says, 'the design of LA MARSEILLAISE is credited to General Strasburg of France, who is said to have directed de Lisle, the composer of the anthem, to 'produce one of those hymns which conveys to the soul of the people the enthusiasm which it (the music) suggests.' "
6M-6 Marshal Haig - A single piece of sheet music (Vandersloot Music Publishing, Co., Williamsport, Pennsylvania - 1918) with music ("One Step March or Two Step") by Abe Losch ("Composer of SPIRIT OF FREEDOM and SLIDING SID" - Dedicated to "Field Marshall Sir Douglas Haig and the Valiant British Troops"). Cover image a sepia-toned photograph of Sir Douglas Haig in dress uniform by photographer "Underwood." Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Naomi," "General Pershing," and "Nona." According to Wikipedia: SIR DOUGLAS HAIG...was a British senior officer during World War I. He commanded the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) from 1915 to the end of the war. He was commander during the Battle of the Somme, the battle with one of the highest casualties in British military history, the Third Battle of Ypres, and the Hundred Days Offensive, which led to the armistice in 1918. Although he had gained a reputation during the immediate post-war years, with his funeral becoming a day of national mourning, Haig has since the 1960s become an object of criticism for his leadership during the First World War. Some called him 'Butcher Haig' for the two million British casualties under his command, and regard him as representing the very concept of class-based incompetent commanders, stating that he was unable to grasp modern tactics and technologies. However, Major-General Sir John Davidson, one of Haig's biographers, praised Haig's leadership and since the 1980s some historians have argued that the public hatred in which Haig's name had come to be held failed to recognize the adoption of new tactics and technologies by forces under his command, or the important role played by the British forces in the Allied victory of 1918 and that the high casualties suffered were a function of the tactical and strategic realities of the time..."
6M-7 Merrily We'll Roll Along - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Andrew B. Sterling and music by Abner Silver ("A Feature in Vaudeville with Al Herman" - with cover photograph): "Two sailor boys went rolling 'round the town to get some air - They went rolling everywhere - For they had a roll to spare - And as they went rolling, soon they spied a rolling chair and said Jack to Jim we'll do our rolling there - For we know that Uncle Sam will pay the fare - And as they rolled along - They sang a rolling song - Merrily we'll roll along, roll along, roll along - We'll roll across the sea - Roll in gay Paree - Keep the ball a-rolling 'till we roll to Germany - And merrily we'll roll along - Far across the foam - And when everything's all over we'll roll the Kaiser over - Then we'll all come rolling home..." Cover image: A color-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillian AL HERMAN by an unknown photographer. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "We're Going Over," and "There's A Service Flag Flying At Our House." According to the Word Press Web Site: "AL HERMAN was a Scottish-born blackface vaudeville monologist, billed variously as 'The Assassin of Grief and Remorse' and 'The Black Assassin of Grief'" His highest stage credit was an appearance in the 1921 edition of The Greenwich Village Follies. In the 20s he wrote and directed a handful of comedy shorts and participated in an early Lee DeForest talkie experiment. From the 30s through the 50s he worked mostly as a bit player in Hollywood films (e.g., 'reporter' in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town)."
6M-8 Military Waltz - Two pieces of sheet music (Forster Music Publisher Inc., Chicago - 1917) arranged ("Patriotic Medley" including COLUMBIA -THE GEM OF THE OCEAN, TENTING TONIGHT ON THE OLD CAMPGROUND, DIXIE, WHEN JOHNNY COMES MARCHING HOME, JOHN BROWN'S BODY, MARCHING THROUGH GEORGIA and SOLDIER'S FAREWELL) by Frederic Knight Logan ("Writer of the famous MISSOURI WALTZ, MOONLIGHT WALTZ and BLUE ROSE WALTZ"). Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers dancing with their girls in a ballroom. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I Wish You All The Luck In The World."
6M-9 Mr. Sousa's Yankee Band - A single piece of sheet music (Tell Taylor Music Publisher, Chicago and NYC - 1918) with words and music by Gene Greene and Joe Farrell (Featured by Gene Greene): Ev'rything is hustle bustle - Boys are goin' away to tussle, over there, over there - Jiminy they're glad they're goin - here dem sing dat song by Cohan, over there, over there - Ev'ry step shows Yankee spirit - Sing dat song so they can hear it, over there, over there - Hear dat Yankee band a-comin' - Sure dey'll hear dat Yankee drummin,' over there, over there - Here comes Mr. Sousa an' his Yankee band - Listen Hannah, listen aint de music grand - Listen to de shufflin' of de soldiers' feet - Music sweet and true - Golly don't dat trombone sound like ev'rything - Makes you want to love an' dance an' fight an' sing - Stand up, stand up, Hannah an' salute de Spangled Banner - There's de Marseillaisey - Gee but dat's a daisy - Played by Mister Sousa's Yankee band..." Cover image (Featuring an inset publicity photograph of composer/vaudevillian Gene Greene) by an unknown artist: John Philip Sousa conducting his "Yankee band." Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "He Sleeps Beneath The Soil Of France," "Just An Old Time Love Song" and "When The Autumn Leaves Are Turning Gold." According to the Library of Congress Web Site: JOHN PHILIP SOUSA was born in Washington, D.C. on Nov. 6, 1854. His father was born in Spain of Portuguese parents and his mother was Bavarian. Sousa, known as the 'March King,' ranks among the most famous American composers and conductors. On December 25, 1896, he composed The Stars and Stripes Forever, the official march of the United States of America. Sousa was the inventor of the sousaphone. He died on March 6, 1932 in Reading, Pennsylvania and is buried in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C..." SOUSA was portrayed by Clifton Webb in the biopic STARS AND STRIPES FOREVER (20th Century-Fox - 1952). According to Wikipedia: "GENE GREEENE was an American entertainer, singer and composer, nicknamed 'The Ragtime King.' He was a vaudeville star and made some of the earliest sound recordings of scat singing in 1911 for Columbia Records and Victor Records and was a popular ragtime performer. Greene was born in Aurora, Illinois and moved to Chicago as a young child. He began his professional career in the late 1890s with his future wife Blanche Werner. They performed in vaudeville first as Manjonita and Eugene and then as Greene and Werner. Greene began performing as a solo act around 1909. He toured England in 1912 and 1913 and Australia in 1913 and 1914. His pianist was on these tours was Charley Straight. Greene continued to be a popular vaudeville performer in the United States and Canada until his death backstage immediately after a vaudeville performance at the Grand Opera House in New York in 1930. Greene was closely associated with the song 'I Didn't Raise My Boy to Be a Soldier' by Alfred Bryan and Al Piantadosi. This song was one of the extremely few anti-war music-hall songs during the First World War, most music-hall songs being fiercely pro-war. This reflected the views of Chicago's large German population at the time, but the song was also well-known, and controversial, in Britain. Recordings of Greene are scarce in the compact disc era. One track, 'King of the Bungaloos' recorded on February 17, 1911, can be found on Pop Music The Early Years 1890-1950, part of Sony Music's Soundtrack For A Century box set. Another recording, 'Frankie and Johnny' by the Leighton Brothers, is discussed and played by Peter C. Muir in a video to accompany his book Long Lost Blues. Greene and Straight recorded the song for Pathé Records in London during their 1912-1913 tour of England."
6M-10 M'Sieur Jimmie (Come And Shake Ze Shimmy) - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., Music Publishers, NYC - 1919) with words by Lieut. Ballard MacDonald and music by Nat Osborne ("As Featured in the Successful Musical Review ATTA BOY with Frank Tinney and 100 Overseas Soldiers and Sailors - Staged by Dan Dody"): "Jimmy Bent, Jimmy Bent used to teach the shimmy dance - He was sent, he was sent with his regiment to France - On the boulevards of gay Paree - Jimmy was as popular as he could be - When he went , when he went into any swell cafe - Not a cent did he ever have to pay - When the girls saw Jim they would run for him and you'd hear those cuties say - M'sieur Jimmy, come and shake ze shimmy - In ze Yankee Doodle way - When ze orchestra she play I want to sway - Shake ze shoulder with ze soldier - Oh! Bebe, it make me feel so oo-la-la - I want to kiss ze sweet Papa - Let's go to it - Show me how to do it - Ball ze Jack and do ze Bombashay - Ze Jazbo is ze great invention - It make you feel what you can't mention - M'sieur Jimmy come and shake ze shimmy - In ze Yankee Doodle way..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: A well-dressed woman waves to a soldier. Popular Broadway musical productions of the period are advertised on the back cover: THE MELTING OF MOLLY, LITTLE SIMPLICITY, LISTEN LESTER and SOMEBODY'S SWEETHEART. ATTA BOY was an all-soldier revue, starring Frank Tinney, which opened at Broadway's Lexington Theatre on December 23, 1918 and closed on January 11, 1919. According to Wikipedia: "FRANK TINNEY was an American blackface comedian and actor.Tinney achieved considerable success in vaudeville and on Broadway in the early 20th century. Comedian Joe Cook considered Tinney, 'the greatest natural comic ever developed in America.' Tinney's career and marriage were ruined after he was accused of beating his mistress, Ziegfeld girl Imogene 'Bubbles' Wilson in May 1924. Although he was never formally charged, the ensuing publicity ruined his reputation.Tinney suffered a number of health problems after the scandal and eventually had a nervous breakdown. He never regained his health and died in November 1940..."
6M-11 Most Beautiful Flag In The World, The - Three piece of sheet music (Lew Berk Music Company, Rochester, NY - 1917) with words by Charles H. Newman and music by Jack Glogau ("Writer of WAKE UP AMERICA"): "The brightest stars from heaven - Are in your field of blue - Your stripes are from the rainbow - Taken out of heaven too - They made you there with greatest care - And when you were unfurled - God gave as his gift to America - The most beautiful flag in the world..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier and his girl against a red white and blue background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "When Twilight Shadows Are Falling."
6M-12 Mother Pays It All - A single piece of sheet music (The Bell Music Publishing Co., Chicago - 1918) with words and music by George Clancy ("The War Ballad Beautiful"): "There's a vacant chair beside the daily table - Left by the boy who went away to war - There's a mother, old but glad, she was able to give him for the cause he's fighting for - There's his picture that is hanging in her bedroom - Ev'ry night when twilight shades begin to creep - Then her thoughts they wander over to the trenches - As she prays to God that his dear soul he'll keep - No one knows how much she suffers, on her face there is a smile - To hide the heart that's breaking for her loved one all the while - And when the war is over, credit will on gen'rals fall - But the price at stake for freedom's sake - The mother pays it all..." Cover image by artist "Fad" - A mother sadly sits at a window (decorated with a blue-star service flag) watching the troops march by. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Star And The Rose" and "When Mother Was A Girl."
6M-13 Mothers Of America, You Have Done Your Share! - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co. - "The House of Hits" - NYC - Chicago and London - 1918) with words by Harry Ellis and music by Lew Porter (Featured by The Gus Hill's Minstrels and Charles Kent and endorsed by Eva Tanguay - "I consider this song our greatest war song written to date." - with cover photographs): "When all is said and done - When ev'rything is won - Who paid the price to win the war? - Who sacrificed her all - And answered to the call - M-O-T-H-E-R - Mothers of America - You have done your share - You have given ev'ry son - So our battles could be won - And with a smile you sent them over there - When he wins upon the battlefield of glory - For his safe return you say a prayer - You have given to the strife - Your heart, your soul, your life - Mothers of America - You have done your share..." Cover image by an unknown artist (featuring publicity photographs of Charles Kent and Eva Tanguay by the Baker Art Gallery) by an unknown artist: Sketches of various mothers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Indianola." According to Wikipedia: "GUS HILL was an American vaudeville performer who juggled Indian clubs. He later became a burlesque and vaudeville entrepreneur. Hill was one of the founders of the Columbia Amusement Company, an association of burlesque shows and theaters, and became president of the American Burlesque Association. He also staged drama and musical comedies. He launched a highly popular series of 'cartoon theatricals,' musical comedies based on comic strips or cartoons. At one time he was running fourteen different shows. According to Wikipedia: "CHARLES KENT was a British-born American silent film actor and director. He appeared in 141 films between 1908 and 1923. He also directed 36 films between 1908 and 1913. He was born in London, England, and died in Brooklyn, New York..." According to the IMDb Web Site: EVA TANGUAY was born in Marbleton, Québec, Canada, on August 1, 1878. A stage actress early on, Eva went into vaudeville as soon as she got the chance and performed there for years, becoming known as 'The Girl Who Made Vaudeville Famous.' She was a late comer to the world of movies; had she been born 20 years later, she probably would have been a bona fide star on the screen. She was 38 when she appeared in her first motion picture, Energetic Eva (1916). Her next--and last--film was The Wild Girl (1917). Eva died of a heart attack in Hollywood, California, on January 11, 1947. She was 69 years old..." TANGUAY was portrayed by Mitzi Gaynor in the biopic THE 'I DON'T CARE' GIRL (2oth Century - Fox - 1953).
6M-14 Mothers Of France - A single piece of sheet music (Meyer Cohan Music Publishing Co., Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Leo Woods: "Kneeling in sorrow, I see you there - Heart-broken mothers of France - Patiently offering up your pray'r - Heart-broken mothers of France - You've borne the burden for many a day - Now other mother's sons enter the fray - Mothers of France - Heartbroken mothers of France - God bless your sons, ev'ry one - For the fighting they have done - They fought as never before - They kept the 'Hun' from the door - And gave the world a fighting chance - Oh, mothers of France - You son-less mothers of France - The world will never forget the debt it owes to you - And ev'ry mother now is praying - And to ev'ry son they're saying - Go out and fight for the right and the mothers of France..." Cover image (featuring a photograph of a statue of Joan of Arc - reproduced by permission of Morris G.J. Poznanski - Paris and NYC) by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A background of the red, white and blue French flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When The War is Over, I'll Return To You," "That's What God Made Mother's For," etc.
6M-15 Mother's Prayer For Her Boy Out There, A - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Andrew B. Sterling and music by Arthur Lange: "Beside a vacant chair she's kneeling - When the lights are burning low - 'Way down in her heart the feeling - That only a mother can know - And in the peaceful silence, by the vacant chair - She softly says her evening pray'r - Just a little pray'r - When shades are stealing - Just a little pray'r - A voice appealing - To a baby shoe she's clinging - While the Angelus is ringing - Come the words that start - From an aching heart - May angels guard him tenderly, tonight, and send my baby back tome - That's a mother's pray'r for her boy out there..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A mother kneels in prayer, at a living room chair, with a framed photo of her son (in uniform) on the wall in the background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Before The World Began."
6M-16 My Angel Of The Flaming Cross - A single piece of sheet music (Sunset Publishing, NYC/Plaza Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Byron Gay: "On a homebound transport - As the sun was sinking low - Stood a wounded soldier dreaming in the twilight's glow - Visions of an angel - Golden hair and eyes of blue - Said a sailor 'Why are you so sad' - Said the soldier 'I'll tell you' - There's an angel over there - An angel from I know not where - Smiling sweetly thru her tears - She drove my fears away - Little girl who nursed me thru - I owe my life to you - Oh, come back - Love that I found and lost - My Angel of the Flaming Cross..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A black and white photograph of a young woman in a nurse's uniform (or nun's habit) with a background of angels in a stormy sky. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "A Soldier's Dream."
6M-17 My Barney Lies Over The Ocean (The Way He Lied To Me) - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., Music Publishers, NYC - 1919) with words by Joe Young and Sam M. Lewis and music by Bert Grant: "Barney Carney promised he'd be true to Molly O - The day he went away to war, about a year ago - In ev'ry note that Barney wrote he called her 'Ma cherie' - She read the name and said with shame ' this isn't meant for me' - All the neighbors noticed there were teardrops in her eye - And when they asked her how was Barney, she'd begin to cry - My Barney lies over the ocean - My Barney lies over the sea - Sure he said he went to war to help the women - And I think he's helped himself to two or three - Now he's got a little girl in Belgium and one in Paree -And I know the little things he tells 'em, when they're on his knee - Sure my Barney lies over the ocean - Just the way he lied to me..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A soldier escorts a smiling French girl past a sidewalk cafe in Paris. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "That Tumble-Down Shack In Athlone."
6M-18 My Belgian Rose - Four pieces (various covers and sizes) of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC/Herman Darewski Music Publishing Co., London - 1918) with words by George Benoit, Robert Levenson and Ted Garton (Featured by Louise Glaum and Yvette of Yvette and Saranoff): "Rose of Belgium drooping so low - Lift up your head for we love you so - Robbed of your sunshine, you're fading away - But you'll live to bloom on a happier day - America is calling to you - Speaking in words divine - 'My home shall be thy home - And my treasures be thine' - Belgian Rose - My drooping Belgian Rose - For ev'ry hour of sorrow you've had - You'll have a year in which to be glad - You were not born in vain - For you will bloom again - And tho' they've taken all your sunshine and dew - We'll make an American beauty of you - And you will find repose, over here - My Belgian Rose..." Cover images (featuring color-tinted publicity photographs of vaudevillians Louise Glaum and Yvette as well as an unidentified female model by unknown photographers) by an unknown artist: A drooping rose bush. Advertised song samples on the back covers include: "Bring Back My Daddy To Me," "Good Morning Mr. Zip, Zip, Zip," "K-K-Katy," etc., According to Wikipedia: "LOUISE GLAUM (September 4, 1888 - November 25, 1970) was an American actress. Best known for her role as a femme fatale in silent era motion picture dramas, she was credited with giving one of the best characterizations of a vamp in her early career. Glaum began her acting career on the stage in Los Angeles, her hometown, in 1907. After a few years, she went on the road with a touring company and performed as an ingenue in the play Why Girls Leave Home. She stayed on in Chicago, where she appeared in a number of productions. After returning to Los Angeles in 1911 because of the death of her younger sister, Glaum found acting work at a movie studio. She appeared in over 110 movies from 1912 to 1925, her debut being in When the Heart Calls. After starring in Greater Than Love (1921), she retired from the screen and moved to New York. In 1925, she sued for money owed her for movie work amounting to $103,000. The suit was ultimately dismissed by the court due to technicalities. Glaum made a final movie appearance in 1925. Under contract with Associated Exhibitors, she starred as the conniving other woman opposite Lionel Barrymore in a drama directed by Henri Diamant-Berger titled Fifty-Fifty. For over three years, Glaum headlined on the vaudeville circuit in dramatic playlets. She presented a play in which she starred, Trial Marriage, in Los Angeles in 1928. Continuing to act on the stage, she opened and appeared in her own theatre in Los Angeles in the mid-1930s and became a drama instructor. Glaum was active in music clubs over the following decades. She served as president of the Matinee Musical Club for many years and was also state president of the California Federation of Music Clubs..." YVETTE (RUGEL?) was a vaudeville headliner who appeared in acts titled YVETTE AND SARANOFF ("A Double-Stringed Constellation") and YVETTE and COMPANY (No other biographical information was found).
6M-19 My Choc'Late Soldier Sammy Boy - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1919) with words and music by Egbert Van Alstyne (Portrayed by Dick Simmons in the Gus Kahn biopic I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS -Warner Brothers - 1951): "Just hear that band a-playin' down the street - Just hear the sound of drums and marchin' feet - That's Colonel Jackson and his Colored Brigade - Just back from Over There and out on parade - Just see the crowd a-swayin' to and for - The p'rade is startin' - Honey come let's go - See that chile of mine - Watch him markin' time - Waiting for that bugle blow - See him marchin' along - Hear him hummin' a song - watch that baby throw out his chest - See them medals pinn'd on his breast - Lord love him, I'm so happy and proud - Feel like shoutin' out loud - My honey come, come to your Mammy - My Choc'late Soldier Sammy Boy..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: Soldiers marching by a river as a large riverboat passes in the distance and a crowd cheers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I've Got The Blue Ridge Blues."
6M-20 My Daddy's Coming Home - A single piece of sheet music (D.W. Cooper Music Co., Boston - 1918) with words and music by David W. Cooper ("The Song The Whole World Is Singing"): "Hear the bells all ringing - Hear the whistles blow - Gee! But We're glad - No one is sad - This is the greatest day we've ever had - See the love light shining - In my mother's eyes - Now listen while I tell you - Just why she's in paradise - My Daddy's coming home! - Oh I'm jumping for joy - Just like each girl and boy who's got someone over the foam - We've kept the homefires burning bright - And in the window there's a light -All our worries are o'er - Mother will cry no more -'Cause my Daddy's coming home..." Cover image: Photograph of a smiling baby in a crib "reproduced by special permission of White Photo - Boston." Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "There's A Picture In My Memory, And It Calls Me Back To You."
6M-21 My Life Belongs To Uncle Sam, But My Heart Belongs To You - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1914) with words by Schuyler Greene and music by Otto Motzan: "Mollie darling I have come to say good-bye - And I must be leaving - For the front to help the soldier boys in blue - Fight for the flag and you - Mollie darling when I'm far away - Think of what I say - My life belongs to my Uncle Sam - But my heart still belongs to you - When I hear the bugles calling - There is nothing else to do - But join the boys as they rally 'round Old Red, White and Blue - For my life belongs to Uncle Sam - But my heart still belongs to you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier holds his girl and the American flag as the troops march behind. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "If I Could Live To Love You (Then I Would Love To Live)."
6M-22 My Red Cross Girlie, The Wound Is Somewhere In My Heart - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by Harry Bewley and music by Theodore Morse ("Composer of M-O-T-H-E-R, BLUE BELL, etc."): "Ev'ry Red Cross girlie likes a soldier - There's a feeling in her heart akin to love - Some laddie with a gun upon his shoulder - Very often is the one she's thinking of - Ev'ry soldier laddie has a yearning - For some noble girl all in white - In his heart the light of love is always burning - For a little Red Cross girlie, day and night - My Red Cross Girlie for you I'm Calling - Tho' you're many miles away - My Red Cross girlie for you I'm falling - Longing for you night and day - I need you, sweetheart, for I'm wounded - By a cunning fellow's dart - But don't swoon, dear, for the wound, dear - Is only somewhere in my heart..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A color-tinted color photograph of a Red Cross nurse (framed by the Red Cross) with sketches of wounded soldiers on each side. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Goodbye Broadway, Hello France," ""Where Do We Go From Here?." "Mother, Dixie and You" and "There's Something In The Name Of Ireland."
6M-23 My Sweetheart Is Somewhere In France - Two pieces of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1917) with words and music by Mary Earl (Pen name for Robert King - "Writer of LAFAYETTE - WE HEAR YOU CALLING"): "I've a letter from my sweetheart - And he writes me in this way - 'Somewhere, dear, in France we're fighting - But just where we dare not say - Be brave and do not sigh - And I will come back bye and bye' - My sweetheart is far across the ocean - My sweetheart is somewhere in France - When he whispered 'Good-bye' - I tried not to cry - Because he said 'I'm taking a soldier's chance' - I see him I'd tell him that I love him - And I 'd put all my heart in one fond glance - Ev'ry night I say a pray'r - For the boy who's over there - My sweetheart is somewhere in France..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A young woman dreams of her soldier in France as he writes a letter in camp - an orange moon shines over each. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Long Boy," "One Day in June," "Chin-Chin Chinaman" and "Liberty Bell (It's Time To Ring Again)." According to The List of Robert King's Work Web site: "Robert A. King [born Robert Keiser] was a prolific American composer and songwriter of popular music; born and died in New York. He published using both names, anonymously and also used a pseudonym, MARY EARL. His total output will probably never be known. He worked at Ditson's music store as a child before entering Tin Pan Alley at the publisher, Leo Feist, where he produced his first hit Anona (1903). In 1918, he was contracted to Shapiro-Bernstein Music Publishers to write 4 songs per month. These included the hits Beautiful Ohio (1918) and Dreamy Alabama (1919). Of ragtime interest, is his very early Everything is Ragtime Now (1899) written as Robert Keiser."
6M-24 My Uncle Sammy Gals - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co., Chicago and NYC - 1918) with words by Jack Frost and music by F. Henri Klickmann: "Good-bye, Good-bye for Uncle Sam is calling - Don't cry, Don't cry for I've no thought of stalling - I must hurry to that ship - And oh, it's bound to be a wonderful trip - Don't sigh, don't sigh for I must go today - I promise you I will say - Good-bye to Kitty from Kansas City and little Della from Delaware - Good-bye to Minnie from dear old Minneapolis and Annie from Anywhere - Good-bye to all of the rest from the north, east and west - And just tell my little pals - That like the flag up above - I always will love my Uncle Sammy Gals..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Three well-dressed women wave to the departing troops backed by a city skyline and a busy harbor. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "There's A Little Blue Star In The Window," "Old Glory Goes Marching On," "Will The Angels Guard My Daddy Over There?," etc.
7N-1 Navy Took Them Over And The Navy Will Bring Them Back, The - Two pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Yeoman Howard Johnson, U.S.N. and music by Ira Schuster ("Successfully Featured in ZIEGFELD'S FOLLIES by Frank Carter"): "OVER THERE we hear of heroes - Who've been fighting for you and me - Ev'rywhere we see our soldiers - Decorated for bravery - Tho' we are proud of them you bet - Don't let that make us all forget - On the sea, we've other heroes, too - On the sea, our sailor boys in blue - With their swift destroyers, SUBMARINE ANNOYERS - They've been tried and true - God bless them! - Now this war is over, OVER THERE - We'll have to take our hats off to Jack - Tho' the army is the clover - 'Twas the Navy took them over and the Navy will bring them back..." Cover images: A black and white photograph of sailors gathered on a destroyer by photographer F. Muller/ A black and white publicity photograph of actor and singer Frank Carter by an unknown photographer. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Ja-Da!" and "Salvation Lassie Of Mine." According to the Word Press Web Site: Singer/dancer FRANK CARTER (1888-1920) is sadly better known for his death than his life. The young performer met Marilyn Miller when they performed together in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1918. They fell in love and married, which infuriated the possessive Ziegfeld, who fired Carter from the Follies of 1919. Miller was performing in that show when she learned that Carter had died in a car crash on his way to meet her. A Kansas City native, Carter had gotten his start as an usher and occasional extra at his local theatre. He worked his way into show business first as a high-diving daredevil, then as a slide singer in a local nickelodeon, and then into vaudeville. A successful engagement at the Victoria theatre led to a tour of English music halls lasting until the eve of the First World War. Carter returned to conquer American vaudeville again..and to the Broadway revue that led him to Miller. Miller considered him the love of her life. So much so that she buried him in the $35,000...and had herself interred with him when she herself passed (despite two subsequent husbands)..." FRANK CARTER was portrayed by Gordon MacRae in theMarilyn Miller biopic LOOK FOR THE SILVER LINING (Warner Brothers - 1949).
7N-2 NC - 4 March - A single piece of sheet music (Walter Jacobs, Inc., Boston - 1919) with music by F.E. Bigelow ("Composer of the World-Famous March OUR DIRECTOR" - The march is "Respectfully Dedicated to Commander A.C. Read, United States Navy"). Cover image: A green-tinted photograph of the NC-4 Curtiss flying boat over an unidentified island. According to Wikipedia: "The NC-4 was a Curtiss NC flying boat which was designed by Glenn Curtiss and his team, and manufactured by Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company. In May 1919, the NC-4 became the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic Ocean, starting in New York State and making the crossing as far as Lisbon, Portugal, in 19 days. This included time for stops of numerous repairs and for crewmen's rest, with stops along the way in Massachusetts, Nova Scotia (on the mainland), Newfoundland, and twice in the Azores Islands. Then its flight from the Azores to Lisbon completed the first transatlantic flight between North America and Europe, and two more flights from Lisbon to northwestern Spain to Plymouth, England, completed the first flight between North America and Great Britain. The accomplishment of the naval aviators of the NC-4 was somewhat eclipsed in the minds of the public by the first nonstop transatlantic flight, which took 15 hours, 57 minutes, and was made by the Royal Air Force pilots John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown, two weeks later..." According to Wikipedia: "ALBERT CUSHING 'PUTTY" READ (March 29, 1887 - October 10, 1967) was an aviator and Rear Admiral in the United States Navy...As a Lt. Commander in May 1919, Read commanded a crew of five on the NC-4 Curtiss flying boat, the first aircraft ever to make a transatlantic flight, eight years before Charles Lindbergh's historic solo, non-stop flight, and a couple of weeks before Alcock and Brown's non stop flight. Read's flight started from Rockaway Beach, Long Island, took 23 days before arriving in Plymouth, England. The six stops included layovers at Trepassey Bay, Newfoundland, the Azores, and Lisbon, Portugal..."
7N-3 Nephews Of Uncle Sam - Two pieces of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder, Co., NYC -1917) with words by George Graff Jr. and music by Bert Grant: "When I was just a little school-boy kid - I'd read about the things our heroes did - I love to think how farmers and their sons - Would drop their plows and grab up guns - From farms and cities they'd all march away - You'll find they'll do the same old thing today - You have fifty million nephews, Uncle Sam - And they love you like a father, Uncle Sam - We don't want a war that's true - Still we'll fight and die for you - The nephews you've adopted, you will find are loyal, too - You have fifty million nieces, don't forget, who are proud to do their duty, you can bet - Let danger ever beckon - The world will have to reckon - With your fifty million nephews, Uncle Sam..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: Naval ships sailing to war with inset images of soldiers, sailors and a silhouette of Uncle Sam against the seal of the United States. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Road That Leads To Love" and "Way Down In Iowa, I'm Going to Hide Away."
7N-4 Neutrality March, The - A single piece of sheet music (Charles K. Harris Publisher, NYC - Chicago - Toronto - 1915) with music by Mike Bernard ("The Ragtime King"). Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A full-color sketch of Uncle Sam framed by flags of various nations. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When Angels Weep (Waltz of Peace)." According to the HISTORY.COM Web Site: "As World War I erupts in Europe, President Woodrow Wilson formally proclaims the NEUTRALITY OF THE UNITED STATES, a position that a vast majority of Americans favored, on August 4, 1914. Wilson's initial hope that America could be 'impartial in thought as well as in action' was soon compromised by Germany's attempted quarantine of the British Isles. Britain was one of America's closest trading partners, and tension arose between the United States and Germany when several U.S. ships traveling to Britain were damaged or sunk by German mines. In February 1915, Germany announced unrestricted warfare against all ships, neutral or otherwise, that entered the war zone around Britain. One month later, Germany announced that a German cruiser had sunk the William P. Frye, a private American vessel that was transporting grain to England when it disappeared. President Wilson was outraged, but the German government apologized and called the attack an unfortunate mistake. In early May 1915, several New York newspapers published a warning by the German embassy in Washington that Americans traveling on British or Allied ships in war zones did so at their own risk. The announcement was placed on the same page as an advertisement for the imminent sailing of the British-owned Lusitania ocean liner from New York to Liverpool. On May 7, the Lusitania was torpedoed without warning by a German submarine just off the coast of Ireland. Of the nearly 2,000 passengers, 1,201 were killed, including 128 Americans. It was revealed that the Lusitania was carrying about 173 tons of war munitions for Britain, which the Germans cited as further justification for the attack. The United States eventually sent three notes to Berlin protesting the action, and Germany apologized and pledged to end unrestricted submarine warfare. In November, however, a U-boat sunk an Italian liner without warning, killing 272 people, including 27 Americans. Public opinion in the United States began to turn irrevocably against Germany. In late March, Germany sunk four more U.S. merchant ships, and on April 2, President Wilson appeared before Congress and called for a declaration of war against Germany. On April 4, the Senate voted 82 to six to declare war against Germany. Two days later, the House of Representatives endorsed the declaration by a vote of 373 to 50, and America formally entered World War I..."
7N-5 Nobody Knows How I Miss You, Dear Old Pals - Two pieces of sheet music (Meyer Cohen Music Publishing Co., Inc., NYC - 1919) with words and music by Eddie Dorr and Lew Porter ("A Musical Masterpiece from FRIENDLY ENEMIES - A.H. Woods Big Success - Endorsed by President Wilson"): "I sit and ponder the whole day long - Wishing that I could see - My mother and dad, the best pals I had - They're waiting patiently - I'll tell the world that I love them so, and soon I'll be back there I know - Nobody knows how I miss you - Dear old pals - Nobody knows how I love you - Dear old pals - When nights are dreary and I sit alone - My thoughts are weary they drift t'ward my home, cause nobody knows how I miss you - Dear old pals..." Cover image by an unknown artist and photographer: Scenes form the Broadway production of FRIENDLY ENEMIES ("The Departure" and "The Return") with a message from President Woodrow Wilson included on the cover ("All that I can say has already been said most admirably in this beautiful play. All the sentiments I could express have been admirably represented - sentiments that, I hope, will soon grip the world."). Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "When The Is Over," "There's A Vacant Chair In Every Home To-Night," "That's What God Made Mothers For" and "Mothers Of France." FRIENDLY ENEMIES produced by A.H. Woods and starring Sam Bernard, Richard Barbee, Mathilde Cottrelly, Felix Krembs, Lois Mann, Natalie Manning and Regina Wallace opened at Broadway's Hudson Theatre on July 22, 1918 and closed on c. August 19, 1919. The play was written by Samuel Shipman and Aaron Hoffman.
7O-1 Oh! Frenchy - Two pieces of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President, NYC - 1918) with words by Sam Ehrlich and music by Con Conrad: "Rosie Green was a village queen, who enlisted as a nurse - She waited for a chance - And left for France with an ambulance , Rosie Green met a chap named Jean, a soldier from Paree - When he said 'Parlez-vous, my pet' - She said "I will, but not just yet' - When he'd speak in French to her, she'd answer lovingly - Oh! Frenchy - Oh, Frenchy, Frenchy - Although your language is so new to me - When you say 'Oui, oui la la - 'We' means you and me , la la - Oh! Frenchy, Oh, Frenchy, Frenchy - You've won my love with your bravery - March on - March on with any girl you see - But when you la la la la la- Oh, Frenchy save your la la la's for me..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: Framed in a heart, a sitting French soldier looks up at a young woman. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "After You've Gone" and "Everybody's Crazy 'Bout The Doggone Blues, But I'm Happy."
7O-2 Oh! How I Hate To Get Up In The Morning - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words and music by Irving Berlin ("Irving Berlin's Bugle Song - Featured by Horace Wright and Rene Dietrich" - with cover photograph): "The other day I chanced to meet a soldier friend of mine - He'd been in camp for sev'ral weeks and he was looking fine - His muscles had developed and cheeks were rosy red - I asked him how he liked the life and this is what he said - Oh! how I hate to get up in the morning - Oh! how I'd love to remain in bed - For the hardest blow of all, is to hear the bugler call - You've got to get up, you've got to get up You've got to get up this morning! Someday I'm going to murder the bugler - Someday they're going to find him dead - I'll amputate his reveille and step upon it heavily - And spend the rest of my life in bed..." Cover image (including a black and white inset publicity photograph of vaudevillians Horace Wright and Rene Dietrich by an unknown photographer) by Albert Wilfred Barbelle : A U.S. Army bugler. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "At Half Past Nine."
7O-3 Oh! How I Wish I Could Sleep Until My Daddy Comes Home - Two pieces (various covers and sizes) of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., Music Publishers, NYC- 1918) with words by Sam M. Lewis and Joe Young and music by Pete Wendling ("Successfully Introduced by Al Jolson"): "Early to bed, Early to rise - I heard a mother say to her angel eyes - Dream of your Dad, My little lad - Don't wake until the sun appears in the skies - 'I hate the sunshine' he said - "It makes me get out of bed' - Oh! How I wish I could sleep until my Daddy comes home - Oh! mamma, why must we always be all alone? - I miss him more ev'ry day - How can you ask me to play - You're always sighing and crying, since he went away - Last night I heard Daddy call - But I was dreaming, that's all - He kissed me and he said, 'Go to bed, my own' - Oh! mamma, that's when I thought, God made the night-time too short - Oh! How I wish I could sleep - Until my Daddy comes home..." Cover image (with a black and white inset publicity photograph of Broadway star Al Jolson by an unknown photographer) by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A sad child sits up in bed as a full moon shines through the window. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "American Beauty" and "Don't You Remember The Day." According to Wikipedia: "AL JOLSON (born Asa Yoelson; May 26, 1886 - October 23, 1950) was a Jewish Lithuanian-born American singer, film actor, and comedian. At the peak of his career, he was dubbed 'The World's Greatest Entertainer.' His performing style was brash and extroverted, and he popularized a large number of songs that benefited from his 'shamelessly sentimental, melodramatic approach.' Numerous well-known singers were influenced by his music, including Bing Crosby, David Bowie, Bob Dylan and others, Dylan once referred to him as 'somebody whose life I can feel.' Broadway critic Gilbert Seldes compared him to the Greek god Pan, claiming that Jolson represented 'the concentration of our national health and gaiety'..."
7O-4 Oh! Jack, When Are You Coming Back - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Andrew B. Sterling and music by Arthur Lange (Featured by the Carnival Four - with cover photograph): " A sailor boy was just about to sail away - Sail away, down the bay - And from the crowd that stood upon the pier - A cheer, a tear and then good-bye - Oh Jack, when are you coming back? - You left broken hearts - And broken heads behind you - For you love just like you fight, you swab, you're always on the job - Wherever there's both, sure that's the place to find you..." Cover image (with a yellow-tinted inset publicity photograph of the Carnival Four by an unknown photographer) by artist William Austin Starmer: A sailor stands on a pier with military ships in the background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Tho' I'm Not The First To Call You Sweetheart." THE CARNIVAL FOUR were a singing group in vaudeville (No other biographical information was found).
7O-5 Oh! Johnny, Oh! Johnny Oh! - A single piece of sheet music (Forster Music Publisher, Inc., Chicago - 1917) with words by Ed Rose and music by Abe Olman ("By the writers of SOONER OR LATER - Featured by Baby Sylvia Jaffee"): "All the girls are crazy 'bout a certain little lad - Altho' he's very, very bad - He could be, oh, so good when he wanted to - Bad or good he understood 'bout love and other things - For ev'ry girl in town followed him around - Just to hold his hand and sing - Oh, Johnny! Oh, Johnny! How you can love - Oh, Johnny! Oh, Johnny! Heavens above! - You make my sad heart jump with joy - And when you're near I just can't sit still a minute - I'm so, Oh, Johnny! Oh, Johnny! Please tell me dear - What makes me love you so? You're not handsome it's true - But when I look at you - I just, Oh, Johnny! Oh, Johnny! Oh!" Cover image (with a blue-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillian Baby Sylvia Jaffe by an unknown photographer) by an unknown artist: Three women swoon over a dapper male figure. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Some Sweet Day." BABY SYLVIA JAFFE was a child star in vaudeville (No other biographical information was found).
7O-6 Oh Let It Wave - A single piece of sheet music (S. Pennell Publishing, Youngstown, Ohio -1917) with words and music by Sigler Pennell: "The Stars and Stripes for humanity and right - Are waving o'er the land and sea - Brave boys ev'ry one so true - Our nation all depends on you - Watch pray old Glory leads the way - And don't forget the day will come - For our vic'try let thy banner roll - Oh, let it wave, oh, let it wave - Oh let it wave for the freedom of the world - Let nations small be free from ruthless call - and ev'ry heart rejoice in praise..." Cover image by an unknown artist: The full-color Stars and Stripes waving against a blue background.
7O-7 Oh, Moon Of The Summer Night (Tell My Mother Her Boy's All Right) - Three pieces of sheet music (Al Piantadosi and Co., Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Allan J. Flynn ("Sung with great success by Miss Bessie Hamilton - Phenomenal Baritone with Lady Bountiful Minstrels"): "Over There - The silv'ry moon was shining , Over There - A soldier boy while pining to the moon pleaded - And if it heeded - This is what it heard him say - Oh! Moon of the summer night - Your silv'ry beams bring me dreams of the loved ones way back home - Could you only tell them all - That I'm safe tonight - How it would cheer up the loved ones far across the foam - Over yonder in the golden west - My mother's praying - And the little girl I love the best - Is praying too - So I'm asking you - Oh! Moon - Won't you send your light - And tell my mother for me, 'cross the sea - Her boy's alright..." Cover images (including a sepia-toned inset publicity photograph of vaudevillian Bessie Hamilton by an unknown photographer) by artist William Austin Starmer: A soldier in a battlefield trench stares at the full moon (which frames the images of his mother and girl back home). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "It's A Long Ways back To School Days," "Here Comes America," "Oh Moon Of The Summer Night," etc. BESSIE HAMILTON was a singer/actress in vaudeville and minstrel shows (No other biographical information found). No information found for THE LADY BOUNTIFUL MINSTRELS.
7O-8 Oh! What A Time For The Girlies, When the Boys Come Marching Home - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., Music Publishers NYC - 1918) with words by Joe Young and Sam M. Lewis and music by Harry Ruby (Portrayed by Red Skelton in the Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby biopic THREE LITTLE WORDS - MGM - 1950): "Why are all the girlies feeling great - Something's in the air - They don't even want to make a date - With a poor old millionaire - They're fixing up the Morris chair - And pulling down the blind - Soon There'll be somebody there - And here's what's on their minds - Oh! what a time, what a time, for the girlies when the boys come marching home - They'll get the kissing that they've been missing, while they were over the foam - Mary and Jane will explain to her soldier how she spent her nights alone - Think of all the loving they will get - Two long years they've been without a pet - Oh! what a time, what a time for the girlies when the boys come marching home..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A soldier and his girl hug during the celebration of the end of the war. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With A Dixie Melody."
7O-9 Oh You Rookie - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NY C- 1918) with words and music by Moe Thompson and Johnny Fink ("Patriotic War Edition"): "Listen ev'rybody, please listen to me - I am just as happy as I can be - Ever since I heard a song the other night - Heard a fellow sing it with all his might - When you hear it sung, you will have to agree - That is a pretty melody - The words are very catchy and very clear - It's always ringing in my ear - Oh, you Rookie! How's my Cookie? - Gee I'm proud of you - Oh, you Rookie! Oh, just lookie! - How glad I am, too - For in your khaki or your blue - You'll lick the Kaiser, too - Oh, you Rookie! How's my Cookie? - I think the world of you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier (with rifle) salutes from the battlefield. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "God Spare Our Boys Over There (The Army And Navy Song-Prayer)."
7O-10 Old Glory (The Flag That Floats O'er The U.S.A.) - A single piece of sheet music (Franklin Earl Hathaway Music Publisher, Chicago - 1917) with words and music by Franklin Earl Hathaway: "There's a flag that floats o'er the U.S.A. - it is filled with glittering stars - It has broad stripes touched with red and white - There's no stain that its beauty mars - We behold you - OLD GLORY - There's no flag in the world like you - You're the same Star-Spangled Banner - You're the same Red White and Blue - We love you OLD GLORY - And forever you must wave..." Cover image by artist E.H Pfeiffer: A ship shines a searchlight on "Old Glory" waving on a pier. The back cover features a reprinted article by Christian F. Reisner in the Epworth (Illinois) Herald - OLD GLORY: THE MEANING OF OUR FLAG : The story of THE ORIGINAL AMERICAN FLAG SONG.
7O-11 Old Glory Goes Marching On (The Flag That Never Knew Defeat) - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co./McKinley Music Co., Chicago and NYC - 1918) with music by Paul B. Armstrong and music by F. Henri Klickmann: "Proudly it waves, the Flag of the Free - Never dishonored on land or sea - Eternal justice for you and me - Who will defend it, will you? - The Red, the white, the blue - Crimson red for sacrifice, the blood of heroes shed - Spotless white for purity, the souls of soldier dead - Azure blue for fearless truth, the promise of the dawn - The flag that never knew defeat - Old Glory goes marching on..." Cover image: A black and white photograph (used by special arrangement with "Great Lakes Recruit 1917") of the "Irving Flag of Blue Jackets at Salute" (A "living flag" made up of military personal at the United States Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Illinois.). The back cover features a description of THE LIVING FLAG : "Betsy Ross fashioned the first American flag, but it remained for ten thousand American bluejackets to give the nation the most modern flag - a living, breathing, animated mass of humanity pulling taut at its 'rope' and attached to the 'pole' - a perfect replica of the National Stars and Stripes..."
7O-12 Old Grand Army Man, An - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1918) with words and music by Harry De Costa ("Writer of THE LITTLE GREY MOTHER, THAT SOOTHING SERENADE, AT THE COFFEE COOLERS, etc."): "In a uniform of blue that he'd worn years before - He stood in line prepared to fight for us, once more - At last his turn came 'round and when they said 'You'll have to stay' - All eyes grew dim at sight of him when they heard the vet'ran say - I've fought before and I'll fight once more - Please don't say that I'm too old - Tho' I've snow white hair, still the spirits there - And we need men, I've been told - There'll be no tears spent on this frame that's bent - And I'll do the best I can - To the front then let me start - If you don't, you'll break the heart of an old Grand Army man..." Cover image by and unknown photographer: A color-tinted photograph of "CHARLES KENT - Vitagraph Star - Reproduced by Permission." Advertised song samples on the back cover includes: "Kiss Me Again." According to Wikipedia: "CHARLES KENT (June 18, 1852 - May 21, 1923) was a British-born American silent film actor and director. He appeared in 141 films between 1908 and 1923. He also directed 36 films between 1908 and 1913."
7O-13 Old U.S. We're Fighting For, The - A single piece of sheet music (The Frances Clifford Music Publishing Co., Chicago - 1918) with words and music by Tade Dolen: "We've always been a peaceful land and never cared to war - We've always felt that liberty should reign - But now it time of trouble, it's up to us to see - That dear old Glory doesn't lose her fame - The bugle call is sounding, the call to arms has come - And we stand by dear Old Glory tho' it be with sword and gun - Tramp, tramp, tramp, the boys are marching - To the lands across the sea - With Old Glory proudly waving, leading on to victory - Then Hurrah! for the stars and the Stripes - May they wave for evermore - For My Country 'Tis of Thee - The U.S. we're fighting for..." Cover image by artist Grim Natwick: Two American soldiers charging to battle backed by a map of the United States of America. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Don't You Hear Me Calling, Dear?"
7O-14 On The Avenue - A single piece of sheet music (The Columbia Music Company, Washington, DC - 1909) with music ("March adn Two-Step") by Will T. Pierson. Cover image by an unknown photographer: A black and white photograph of an unidentified procession on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Rippling Waters and Love Me Lots And Love Me All The Time."
7O-15 On The Fields Of France - A single piece of sheet music (Sam Fox Publishing Co., Cleveland, Ohio - 1918) with words (Poem) by Gunner's Mate George M. Mayo and music by John S. Zamecnik ("Dedicated to and Sung by Reinald Warrenrath" - correct spelling "Werrenrath"): "Here's to the blue of the wind-swept North - When we meet on the fields of France - May the spirit of Grant be with you all - As the sons of the North advance - And here's to the gray of the sun-kissed South - When we meet on the fields of France - May the spirit of Lee be with you all - As the sons of the South advance - And here's to the blue and the gray as one - When we meet on the fields of France - May the spirit of God be with you all - As the sons of the Flag advance..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A silhouette of marching soldiers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "One Fleeting Hour." According to Wikipedia: " REINALD WERRENRATH (August 7, 1883 - September 12, 1953) was an American baritone opera singer, who also recorded popular songs and appeared regularly on radio in the early decades of the twentieth century. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of George Werrenrath, an operatic tenor born in Denmark. He studied at New York University, and made his operatic debut in 1907 in Die Meistersinger. He also recorded for Edison Records in 1907, before a long recording career with Victor Records. He sang on several hundred Victor recordings between 1906 and 1929, both as a soloist and as part of vocal ensembles such as the Orpheus Quartet. His most commercially successful recordings included 'As Long As The World Rolls On' (1907), 'Hello Frisco!' (from "Ziegfeld Follies of 1915"), and 'Smilin' Through' (1919). Werrenrath made his debut at the Metropolitan Opera in 1919, in Pagliacci, in a cast that also included Enrico Caruso. He also toured widely, and made over 3,000 concert appearances. He was one of the first singing stars to appear regularly on radio, notably on radio station WEAF in New York. In 1930, he made a private recording of Christmas greetings accompanied by Harpo Marx and others. In 1932, he became a member of NBC's music staff, and in later years devoted himself mainly to teaching, at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, Maryland and elsewhere. He also ran a regular summer music school at Chazy Lake, New York. He was married three times. He died in 1953 in Plattsburgh, New York, after suffering a heart attack while at Chazy Lake."
7O-16 One Hundred and First (101st) Regiment U.S.A. March - A single piece of sheet music (D.W. Cooper Publishing Co., Boston, Massachusetts - 1917) with music by Bert Potter. Cover image by an unknown artist: A silhouette of charging soldiers backed by a red, white and blue shield. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When The Sun Goes Down In Switzerland," "Like A Rose You Have Faded Away," "Somewhere In Georgia" and "Carolina, I'm Coming Back To You."
7O-17 One, Two, Three, Boys (Over The Top We Go) - A single piece of sheet music (Charles K. Harris Publishing - NYC - Chicago - Toronto - 1918) with words and music by Charles K. Harris: " What care we when bullets are whistling o'er our heads - What care we for shrapnel or for shell - They have tried their gases and their great big 'Berthas,' too - Now you watch us make those fellows yell - Now, all together, don't mind the weather - One, two, three, boys and over the top we go - Show them we're ready - Keep cool and steady - Think of only how they treat you if they beat you - Show them no quarter, don't think you oughta - Hold tight, just fight, America's watching you - Think of Belg'um, fight and show her - Think of France and all we owe her - One, two, three, boys, over the top we go..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A silhouette of soldiers (with rifles and bayonets) jumping into the enemy trenches. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "I Miss The Old Folks Now," "Yankee (He's There, All There)," "Love O' Mine," "Dry Your Tears," etc.
7O-18 Oui, Oui, Marie (Wee, Wee, Marie) - A single piece of sheet music (McCarthy and Fisher Inc. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words by Alfred Bryan and Joe McCarthy and music by Fred Fisher (Portrayed by S.Z. "Cuddles" Sakall in the Fred Fisher biopic OH, YOU BEAUTIFUL DOLL - 20th Century-Fox - 1949 - "Respectfully Dedicated to Our pal Ed Morton" - Vaudeville's "Singing Cop"): "Poor Johnny's heart went pity, pity pat - Somewhere in Sunny France - He met a girl by chance with ze naughty, naughty glance - She looked just like a kitty, kitty cat - She loved to dance and play - Tho' he learned no French when he left the trench - he knew well enough to say - Oui, Oui, Marie, will you do zis for me - Oui, Oui, Marie, then I'll do zat for you - I love your eyes, they make me feel so spoony - You'll drive me loony, you're teasing me - Why can't we parley vous like other sweethearts do - I want a kiss or two from Ma Cherie - Oui, Oui Marie, if you'll do zis for me - Then I'll do zat for you..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: An American soldier confers with a French woman. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Lorraine (My Beautiful Alsace Lorraine)." According to Wikipedia: "ED MORTON was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of a Scottish immigrant. From about 1898 until about 1905, he worked for the Philadelphia Police Department, leading to his later billing as 'The Singing Cop.' He then became a variety performer, and in 1907 appeared at the Madison Square Roof Garden in New York City in the cast of The Maid and the Millionaire, a musical comedy. The following year he toured as part of M. M. Thiese's Rollickers burlesque show, and then became a popular attraction in the vaudeville shows run by Benjamin Franklin Keith and Sylvester Z. Poli. He first recorded, as a gruff-voiced comic baritone, in 1907, and over the next few years recorded for Victor, Columbia, Edison, Zonophone and other companies. His successes included 'That's Gratitude,' 'Just a Friend of the Family,' 'The Right Church, But The Wrong Pew,' 'You Ain't Talking To Me,' 'The Party that Wrote Home, Sweet Home Never Was a Married Man,' 'What's the Matter with Father?,' and 'Oceana Roll,' first released in 1911 on the flip side of 'Alexander's Ragtime Band' by Collins and Harlan. As a Tin Pan Alley 'song plugger,', many of his songs also featured in the repertoires of rival performers Arthur Collins and Bert Williams, including 'coon songs.' He also wrote some of his own comic material. Morton did not record after 1917, but continued as a popular vaudeville attraction until 1926. He then retired to run a golf club and a restaurant, Ed Morton's Little Bit of Broadway, at Wildwood, New Jersey. He died of a heart attack in 1938 at the age of 67..."
7O-19 Our Boys - A single piece of sheet music (Herm M. Hahn Publishing, Fort Wayne, Indiana - 1918) with words and music by Herm M. Hahn ("Dedicated to the Army and Navy - Successfully sung by Ernest Moeller, Leading Baritone with American Grand Opera Company"): "Now our boys are marching forward - Marching forward to the war - And our homes are dark and dreary - And our hearts are justly sore - But the boys are proud and cheerful - For they'll fight for me and you - For the glory of their country - For the Red, White and Blue..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A brown-tinted publicity photograph of opera singer Ernest Moeller. The back cover features a full-page advertisement for The Packard Piano Company ("If there is no harmony in the factory, There will be none in the piano.").
7O-20 Our Country - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1917) with words and music ("National Hymn") by Frank Taft ("Dedicated to Captain J.R. De Lamar - First sung by Madame Frances Alda of Metropolitan Opera House, New York"): "To our country rich in deeds - We pledge our lives her name to save - Her sacred banner long shall wave - O'er land and sea - Hail! all hail America! - Land of freedom, truth and light - We sing thy praise - We know thy might - Democracy forever!" Cover image by an unknown artist: An angel with a sword protecting "Our Country." According to Wikipedia: "MADAME FRANCES ALDA was a New Zealand-born, Australian-raised operatic soprano. She achieved fame during the first three decades of the 20th century due to her outstanding singing voice, fine technique and colorful personality, as well as her frequent onstage partnerships at the New York Metropolitan Opera with Enrico Caruso..." According to Wikipedia: "JOSEPH RAPHAEL DE LAMAR was born in Amsterdam, Holland, September 2, 1843. His father, a banker in Amsterdam, died when he was six years of age, and the lad in love of adventure went aboard a Dutch vessel that plied to the West Indies. When the young stowaway was discovered, he was put to work as assistant to the cook without wages. He worked as a seaman until he was twenty, when he became master of a ship, and three years later received a captain's command. He visited almost every port in the world and acquired a wonderful education through his observations in foreign countries. His alert mind was attracted to submarine work, which was profitable, owing to the American Civil War, and, with characteristic energy, he abandoned the merchant service and became a submarine contractor, with headquarters at Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts, operating along the entire coast to the West Indies...He received several contracts for raising sunken ships, and was very successful. In 1872 he raised the 'Charlotte,' a transatlantic steamship loaded with Italian marble that had foundered off the Bermudas, and which had baffled the attempts of three previous wrecking companies. His experience, which nearly cost him his life, at Martha's Vineyard, going down in his diving suit to examine personally the damage to the Steamer 'William Tibbitts,' in which he was imprisoned for thirty-six hours, led Captain De Lamar to relinquish submarine work. He then studied the opportunities of trade with Africa; trading companies had confined their operations to the Coast, the natives from the interior bringing their goods to the Coast on the shoulders of negroes at considerable expense. Captain De Lamar decided to do trading in the interior. He equipped a small vessel, capable of navigating the African rivers, stocked with goods and armed with four small cannon, a dozen blunderbusses, rifles and ammunition. He pushed on to the interior, exercising constant vigilance to prevent attacks from hostile tribes. His venture was crowned with complete success. He traded principally on the Gambia and Great Jeba Rivers in West Africa. After three successful years he gave up this trade on account of the climate. Many of his crew died every year of African fever. He sold his outfit to an English company..."
7O-21 Our Country's In It Now! We've Got To Win It Now! - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Arthur Guy Empey ("Arthur Guy Empey's Gripping War Song - Author of the famous book and star of the VITAGRAPH feature photoplay OVER THE TOP") and music by Charles R. McCarron and Carey Morgan ("Sung in the comedy PACK UP YOUR TROUBLES produced by Wagenhals and Kemper Co."): "Germany begun this war - Belgium had no chance - And to help her, Italy and England joined with France - They've been fighting quite a while - Now we've joined the fray - One and all must heed the call - It's up to us today - Our country's in it now - We've got to win it now - And this is how - Ev'ry mother's son should run and get a gun - We've got to punish the Hun - Our country's in it, men - Just like the 'Minute Men' - We're going to forge our way to victory - To save Democracy - We've got to conquer Germany..." Cover image: Color-tinted scenes (featuring Arthur Guy Empey) from the Vitagraph photoplay OVER THE TOP -reproduced by courtesy of the vitagraph Company with a red and white striped background. Thee cover also features a hand-written message to The Joseph W. Stern and Co. Publishers signed by Arthur Guy Empey ("Gentlemen - Please pay all royalties earned from the sales of this song to the OUR BOYS IN FRANCE TOBACCO FUND"). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Your Lips are No Man's Land But Mine," "Liberty Statue Is Looking Right At You," etc. According to Wikipedia: ARTHUR GUY EMPEY was a soldier in both the British and American armies of World War I, and an author, screenwriter, actor and movie producer. was a soldier in both the British and American armies of World War I, and an author, screenwriter, actor and movie producer. Empey served for six years in the US Cavalry and was performing duty as a recruiting sergeant for the New Jersey National Guard in New York City when World War I began. He left the United States at the end of 1915 frustrated at its neutrality in the conflict at that point and travelled to London, England, where he joined the 1st London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers), Territorial Force, of the British Army, going on to serve with it in the 56th (London) Infantry Division on the Western Front as a bomber and a machine-gunner. He was medically discharged from the British Army after he was wounded in action at the commencement of the Battle of the Somme. On returning to the United States, Empey wrote a book of his experiences titled Over the Top, which became a publishing sensation in 1917 with over a quarter of a million copies sold, and was turned into a film in 1918 with Empey writing the screenplay and playing the lead role. Empey had attempted to re-join the US Army in 1917 but was rejected due to his wounds. On the basis of the book's success, he played a major propaganda role for the Federal Government's policy of moving the nation from a position of neutrality in World War I to a combatant role, and toured widely throughout the USA giving public performances and readings from it to rally the American people to the nation's entry into the conflict. He was commissioned a Captain in the US Army's Adjutant General's Department but the commission was withdrawn three days later amidst speculation that the cause was that whilst appearing as an actor in a play of Pack Up Your Troubles, Empey gave a speech praising the American volunteers but not the draftees who were being conscripted at that time, suggesting that the latter lacked the right stuff because they had waited 'until they were fetched' before enlisting for war service. In the audience was President Woodrow Wilson. Empey wrote several more screenplays, and more books on World War I, and formed his own production company called the Guy Empey Pictures Corporation. He was also a popular song-writer during the war years, writing the lyrics for numbers such as Your Lips are No Man's Land but Mine, and Liberty Statue is Looking Right at You..."
7O-22 Our Lads in Olive Drab - A single piece of sheet music (Margaret Hibner Sweet Publishing, Stockdale, Kansas - 1918) with words and music by Margaret Hibner Sweet ("Dedicated to my pupils - In camp - At Home - Abroad"): "We are two aged veterans who fought in sixty-two - One wore the somber Quaker Grey - One wore the Brass and Blue - When we clasped hands, with hearts so true to dear old Uncle Sam - Our hearts were glad for each one had a Lad in Olive Drab - Oh, Laddie clad in Olive Drab, so loyal brave and true - While you're away tho' home we stay, this war we'll help win too - Till your return our hearts will yearn, for just a word from you - Although we're sad, our hearts are glad, for Lads in Olive Drab..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Ornate olive drab lettering of the song title.
7O-23 Our Lanky Yankee Boys In Brown - A single piece of sheet music (F.B. Haviland Publishing Co., NY C- 1917) with words by Edward Madden and Robert F. Roden and music by Theodore Morse ("Dedicated to 'Our Boys' in Khaki"): "See them coming, a mighty throng - Drums rum-tum-tumming They march along - Watch the transports sailing down the bay - 'Way over there in a foreign clime - There will sure be a hot old time - Uncle Sammy's boys are on their way - We are sending the best we've got - You can bet they're a fighting lot - We've a hunch they're going to gain renown - Ev'ry one of them full of grit, going over to do his bit - Our Lanky Yankee Boys in Brown - Hip! Hip! Hooray for they're going to sail away - They leave today - They'll soon be there to do their share out where the fighting is hot - They'll be 'Johnny on the Spot' - For that's a way our boys have got. By gum! We're in for a scrap, but we'll wipe 'em off the map - Once we begin - We're in to win by gosh and that's no josh - They'll all clear the away Hip! Hip! Hooray! - For our Lanky Yankee Boys in Brown..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers marching past the Capitol Building in Washington, DC as an eagle soars overhead. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When It's Cherry Time in Tokio" and "My Broken Rosary."
7O-24 Our Pledge To The U.S.A. - A single piece of sheet music (Gene Shirley Publishing, Toledo, Ohio - 1917) with words and music by Gene Shirley ("March Song"): "They are fighting everywhere on land and in the air - The world is now at war across the sea - And oh how long we tried till our laws were all defied - To keep our neutrality -At last the U.S.A. - Must enter come what may - So this is what the nation has to say - Uncle Sam, Uncle Sam we are loyal to you - Ready to serve the Red, White and Blue - No tyrant's oppression hangs o'er this free land - United in friendship and strength we all stand - For humanities sake we pledge ourselves on and all to fight for America at Woodrow Wilson's call - So let the Star Spangled Banner continue to wave - O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier saluting at attention.
7O-25 Our Sammies - A single piece of sheet music (Vandersloot Music Publishing Co., Williamsport , Pennsylvania - 1918) with music by Carl D. Vandersloot ("One Step - March or Two-Step"). Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A blue-tinted photograph of the troops marching down a city street against a red, white and blue background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Pepper Sauce (A Hot Rag)," "Tanglefoot Rag," "Nigger Toe," " Halley's Comet," etc.
7O-26 Over Here - A single piece of sheet music (Charles B. Weston Publishing, Brooklyn, NY - 1917) with words and music by Charles B. Weston: "A mother who was bidding a farewell to her boy who was going far away - For he was a gallant soldier lad in the U.S.A. - When she heard the bugle calling - And he could no longer stay - Lovingly she pressed him to her heart these words to him did say - Over here, over here we'll be waiting for you boy - You are father's pride and you are mothers joy - Go right in and be a here son - Never wait until the vict'ry's won - For in home sweet home we want sweet liberty - Over here..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A blue service window star. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Mother's Love Is The Sweetest Love Of All," "The Days When We Were Young" and "Just You And I."
7O-27 Over The Rhine - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1917) with words by Jack Yellin and music by Albert Gumble: " Good-bye ev'rybody for we're going 'cross the sea - Going for a visit to some friends in Germany - They don't know we're coming, but they'll find out mighty soon - Wait until they hear us marching to a Yankee tune- Over the Rhine...through the German line - Tell Kaiser Bill that his time has come - We'll put his army on the bum, bum , bum - He'll bite the dust - He'll bite the dust - We'll get to Berlin or we'll bust! - WE MUST! So come....or you're goin' to miss the fun - Of we'll all going over the Rhine..." Cover image by William Austin Starmer: American troops and equipment crossing the Rhine River. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "On The Road To Home Sweet Home."
7O-28 Over The Top - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Alfred Bryan and music by Peter Wendling and Jack Wells: "See those Yankee Doodle soldiers on their way - Down the bay - Hip-hooray! - Ev'ry gallant heart is anxious for the fray - And they will welcome the say - Hear those voices shout - As the boats pull out - Over the top - When they see us coming - They'll never stop - When we get them running - We'll send them back , bend them back to the Rhine - We'll make a crack in the Hindenburg line - Those Yankee Doodle boys - Will make a lot of noise - The old Red, White and Blue - The Yankee Eagle, too - They'll be there - Doing their share - When we go over the top..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A silhouette of soldiers charging on a battlefield. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Paddle Addle In Your Little Canoe."
7O-29 Over There - Five pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1917) with words and music ("Your Song - My Song - Our Boy's Song") by George M. Cohan (Portrayed by James Cagney on film, Mickey Rooney on television and Joel Grey on stage): "Johnnie get your gun, get your gun, get your gun - Take it on the run, on the run, on the run - Hear them calling you and me - Ev'ry son of liberty - Hurry right away, no delay, go today - Make your daddy glad to have had such a lad - Tell your sweetheart not to pine - To be proud her boy's in line - Over there, over there - Send the word, send the word over there - That the Yanks are coming, the Yanks are coming - The drums rum-tumming ev'rywhere - So prepare - Say a pray'r - Send the word, send the word to beware - We'll be over, we're coming over - And we won't come back till it's over, over there..." Cover images by artists Norman Rockwell and Henry Hut: Four soldiers (one with a banjo) singing in the glow of a campfire/Soldiers in line raising there hats in the air ("The Great War Song - CANADIAN EDITION")/ A color-tinted photograph of William J. Reilly U.S.N.- U.S.S. Michigan. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Cotton Pickin' Time in Alabam," "I'll Come Back To You When It's All Over," etc. W. J. REILLY was a gunner on the U.S.S. Michigan who also performed as a singer and piano player in vaudeville (No other biographical information found).
7O-30 Over Yonder Where The Lilies Grow - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC- 1918) with words and music Geoffrey O'Hara ("Army Song Leader - Composer of K-K-K-Katy" - Dedicated to Mrs. Katy Richardson"): "Last night I lay a-sleeping - A vision came to me - I saw a baby, in Flanders maybe - Its little eyes were wet with tears - I heard a voice so clear - It said "Come over here' - Over yonder, over yonder - Over yonder where the lilies grow - Let us wander, over yonder - To the land of long ago - Where the Lily of France, the Fleur -De-Lis is calling to you and me - Let us wander over yonder - To the land where the lilies grow..." Cover image by artist Norman Rockwell ("Drawing copyright by JUDGE the Nation's Perpetual Smileage Book"): A Dutch girl hands a tulip to a weary American soldier. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "God Spare Our Boys Over There (The Army and Navy Song-Prayer)." According to Dr. W.F. Rannie -Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg - Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada on the mnsu.edu Web Site: " I thought you might be interested in some additional info about the song K-K-K-Katy, undoubtedly the most famous stuttering song. The Katie in the song was my grandmother, Katherine Gertrude Craig of Kingston, Ontario (whose married name was Katherine Richardson by the time the song was written); she was known as Kate. It was composed spontaneously at a party at Kate Richardson's house in Kingston in 1917. 'Katie' was the best friend of Geoffrey O'Hara's sister, Kathleen, who married Katie's brother (thus making her Geoffrey O'Hara's sister's sister-in-law). The finished version of the song was first played at a garden party fund-raiser for the Red Cross at a cottage in Collins Bay on Lake Ontario just west of Kingston. I have a 1918 edition of the sheet music on which is printed above the title 'Lovingly dedicated to K-K-K-Katy Richardson who inspired this song.' There is no recollection in the family as to how the stuttering motif came to be- certainly Katie Richardson didn't stutter but perhaps someone known to the group around the piano did, or more likely it was simply a device to make the words scan to the music. Katie Craig-Richardson died in 1922, leaving two very young daughters- Kathleen E. Rannie (my mother named after O'Hara's sister and living in Beamsville, Ontario) and Katharine Jean Richardson (my aunt still living in Kingston). Geoffrey O'Hara was originally from Chatham, Ontario, taught music at Columbia University and the University of South Dakota, and died in Florida on January 31, 1967, at age 84. During his career, he composed a great many songs, mostly hymns and other sacred music, but none so far as I know have lasted like K-K-K-Katy."
7P-1 Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag (And Smile, Smile, Smile) - Two pieces of sheet music (T.B. Harms, Co., NYC - 1915) with words by George Asaf and music by Felix Powell ("Vide Press: 'What is best described as a PHILOSOPHY SONG, is now being sung and whistled by the troops as they march along. We believe that it will become overwhelmingly popular' "): "Private Perks is a funny little codger - With a smile, a funny smile - Five feet none, he's an artful little dodger - With a smile, a funny smile - Flush or broke he'll have his little joke - he can't be suppress'd - All the other fellows have to grin - When he gets this off his chest - Hi! Pack up your troubles in your old kit bag - And smile, smile, smile - While you've a lucifer to light your fag - Smile, boys, that's the style - What's the use of worrying? - It never was worth-while so- Pack up your troubles in your old kit-bag - And smile, smile, smile..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Ornate title lettering. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Blighty," "Wait Till The Cows Come Home," "A Sweetheart Of My Own," etc.
7P-2 Patria - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1917) with words by George Graff, Jr. and music by Mrs. Vernon (Irene) Castle ("Inspired by Mrs. Vernon Castle's Role in the International Photo-Play PATRIA - Also Published as an Instrumental Waltz"): " You came to me so tenderly - Our hearts both cried for a mating - Wand'ring along, met in a song - Found no excuse for waiting - Just as the perfume 'round a flow'r - Your presence clings and fills ev'ry hour - You're my heart's bouquet - Life glad and gay - You're night and you're day to me - In step with the same sweet measure, all the time - Our lives in their round of pleasure meet in a perfect rhyme - Our hearts care not what the weather - Night or noon - If only they are together - They will find the same sweet tune - You brought to me love's melody - You put a song in my dreaming - Love is so sweet, life so complete - Words are so empty seeming, my Patria - You taught me love and that all angels stay above - Your life's melody, heart's harmony - You're my symphony of love..." Front and back cover images by an unknown artist: Mrs. Vernon (Irene) Castle wrapped in an American flag/A profile publicity painting of Mrs. Vernon (Irene) Castle. According to E.S. Scott on the IMDb Web Site: "IRENE CASTLE and her husband Vernon Castle (born Vernon Blyth) were the best known ballroom dancers of the early 20th Century. Beginning about 1914 they operated several clubs and studios in the NYC area, toured the country dancing, and were able to charge as much as a thousand dollars an hour for lessons. They appeared in an Irving Berlin musical ('Watch Your Step') and in the film 'The Whirl Of Life' as themselves. Irene appeared in a number of films alone, notably the WWI drama 'Patria.' Vernon (as a military flying instructor) was killed in an airplane accident shortly before the war's end. Irene later married Robert Treman, an Ithaca NY businessman who stole her money and lost it on the stock market. In 1923 she married Frederic McLaughlin, a man sixteen years older than her. She married him for his money, divorcing him when he proved to be possessive and physically violent. Her fourth and final husband was George Enzinger an advertising executive from Chicago. She spent the later years of her life championing animal rights."
7P-3 Paul Revere (Won't Your Ride For Us Again?) - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words by Jo Goodwin and music by Halsey K. Mohr ("Writers of LIBERTY BELL"): " With your lantern, Paul Revere - You rode miles around - 'One if by land - Two if by sea' - Spreading alarm thru ev'ry town - You warned us then of danger that was near - We need another warning Paul Revere - Paul Revere - Paul Revere - Won't you ride for us again? - Won't you ride thru each hamlet, village and farm? - Ride, Paul Revere, and spread the alarm - Paul Revere, Paul Revere - Your a mem'ry we all hold dear - Tho' you've rested for ages on history's pages - Ride for us now, Paul Revere..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A depiction of Paul Revere's midnight ride. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Three Wonderful Letters From Home," "Lafayette! We Hear you Calling," "Beautiful Ohio," etc.
7P-4 Pick A Little Four Leaf Clover (And Send It Over To Me) - A single piece of sheet music (Forster Music Publisher Inc., Chicago/J. Albert and Son, Sydney, N.S.W. Australia - 1918) with words by C. Francis Reisner and Ed Rose with music by Abe Olman ("Featured by THE GREAT LAKES SEXTETTE with JOHN PHILIP SOUSA'S GREAT LAKES BAND" - with cover photograph): "Somewhere out there, over in France - Came a note from a soldier boy - A world of love each word contained - And it brought to his sweetheart joy - 'Remember me' she read thru a tear - And next time you write to me, dear - Pick a little four leaf clover and send it over to me - Out on the battlefield - Just like an armor shield - It will help me to win the victory - For the four leaf clover makes wishes come true - And my heart's yearning and wishing for you - So won't you pick a little four leaf clover - And send it over to me..." Cover image by an unknown artist: The Great Lakes Sextette framed by a large green four leaf clover. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Uncle Sammy Take Care Of My Girl." According to the navy.mil Web Site: "PRIDE IN SERVICE has been the theme for NAVY BAND GREAT LAKES for more than a century. From 1911, when the band first formed, to 1917, when Lieutenant Commander John Philip Sousa served as Bandmaster, to today's Director, Lieutenant Patrick K. Sweeten, our music represents the pride and professionalism that is synonymous with the United States Navy. Serving Commander, Naval Service Training Command's mission of transforming volunteers into 21st century Sea Warriors, Navy Band Great Lakes performs ceremonies to honor recruits, Sailors, and their families. Also, as the Navy's 'Ambassadors to the Midwest,' Navy Band Great Lakes performs for hundreds of thousands yearly. We provide musical support for communities of all sizes as well as supporting Navy recruiting in a nine state area of responsibility stretching from Michigan to North Dakota..."
7P-5 Please Bring Back My Daddy To ME - A single piece of sheet music (Franklin Earl Hathaway Music Publisher, Chicago - 1918) with words by Franklin Earl Hathaway and music by Leo Friedman ("Composer of MEET ME TONIGHT IN DREAMLAND, SOMEWHERE A HEART IS BREAKING, WHEN I DREAM OF OLD ERIN, LET ME CALL YOU SWEETHEART and other HITS"): " Twilight brings mem'ries of home sweet home - To many 'Over There' - For those away beyond the sea - There's many an evening pray'r - O, That one baby girl's daddy dear - Who fights for Uncle Sam - Could hear her say, when tucked away - E'en though her pray'rs are said - Oh, please bring back my daddy to me - For I want him to hold me, you know - Guardian angels take care of my daddy - For oh, I love him so - I don't know what makes Mama's eyes moisten - Ev'ry time when your picture we see - oh, Daddy, oh, Daddy, be careful - And come back to Mama and me..." Cover image by artist Helen Smith: A young girl sadly sits on her bed thinking of her father (whose army photo is framed over her bed). Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "We're Coming Uncle Sam To You," "Old Glory," "Our Country's Starry Banner," etc.
7P-6 Poor Little Butterfly Is A Fly Girl Now - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder, NYC - 1919) with words by Sam M. Lewis and Joe Young and music by M.K. Jerome: "All alone in her pagoda - Waiting for her sailor-man - Poor Butterfly would sit and cry - Someone came along and showed her - How to keep him in Japan - He just came back for a day, but she said, 'I guess you'll stay' - Poor little butterfly has learned to roll her eye - And when she shimmies, She's as cute as she can be - Say when this baby shakes - She's got just what it takes - To keep her sailor-boy from going out to sea - She knew the 'Ballin' Jack' - Was bound to bring him back - She learned to do an Oriental dance and how - Wow! Wow! - You ought to see - You ought to see the way she shakes her Japan-knee - Poor little Butterfly is a fly gal now..." Cover image by an unknown artist: An Asian woman in a Kimono. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "I'll Be Happy When The Preacher Makes You Mine," "Mickey," etc.
7P-7 Private Arkansaw Bill (Yip -I-Yip And A Too-Ra Le Ay) - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co., Chicago and NYC - 1918) with words and music by Lloyd Garrett ("The great GANG Song"): "Arkansaw Bill came to camp one day - And brought his old fiddle along - The only tune he was known to play - Was a little old Arkansaw song - And now ev'ry where that song's in the air - You hear it all night and all day - That foolish refrain gets into your brain - It's 'Yip - i - yip and a Too-ra-le -ay' - You can hear it all day - When that haunting strain gets in your weary brain - Ev'ry now and then you start to sing again - Yip-i-yip and a Too-ra-le ay! - No use! You can't drive it that away - So what's the use tryin' and what's the use of cryin' It's yi-i-yip! and too-ra-le-ay..." Cover image by an unknown artist: American soldiers singing.
7R-1 Ragtime Soldier Man, The - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Music Publishers, NYC - 1912) with words and music by Irving Berlin: " My lovin' baby - My lovin' baby - You better dry your eyes and don't be grievin' - You got to stop it - You better drop it - I told you once before - I've got to go to war - Now don't you worry - I've got to hurry - Because the regiment will soon be leavin' - Don't you feel blue - Because I'm goin' off to war - I've got to go - I've got to go - A soldier-man I've got to be - I've got to go - I've got to go - I hear the bugle calling me - Oh my Hon,' hurry up - Get my gun, hurry up, hurry up - Can't you see that I've got to fight for love and liberty - My honey dear, My honey dear - You better save your sympathy - If you should hear - If you should hear - I got to near the enemy - Kindly carry me back to Old Virginia - And when you get me there - Say A prayer for your ragtime soldier man..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: An American soldier dodging enemy cannon balls. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Spring and Fall."
7R-2 Rainbow From The U.S.A., A - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by William Jerome and J.F. Mahoney and music by Percy Wenrich (Featured in "Charles Dillingham's Super -Spectacular EVERYTHING at the Hippodrome by R.H. Burnside"): "France, you never faltered when the war clouds gathered o'er - Undaunted as of yore, your sons respond once more - On the page of time your deeds will live thru future years - Tho' smiling fields are flooded with your tears - Thru the storm a light shines down on you - Can't you see the rainbow breaking thru? - France there's a rainbow in the sky - Weep no more can't you see it shining? - France, brush the teardrop from your eye - Clouds of war have a silver lining - See it bending o'er from the Western shore - Growing brighter day by day - Just see those colors shining through - It's the old Red, White and Blue - A rainbow from the U.S.A!" Cover image by an unknown artist: Ornate song-title lettering backed by a red, white and blue "Rainbow From The U.S.A." Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Radiance In Your Eyes." EVERYTHING, a musical revue written by R.H. Burnside, produced by Charles Dillingham and starring De Wolf Hopper and Harry Houdini was produced by Charles Dillingham opened at Broadway's Hippodrome Theatre on August 22, 1918 and closed on May 17, 1919.
7R-3 Raus Mit Der Kaiser (He's In Dutch) - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Andrew B. Sterling and Hartley Costello and music by Arthur Lange: "The boys are learning German that was never in a book - And they're going to speak that German when the Kaiser gets the hook - They practice ev'ry morning to serenade Berlin - And you will hear them singing the moment they get in - Raus mit der Kaiser! Raus mit der Kaiser! - Raus mit der Kaiser!- Soon he'll not amount to much - We'll hock his throne and break his crown - And turn his mustache upside down - Raus mit der Kaiser..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: Uncle Sam's boot kicking the Kaiser. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Before The World Began." According to Wikipedia: Wilhelm II or William II (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, three notable contemporary relations being his first cousins King George V of the United Kingdom, founder of the House of Windsor, Marie of Romania, Queen consort of Romania and the Czarina Alix of Hesse, consort of his second cousin Tsar Nicholas II of the House of Romanov, the last ruler of the Russian Empire before the Russian Revolution of 1917 which deposed the monarchy. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose 'New Course' in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to the First World War. Bombastic and impetuous, he sometimes made tactless pronouncements on sensitive topics without consulting his ministers, culminating in a disastrous Daily Telegraph interview that cost him most of his power in 1908. His top generals, Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, dictated policy during the First World War with little regard for the civilian government. An ineffective war leader, he lost the support of the army, abdicated in November 1918, and fled to exile in the Netherlands..."
7R-4 Rear Admiral Wood - A single piece of sheet music (Daisy M. Erd - First Naval District Headquarters - Publisher, Boston - 1918) with music ("One-Step") by Daisy M. Pratt Erd (Chief Yeoman U.S.N.R.F. - Composer of UNCLE SAM'S SHIP, We'll CARRY THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER THRU THE TRENCHES and others"). Cover image: A photograph of Rear Admiral Spencer S. Wood by an unknown photographer. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Old Ireland Will Smile Back At Me." According to Wikipedia: "Rear Admiral SPENCER SHEPARD WOOD (August 7, 1861 - July 30, 1940) was a United States Navy officer. His career included service in the Spanish-American War and World War I, command of battleships and cruisers, and duty as an aide to a number of senior naval leaders...After the United States entered World War I in April 1917, Wood became the second commanding officer of the battleship USS Oklahoma in the United States Atlantic Fleet on June 6, 1917. On December 24, 1917, Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels announced the promotion of twelve captains to a temporary rank of rear admiral for World War I service, and Wood was among them. He remained aboard Oklahoma until February 1, 1918, involved primarily in the training of her crew and a refit of the ship, and received the Navy Cross for 'exceptionally meritorious service' while in command of her. After leaving Oklahoma, he was commandant of the First Naval District through the end of the war in November 1918 and into 1919..."
7R-5 Red, White And Blue - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph S. Whalen Publisher - Hartford, Connecticut - 1919) with words and music by Joseph S. Whalen ( with cover photograph - "Patriotically Dedicated to THE AMERICAN LEGION and to our COMRADES who made the supreme sacrifice that others might live."): "A little lad of three on his grand dad's knee - Grand-dad dear he said, please tell to me just how they came to make Old Glory - Each stripe of red and white - Each star that shines so bright - And this the story that his grand - dad told - Red means our dead, the blood that they shed - In fighting your battles and mine - White means security to each mother's purity - For each son she gave to thee - Blue is for Yankee hearts so true - Hearts that will do or die - For every single star you see - A state whose sons lay down and die - And that's how they made old Red, White and Blue...." Cover image: A black and white publicity photograph of Joseph S. Whalen (by an unknown photographer) against a red, white and blue background. The back cover features an explanation as to "What the (American) Legion Stands For" ("A - AMERICANISM - one hundred per cent - M-MILLIONS - To stick together - E- EDUCATION - For ourselves and our children - R-RIGHT - 'Our Country - Right or Wrong' - I-INDEPENDENCE - We fought for it - C- CALL - We are Ready for another - A - ALL AMERICANS - Our own.").
7R-6 Red, White And Blue Is Calling You, The - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co., Chicago and NYC - 1916) with words and music by Billy Johnson: "Can't you hear the bugle chorus? - See the flag that's floating o'er us! - 'Tis the starry emblem of the U.S.A. - 'Tis the grandest flag that waves beneath the sun today - Can't you hear the call 'tis sending? - Don't you know it needs defending? - Ev'ry true American will march with loyal pride - Beneath the flag of liberty for which our fathers fought and died - The red, white and blue is calling you! - Come on and do your duty, too - Come and show your loyalty - To the banner of the free - 'Twill always wave above the brave on land and sea - The blue and the gray in joint array - March beneath one starry banner while the bands all play - 'I wish I was in Dixie, Hooray, Hooray!' - From pine-clad hills of far off Mine - To sunny Texas golden plain - The red, white and blue is calling you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: The American Eagle and shield against a red, white and blue starred background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Avalon," "Let's Go Back To Dreamy Lotus Land," "My Fox-Trot Girl," etc.
7R-7 Ring Out! Sweet Bells Of Peace - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - San Francisco - Boston - London - 1918) with words by William H. Gardner ("Author of THY BEAMING EYES, HONEY, IF YO' ONLY KNEW, THE CROWN OF LIFE, etc.") and music by Caro Roma ("Writer of THE SILENT VOICE, I COME TO THEE, RESIGNATION, GOD SHALL WIPE AWAY ALL TEARS, etc.") - Dedicated To The Glory And Success Of THE ALLIED NATIONS: "A white dove flies at the dawning - An angel sings o'er the sea - This is a wondrous morning - For freedom and Liberty! - Lo, out from the stars of midnight - God bade all war to cease - And now for the waiting nations - At last there reigneth Peace! - Ring out! Ring out! Ring out, sweet bells of Peace! - Ring out! Ring out! the Lord has sent release! - The world is safe, and right is won! - The vict'ry's gained, the task is done! - The clouds of war at last shall cease - Ring out sweet bells of peace..." Cover image: Ornate song-title lettering. Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers includes: "Can't You Heah Me Callin,' Caroline," "Honey, If You Only Knew," "Resignation," etc.
7R-8 Riproaring Yankee, The - A single piece of sheet music (Wilton and Co. Publishers, Cleveland, Ohio - 1917) with words and music by T.W. Small ("Composer of AMERICA FOREVER" - Dedicated "To ALL The Sammies"): "I'm a son of Uncle Samuel - And I'm on my way to France - He has ordered out his fighting men - And is giving me a chance - But it won't be long, my dearie - before our work is thro' - And with honors heaped on the U.S.A. - I'll be coming back to you- So make way for the rip-roaring Yankee - Who lives in the far-off West - With gun in his hand, his flag flying grand - He's doing his bit with the rest - His heart may be grievin' for those he is leaving - But yet he is cheerful and gay - He'll fight 'till he bust, for in God is his trust - This little rip-roaring Yankee..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Ornate song-title lettering against a red, white and blue background.
7R-9 Rocked In The Cradle Of Liberty - A single piece of sheet music (Daly Music Publishers, Inc., London - Boston - NYC -Sydney - 1916) with words and music by Richard Howard ("Composer of I'VE LOST YOU SO WHY SHOULD I CARE, JUST A LITTLE SONG AT TWILIGHT, SOME DAY YOU"LL MISS ME, THERE IS ALWAYS SOMEBODY TO BLAME, etc."): "A laddie was telling his mother - That war would never cause her pain - They may come for me, but when they do said he - They'll come for me in vain - It's not that I love my country less - But I love you, mother more - And so far that reason set your heart at rest - I'll never go to war - The mother then with tear-dimmed eye - Made to her boy this reply - You were rocked in the cradle of liberty - To the battle cry of peace - That's why I pray from day to day - That wars may forever cease - I don't want to lose my baby - You're all I'm living for - But when you know your country's right - You must march away and fight - To the battle cry of war, war, war..." Cover image by the Union Engraving Company : A mother and her boy (in uniform) gaze into each other's eyes. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "The Birth Of A Nation." - "A wonderful patriotic number..."
7R-10 Root For Uncle Sam - A single piece of sheet music (Havez and Silvers Publishers, NYC/Jerome H. Remick and Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Jean C. Haves and music by Louis Silvers ("Dedicated to the Friar's Machine Gun Company"): "Come on you Yankee boys and girls - It's time to show your nerve - We're out to give the enemy the licking they deserve - Altho' at peace they've sunk our ships - As friends could never do - They've turn'd their guns upon our flag - I won't stand for that, will you? - Everybody root for Uncle Sam - I'm for Wilson, you bet your life I am - Bring on your sneaky submarines - and lick us if you can - Everybody root for Uncle Sam..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A red, white and blue striped background.
7R-11 Rose Of No Man's Land, The (La Rose Sous Les Boulets) - Three pieces (various covers and sizes) of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC/Jack Mendelsohn Music Co., Boston - 1918) with words by Jack Caddigan (French text by Louis Delamarre) and music by James A. Brennan ("Patriotic War Edition - Dedicated to the American Red Cross Nurse"): "I've seen some beautiful flowers - Grow in life's garden fair - I've spent some wonderful hours - Lost in their fragrance rare - But I have found another - Wondrous beyond compare - There's a rose that grows on 'No Man's Land' - And it's wonderful to see - Though it's sprayed with tears, it will live for years - In my garden of memory - It's the one red rose the soldier knows - It's the work of the Master's hand - 'Mid the war's great curse stands the Red Cross Nurse - She's the rose of 'No Man's Land' " Cover images by unknown artists: A Red Cross nurse gazes heavenward as a beam of light falls upon her/The head of a Red Cross Nurse blooms on a rose branch with a background of the battlefield barbwire and trenches. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Somewhere There's A Someone," etc.
7R-12 Russians Were Rushin' - The Yanks Started Yankin' - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Co. - Will Von Tilzer - President, NYC - 1918) with words by Carey Morgan and music by Charles McCarron: "I dreamed of a scene in an old soldier's home - the year was nineteen fifty-three - With medals galore he'd won in this war - He sat smoking peacefully - Tell me of the war of nineteen seventeen - Said his grandson who stood by his side - How did they fix up that terrible mix-up? - And proudly the old man replied - The Russians were Rushin' the Prussians - The Prussians were crushin' the Russians - The Balkans were balkin' and Turkey was squawkin' - Rasputin disputin' and Italy scootin' - The Boches all bulled Bolshevikis - The British were skittish at sea - But the good Lord I'm thankin' - The Yankees started yankin' - And yanked Kaiser Bill up a tree..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: A young boy and his grandfather with a background of a silhouette of various soldiers surrounding Kaiser Wilhelm. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "After You've Gone" and "Ev'rybody's Crazy 'Bout The Doggone Blues (But I'm Happy)."
8S-1 Salute The Flag (by V. Bartlett) - A single piece of sheet music (Himan Music Co., NYC - 1914) with music by Victor Bartlett. Cover image by an unknown artist: The "U.S.S. St. Louis" speeding across the ocean. The new PAUL G. MEHLIN and SONS (West New York, NJ) piano models ("The Mehlin," etc.) are advertised on the back cover. According to the MILITARY ROOTS Web Site: "The fourth St. Louis, Cruiser No. 20 was launched on May 6, 1905 at Neafie and Levy Company shipyards in Philadelphia, PA. Miss Gladys Bryant Smith of St. Louis, Missouri sponsored the St. Louis as she christened her with the breaking of a champagne bottle on her bow. Along with the dignitaries on the launching platform with Miss Smith were her two Maids of Honor Mary S. Wright and Rebecca Reeves Van Lennep...In April of 1914 St. Louis was now skippered by Commander Joseph Mason 'Bull' Reeves. During CMDR Reeves term as captain from April 1914 through June of 1915, St. Louis served as a training ship, Receiving Ship and as Submarine support ship. Reeves later would retire from the Navy at the rank of Admiral and distinguished himself by served in the Spanish-American War, WWI and WWII and it was largely through Admiral Reeves foresight that the foundation of modern carrier striking forces are based on today. Detached from the Reserve Fleet on 10 July 1916, St. Louis departed Puget Sound on July 21st for Honolulu. She arrived at Pearl Harbor on the 29th of July, where she commenced her next duty assignment as the tender for Submarine Division Three, Pacific Fleet, with additional duty as station ship, Pearl Harbor. As such St. Louis became the first major warship to be stationed at Pearl Harbor...Returning to Boston for repairs on July 19, 1917, she had completed six additional voyages, escorting convoys bound from New York for ports in Britain and France by the end of the war. During these convoy escorts on January 7, 1918 Seaman Thomas Henry Schaeffer was lost his life as he was washed overboard. And Fireman 1st Class Basil Floyd Brumbaugh passed away due to respiratory problems on January 20, 1918. In March of 1918 the St. Louis was not immune to the effects of the Spanish Influenza Pandemic. As she was at the Navy Yard at Norfolk, VA St. Louis reported 73 cases of the flu resulting in some deaths. Seaman 2c Hilbert Charles Bell died on March 6, 1918 of an unknown illness, Apprentice Seaman Charles Edward Gibson died on June 6, 1918 of an unknown illness. Seaman 2c Elias William Whitmore dies on October 7, 1918 of respiratory disease..."
8S-2 Salute The Flag (by W. T. Pierson) - A single piece of sheet music (Church, Paxson and Company, NYC - 1914) with music ("March and Two-Step") by William T. Pierson. Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: An unidentified battleship speeding across the ocean with an American flag waving above. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Little Soldier," "Reelections," "The Greyhound," etc.
8S-3 Salvation Lassie Of Mine - Three pieces (various covers and sizes) of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC/J.J. Caddigan Publishing, Boston - 1919) with words and music by Jack Caddigan and "Chick" Story ("Dedicated to Commander Evangeline Booth - By the writers of ROSE OF NO MAN'S LAND and IN THE OLD SWEET WAY"): "They say it's in Heaven that all Angels dwell - But I've come to learn they're on earth just as well - And how would I know that the like could be so - if I hadn't found one down here below - A sweet little Angel that went o'er the sea - With the emblem of God in her hand - A wonderful Angel who brought there to me - The sweet of a war-furrowed land - The crown of her head was a ribbon of red - A symbol of all that's divine - Tho' she called each a brother - She's more like a mother - Salvation Lassie of mine..." Cover images by unknown artists: A color-tinted photograph of a Salvation Army woman with a background sketch of the "Salvation Army Hut"/Ornate song-title lettering with the "Official Emblem" of The Salvation Army. The back cover features an advertisement for the SONGS OF CHEER folio ("For Camp, Fireside, Liberty and Community Singing - A Pocket Book of Songs - the soul of America's war-time spirit..."). According to Wikipedia: "EVANGELINE BOOTH (December 25, 1865 - July 17, 1950) was the 4th General of The Salvation Army from 1934 to 1939. She was its first female General...In August 1917, despite the differences between Commander Evangeline Booth and US General Pershing, the first of 250 Salvationists left New York for the front line of the Great War in France. They soon won the confidence of the troops with their cheerful brand of 'seven-days-a-week' Christianity. As tributes poured in, Evangeline protested: 'The Salvation Army has had no new success; we have only done an old thing in an old way.' The American people disagreed, and subscribed an unprecedented $13 million to clear debts incurred by The Army, through its provision of canteens, hostels, rest rooms during the war, and afterwards on the provision of care and accommodation for the returning forces..."
8S-4 Sarah! Come Over Here! - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President, NYC - 1918) with words by Eddie Nelson and music by Con Conrad: "Sarah Small was a waitress tall - Who dearly loved to dance - She was the queen of a big canteen - In a Yokel town in France - Who'd swerve and curve as the beans she'd serve - To the army boys delight - They'd watch her feet, forget to eat - And shout with all their might - Sarah, come over here - Sarah, come over here - 'Can' the old baked beans and get on the job - Your jazz dancing'll feed the mob - Do your duty, honey - Oh you dance so funny, Sarah - You know you're there - Sarah, oh you're a bear - Now if Frenchy asks you to parlez vous - La - la - la then you 'Hitchy-Koo" - Sarah, come over here..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: A young waitress holds a bowl of food. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "After You've Gone."
8S-5 Say A Prayer For The Boys "Out There" - Three pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Bernie Grossman and music by Alex Marr ("The Greatest Patriotic Ballad of the Season" - Featured by Gertrude Cogert, Florence Rayfield and Marty Semon): "A mighty nation hears a ringing call to arm - A call that draws her sons from city, vale and farm - A nation sends the best of us across the sea - That the rest of us forever may be free - An while a mighty nation's heart will yearn - Let's pray that they soon will return - Won't you say a prayer for the boys out there - For our heroes o'er the sea - In that raging fray by night and day - They're fighting for you and me - When they take their stand in no man's land - We know they'll do their share - So that we may live, their lives they give - Say a prayer for the boys out there..." Cover images (with individual publicity photographs of vaudevillians Gertrude Cogert, Florence Rayfield and Marty Semon) by artist William Austin Starmer: A father, mother and girlfriend/sister pray at the dining room table with a background of a military campground (in their thoughts). Advertised song samples on the back cover include "Before the World Began." According to the ILLINOIS DIGITAL NEWSPAPER COLLECTION Web Site: GERTRUDE COGERT was a "Supreme Contralto" billed as "Vaudeville's Youngest Character Comedienne." According to the NEWSPAPERS.COM Web Site: FLORENCE RAYFIELD was a : 'Singing comedienne with a big reputation" in vaudeville. According to the IBDB Web Site: MARTY SEMON was a popular vaudeville and Broadway performer most famous for his appearance in the musical MUSIC IN THE AIR (1932).
8S-6 Send Back Dear Daddy To Me - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Alexander Sullivan and Harry Tenney and music by Irving Maslof (Featured by "Bailey and Cowan"): "In a quaint old country schoolroom - The teacher asked each little girl and boy - To tell her in a simple note - What would give them greatest joy - One girlie's note brought tears to the teacher's eyes - When she read with great surprise - I don't want anymore dollies - Brother don't want any pollies - Sister don't want any fancy things - Mother don't want any diamond rings - There's but one gift we pray for - one thing we long night and day for - Stop all this war and give us victory - And send back daddy to me..." Cover image (including a publicity photograph of vaudevillians "Bailey and Cowan") by artist E.E. Walton: A little girl holds her father's photograph while her toys are scattered around the room. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "My Little Rambling Rose," "Billy Boy," "Farmyard Blues" and "Oh, You Wonderful Girls!" According to the IMDb Web Site: "LYNN COWAN was a composer, songwriter, pianist, actor, director and singer, educated at Iowa State College with a Bachelor of Civil Engineering degree. He was a member of a vaudeville team with BILL BAILEY. During World War II, he was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Corps of Engineers, and he received the Legion of Merit. In Okinawa, he managed the Castle Terrace Club. In 1963, he retired to Kauai, Hawaii. Joining ASCAP in 1942, his chief musical collaborator was Alex Sullivan. His chief popular-song compositions include 'Kisses,' 'Dream House,' 'Just Give Me a Week in Paris,' 'Secret' and 'I'm in Love with You.' " According to the PARLORSONGS.COM Web Site: "...Supposedly, the song ('Won't You Come Home, BILL BAILEY) is based on a 'real' BILL BAILEY who was a...vaudeville performer, member of the team of BAILEY AND COWAN. One night he was locked out of his house by a wife who had reached her limit of tolerance for his late night revelry with friends. It is said that Cannon (the composer) was one of his friends who partook of these nocturnal pleasures with him and Cannon paid for a room for Bailey at a local hotel and assured him that a night away from home would surely cause his wife to plead for his return. The song was so popular it inspired a number of spin-off tunes including I Wonder Why BILL BAILEY Won't Come Home and Since BILL BAILEY Came Back Home..."
8S-7 Send Me A Curl - A single piece of sheet music (Huntzinger and Dilworth Publishers, NYC - 1917) with words and music by Geoffrey O' Hara: "Soldiers ev'rywhere - See the people stare! - All the boys are on their way - Good-bye, here we go - Step out - Don't be slow - We will leave for France today - But though we go to fight across the foam - We won't forget the folks at 'Home Sweet Home' - There's a corner in my heart - That I'm keeping all apart - For the little girl I left behind - I can see her waiting there - With the flowers in her hair - And the roses in her cheeks entwined - So when you're thinking of me over yonder - When you wonder what I'd like to wear - Send a pretty little curl - From the sweetest little girl in my home town..." Cover image by artist McGregor Ormiston: A soldier and sailor on each side of a large sketch of a young woman knitting. Advertised song samples on the inside back and back cover include: "Content" and "Lass O' Mine."
8S-8 Send Me A Picture Of Baby - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words by Budd Green and music by Archie Gottler: "At the first call to arms - He was first to leave the arms - Of the one that he loved the best - While he was away - The stork called one day - And brought a bit of sunshine to their nest - When she sent him the news 'over there' - He sent her this request with a pray'r - Send me a picture of baby - You know the joy it will bring to my heart - Though I'm far across the sea - I am dreaming constantly of ten little baby fingers waving to me - Just hold her close to your heart - Have her smiling at you - And my two little angels I'll see - So won't you send me a picture of baby..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A soldier writing a letter with thoughts of his wife and baby. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Just A Baby's Prayer At Twilight."
8S-9 Send Me Away With A Smile - Four pieces of sheet music (Al Piantadosi and Co., Inc., NYC - 1917) with words and music by Louis Weslyn and Al Piantadosi ("A War Love Song With Universal Appeal" - Featured by Rita Gould - with cover photograph): "Little girl, don't cry - I must say 'Good-bye' - Don't you hear the bugle call? - And the fife and drum bid the fellows come - Where the flag waves over all - Tho' I love you so - It is time to go - And a soldier in me you'll find - When on land or sea - They need boys like me - You would not have me stay behind - Send me away with a smile, little girl - Brush the tears from eyes of brown - It's all for the best - And I'm off with the rest - Of the boys from my own hometown - It may be forever we part, little girl - And it may be for only awhile - But if fight, dear we must - In our Maker we trust - So send me away with a smile ..." Cover image (with a color-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillian Rita Gould) by an unknown photographer) by artist William Austin Starmer: A young woman waving her handkerchief to a departing soldier. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Tell The Last Rose Of Summer, Good-Bye." According to the New York Clipper (August 1971) from the Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections Web Site: "RITA GOULD...is a talented songstress who is now presenting to vaudeville a high-class single, well-routined and excellently presented . Miss Gould , who has been a favorite at the Winter Garden, brings to vaudeville many new ideas and original creations in the art of dressing, and possesses a wardrobe that, in itself, would warrant the act s success . But Miss Gould possesses a radiant personality and a rich, contralto voice as well, and does not simply depend on her appearance to put the act over. Coupled with an excellently chosen wardrobe, she possesses real talent, and these two essential attributes forecast long success for such a capable singer in the realm of the two-a-day ."
8S-10 Service Flag, The - A single piece of sheet music (Sam Fox Publishing Co., Cleveland, Ohio - 1918) with words (Poem) by William Herschell and music by Floyd J. St. Clair: "Dear little flag in the window there - Hung with a tear and a woman's prayer - Child of Old Glory, born with a star - Oh, what a wonderful flag you are! - Blue is your star in its field of white - Dipped in the red that was born of fight - Born of the blood that our forebears shed - To raise your mother, The Flag, o'erhead..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Ornate song-title lettering with a reprinting of the song lyrics in a frame. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "One Fleeting Hour." According to Wikipedia: "A SERVICE FLAG or service banner in the United States is an official banner that family members of service members can display. The flag or banner is defined as a white field with a red border, with a blue star for each family member serving in the Armed Forces of the United States during any period of war or hostilities in which the Armed Forces of the United States are engaged. A gold star (with a blue edge) represents a family member that died during service, without specifying cause of death. The deceased might have been killed in action, or died due to unrelated causes. The banner was designed in 1917 by United States Army Captain Robert L. Queisser of the Fifth Ohio Infantry, in honor of his two sons who were serving in World War I. It was quickly adopted by the public and by government officials. On September 24, 1917, an Ohio congressman read into the Congressional Record: 'The mayor of Cleveland, the Chamber of Commerce and the Governor of Ohio have adopted this service flag. The world should know of those who give so much for liberty. The dearest thing in all the world to a father and mother - their children...' "
8S-11 Set Aside Your Tears (Till The Boys Come Marching Home) - Two pieces of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co., NYC - 1917) with words and music by L. Wolfe Gilbert, Malvin M. Franklin and Anatol Friedland: "Mothers, wives and sweethearts true - Hearken one and all - Those you love have gone away - To answer duty's call - I see a teardrop in your eye -You sadly weep and sigh - As they brave, let us be brave - Make this battle cry - Set aside your tears for laughter - Till the boys come marching home - For we'll all be happy after - They return from 'cross the foam - Let us pray for fair weather - For the ones who dared to roam - Set aside your tears for laughter - Till the boys come marching home..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier framed by a laurel wreath backed by marching troops and waving girls. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Play My Wedding March In Ragtime " (Featured by NAN HALPERN - "Vaudeville's Favorite Singing Characteriste"), "The Youngest In The Family," "I'm Glad I Can Make You Cry," etc.
8S-12 She Was A Soldier's Sweetheart - A single piece of sheet music (Richmond Publisher, NYC - 1918) with words by Monroe Rosenfeld and music by Frank Church: "I see a dear old lady in a rustic chair - Sunbeams gently fall on her snow-white hair - It was a sad, sad story - I pictured in her face - Sorrow and woe, long ago had left the sad lines you trace - She was a soldier's sweetheart after all these years - Golden locks are silver now, dimmed her eyes with tears - Only a soldier's sweetheart waiting her love in vain - He marched away on a summer's day and never returned again..." Cover image by artist Evelyn Esme: A color-tinted photograph of a sad young woman framed by the silhouettes of two soldiers and battlefield action. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Hawaiian Nights."
8S-13 She'll Be There - A single piece of sheet music (Daly Music Publisher, Inc., Boston and NYC - 1917) with words by Jack Caddigan and music by James A. Brennan ("A Tribute to American Womanhood"): "Now songs are sung in ev'ry tongue of heroes tried and true - Who fight and die to keep on high the old Red, White and Blue - We don't hear much about the girl that Johnny leaves behind - But when you strike her Uncle Sam - She'll do her bit you'll find - She'll be there, she'll be there like her sisters were in days of Sixty-one - She'll be knitting socks and sweaters for the German pirate-getters - Rally 'round the flag she'll cry and Johnny get your gun - She'll be there, she'll be there - You'll find the Yankee Doodle girl a bear - She'll forget her father's riches - She'll be mending soldiers breeches - She'll be there, she'll be there..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A young woman in a white nurse uniform framed by a red, white and blue background. Advertised song samples include; "After You've Had Your Way" and "I'm Building A Palace In Palestine."
8S-14 She'll Miss Me Most Of All - Two pieces of sheet music (A.J. Stasny Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Will J. Hart and music by Ed Nelson: "Last night I joined the regulars - I'm glad I volunteered - Soon I'll leave my friends so dear -'Mid a Yankee Doodle cheer - Now most of you, with hearts so true - You'll wish the best for me - But those at home I leave alone - They'll need your sympathy - My sweetheart, when we part - She will sigh and cry - My old dad, he'll feel bad, as the troops march by - Little Sister Jane - She will cry in vain - When I'm away she'll pray each day - That I'll come back again - Brother Joe, when I go - He'll be proud I know - For I've answered my country's call - But my dear gray-haired Mother - She'll sigh like no other - For she'll miss me most of all..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A soldier hugging his gray-haired mother in the living room of their home. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Rose Dreams."
8S-15 Should The Stars In Your Service Flag Turn To Gold - A single piece of sheet music (The Rodeheaver Company, Chicago and Philadelphia - 1918) with words by Dora F. Hendricks and music by Charles H. Gabriel: "Should the stars in your service flag turn to gold - If from somewhere in France comes the message - Should the anguish of death on your heart be rolled - Creep close to God and you will hear - His great heart throbbing as soft and low - He whispers 'Child, I know, I know! - Your very best for the world you've done - I also gave my beloved Son..' " Cover image by an unknown artist: A blue star and gold star. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "We're All Uncle Sam's Boys Now," "The Land For Me," "They Have Called Us To The Colors," etc. According to Wikipedia: "A SERVICE FLAG or service banner in the United States is an official banner that family members of service members can display. The flag or banner is defined as a white field with a red border, with a blue star for each family member serving in the Armed Forces of the United States during any period of war or hostilities in which the Armed Forces of the United States are engaged. A gold star (with a blue edge) represents a family member that died during service, without specifying cause of death. The deceased might have been killed in action, or died due to unrelated causes. The banner was designed in 1917 by United States Army Captain Robert L. Queisser of the Fifth Ohio Infantry, in honor of his two sons who were serving in World War I. It was quickly adopted by the public and by government officials. On September 24, 1917, an Ohio congressman read into the Congressional Record: 'The mayor of Cleveland, the Chamber of Commerce and the Governor of Ohio have adopted this service flag. The world should know of those who give so much for liberty. The dearest thing in all the world to a father and mother - their children...' "
8S-16 Since Katy The Waitress (Became An Aviatress) - A single piece of sheet music (Irving Berlin, Inc., NYC - 1919) with words by Will Curtis and music by Irving Bibo: "All the boys are crazy about a little daisy who used to be a waitress on Broadway - She craved a new sensation, so she took up aviation, and now she's some high flyer, so they say - When ever the propeller starts to buzz - The res'trant has to close its doors because - Since Katy the waitress became an aviatress the boys are all up in the air - She used to give the fellows a smile now and then - But since she took to flying she looks down on the men - How you gonna keep 'em down on the ground - When their hearts follow her ev'rywhere - The boss says she can have her job back any day - But she says being on the level doesn't pay - Since Katy the waitress became an aviatress, the boys are all up in the air..." Cover image by the artist "RS": A young woman in a biplane soaring over a group of waving men. Advertised song samples on the back cover include" "Nobody Knows (And Nobody Seems To Care)."
8S-17 Smile As You Kiss Me Good-Bye - A single piece of sheet music (A.J. Stasney Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Raymond Egan and music by Art Gillham: "Soon you will be over the sea - Somewhere in France, dear, fighting for me - Seeing you start - near breaks my heart - But in dreams I'll be with you tho' we're miles apart - For what is an ocean between hearts that love? - We'll meet each twilight in Dreamland above - So dry ev'ry teardrop, forget ev'ry sigh - And smile as you kiss me goodbye..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A soldier and his girl. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Just You."
8S-18 Smiles - Two pieces (various sizes) of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1917) with words by J. Will Callahan and music by Lee S. Roberts ("Dearie, now I know - Just what makes me love you so - Just what holds me and enfolds me - In its golden glow - Dearie, now I see - 'Tis each smile so bright and free - For life's sadness turns to gladness - When you smile on me - There are smiles that make us happy - There are smiles that make us blue - There are smiles that steal away the teardrops - As the sun beams steal away the dew - There are smiles that have tender meaning - That the eyes of love alone may see - And the smiles that fill my life with sunshine - Are the smiles that you give to me..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A smiling young woman. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "A Little Birch Canoe And You" and "I've Got The Blue Ridge Blues."
8S-19 So Long, Mother - Three pieces of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1917) with words by Raymond Egan and Gus Kahn and music by Egbert Van Alstyne ("Al Jolson's Mother Song" - with cover photograph of Al Jolson): "Oh mother dear a little tear is gleaming in your eye - Your lips are all a-tremble as you hear me say 'good-bye' - The Stars and Stripes are calling now - On ev'ry mother's boy - From Maine to dear old Dixie - They shoulder arms with joy - So long my dear old lady don't you cry - Just kiss your grown-up baby boy good-bye - Somewhere in France I'll be dreaming of you - You and your dear eyes of blue - Come let me see you smile before we part - I'll throw a kiss to cheer your dear old heart - Dry the tear in your eye - Don't you sigh, don't you cry - So long mother, kiss your boy good-bye..." Cover image (with a color-tinted publicity photograph of legendary entertainer Al Jolson) by an unknown artist: A soldier and his mother embracing. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Sweet Little Buttercup," "You're A Great Big Lonesome Baby," etc. Danny Thomas portrayed lyricist "GUS KAHN" and Dick Simmons portrayed composer "EGBERT VAN ALSTYNE" in the biopic I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS -Warner Brothers - 1952). According to Wikipedia: "AL JOLSON(born Asa Yoelson; May 26, 1886 - October 23, 1950) was a Jewish Lithuanian-born American singer, film actor, and comedian. At the peak of his career, he was dubbed 'The World's Greatest Entertainer.' His performing style was brash and extroverted, and he popularized a large number of songs that benefited from his 'shamelessly sentimental, melodramatic approach.' Numerous well-known singers were influenced by his music, including Bing Crosby, David Bowie, Bob Dylan and others, Dylan once referred to him as 'somebody whose life I can feel.' Broadway critic Gilbert Seldes compared him to the Greek god Pan, claiming that Jolson represented 'the concentration of our national health and gaiety'..."
8S-20 So Long Sammy - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., NYC and Detroit - 1917) with words by Benny Davis and Jack Yellin and music by Albert Gumble: "We're mighty proud of you, Sammy Boy - Though the time has come to part - There's something in my heart that seems to turn the sadness into joy - We're sorry that you have to go - But you won't be gone for long, I know - So long, Sammy ! - May good luck be your guide - You've fill'd your dear old mammy's heart with pride - Keep smiling Sammy - Go and show what you can do - We love you, Sammy boy! - Good-bye and good luck to you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers marching as a group of women (of various ages) wave good-bye. The STAR DANCE FOLIO ("The Season's Most Popular Songs") is advertised on the back cover. According to Wikipedia: BENNY DAVIS (August 21, 1895 - December 20, 1979) was a vaudeville performer and writer of popular songs. He composed the classic 1926 standard 'Baby Face' with Harry Akst. Davis started performing in vaudeville in his teens. He began writing songs when working as an accompanist for Blossom Seeley. His first success was 1920's 'Margie,' with music by Con Conrad and J. Russel Robinson. His most popular song was 'Baby Face,' written in 1926 with Harry Akst. For Broadway, Davis wrote the score for the 1927 rendition of Artists and Models and for the 1929 show Sons o' Guns. His career lasted until the mid-1930s. Davis died in 1979 in Miami, Florida."
8S-21 Soldier Boy - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1915) with words by D.A. Esrom and music by Theodore Morse ("Dedicated to the National Guards of the U.S.A."): "You're a man that's brave and true, soldier boy - And I'm mighty proud of you, soldier boy - When the bugle call, so clear, called for men you answered 'Here" with a voice so full of cheer, Soldier Boy! - Soldier boy, one kiss before you go - Soldier boy, I'll miss you, that you know - Ev'ry night I'll pray for you far away - And trust to Him above to send you back someday - In my heart a love will always yearn - And I'll wait for your return - So go and fight for the cause you know is right - God bless you, My soldier boy..." Cover image by artist Harry Lewis: Three Wide-eyed soldiers march away as one turns to kiss a young woman. The "New Style" sheet music ("Entire song in sight - NO LEAVES to turn or lose") is advertised on the back cover.
8S-22 Soldier's Dream, A (by B.Gay) - A single piece of sheet music (Sunset publishing Co., NYC/McKinley Music Co., NYC and Chicago - 1918) with words and music by Byron Gay : "Out in the land of heroes - When shadows of twilight fall - And the night keeps the sun in hiding - 'Till it hears morning call - 'Tis then when the soul is weary - Of all that the daytime has done - 'Tis then when the soldier dreams - Of happy days to come - Thousands of dreams are for dreamers - But a soldier can dream only one - He dreams of a home and mother - He dreams of the days gone by - A cottage 'mongst the trees - The humming of the bees - And a mother's lullaby - He dreams of he land of 'No Man' - And there thru the clouds of war - Comes a light thru the night - And the world seems bright - Returning to home once more..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A black and white publicity photograph of opera singer Ernestine Schumann-Heink (wearing a "Four-Star Mother" service ribbon) with a printed autograph and signature ("To the composer of my heart, Byron Gay, and my four sons serving Uncle Sam..."). The back cover features a black and white photograph of "Mme. Schumann -Heink , known as the 'Mother of the American Army' presenting colors to the twenty first Infantry, U.S.A. The famous singer has cancelled her professional engagements for one year so she may visit the various cantonments and with her marvelous voice cheer up the boys, among whom are four of her own." The inside cover features a HOW TO WIN THE WAR list: "Eat as little as you can...Use corn instead of wheat...Buy Liberty Bonds, Buy all you can...By all means, plant a garden - And raise a bumper crop...Be cheerful and kind...Do your bit with all your heart - Patriotic to the core..." According to Wikipedia: "ERNESTINE SCHUMANN-HEINK... was a celebrated German Bohemian, later American, operatic contralto, noted for the size, beauty, tonal richness, flexibility and wide range of her voice...Her breakthrough into leading roles was provided when prima donna Marie Goetze argued with the director of the Hamburg opera. He asked Ernestine to sing the title role of Carmen, without rehearsal, which she did to great acclaim. Goetze, in a fit of pique, cancelled out of the role of Fidès in Le prophète, to be performed the following night, and was again replaced by Ernestine. Schumann-Heink replaced Goetze as Ortrud in Lohengrin the following evening, one more time without rehearsal, and was offered a ten-year contract...She performed with Gustav Mahler at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, London, and became well known for her performances of the works of Richard Wagner at Bayreuth, singing at the Bayreuth Festivals from 1896 to 1914. She first sang at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City in 1898, and performed with the Met regularly thereafter for decades. Schumann-Heink made the first of her many phonograph (gramophone) recordings in 1900. Many of them have been reissued on CD and continue to impress due to the quality of her rich voice and the excellence of her technique. In 1905, she married William Rapp, Jr., her manager. They divorced in 1915. In the midst of a legal battle in Germany over her late husband's estate, she filed U.S. naturalization papers on February 10, 1905, which became final on March 3, 1908. She and her new husband lived on Grandview Avenue, North Caldwell, Essex County, New Jersey in her 'Villa Fides' from April 1906 to December 1911; she then moved to 500 acres of farm land located just outside of San Diego, California (in an area known as Helix Hill in Grossmont), purchased by her in January 1910, where she would live for most of her life. Her residence there still stands. In 1909, she created the role of Klytaemnestra in the debut of Richard Strauss's Elektra, of which she said she had no high opinion, calling it 'a fearful din'. Strauss, for his part, was not entirely taken by Schumann-Heink; according to one story, during rehearsals he told the orchestra 'Louder! I can still hear Mme. Schumann-Heink!' In 1915, she appeared as herself in the early documentary film Mabel and Fatty Viewing the World's Fair at San Francisco, which was directed and starred by Fatty Arbuckle..."
8S-23 Soldier'S Dream, A (by F. E. Gladdish) - A single piece of sheet music (Victor Kremer Co. Publishers, Chicago - 1915) with words by W.L. Werden and music by Frederick E. Gladdish (Arranged by G. W. Ashleigh): "The soft shades of twilight were falling - Two lovers were standing side by side - A soldier whose country was calling - And a sweetheart who was his promised bride - The tears in her eyes told love's story - As he kissed her and press'd her to his breast - Then they strolled beneath the trees - In the fragrant summer breeze - While the sun sank in the golden west - It was only a soldier's dream - As he slept thro' the long dark night - Of a sweetheart far away - By the river in the bright moonlight - There his love he used to tell - While the twinkling stars would gleam - And the moon from above shone up on their love - It was only a soldier's dream..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A blue-tinted photograph of a military campground. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Remember Dear," "Mrs. O' Harahan," etc.
8S-24 Soldier's Farewell, The - A single piece of sheet music (Weber Brothers Publishing, Kansas City, Kansas - 1915) with music by Louis Weber ("A Reverie for the Piano"). Cover images by an unknown photographer: A black and white photograph of a sailor and his girl/A black and white publicity photograph of composer Louis Weber.
8S-25 Soldier's Rosary, A - A single piece of sheet music (A.J. Stasney Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by J.E. Dempsey and music by Joseph A. Burke: "A mother's last words - To ev'ry soldier - 'Kneel down at night and say your prayers' - But he's so weary - Thro' days so dreary - After all his trials and cares - Don't worry mother - He serves his maker when he serves his country's needs - No matter where each act is a pray'r and they form the links upon a soldier's beads - For his thoughts keep turning homeward and their pray'rs come drifting back - That's his chaplet and his guide to victory - But bullets are his beads and on his knees he pleads that each one will help to end the misery - Ev'ry shot a pearl, each pearl a pray'r he fights until he falls - 'Lost in action' comes the message o'er the sea - and while the nation mourns his loss - His dear old mother bears the cross that's a soldier's rosary..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: A soldier writes a letter by campfire with the thought of his mother rising from the page of the letter. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Rose Dreams."
8S-26 Some Day (When The War Is O'er) - Two pieces of sheet music (A.J. Stasney Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Walter King and music by Earl Burtnett: "Soldier boy is leaving - To his sweetheart says good-bye - And to stop her grieving - He murmurs dear, don't cry - Someday, someday, when the war is o'er - We'll dwell in Love's garden - For evermore - Then love beams shining - Will lead us the way - To our home in Sunshine Valley..." Cover image by artist ARK: A colorful farm scene with a frame of flowers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "It's Never Too Late To Be Sorry."
8S-27 Somebody's Boy - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with words by J.E. Dempsey and music by Joseph A. Burke: "I watch'd a transport yesterday - And as the soldiers sail'd away - I heard their sweethearts bravely cry - 'Au Revoir, but not good-bye' - I heard a mother murmur low - 'When duty calls somebody's boy must go' - Somebody's boy will take a million hearts with him over there - Breathing a pray'r - Somebody's boy will add a few more threads of gray to the hair - Of someone who'll care - Somebody's boy will thrill the nation with joy - When peace is sign'd, we'll write below it - 'We owe it to somebody's boy...' " Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A soldier waves from an exploding battlefield. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When We Meet In The Sweet Bye and Bye."
8S-28 Somebody's Darling Boy - A single piece of sheet music (Ted Browne Music Co., Chicago, Illinois - 1919) with words and music by William A. Downs ("Respectfully dedicated to those of 'OUR BOYS' who made the Supreme Sacrifice'): "At a little green mill at the foot of a hill - Battered by shot and shell - Lies an unmarked grave of a soldier brave - Who was buried where he fell - No one knew his name - Or from whence he came - But somebody's darling lies over there - Somebody someone loved - Armies have trod over the sod - Still that spot is watched over by God - May heaven bless it - Some poor old mother , sweetheart or wife longs for her pride and joy - Someone, somewhere offers a prayer for somebody's darling boy..." Cover image by artist Hazel Brown: A young girl mourns at a cross-covered grave - framed in a wooden cross. Advertised song samples include: "Somewhere A Heart Is Breaking And Calling Me Back To You."
8S-29 Somebody's Waiting For Someone - A single piece of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co., NYC - Chicago - San Francisco - Sidney - London - 1919) with words by Andrew B. Sterling and music by Harry Von Tilzer ("A Beautiful Ballad"): "She sits by the window in sunshine or rain - He dear face pressed close to the cold window pane - Her poor heart is yearning, she's waiting each day - For someone's returning, someone far, far away - Somebody's waiting for someone in the house across the way - Somebody's waiting , watching and waiting, day by day - At night there's a light in the window for someone across the foam - And somebody's waiting for someone - I wonder if he'll come home..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A sad young woman with a background of a framed wooded scene. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "The Little Good For Nothing's, Good For Something After All" and "When I Send You A Picture of Berlin (You'll Know It's Over, 'Over There' - I'm Coming Home)."
8S-30 Someday They're Coming Home Again - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons - NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1917) with words and music by Harry Hilbert ("March Song"): "We've said good-bye to those we love - Our boys have sail'd away - And left us here at home to wait their glad homecoming day - They've gone to make the world a place for men and not for slaves - And all our love went with them on their journey o'er the waves - Somewhere the boys are fighting for you - Somewhere the boys are fighting for me - Somewhere they're showing what they can do - To make the name of Uncle Sam respected o'er the sea - Somewhere they're making hist'ry today - Somewhere they're making somebody pay - But when the Hun is on the run - And the Victory is won - Then someday they're coming home again..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A silhouette of marching troops. Advertised song samples include; "My Rosary For You."
8S-31 Someone Is Longing For Home Sweet Home (Thousands of Miles Away) - A single piece of sheet music (Douglas and Newman Music Co., Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by David Berg, William Tracey and Jack Stern ("One of our biggest successes - Sincerely Courtney Sisters' - with artist's publicity rendering on the cover): "Only a letter to home, sweet home, from someone far away - Only a boy across the foam, dreaming of yesterday - There's a picture that comes to his mind - Of the someone he left behind - Someone is longing for home, sweet home, thousands of miles away - But he's proud to fight for a cause that is right - he'll battle on till the end's in sight - And while he is sighing - He sees someone trying to smile through clouds of gray - Someone is longing for home, sweet home, thousand of miles away..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A sketch of vaudevillians THE COURTNEY SISTERS staring, sadly, into a fireplace as a letter is delivered by a bluebird. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When I Come Back To You (We'll Have A Yankee-Doodle Wedding)." According to JOE LAURIE, JR.'S VAUDEVILLE: "FAY AND FLORENCE COURTNEY were 'one of the first great harmony sister acts.' Florence was married to George Jessel twice."
8S-32 Someone Is Waiting For You - A single piece of sheet music (Al Piantadosi and Co., Inc., NYC - 1917) with words and music by Al Piantadosi ("The Greater MOTHER LOVE Song" - By the "Composer of SEND ME AWAY WITH A SMILE and IF I HAD ALL THE WORLD, etc.): "Picture a chair, by an old fireside - A mother who's left all alone - And tho' he's away - She prays night and day - That no harm will come to her own - She watches and waits for her one pride and joy - So while you are longing remember my boy - Someone is waiting for someone she loves - Tho someone is far, far away - Someone is wond'ring where one can be - And longing for him day by day - Just try for awhile - And I think what she's been through - She gave up her all - Yes her life just for you - She did more than her share, now it's your turn to care - For someone who's waiting for you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A sad mother sitting by her front door waiting for her soldier/son to return. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Tell The Last Rose Of Summer, Good-Bye."
8S-33 Somewhere In France Is Daddy - Two pieces of sheet music (Plaza Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Great Howard (with cover publicity photograph - Joseph E. Howard aka "Great Howard" was portrayed by Mark Stevens in the 1947 Twentieth Century-Fox biopic I WONDER WHO'S KISSING HER NOW): "A little boy was sitting on his mother's knee one day - And as he nestled close to her these words she heard him say - 'Oh! mama, dear, tell me why our Daddy don't come home -I miss him so and you do too - Why are we left alone?' - She tried hard not to cry as she answered with a sigh - Somewhere in France is Daddy - Somewhere in France is he - fighting for home and country - Fighting, my lad, for liberty - I pray ev'ry night for the Allies - And ask God to help them win - For our Daddy won't come back 'till the Stars and Stripes they'll tack - On Kaiser Williams's flag staff in Berlin..." Cover image (with blue-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillian/composer Great Howard) by an unknown artist: Soldiers shooting from a foxhole as a mother talks to her young son. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I'll be Waiting Sailor Boy For You," "I'm Proud To be Of Service To My Country," "When Our Boys Go Over The Top," "Uncle Sammy's At The Bat," "Come Back Dixie," "Norway (The Land Of The Midnight Sun)," etc. According to the GONZAGA UNIVERSITY DIGITAL COLLECTIONS Web Site: Composer Joseph E. Howard is also known as GREAT HOWARD. According to Wikipedia: "JOSEPH E. HOWARD was a Broadway composer, lyricist, and librettist. A famed member of Tin Pan Alley along with wife and composer Ida Emerson as part of the song-writing team of Howard and Emerson, his hits included 'Hello Ma Baby' and Broadway musicals like 'I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now?' He toured in a stock company production of 'Little Eva,' then he appeared in Vaudeville as a boy soprano at the age of 11. He was married to singer actress Mabel Barrison who died in 1912. At 17, he met a young singer named Ida Emerson who would become Howard's second wife. They played the Midwestern vaudeville circuit, drawing notice enough in Chicago to catch an engagement in New York at Tony Pastor's Music Hall on 14th Street, where they were a bit hit in 1898. Their fortunes would change for the better in 1899 when they wrote the song 'Hello, Ma Baby' which became one of the most popular songs of its day, selling over a million copies of the sheet music, the predominant way of making money on music prior to recordings, in just a few months. They found themselves space at the famed Tin Pan Alley where they continued to write songs for Vaudeville .They penned another hit, 'Goodbye, My Lady Love' in 1904. They moved back to Chicago, where Howard performed and composed his tunes, and produced some of the biggest Chicago Musical hit shows from 1905 to 1915. Howard produced a string of pop jazz hits including 'What's the Use of Dreaming?,' 'I Don't Like Your Family,' and 'A Boy's Best Friend Is His Mother.' The tunes that he is most often associated with in modern times are 'Hello, Ma Baby' and 'I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now?' The latter was a jilted man's waltz that made its debut in the 1909 Broadway musical The Prince of To-Night and became the subject of controversy many years later when one of Howard's employees, a composer, sued and won the right to remove Howard's name from the piece as its primary composer...Howard performed in nightclubs, theaters, radio and television throughout his career. His writing slacked off between 1915 and 1939, then picked up again. In 1939 Howard collaborated with Beatrice Kay, the husky-voice showgirl on a radio program called Gay Nineties, which revisited his hits from the turn of the century and the teens, which by then had become nostalgic American entertainment for listeners during the Big Band Era. He made recordings for the Decca and Vocalion labels in the late 1940s. In 1947, a motion picture was produced based on Howard's biography called "I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now." which starred Mark Stevens with Buddy Clark taking on the singing chores. The film generated legal controversy when a former employee sued, proved his authorship of the composition, and won the right to remove Howard's name from the song. In the late 1950s, he published an autobiography entitled Gay Nineties Troubadour. Howard hosted the early live television series The Gay Nineties Revue (ABC, 1948-1949). Howard died on stage in Chicago while singing Let Me Call You Sweetheart during a curtain call at the Chicago Opera House on May 19, 1961..."
8S-34 Somewhere in France Is The Lily - Three pieces (various covers) of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London -1917) with words by Philander Johnson and music by Joseph E. Howard ("Written and Sung With Great Success by the Well-Known Composer Joseph E. Howard of Howard and Clark" - with cover publicity photograph - Joseph E. Howard was portrayed by Mark Stevens in the 1947 Twentieth Century-Fox biopic I WONDER WHO'S KISSING HER NOW): "One day as morning shed its glow across the eastern sky - A boy and girl in accents low, in a garden said 'Good-bye!' - She said 'Remember as you stray - When each must do his share - The flowers blooming here today are emblems over there!' - Somewhere in France the lily, close by the English rose - A thistle so keen and a shamrock green - And each loyal flow'r that grows - Somewhere in France is a sweetheart - Facing the battle's chance - For the flow'r of our youth fights for freedom and truth - Somewhere in France..." Cover image (with a black and white publicity photograph of vaudevillian/composer Joseph E. Howard) by artist William Austin Starmer: A woman's face on a fleur-de-lis with a background of a European battlefield/A full-page publicity photograph of vaudevillian/composer Joseph E. Howard. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Evening Brings Rest And You." According to Wikipedia: "JOSEPH E. HOWARD was a Broadway composer, lyricist, and librettist. A famed member of Tin Pan Alley along with wife and composer Ida Emerson as part of the song-writing team of Howard and Emerson, his hits included 'Hello Ma Baby' and Broadway musicals like 'I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now?' He toured in a stock company production of 'Little Eva,' then he appeared in Vaudeville as a boy soprano at the age of 11. He was married to singer actress Mabel Barrison who died in 1912. At 17, he met a young singer named Ida Emerson who would become Howard's second wife. They played the Midwestern vaudeville circuit, drawing notice enough in Chicago to catch an engagement in New York at Tony Pastor's Music Hall on 14th Street, where they were a bit hit in 1898. Their fortunes would change for the better in 1899 when they wrote the song 'Hello, Ma Baby' which became one of the most popular songs of its day, selling over a million copies of the sheet music, the predominant way of making money on music prior to recordings, in just a few months. They found themselves space at the famed Tin Pan Alley where they continued to write songs for Vaudeville .They penned another hit, 'Goodbye, My Lady Love' in 1904. They moved back to Chicago, where Howard performed and composed his tunes, and produced some of the biggest Chicago Musical hit shows from 1905 to 1915. Howard produced a string of pop jazz hits including 'What's the Use of Dreaming?,' 'I Don't Like Your Family,' and 'A Boy's Best Friend Is His Mother.' The tunes that he is most often associated with in modern times are 'Hello, Ma Baby' and 'I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now?' The latter was a jilted man's waltz that made its debut in the 1909 Broadway musical The Prince of To-Night and became the subject of controversy many years later when one of Howard's employees, a composer, sued and won the right to remove Howard's name from the piece as its primary composer...Howard performed in nightclubs, theaters, radio and television throughout his career. His writing slacked off between 1915 and 1939, then picked up again. In 1939 Howard collaborated with Beatrice Kay, the husky-voice showgirl on a radio program called Gay Nineties, which revisited his hits from the turn of the century and the teens, which by then had become nostalgic American entertainment for listeners during the Big Band Era. He made recordings for the Decca and Vocalion labels in the late 1940s. In 1947, a motion picture was produced based on Howard's biography called "I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now." which starred Mark Stevens with Buddy Clark taking on the singing chores. The film generated legal controversy when a former employee sued, proved his authorship of the composition, and won the right to remove Howard's name from the song. In the late 1950s, he published an autobiography entitled Gay Nineties Troubadour. Howard hosted the early live television series The Gay Nineties Revue (ABC, 1948-1949). Howard died on stage in Chicago while singing Let Me Call You Sweetheart during a curtain call at the Chicago Opera House on May 19, 1961..."
8S-35 Somewhere - Somewhere in France - A single piece of sheet music (Will Rossiter - "The Chicago Publisher" - 1917) with words by William Vaughan Dunham and music by Shelton Brooks ("Dedicated to Mrs. Mary Borden-Turner - U.S.A. by the Writers of AU REVOIR NOT GOODBYE, etc. - Featured by Hilda Blake"): "Up on the field of battle, a dying soldier lies - A nurse beside him kneeling - 'Have you a friend' she cries? - 'Just one who'll grieve' he answered - 'Her aching heart will break - but she'll be proud I died for my country's sake' - Somewhere in France her bitter tears are falling - Somewhere in France a quaint old voice is calling - I know what she's saying - I can hear her praying - Come home my darling boy I want you - Please say goodbye to my old gray-haired mother - If you should get a chance - There are a million others with poor heartbroken mothers - Somewhere, somewhere in France..." Cover image (with a black and white publicity photograph of vaudevillian Hilda Blake) by an unknown artist: A Dutch woman sits with her head on a table. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Butterfly." According to the FULTONHISTORY.COM Web Site: HILDA BLAKE was a vaudevillian and actress billed as "The Child Genius" and "The Girl at the Piano." According to Wikipedia: "MARY BORDEN-TURNER was an early 20th-century, Anglo-American novelist...She attended Vassar College, graduating with a B.A. in 1907. In 1908 she married George Douglas Turner, with whom she had three daughters; Joyce (born 1909), Comfort (born 1910) and Mary (born 1914). She was living in England in 1914 at the outbreak of the war and used her own money to equip and staff a field hospital close to the Front in which she herself served as a nurse from 1915 until the end of the war. It was there she met Brigadier General Edward Louis Spears, who became her second husband, in 1918, following the dissolution of her first marriage. Despite her considerable social commitments as the wife of a prominent diplomat, she continued a successful career as a writer. During her war-time experience she wrote poetry such as 'The Song of the Mud' (1917). Notably, her work includes a striking set of sketches and short stories, The Forbidden Zone (1929), which was published in the same year as A Farewell to Arms, Good-Bye to All That and All Quiet on the Western Front. Even in this context, contemporary readers were disturbed at the graphic, sometimes hallucinatory, quality of this work coming from a woman's pen..."
8S-36 Somewhere There Are Thousand Broken Hearts - A single piece of sheet music (A. Rossi Publishing, NYC - 1916) with words by A. Rossi and music by T. Acciani ("Featured by Emily Gordon"): "Somewhere on the old Continent - Where life does not seem to be content - Somewhere a mother's heart beats full of hope and fear - When they part with their sons so dear - Somewhere you can hear them all say - Don't be afraid I'll return someday - And so it's the same old story - They all will go forward for the same old glory - Somewhere there's thousand broken hearts - Somewhere they kiss and then they part - Over on the Eastern Hemisphere - Somewhere they leave with a tear and cry - Somewhere they leave with cheer goodbye and from their heart a sigh imparts - Their hearts are aching - Their hearts are breaking - And somewhere there are thousand broken hearts..." Cover image (with a black and white publicity photograph of vaudevillian Emily Gordon) by artist Rausenkolr - NY: A soldier and sailor with guns raised. No biographical information for EMILY GORDON was found.
8S-37 Where Is My Wandering Boy To-Night? (The Song Of A Mother's Heart) - A single piece of sheet music (Frank A. Root and Co./McKinley Music Co., Chicago and NYC - 1918) with words by Jack Frost and music by E. Clinton Keithley: "I've heard the songs of Dixie - And songs of Ireland's shore - The songs of love and roses - And many, many more - I've heard the songs of angels - Sweet melodies they bring - But there's just one song lasts all life long - A mother's heart will sing - Where is my wand'ring boy tonight? - That's the song of a mother's heart - Each word of that melody is her rosary - She tells tho' they're far apart - And all the angels singing - Know her teardrops start - For where is my wand'ring boy tonight?- That's the song of a mother's heart..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A mother sits in a rocking chair, staring sadly, at a framed photograph of her soldier/son with a background of a moonlit country scene. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "There's A Little Blue Star In The Window," etc.
8S-38 Song Of Freedom - A single piece of sheet music (Alex W. Grant Publisher, NYC - 1916) with words ("Verses") by Alex W. Grant and music by T.A. Simpson ("One half of the net profits from the sale of this song will be contributed to the cause of Socialism"): "Come men awake the dawn is near - Forget the night of strife and fear - Lift up your voice in mighty song - Forget the frightful wrong - Then men arise to nobler sphere - Rejoice your happy days are near - When you shall be as brothers free - To work and live in sympathy..." Cover and back cover images by artist Hal Ross Perrigard: Five Men looking toward a sunrise and a city/A "For A Better Civilization" sun wheel "Free Speech, The Truth, "Make This Earth A Heaven, Peace With Respect, Better Environment, The Study of Thought Waves, Shorter Hours, Esperanto, Free Trade, Everybody Working, Early Marriages.."
8S-39 Sons of America, America Needs You - A single piece of sheet music (W.T. Pierson and Co., Washington, DC and NYC - 1917) with words by Arthur F. Holt and music by William T. Pierson ("Respectfully dedicated to Captain William H. Santelmann, Director of U.S. Marine band, Washington, DC"): "Hark to the call, high over all! - Hark to grim war's alarm! - Our Uncle Sam, as perils befall - Sounds the loud call, To Arms! - Rally, brave sons, your land to defend - Stand to your guns and nobly contend - You are the ones on whom we depend - Valorous sons, To Arms! - Sons of America, American needs you - Protect your country's flag, the old Red, White and Blue - Fight for America, home of the free - United stand to guard the land of Liberty..." Cover image by artist Dunk - NY: A Uncle Sam points to a recruiting sign as a soldier blows a bugle. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Dainty Demoiselles." According to : WILLIAM H. SANTELMANN was born into a family with a long musical heritage on Sept. 23, 1863, at Offensen in Hanover, Germany. Santelmann began studying the violin at an early age and progressed rapidly. After less than a year of study he was invited to perform with a 10-piece orchestra that visited Offensen. He soon began study of the clarinet and by age 15 composed his first piece of music. Santelmann joined the 134th Infantry Band in Leipzig and, upon completion of his service, studied at the Leipzig Conservatory. He finished his studies in three years and then left his native land to come to the United States to perform with the Royal Stuttgart Orchestra near Philadelphia. In 1887, Santelmann decided to audition for the United States Marine Band. He applied to John Philip Sousa and auditioned for him on violin, clarinet, and baritone. He was accepted on all three instruments and joined the band Sept. 24, 1887. His first two years with the Marine Band included the first two concert tours ever taken by the band. He remained with the band until 1895 when he left to join the Lafayette Theater Orchestra. Santelmann soon formed his own orchestra and performed at many of the social events held by Washington's elite. The following year, when Washington's Columbia Theater was built, he was hired as music director of the orchestra. In 1898 the position of leader of the Marine Band became open and he was named 19th Director on March 3, 1898. Santelmann brought his excellent training and strict personal discipline to the rehearsal hall of the Marine Band. The quality of the band improved rapidly and its reputation grew throughout the country. He decided to create a full symphony orchestra within the band and required all new members, as well as all current members with less than nine years of service, to learn a stringed instrument in addition to their wind instrument. After four hard years of rehearsal, Santelmann was satisfied with the new ensemble and they began performing regularly at the White House in 1902. In 1916, Santelmann began keeping a daily log of the band's activities. He continued this log throughout his career and it continues to this day, providing a detailed and valuable source of information about the organization's activities. Santelmann was a strong leader and a talented musician who was able to lead the band into the 20th century. The band's schedule became very demanding. Concerts were held on almost every day of the week with regular concerts at the White House on Saturday afternoons. In addition to the busy concert schedule the band began a series of weekly radio broadcasts in 1922. Santelmann brought his career with the Marine Band to an end on May 1, 1927. He was formally commissioned a captain in the Marine Corps and then passed the baton to Taylor Branson."
8S-40 Spirit Of America - A single piece of sheet music (Sam Fox Publishing Company, Cleveland - 1917) with music ("A Patriotic Patrol") by J.S. Zamednik. Cover image Soldiers and a cannon ready to charge. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "For The Freedom Of The World (The Song Of Nations)" - SEE BOX 3 - FOLDER F-13.
8S-41 Stand By Your Colors - A single piece of sheet music (Ella Thomas Publisher, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - 1915) with words and music (Arranged by Houston Johns) by Ella Thomas ("Author of MOTHER'S LOVE IS BEST OF ALL"): "Years ago there rose a cry - Freedom tho' we die - For the Cause he bid farewell to home and friends -With hearts beating so true - Marched away the boys in blue - Pledging hands and hearts to stand by colors true! - Then stand by your colors, be firm and true - They wave with honor today - There are many, many colors may be true - But there's none like the Red, White and Blue..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier and sailor stand on each side of the American flag.
8S-42 Stars And Stripes For Me, The - A single piece of sheet music (Success Music Company, Akron, Ohio and NYC - 1917) with words by George H. Carey and music by A.J. Shaeffer ("The Great American March Song"): "Faraway upon a battlefield at sunset - Mid the turmoil and the roar of shot and shell - There her own dear boy in blue is bravely fighting - He is fighting for the flag we love so well - Gamely fighting for the cause of Uncle Sammy - To the only flag that floats he would be true - The good old stars and stripes will live forever - There is no flag like the old red, white and blue - Then it's fight for the grand old banner - That waves o'er the land of the free - And the good old American eagle - The emblem of Liberty - The red, white and blue means Protection - Where ever you may be - So its fight for the grand old flag we love - The stars and the stripes for me..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Drum and fife troops marching with the American flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "To The End And Beyond Only Thine."
8S-43 Statue Of Liberty Is Smiling (On The Hearts Of The World Today), The - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NY C- 1918) with words by Jack Mahoney and music by Halsey K. Mohr: "Standing Down the Bay - In her grand array - Liberty is watching there today - For heroes khaki clad - and ev'ry sailor lad - Their glorious, victorious return makes her glad - Her light is seen three thousand miles away - The guardian angel of the U.S.A. - Now the Statue of Liberty is smiling - As she gazes across the sea - And the gleam lights the way back from France - The beacon light of victory - Her torch of freedom burning, will brighten the miles - To make their glad returning a bright lane of smiles - For the Statue of Liberty is smiling - On the hearts of the world today..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: The Statue of Liberty casting a beam of light over France and the returning troop transport ships. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "You're Some Pretty Doll," "Baby's Prayer Will Soon Be Answered," "I Dreamt My Daddy Came Home," etc.
8S-44 Stay Down Here Where You Belong - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder, Co., NYC - 1914) with words and music by Irving Berlin: "Down below - Down below - Sat the Devil talking to his son - Who wanted to go - Up above - Up above - He cried 'It's getting too warm for me down here and so - I'm going up on Earth where I can have a little fun' - The Devil simply shook his head and answered his son - Stay down here where you belong - The folks who live above you don't know right from wrong - To please their kings they've all gone out to war - And not a one of them knows what he's fighting for - 'Way up above, they say that I'm a Devil and I'm bad - Kings up there are bigger than your dad - They're breaking the hearts of mothers - Making butchers out of brothers - You'll find more hell up there, than there is down below..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: The Devil and his small son observe the war on Earth. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Along Came Ruth."
8S-45 Sweet Little Buttercup - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1917) with words by Alfred Bryan and music by Herman Paley: "Will you miss me little Buttercup - Said a rustic lad one day - I must go away - And I must obey - Come and kiss me, lift your two lips up - There now dearie don't you cry - Hear the bugles calling - It is time to say 'Good-bye' - Sweet little Buttercup - Shy little Buttercup - Dry your eyes of blue - I'll come back to you - When the war is through - Safe in your sylvan dell - Far from the shot and shell - Let your lovelight shine - Angels guide you, watch beside you - Sweet little Buttercup mine..." Cover image by an unknown artist : A young blonde woman tossing flowers from a basket. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Don't Try To Steal The Sweetheart Of A Soldier."
9T-1 Take Me Across The Sea - A single piece of sheet music (David J. MacArthur Publishing, Flint, Michigan - 1917) with words by David J. MacArthur and music by Leonard B. Rosborough ("Dedicated to the Boys in Khaki"): "Oh Lafayette we love you - Your mem'ry never dies - To you we're true Red, White and Blue - Proclaim it from the skies - In days of yore, upon our shore - You were a welcome sight - Now we'll come back upon your track - And show you how we fight - The bugle call rings out to all - From mountain, vale and glen - We draw the sword against the horde - That scorn the rights of men - So join your hands, God-fearing lands - And sing and fight and pray - The Red, White and Blue will stand by you - Until the Judgment Day..." Cover image by an unknown artist: An American Eagle carrying the American flag over the Statue of Liberty and New York Harbor.
9T-2 Take Me Back To My Mother - A single piece of sheet music (K.C. Harck Publishing, Lee Center, Illinois - 1915) with words and music by Katherin(e) Clapp Harck: A soldier boy was dying - Upon a battle field - And tho' the flag was flying - His life he soon must yield - Say that I died bravely - With the enemy in view - And that her words last spoken - Did so oft my strength renew - Take me back to my mother - 'Twas the soldier's last request - There's no one like mother - She is dearer than the rest - She'll be waiting for me - Ere the sun sinks in the west - Oh take me back to my mother - She's the one I love the best..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers firing from a trench as a single soldier attends to a wounded comrade.
9T-3 Tale The Church Bell Told (Someone Will Answer For My Silence), The - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder, NYC - 1918) with words by Joe Young and Sam M. Lewis and music by Bert Grant: "In the shattered part of France - In the very heart of France - A soldier from a Yankee shore - Lay dreaming by an old church door - From the belfry in the sky - He thought he heard the old bell sigh - I was lonely in my steeple - How I missed the birds of spring - Looking down upon my people - It just broke my heart to ring - Through the din of cannon thunder - I could hear the cries of young and old - Someone will answer for this vi'lence - Answer for my silence - That's the tale the church bell tolled..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A soldier resting in the rubble of a bombed church as another soldier marched by. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Oh! How I Wish I Could Sleep (Until My Daddy Comes Home)."
9T-4 Tell Mother The World War Is Won - A single piece of sheet music (G.S. Baggs Music Publishers, Lima Ohio - 1919) with words by Gorum S. Baggs and music by Dale H. Baggs ("Dedicated to Gen. Pershing"): "With two million Yanks across the ocean - To protect the Stars and Stripes we all adore - Anxious mothers, sisters, pals or brothers need not worry - Hindenburg is no more - All the Yankee soldier boys were fighters - And they knew they were in the right - And the Kaiser's sunshine saw the cloud - Nineteen eighteen ends his might - Tell mother we'll come marching home - The world was is won - The Yankee soldier boys have seen a conquered Hun - We'll come flying home - We'll fly across the sea - back to our land of Liberty - The Yanks have paid the debt we owed dear old France - We taught Von Hindenburg he had no fighting chance - Democracy the terms - The stars and stripes shall stand for Freedom o'er the land..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier hands a letter to an elderly woman knitting at her dining room table. According to the ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANNICA Web Site: "PAUL VON HINDEBURG...was a German field marshal during World War I and second president of the Weimar Republic (1925-34). His presidential terms were wracked by political instability, economic depression, and the rise to power of Adolf Hitler, whom he appointed chancellor in 1933. Hindenburg was the son of a Prussian officer of old Junker (aristocratic) stock. His mother, however, was from a middle-class family-a fact he preferred to ignore. A cadet at the age of 11, he served in the Austro-Prussian (Seven Weeks') War of 1866 and in the Franco-German War of 1870-71. He retired as a general in 1911 after an honorable, but not especially distinguished career. Hindenburg was called back into service in August 1914 to be the nominal superior of Maj. Gen. Erich Ludendorff. Acclaimed as one of the army's best strategists, Ludendorff was to drive a Russian invasion force from East Prussia. For this achievement, the rocklike Hindenburg, rather than Ludendorff, received the nation's applause. Soon Hindenburg's standing overshadowed that of Emperor William II. He was promoted to the rank of field marshal, and in 1916 the Emperor was pressured into giving him command of all German land forces, with Ludendorff his co-responsible chief aide. Unable to win the war on land, the duo tried starving Britain into surrender by unrestricted submarine warfare, thus drawing the United States into the war and causing Germany's ultimate defeat. When they conceded defeat, Hindenburg let Ludendorff take the blame. After the overthrow of William II, Hindenburg collaborated briefly with the new republican government. He directed the withdrawal of German forces from France and Belgium and had his staff organize the suppression of left-radical risings in Germany. With both tasks accomplished (and the old officer corps preserved in the process), he retired once more in June 1919. Living quietly in Hanover, he occasionally expressed anti-republican views but, on the whole, cultivated his image of a nonpartisan national hero..."
9T-5 Tell That To the Marines - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words by Harold Atteridge and music by Jean Schwartz and Al Jolson ("As introduced by Al Jolson in SINBAD - with cover photograph): "Do you remember Kaiser Bill about a year ago - We told your old friend Bernstorff that he'd better pack and go - You laughed and said America possessed no fighting stuff - Until our fighting Yankee boys walked in and called your bluff - That Monte Christo idea will not do - If you think that the world belongs to you - Tell that to the Marines - Those Deviling Hounds who know what fighting means - You are going to lick the world you say you will - If you mean Uncle Sam, now listen Kaiser Bill - Tell that to the Marines - The first to fight on all fighting scenes - If you think you'll sink our new boats - With your damned old U Boats - Tell that to the Marines..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A brown -tinted sketch of entertainer Al Jolson pulling off his suit coat and ready for a fight. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I Cannot Bear To Say Goodbye." According to Wikipedia: "AL JOLSON (born Asa Yoelson; May 26, 1886 - October 23, 1950) was a Jewish Lithuanian-born American singer, film actor, and comedian. At the peak of his career, he was dubbed 'The World's Greatest Entertainer.' His performing style was brash and extroverted, and he popularized a large number of songs that benefited from his 'shamelessly sentimental, melodramatic approach.' Numerous well-known singers were influenced by his music, including Bing Crosby, David Bowie, Bob Dylan and others, Dylan once referred to him as 'somebody whose life I can feel.' Broadway critic Gilbert Seldes compared him to the Greek god Pan, claiming that Jolson represented 'the concentration of our national health and gaiety'..." According to Wikipedia: "SINBAD is a Broadway musical with a book and lyrics by Harold R. Atteridge and music by Sigmund Romberg, Al Jolson and others. Jolson plays a porter in old Bagdad where he meets a series of characters from the Arabian Nights, including Sinbad. He is transported to various exotic settings. The musical was produced by Lee Shubert and J. J. Shubert and staged by J. C. Huffman and J. J. Shubert. After a tryout in New Haven, Connecticut, the Broadway production opened on February 14, 1918 at the Winter Garden Theatre, where it ran for 164 performances. The cast included Jolson (in blackface), Kitty Doner, Constance Farber and Forrest Huff. This show was a 'musical comedy' with little purpose other than to provide a vehicle for Jolson, who sang specialty songs that were written for him by himself and others, while Romberg's songs held the show together. As with Jolson's previous shows, songs were interpolated during the run and for the national tour, which ran for nearly two years..." According to the ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANNICA Web Site: "JOHANN-HEINRICH, COUNT VON BERNSTORFF was a German diplomat who represented his country in London and Cairo and, as ambassador, in Washington, D.C. (1908-17). The son of the Prussian diplomat Count Albrecht von Bernstorff, he entered the diplomatic service in 1899, was secretary of legation successively at Belgrade, Dresden, St. Petersburg, and Munich, and (1902-06) was councilor of the embassy in London. He then went as consul-general to Cairo, whence he proceeded as German ambassador in 1908 to Washington, D.C., where he remained until America's declaration of war against Germany in April 1917. During World War I he made great efforts to facilitate mediation of that conflict by President Woodrow Wilson, but he did not receive the support he expected from authoritative quarters in Berlin. On the American declaration of war, he returned to Germany and was sent as ambassador to Constantinople, where he was employed until 1918. In various publications, and in his reminiscences on his term as ambassador in Washington, he endeavored to prove that Germany, if it had followed the proper policy, could have avoided war with America. This statement of his views excited much controversy in his own country. When the revolution broke out in 1918, Bernstorff left the diplomatic service, but he was later active in parliamentary politics as a member of the Democratic Party in the Reichstag and also maintained a close connection with international affairs, as chairman of the German League of Nations Union until 1933. After Hitler's advent he went into exile in Geneva." According to Wikipedia: WILHELM II or WILLIAM II (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, three notable contemporary relations being his first cousins King George V of the United Kingdom, founder of the House of Windsor, Marie of Romania, Queen consort of Romania and the Czarina Alix of Hesse, consort of his second cousin Tsar Nicholas II of the House of Romanov, the last ruler of the Russian Empire before the Russian Revolution of 1917 which deposed the monarchy. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose 'New Course' in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to the First World War. Bombastic and impetuous, he sometimes made tactless pronouncements on sensitive topics without consulting his ministers, culminating in a disastrous Daily Telegraph interview that cost him most of his power in 1908. His top generals, Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, dictated policy during the First World War with little regard for the civilian government. An ineffective war leader, he lost the support of the army, abdicated in November 1918, and fled to exile in the Netherlands..."
9T-6 That's A Mother's Liberty Loan - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1917) with words and music by Mayo and Tally and Clarence Gaskill: "There's a lonely little mother - In a lonely home tonight - She's thinking of her soldier boy - Who marched away to fight - Though she's only one in millions - And she has no gold to spare - Her tear-dimmed eyes just seem to say 'I think I've done my share!' - I gave my boy to Uncle Sam - To fight for you and me - Just like his dad at Gettysburg in Eighteen Sixty-three - If life must pay for Liberty - I'm giving all I own - And when the battle's won - I'll then take back my son - That's a mother's Liberty Loan..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A gold-tinted photograph of a mother and soldier/son, greeting each other, in front of their home (Posed by "Edward Earle and Mary Maurice - Greater Vitagraph Stars - Reproduced by Permission"). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Evening Brings Rest And You." According to Wikipedia: "EDWARD EARLE (July 16, 1882 - December 15 1972) was a Canadian film actor. He appeared in almost 400 films between 1914 and 1956. He was born in Toronto and died in Los Angeles, California, aged 90. According to Wikipedia: "MARY MAURICE (November 15, 1844, Morristown, Ohio - April 30 1918, Port Carbon, Pennsylvania) was an American actress, who appeared 139 films between 1909 and 1918. This Vitagraph 'mother lady' was a Philadelphian. During her long stage career, she appeared in support of Booth, Barrett, Jefferson, Modjeska and her last engagement was with Robert B. Mantell. She did not mind admitting that she was past sixty, but she had the heart of youth and was the best loved of screen mothers. She played in both The Goddess and The Battle Cry of Peace. She, Russell Bassett, Sarah Bernhardt, W. Chrystie Miller, Ruby Lafayette, Kate Meek(b. 1838), the veteran character actor Matt B. Snyder and Harold Lloyd regular Anna Townsend were the eight oldest people working in film during the 1910s." According to the ANSWERS.COM Web Site: "Upon the entry of the United States into World War I in April 1917, it at once became apparent that large sums in excess of tax receipts would be needed both to provide funds for European allies and to conduct the war activities of the nation. To obtain the necessary funds, the Treasury resorted to borrowing through a series of bond issues. The first four issues were known as LIBERTY LOANS; the fifth and last was called the victory loan. The issues were brought out between May 14, 1917 and April 21, 1919 in the total amount of $21,478,356,250. The disposal of this vast amount of obligations was accomplished by direct sales to the people on an unprecedented scale. Liberty loan committees were organized in all sections of the country, and almost the entire population was canvassed. Four-minute speakers gave high-powered sales talks in theaters, motion picture houses, hotels, and restaurants. The clergymen of the country made pleas for the purchase of bonds from their pulpits. Mass meetings were held on occasion, and the banks assisted by lending money, at a rate no higher than the interest on the bonds, to those who could not afford to purchase the bonds outright. In this way it was possible to secure the funds wanted and to obtain oversubscriptions on each issue."
9T-7 That's What The Red, White And Blue Means (To Ev'ry True Heart In The U.S.A.) - Two pieces of sheet music (Walter Jacobs Publishing, Boston - 1918) with words by Robert Levenson and music by E. E. Bagley ("Vocal Adaptation of NATIONAL EMBLEM MARCH known and played in every land on the face of the Globe"): "Ev'ry stripe that's in the flag means something dear to me - For it's the emblem of our land and of democracy - And ev'ry time I see Old Glory - Then I want to tell the story - Just as in the days of old, the tale was told to me - Red is for the soldier boys, their musket swinging - While they're singing songs of cheer - White is for the mothers, while their hearts are pining - Smiles are shining through each tear - Blue is for the jackies on the ocean sailing, never failing - Once to win the day - That's what the Red and White and Blue means to ev'ry true heart in the U.S.A." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A group of seven mothers, encircled by a laurel wreath, backed by marching soldiers, a Navy ship and the Statue of Liberty." MELODY - A Monthly Magazine for Lovers of Popular Music" is advertised on the back cover.
9T-8 That's What We're Fighting For - A single piece of sheet music (Kendis Music Publishing Co., Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by M.M. Einson and music by James Kendis (Including a quote from President Woodrow Wilson: "There is not a single selfish element, so far as I can see in the cause we are fighting for. We are fighting for what we believe and wish to be the rights of mankind and for the future peace and security of the world."): "Columbia the gem of the ocean - For freedom on land and sea - We're happy to show our devotion - Uncle Sam to fight for thee - We fight for the right of mankind - We fight for humanity - We fight for the birth of freedom - In the lands far across the sea - We fight for the Star Spangled Banner - That waves o'er our land and more - My country 'tis of thee - Sweet land of Liberty - That's what we're fighting for..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A red white and blue sketch of the Statue of Liberty. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I Think We've Got Another Washington (And Wilson Is His Name), "Every Little Memory Of You," etc.
9T-9 That Red Cross Girl Of Mine - A single piece of sheet music (Buckeye Music Publishing, Columbus, Ohio - 1917) with words and music by Ed C. Cannon: "There are Sue and Jane in their uniforms - With a band around their arm - There are girls next door and across the street - Who will keep our courage warm - It's a sacrifice little girl we know - It has won our true esteem - On the field of service while the dark draws o'er us - Our hearts just seem to sing - I'll go to sleep tonight and dream - Of that Red Cross Girl of mine - She's just the kind of girl to dream of - She's lovely, she's divine - What chance has Kaiser Bill to win - When we have a million men in line - Who have plucky little girls to keep them well - Like that Red Cross Girl of mine..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A young woman in a Red Cross uniform. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Virginia From Virginia."
9T-10 That Wee Bit Of Devil In Your Irish Eyes (Only Makes You An Angel To Me) - A single piece of sheet music (Theron C. Bennett Publishing, NYC - 1918) with words by George A. Norton ("Author of MELANCHOLY, MEMPHIS BLUES, SOMEHOW I CAN'T FORGET YOU, THAT'S WHAT MAKES A WILD CAT WILD, etc.") and music by George E. Springer ("Composer of SOMEHOW I CAN'T FORGET YOU"): "Sweetheart I have just read your letter - Addressed to me 'Somewhere in France' - I must say it made me feel better - And nerved me to take any chance - I'm thankful for tidings of home, dear - I'm proud that your heart is still true - You're just the same sweet girl, in all this big world - I know there's not another girl like you - You're fair as the rose of Killarney - And as pure as the Shamrock is green - You're as sweet as an Irishman's Blarney - When he's courtin' his favorite Colleen - You're as good as a babe in its cradle - With a smile that's a glad sight to see - And that wee bit of Devil in your Irish eyes - Only makes you an Angel to me..." Cover image by artist E. H. Pfeiffer: A soldier, with a letter in hand, dreams of his girl envisioned in the campfire smoke. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Somehow I Can't Forget You."
9T-11 Then I'll Come Back To You - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1917) with words and music by John W. Bratton ("Novelty Song"): "While canons roar and thunder far across the deep blue sea - There's a little girl at home whose heart is breaking - And while she sits and wonders where her soldier boy can be - He is somewhere in the trenches for France and Liberty - But thro' her tears today, I see her smile with joy - She reads this letter from her darling soldier boy - When the Fatherland has Boston beans for breakfast ev'ry day - Then I'll come back to you - When they change 'Unter der Linden' and rechristen it Broadway - Then I'll come back to you - When the Stars and Stripes are flying from each castle on the Rhine - And German bands are playing Yankee Doodle in ragtime - And the Kaiser tells his people 'Uncle Sam's a friend of mine' - Then I'll come back to you..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A soldier and his girl leaning on a wooden fence. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "There's A Long, Long Trail."
9T-12 There Are Lots Of Things We'll Do When We Get Over There - A single piece of sheet music (Billy Smythe Music Co., Inc., Louisville, Kentucky - 1918) with words and music by Harry Galanter (with cover photograph): "Right on to the front that's the place - Where we'll make Kaiser Bill blue in the face - When he sees our Yankee boys a-coming on the run - Chasing Von Hindenburg, the leader of the Hun - He'll know we are from the U.S.A. - And he'll find out we're in this war to stay - Come, let's lose no time, fall in line - Help drive old Kaiser Bill back of the Rhine - For there are lots of things we'll do when we get over there - The German Kaiser, he'll get wiser, he'll be up in the air - We'll free dear old Belgium and restore Alsace Lorraine - And when we reach the Rhine, we'll make it hot again - We'll let them know America is in to do its part - And millions wait a chance to do their share - I hope I get a chance to shoot the Kaiser in the pants - There are lots of things we'll do when we get over there..." Cover image (with a black and white publicity photograph of composer Harry Galanter) by an unknown artist: Soldiers charging on a battlefield. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "What Dixie Means To Me," "Fight For The Flag We Love," etc. No biographical information was found for composer HARRY GALANTER.
9T-13 There's A Call For You And Me, Carry ON! - A single piece of sheet music (W.T. Pierson and Co., Washington, DC and NYC - 1918) with words by Philander Johnson ("Author of SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE IS THE LILY") and music by William T. Pierson (Composer of SONS OF AMERICA"): "There's a call for you and me - Sounding over land and sea - Carry on! Carry on! - Through each loyal heart it goes - From the tropics to the snows - Carry on ! Carry on! - So it's good-bye, boy, and we wish you luck and joy - Though it's weary waiting while you're gone - But we'll check the rising tear - And we'll say, without fear - Carry on! Carry on! Carry on! - Carry on ! Carry on! - 'Tis the call for you and me - We will fight - For the right - In the light of liberty - 'Tis the dawn! 'Tis the dawn - Of the day we long to see! - Our ships are afloat, and the sword is drawn - Carry on! Carry on..." Cover image by artist Walter M. Dunk: A column of mounted artillery. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Sons Of America," "My Honolulu Lulu," "Carolina Blues," "The Girls We Leave Behind," etc.
9T-14 There's A Green Hill Out In Flanders (There's a Green Hill Up In Maine) - A single piece of sheet music (A. Piantadosi and Co., Inc., NYC - 1917) with words and music Alan J. Flynn (Featured by Burns and Fabrito - with cover photograph): "Just another story - Woven round old glory - Just another mother and her lad - At her country's calling - Tho' her tears were falling - She gave a son, the only one she had - And tonight a light at home is burning - For the lad who will not be returning - There's a green hill out in Flanders - There's a green hill up in Maine - Under one lies a son - "Neath the sod and dew - Sleeping where he fell for the Red, White and Blue - On the other there's a mother - In a little cottage waiting in vain - So here's a tear for the brave heart in Flanders - And a cheer for a brave heart in Maine..." Cover image (with a blue-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillians Burns and Fabrito) by artist William Austin Starmer: Soldiers charging on a battlefield backed by a moonlit cottage, on a hill, with a woman standing in front. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Tell The Last Rose Of Summer, Good Bye." HARRY BURNS AND FRANK FABRITO were a popular musical comedy act ("Shoes") in vaudeville. No other biographical information was found.
9T-15 There's A Little Blue Star In The Window And It Means The World To Me - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co./McKinley Music Co., Chicago and NYC - 1918) with music by Paul B. Armstrong and music by F. Henri Klickmann: " There's a little blue star in the window - And it means all the world to me - There's a lad who is true to the Red, White and Blue - And he's serving his Flag o'er the sea - But it does not reflect golden sunshine - Never gleams in the dead of night - In the brightness of day - As the night wears away - It shines with its own holy light - There are stars in the high heavens shining - With a promise of Hope in their light - There are stars in the field of Old Glory - The emblem of honor and right - But no star ever shone with more brightness, I know - Than the one for my boy o'er the sea - There's a little blue star in the window - And it means all the world to me..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A blue service-star flag hangs in a window. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I'm Hitting The Trail To Normandy," "Old Glory Goes Marching On," etc. According to Wikipedia: "A SERVICE FLAG or service banner in the United States is an official banner that family members of service members can display. The flag or banner is defined as a white field with a red border, with a blue star for each family member serving in the Armed Forces of the United States during any period of war or hostilities in which the Armed Forces of the United States are engaged. A gold star (with a blue edge) represents a family member that died during service, without specifying cause of death. The deceased might have been killed in action, or died due to unrelated causes. The banner was designed in 1917 by United States Army Captain Robert L. Queisser of the Fifth Ohio Infantry, in honor of his two sons who were serving in World War I. It was quickly adopted by the public and by government officials. On September 24, 1917, an Ohio congressman read into the Congressional Record: 'The mayor of Cleveland, the Chamber of Commerce and the Governor of Ohio have adopted this service flag. The world should know of those who give so much for liberty. The dearest thing in all the world to a father and mother - their children...' "
9T-16 There's A Long, Long Trail - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - London - 1915) with words by Stoddard King and music by Zo Elliott ("Sung by Mr. John McCormack"): "Nights are growing very lonely - Days are very long - I'm a -growing weary only list'ning for your song - Old remembrances are thronging - Thro' my memory - Till it seems the world is full of dreams - Just to call you back to me - There's a long, long trail a-winding - Into the land of my dreams - Where the nightingales are singing - And a white moon beams - There's a long, long night of waiting - Until my dreams all come true - Till the day when I'll be going down - That long, long trail with you..." Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers include: "The Magic Of Your Eyes," "Freedom For All Forever," etc. According to Wikipedia: "John McCormack was a world-famous Irish tenor, celebrated for his performances of the operatic and popular song repertoires, and renowned for his diction and breath control. He was also a Papal Count..."
9T-17 There's A Motherland For Every Yankee Man - A single piece of sheet music (Liberty Publishing Co., Kansas City, Missouri - 1918) with words and music by Jess M. Worley: "You are proud of the 'dough boys' and the brave marines - Just as proud of the staunch gunners, too - The fighting 'tanks' were sturdy Yanks and fought till they saw it through - Each faithful 'gob' was on the job - He stayed until his duty was done - Now it's up to you to show you're true - Lend to pay for the peace they won - Come America, let's land the price of peace - And bring our heroes home - Let's lend once more as we did before - When our soldiers were over the foam - From away down upon the Swanee River to the Rockies highest crag - From Texas to Maine - We will dig down again lending for America's flag..." Cover image by artist W.R: Lady Liberty and a military bugler stand with the backing of marching troops. Liberty Bonds ("Come on! Buy more...If you can't be a soldier of our Uncle Sam - Let your cash do your fighting for you...") are advertised on the back cover. According to Wikipedia: "A LIBERTY BOND was a war bond that was sold in the United States to support the allied cause in World War I. Subscribing to the bonds became a symbol of patriotic duty in the United States and introduced the idea of financial securities to many citizens for the first time. The Act of Congress which authorized the Liberty Bonds is still used today as the authority under which all U.S. Treasury bonds are issued..."
9T-18 There's A Picture In My Old Kit Bag - A single piece of sheet music (Ted Browne Music Co., Chicago, Illinois - 1918) with words and music by Al Sweet: "A soldier boy was writing to his Mother o'er the sea - Telling of the strange and awful sights in this war for humanity - He told his love for ones so dear - How he missed them all at home - And thru her tears a Mother read these words for her alone - There's a picture in my old kit bag in a worn old leather frame - It's as dear to me as our grand old flag and I'll cherish it just the same - On the long, long trail to No-Man's Land - When my weary footsteps lag - There's a cheer all the while in my Mother's smile - In that picture in my old kit bag..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier, on a battlefield, reads a letter from home. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Somewhere A Heart Is Breaking And Calling Me Back To You."
9T-19 There's A Service Flag Flying At Our House - Two pieces of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Thomas Hoier and Bernie Grossman and music by Al W. Brown ("Authors of DON'T BITE THE HAND THAT'S FEEDING YOU and SAY A PRAYER FOR THE BOYS OUT THERE"): "See the people running - Hear the rum-tum-tumming - Military music fills the air - Ev'ry one is waiting - Hearts are palpitating - Flags are flying ev'ry where - Of ev'ry allied nation from nearly all creation - Their banners wave from ev'ry staff and Dome - But the one I love to see - That means so much to me - Is the flag that's flying at home - There's a service flag flying at our house - A blue star in a field of red and white - Father is so proud of what his boy has done - There's a tear in mother's smile and she murmurs 'my son' - Perhaps he may return with fame and glory - But if by chance we lose him in the fight - There'll be a service flag flying at our house - And a new star in heaven tonight..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: Soldiers marching down a city street as service flags fly from various brownstone buildings. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When The Parson Hands The Wedding Band From Me To Mandy Lee" and "Before The World Began." According to Wikipedia: "A SERVICE FLAG or service banner in the United States is an official banner that family members of service members can display. The flag or banner is defined as a white field with a red border, with a blue star for each family member serving in the Armed Forces of the United States during any period of war or hostilities in which the Armed Forces of the United States are engaged. A gold star (with a blue edge) represents a family member that died during service, without specifying cause of death. The deceased might have been killed in action, or died due to unrelated causes. The banner was designed in 1917 by United States Army Captain Robert L. Queisser of the Fifth Ohio Infantry, in honor of his two sons who were serving in World War I. It was quickly adopted by the public and by government officials. On September 24, 1917, an Ohio congressman read into the Congressional Record: 'The mayor of Cleveland, the Chamber of Commerce and the Governor of Ohio have adopted this service flag. The world should know of those who give so much for liberty. The dearest thing in all the world to a father and mother - their children...' "
9T-20 There's A Vacant Chair In My Old Southern Home - A single piece of sheet music (Al Piantadosi and Co., Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by Jack Yellin ("Writer of ARE YOU FROM DIXIE?") and music by Al Piantadosi: "I just got a tear-stained letter from the place I call home - And it's the best thing that has happen'd - Since I started out to roam - 'Cause it's from my dear old mother - You can imagine what she'd say - And so I've just told my landlord - This is moving day - For there's a vacant chair in my old Southern home - A pair of old folks are alone - And ev'ry time they see that empty chair - Their lips begin to move in pray'r - I know they keep a little light - Burning in the window for me ev'ry night - And there's a lonesome gal down in a country lane - Who's at the station to meet each train - And so I've come to bid you good-bye, Bill - Because it's time for me to fill - That vacant chair in my old Southern home..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: An empty dining room place -setting. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Tell The Last Rose Of Summer, Good-Bye."
9T-21 There's An Angel Missing From Heaven, She'll Be Found Somewhere Over There - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co./McKinley Music, Chicago and NYC - 1918) with words by Paul B. Armstrong and music by Robert Speroy ("Dedicated to the AMERICAN RED CROSS"): "Picture a beautiful country - Picture a fam'ly at pray'r - Picture a crimson sun sinking low - Contentment and peace ev'rywhere - Then picture grim war's devastation - The cry of a child on the air - No sister, no brother, no father, no mother - Desolation and grief ev'rywhere - There's a cross and it stands for Atonement - Bringing Hope to both you and to me - There's a Cross at the end of a string of pearls - 'My Rosary, My Rosary' - There's a Cross, a Red Cross that means Mercy - Devotion and tenderest care - There's an Angel who's missing from Heaven - She'll be found somewhere over there..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A Red Cross nurse cradles a wounded soldier in her arms. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "There's A Little Blue Star In The Window," etc..
9T-22 There's One More River We're Going To Cross (And That's The River Rhine) - A single piece of sheet music (Tell Taylor Music Publisher, Chicago and NYC - 1918) with words by Ole Olson (Vaudeville, Broadway and film comedian - Half of the comedy team of Olsen and Johnson) and music by Isham Jones (Portrayed by George N. Neise in the 1951 Gus Kahn biopic I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS): "History repeats itself, has often been said - I can't help believing it, from books I have read - Things that happen right today, happened years ago - For instance our own U.S.A., her history will show - We crossed the Delaware - To the whole world's great surprise - We crossed the Mississippi - There we opened the Red-man's eyes - We crossed the Rio Grande - 'Way below our border line - But there's one more river that we're going to cross - And that's the river Rhine..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers singing around a campfire. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "He Sleeps Beneath The Soil Of France," etc. According to Wikipedia: "OLE OLSEN...was the son of Norwegian immigrant Gustav Olsen, a boiler-maker for the railroad, and Catherine Olsen, who was of Swiss German descent. John Sigvard Olsen graduated from Northwestern University in 1912 with a degree in music and hit the Vaudeville circuit. In 1914 he met Chic Johnson, who was advertising himself as the 'Greatest Ragtime Pianist in the Midwest.' The two performers met when they were hired as musicians in the same band. When the band broke up 'Ole' Olsen and 'Chic' Johnson formed the Olsen and Johnson comedy team. They really did not have a set act but found themselves booked into a small Chicago nightclub as part of Mike Fritzol's Frolics. When it came time for their turn in the show, unannounced and not particularly welcome, the brave pair pushed a piano onstage. Johnson seated himself at the keyboard and began to plunk out a ragtime tune. Olsen joined in with his violin and started singing, making up comical lyrics as he went along. The pair began to exchange 'patter,' mostly insults and the soon-to-be-famous 'Olsen and Johnson' team emerged. They performed in Vaudeville, as well as making some film appearances, for 24 years before hitting Broadway in 1938 with the show Hellzapoppin', later successfully filmed. Ole Olsen was married twice. He had three children with his first wife, Lillian: J. C., Joy, and Moya. They were later divorced. His son, J. C., committed suicide. Moya married William P. Lear of Learjet fame in 1942. Ole was involved in a serious automobile accident in 1950 and recuperated at the Lear home. In June 1961 Ole married Eileen Maria Osthoff, a dancer and choreographer he had known for eight years. Ole's ambition was to make people laugh. He is remembered for the quote, 'May you live as long as you want to, and laugh as long as you live.' Those words are engraved on his headstone. Olsen died at the age of 70 of a kidney ailment and is interred in Las Vegas, Nevada in a grave adjoining Chic Johnson's."
9T-23 They Acted Like The G.A.R's (Ex-Service Men's Number) - Two pieces of sheet music (Legion of Allied Veterans of the Great War Publishers and Distributors, Boston - 1919) with words by Walter Tobin and music by Arthur Keefe (Arranged by M.J. Getter - "10,000 Dollar Drive for the Legion of Allied Veterans of the Great War"): "Johnny Jones behind a counter selling fancy lace - Johnny used a lot of powder, used it on his face - Then he joined the army so that he could go and fight - When the Germans heard of that they ran and hid with fright - What are you going to do when Jones comes sailing home - Sailing across the sea, we all know what Jonesy did, He's a Yankee Doodle kid - Speak of his pals in song and story - Tell of the soldiers of the Allied fighting force as in days of yore - They acted like the G.A. R.'s fought and bled for the stripes and stars - Welcome the boys back home..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier and sailor standing guard surrounding the symbol of the LEGION OF ALLIED VETERANS OF THE GREAT WAR. The back cover features a reproduction of a letter from Master Engineer Joseph Bligh A.E.F. - Vice Legion Commander (On official LEGION OF ALLIED VETERANS OF THE GREAT WAR stationary dated March 28, 1919): "To the General Public - As the G.A.R. did in its day, so does the Legion aim to do for those of the generations who have served in the Allied Cause. In addition to the fraternal element that will extend thru time , one of the more pressing and persistent matters at present occupying the Legion is the constant demand to render assistance in the re-habilitation of discharged soldiers and sailors. This demand we are straining every effort to satisfy." According to Wikipedia: "The Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) was a fraternal organization composed of veterans of the Union Army, US Navy, Marines and Revenue Cutter Service who served in the American Civil War. Founded in 1866 in Decatur, Illinois, it was dissolved in 1956 when its last member died. Linking men through their experience of the war, the GAR became among the first organized advocacy groups in American politics, supporting voting rights for black veterans, lobbying the US Congress to establish veterans' pensions, and supporting Republican political candidates. Its peak membership, at more than 490,000, was in 1890, a high point of Civil War commemorative ceremonies. It was succeeded by the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War (SUVCW), composed of male descendants of Union veterans..."
9T-24 They All Sang Annie Laurie - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co., Chicago and NYC - 1915) with words by J. Will Callahan and music by F. Henri Klickmann ("The Song That Reaches Ev'ry Heart"): "Soldiers around the fire were dreaming - Tender dreams of the loved ones at home - Of the friends they knew with hearts tried and true - Of sister, brother, sweetheart, mother - 'Give us a song' a soldier shouted - He was brushing a tear form his eye - For in the campfire 's dim light he saw an image that night - Of one with eyes ever bright that made him sigh - Then there was one song of Nora, darling,- From Tipperary so far away - And there was one song of English Mary - With blue eyes so bright and gay - And then from each throat one song came ringing - That caused the tears from their eyes to start - For they all sang 'Annie Laurie' - The song that reaches ev'ry heart..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers singing around a campfire with the image of a women rising from the smoke of the fire. According to Wikipedia: "ANNIE LAURIE is an old Scottish song based on a poem by William Douglas (1672?-1748) of Dumfries and Galloway. The words were modified and the tune was added by Alicia Scott in 1834/5. The song is also known as MAXWELTON BRAES..."
9T-25 They're On Their Way To Germany - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co. Music Publishers - NYC - 1918) with words and music by Halsey K. Mohr: "Ten million Yankee Doodle hearts answered to the call - Ten million hands will lift the flag and never let it fall - A gun on ev'ry shoulder and the Stars and Stripes unfurled - They'll follow Uncle Sammy tho' he lead them 'round the world - From North and South - And East and West - America has given of her best - For they're on their way to Germany - And victory across the sea - With a message in ev'ry gun they're coming - Yankee Doodle is the tune that they are humming -'Neath the Stars and stripes, they'll pave the way - To a world democracy - And there'll be a vacant chair - In the palace over there - For they're on their way to Germany..." Cover image by an unknown photographer and artist: A photograph of American troops marching down a city street framed by a red, white and blue background with gold/brown laurel fronds. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Chin-Chin Chinaman," Liberty Bell (It's Time To Ring Again)," etc.
9T-26 They Are Tenting To-Night In Far Off France - A single piece of sheet music (Blanche M. Tice Music Publishing Co, Sioux City, Iowa - 1918) with words by J. Will Callahan and music by Blanche M. Tice: "See that lonely fireside - See those vacant chairs - See that gray-haired mother - Kneeling to say her pray'rs - She holds two loving letters - That come from far away - And her eyes grow bright with tender light - As her proud lips bravely say - They are tenting tonight, they are tenting tonight - Over yonder across the sea - They are facing the foe, but I told them to go - God will bring them back to me - To my boys over there - he will carry my pray'r - O'er the ocean's broad expanse - And when vict'try's won I'll welcome each son - They are tenting in far off France..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Three soldiers gathered around a campfire. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Swells and Belles," "Valse Divine," "When The Sun Sets In Ireland" and "Only A Memory Of You."
9T-27 They Were All Out Of Step But Jim - Two pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder, Co., NYC -1918) with words and music by Irving Berlin (Featured by Fanchon and Marco and Miss Queenie Williams - with cover photographs): "Jimmy's mother went to see her son - Marching along on parade - In his uniform and with his gun - What a lovely picture he made - She came home that ev'ning - Filled up with delight - And to all the neighbors she would yell with all her might - Did you see my little Jimmy marching - With the soldiers up the avenue? - There was Jimmy just as stiff as starch - Like his Daddy on the seventeenth of March - Did you notice all the lovely ladies - Casting their eyes on him? Away he went - To live in a tent - Over in France with his regiment - Were you there, and tell me, did you notice - They were all out of step but Jim..." Cover image (with black and white publicity photographs of vaudevillians FANCHON and MARCO and MISS QUEENIE WILLIAMS) by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: Women watching soldiers march by a store window as one soldier waves back to them. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I Cannot Bear To Say Goodbye" and "For The Two Of Us." According to the STREETSWING.COM Web Site: "FANCHON AND MARCO were a brother and sister dance team. Born to a Los Angeles clothing store proprietor. Fanny studied piano and dance; her brother Mike (Marco) played the Violin/fiddle. Together they entertained at lodge parties and picnics, later graduated to a dinner show in Tait's famed San Francisco restaurant and later the Western, Interstate, and Keith-Orpheum circuits. The hook to their show was the grand finale exit with Fanchon sitting on Marco's shoulders while he fiddled away on the violin... Fanchon and Marco, Inc. started in 1919 and snowballed until theatres which had bought franchises from them became bankrupt and or due to the depression, Unions, and in order to keep units out they had to become theatre operators. Fanchon and Marco would manage many theatres on the West Coast circuit as well as produce many acts such as the 'Sunkist Beauties,' 'The Fanchon and Marco Girls' and the 48 woman group called the 'Fanchonettes (Formerly California Sunshine Girls)' to perform in these theatres. They also sponsored (hired) the winners of each years Harvest Moon Ball winners in January of the following year such as Ruth Scheim and John Englert (Collegiate Shag Champons). They helped start many careers such as Cyd Charisse (age 12) Joan Crawford, Martha Raye, Johnny Downs, Janet Gaynor, Dorothy LaMour, Judy Garland (Gumm Sisters), Doris Day and Bing Crosby and many others. Fanchon and Marco managed the 'Mickey Mouse Circus' which was comprised of 'Midgets and Elephants' at the California Pacific Exposition held in San Diego from 1935 to 1936. In 'Danse Follies,' chorus girls sang and danced and in 'Hollywood Secrets,' talkies were made and the secrets of synchronizing sound tracks with movements were revealed to the public...." MISS QUEENIE WILLIAMS was a child star (Singer and actress) in vaudeville. No additional biographical information was found for MISS QUEENIE WILLIAMS.
9T-28 They'll be Mighty Proud In Dixie Of Their Old Black Joe - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words and music by Harry Carroll (with cover photograph - "As introduced by the Composer HARRY CARROLL at the Palace Theatre New York"): "The other day I chanced to roam - Beside an old log cabin home - I saw an aged darky dressed in khaki - 'Bout to 'cross the foam - I said 'Old man why must you go - Your head of hair is white as snow?' - He said 'I'm not obliged to sonny - But I want this world to know - I'm a comin' I'm a comin' - And I'm mighty proud to go - 'Cause I seem to hear the bugles callin' Come on Old Black Joe - I've got the same old happy banjo - And the same old trusty gun - And they're the same old weapons that I used in the days of sixty-one - I'll swim across that old Rhine river - And when I get there I won't leave no rind (Rhine) - I know I'll give the whole world liberty - Just like Lincoln did for me - Then They'll be dog-gone proud in Dixie of their Old Black Joe..." Cover image (with a black and white publicity photograph of vaudevillian/composer HARRY CARROLL) by an unknown artist: An elderly African-American man in uniform with gun and banjo. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Three Wonderful Letters From Home," "A Little Bit Of Sunshine From Home," etc. According to Wikipedia: HARRY CARROLL (November 28, 1892, in Atlantic City, New Jersey - December 26, 1962, in Mount Carmel, Pennsylvania) was an American songwriter, pianist and composer. He taught himself how to play the piano and began playing in movie houses before he finished grade school. After he graduated from high school, he moved to New York City, where he worked as an arranger in Tin Pan Alley and at night entertained at the Garden Café and accompanied various vaudeville shows. In 1912, Carroll was hired by the Schubert brothers' Winter Garden productions as a contract writer. He worked with Arthur Fields to produce his first hit, On the Mississippi. He wrote several Broadway stage scores including some popular favorites: 'I'm Always Chasing Rainbows' (based on a section of Fantaisie-Impromptu by Frédéric Chopin), 'By the Beautiful Sea' and 'The Trail of the Lonesome Pine.' Harry married Anna Wheaton and together they had one child. Later he moved west to Los Angeles and became involved in early movies. He served as the director of ASCAP from 1914 to 1917. In 1970, eight years after his death, Carroll was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame."
9T-29 The Third Maine - A single piece of sheet music (Francis C. Chantereau Publisher, Portland, Maine - 1918) with words and music by Francis C. Chantereau ("Dedicated to THE THIRD MAINE INFANTRY by the Author who is a member of Maine's Newest Regiment" - with cover photograph): "They talk about New York, Connecticut also- Enlisting their brave men to go and fight the foe - Yet there's one state I know that won't give up the race - It is not Oregon, but dear old State of Maine - The Third Maine, The Third Maine will surely be a pride - To fathers and dear mothers all through the nation wide - Should the boys across need help to fight the foe - President Wilson then may call the Third Maine will go..." Cover image (with a blue-tinted photograph of composer FRANCIS C. CHANTEREAU in uniform) by an unknown artist: The Maine state flag. No additional biographical information for FRANCIS C. CHANTEREAU was not found.
9T-30 Tho' I Shared My Love With Uncle Sam, I Gave My Heart To You - A single piece of sheet music (Leo T. Corcoran Music Publisher, Boston - 1917) with words and music by Leo T. Corcoran ("The March Song of the Day" by "New England's Youngest Popular Song Composer" - "Composer of I LOST WHAT I CALLED HOME SWEET HOME, EVERYBODY'S GIRL, WHEN I FOUND YOU, etc."): "Sweetheart the nation is calling, calling her boys off to war - Millions of brave loyal soldiers, who'll fight for the land they adore - I've shared my love with Old Glory - Promised I'd be true - So now I bid a farewell, and leave my heart with you - Please, little girl, don't be sighing - Please little girl don't feel blue - After the battle is over I will come back to you - Then there'll be sunshine and gladness - Under the Red, White and Blue - For tho' I shared my love with Dear Old Uncle Sam, I gave my heart to you..." Cover image by artist E.S. Fisher: A soldier and his girl hugging. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I Lost What I Called Home Sweet Home When Mother Passed Away."
9T-31 Those Draftin' Blues - Two pieces (various covers and sizes) of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co., NYC/Griffin Music House, Chicago - 1918) with words and music by Maceo Pinkard ("Writer of REAL KIND MAMA, THE BLUE MELODY, etc."): "Now if you've got a lovin' man - You'd better love him while you can - Perhaps he'll have to go to war - To fight for dear old Uncle Sam - They're drafting ev'ry man right now - To fight the Kaiser and his band - Before they call your man I say - These words you ought to understand - When Uncle Sam calls out your man - Don't sigh - And cry - Because you know he cert'nly can't refuse - To hold him back, might make him 'slack' - Just say, you've got those drafting blues..." Cover image by artist Grim Natwick: Uncle Sam shaking hands with a civilian gentleman with an inset sketch of a weeping woman. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Graveyard Blues," "Indianola," Kentucky Dream," etc.
9T-32 Three Cheers For The Army and Navy - A single piece of sheet music (Gordon V. Thompson Publishing/MUSIC IN THE HOME Page, Evening Mail, NYC - 1917) with words and music by Gordon V. Thompson ("Writer of WHEN YOUR BOY COMES BACK TO YOU, I WANT TO KISS DADDY GOOD NIGHT, etc." - "The N.Y. Evening Mail pledges the entire profits of this song to RECRUITING AND RED CROSS"): "When war clouds arise and over-hang the skies - 'Till threaten'd our peace by land and sea - Uncle Sam's stalwart sons are there to man his guns - And fight for the Flag of Liberty - Three cheers for the Army and Navy - Boys of the red, white and blue - For the boys of the Army and Navy - Fight for a cause they know is true! - For the Stars and Stripes of Old Glory - The freedom our nation enjoys - That the eagle may fly - They'll gladly do or die - The Army and Navy boys..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier and sailor stand at attention on each side of the American Eagle and shield with a background of ships in New York Harbor.
9T-33 Three Cheers For The Lads Of The Navy - A single piece of sheet music (Gordon V. Thompson Publishing, Toronto, Canada - 1917) with words and music by Gordon V. Thompson ("Writer of WHEN YOUR BOY COMES BACK TO YOU, I WANT TO KISS DADDY GOOD NIGHT, etc." - with a cover photograph): "To man all her guns, Britannia has two sons - Two boys she is proud her own to be - To many a song has Tommy marched along - So sing now of Jack who guards the sea - Three cheers for the lads of the Navy! - Here's to the boys in the blue! For the hearts of the lads in the Navy - Beat for a cause they know is true! - For the old Union Jack they are fighting - That Britons forever may sing - That they rule the waves and never shall be slaves - The sailors of our King ..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A navy ship sails through a choppy sea. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I Want To Kiss Daddy Good - Night."
9T-34 Three Flags With Red, White and Blue, The - A single piece of sheet music (Penn Music Publishing Co., Reading, Pennsylvania - 1918) with words by George F. Eisenbrown and music by M.A. Althouse: "There is red, white and blue in our country's flag - There is red, white and blue in the flag of France - In England's there is red, white and blue - We'll change the black in Germany's too - For peace and right we will fight and we'll see it through - Three flags wave with triumphant brilliant hue - And each contains the red, the white and the blue - Let them wave on - While hand in hand our soldier boys they will demand - The stars and stripes shall forever rule..." Cover image by an unknown artist: The flags of France, Great Britain and the U.S.A.
9T-35 Three Wonderful Letters From Home - Four pieces of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words by Joe Goodwin and Ballard MacDonald and music by James F. Hanley: "Three letters left a village bound for somewhere over there - Three letters to a lonesome soldier lad - Each one a loving story told - Each one was worth its weight in gold - Three messages that made his poor heart glad - For the first was just old fashioned - And it breathed a mother's pray'r - Wile the next one started 'Darling, God protect you over there' - And the third was filled with kisses - Sent to Daddy 'cross the foam - From his mother, wife and baby - Three wonderful letters from home..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A mother, wife and baby write letters backed by depictions of their letters and military action in Europe. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "We Don't Want The Bacon," "Boogie Rag, " "Lafayette! We Hear You Calling," "A Little Bit Of Sunshine From Home," etc.
9T-36 Throw Me A Kiss From Over The Sea - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., NYC and Detroit- 1917) with words by Raymond Egan and music by Richard A. Whiting: "There's miles and miles of deep blue sea between your lips and mine - And when you write a note to me, the censor reads each line - He'll cross out all the crosses dear, that mean a loving kiss - But we can fool the censor yet, if you will just do this - Throw me a kiss from over the sea - Send it tonight, the censor won't see - Press it, caress it, address it to me, dear - Throw me your kisses from over the sea..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A woman looks over the sea as the moon sets. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Those Olden Golden Days Of Long Ago."
9T-37 Till Over The Top We Go - A single piece of sheet music (Pearson's Publishing/Halcyon Publishing Co., Indianapolis, Indiana - 1918) with words and music by Roy L. Burtch ("The Song Our Allies, Lodges and Glee Clubs Are Singing" by the "Composer of WHEN THE BUGLE CALLS, PEACE ON EARTH AND LIBERTY, THINK OF ME, TELL ME, THE ORGAN AND THE CHOIR, BYE BYE BABY DEAR, etc."): "Our Allies are united boys, we're going to win this war - Democracy and Liberty must stand for evermore - Ten million Yanks are going to stop the Kaiser's blowing - We're now in shape, our move to make, the Huns will have to wait - Till over the top we go boys, over the top we go - You can all bet your rocks Wilson never will stop, till over the top we go - Till over the top we go boys, over the top we go - We're on Kaiser Bill's track and we'll never come back, till over the top we go..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A brown-tinted sketch of a soldier, with a machine gun/grenade launcher, charging on a battlefield. The Pearson Piano Company (Indianapolis, Indiana) is advertised on the back cover. According to Wikipedia: Wilhelm II or William II (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, three notable contemporary relations being his first cousins King George V of the United Kingdom, founder of the House of Windsor, Marie of Romania, Queen consort of Romania and the Czarina Alix of Hesse, consort of his second cousin Tsar Nicholas II of the House of Romanov, the last ruler of the Russian Empire before the Russian Revolution of 1917 which deposed the monarchy. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose 'New Course' in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to the First World War. Bombastic and impetuous, he sometimes made tactless pronouncements on sensitive topics without consulting his ministers, culminating in a disastrous Daily Telegraph interview that cost him most of his power in 1908. His top generals, Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, dictated policy during the First World War with little regard for the civilian government. An ineffective war leader, he lost the support of the army, abdicated in November 1918, and fled to exile in the Netherlands..."
9T-38 Till The Work Of The Yanks Is Done - A single piece of sheet music (International Edition Publishing Company, NYC - 1917) with words and music by Leon De Costa ("Official March Song of the 14th New York Infantry N.G. - Brooklyn, N.Y." - with a cover photograph of General John H. Foote): "Do you hear that noise? - Do you see those boys - Who are coming down the street? - And their looks so bold - Tell a story old - To the sound of marching feet - They are volunteers - And the ringing cheers - Tell the world they will be 'there' - There's a debt to pay - They are on their way - Ev'ry Yankee will do his share - Keep your eyes on the boys from the U.S.A. - Watch the 'Yanks' do their 'bit' in this fight - We'll follow the flag like our fathers did - And no longer will 'Might be Right' - Let them know that the bird of America - Is a Dove and an Eagle in one - We'll tramp, tramp, tramp, tramp - Till the work of the Yanks is done..." Cover image (with a photograph of GENERAL JOHN H. FOOTE) by an unknown photographer and artist: A soldier and sailor raise their caps in a cheer on each side of the shield featuring the photo of Foote. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Valse Boheme." No biographical information found for GENERAL H. JOHN H. FOOTE.
9T-39 Till We Meet Again - Three pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with words by Raymond B. Egan and music by Richard A. Whiting (Featured by Gene and Willie Howard - with cover photograph): "There's a song in the land of the lily - Each sweetheart has heard with a sigh - Over high garden walls - This sweet echo falls - As a soldier boy whispers good-bye - Smile the while you kiss me sad adieu - When the clouds roll by I'll come to you - Then the skies will seem more blue - Down in lovers lane my dearie - Wedding bells will ring so merrily - Ev'ry tear will be a memory - So wait and pray each night for me - Till we meet again..." Cover image (featuring a green-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillians GENE AND WILLIE HOWARD) by artist F.S. Manning: A soldier and his girl embrace in the shadows by the sea. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "You Don't Know," "Madelon" and "After All." According to Wikipedia: "Willie Howard (April 13, 1883 - January 14, 1949) and Eugene Howard (July 7, 1880 - August 1, 1965), sometimes billed as the Howard Brothers, were Silesian-born American vaudeville performers of the first half of the 20th century. They were two of the earliest openly Jewish performers on the American stage. After performing in amateur night competitions, the brothers began separate professional theatre careers. Soon they were appearing together in burlesque and vaudeville, where, over the course of a decade, they established their reputation. The brothers were hired by the Shubert family in 1912 to perform in a series of successful revues on Broadway over the next decade called The Passing Show. These were followed by another popular series of Broadway revues in the 1920s and 1930s called George White's Scandals. They appeared in a few additional Broadway musicals, notably Girl Crazy. In between these Broadway seasons, the brothers continued to be in great demand on the vaudeville circuit and made a few (mostly short) films. In the 1940s, Willie continued to star in revues and musicals and to perform in vaudeville and night clubs..."
9T-40 Tip-Top Tipperary Mary - Three pieces of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1914) with words by Ballard MacDonald and music by Harry Carroll ("Writers of THE TRAIL OF THE LONESOME PINE"): "Tipperary Tommy was a soldier boy - Brave as any lad could be - Tipperary Mary was a pretty lass - Waiting for her Tommy 'cross the sea - In her heart, in her heart a beating feeling tells - Of a love that is all true blue - And in her ear a song Tommy sang will linger long - And thrill her thru' and thru' - Tip-Top Tipperary Mary - I love you true - Tip -Top Tipperary Mary - My love's true as your eyes of blue - I dream of your endearing young charms - Ev'ry night thru' - Tho' I'm far Away from Tipperary, Mary - My hearts with you..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A color-tinted photograph of a young woman sitting on a riverside stone wall framed by green shamrocks. THE GEM DANCE FOLIO FOR 1916 is advertised on the back cover.
9T-41 To America's Flag - A single piece of sheet music (C.W. Thompson Co., Boston - 1919) with words by George Edward Day and music by Charles Elmer Wilson ("Triumphal Song for Concert, Church and Festival Occasions - Dedicated to the American Legion"): "Flame forth in splendor, O banner all glorious - Symbol of liberty's conquering host - Lead on and speed on, triumphant, victorious - Chivalry's champion, brave without boast - Under thy heav'n of stars floating o'er us - Crimson of courage and chastity's white - March we to vanquish the foe -man before us - Strong and invincible - Armored in right - Soft winds of morning unfurl and caress thee - Glories celestial wreath thee in light - Bearing new hope to the nations that bless thee - Allies of God in humanity's fight..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Ornate title-lettering.
9T-42 Tom, Dick And Harry And Jack - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc. NYC - 1917) with words by Howard Johnson and music by Milton Ager (Featured by Bailey and Cowan - with cover photograph): "Comrades and brothers our loved ones and others - Have left us to join in the fight - Millions of others their sweethearts and mothers - Are proud they fight for the right - In ev'ry home in our nation - This is the prayer ev'ry night - Oh, Tom, Dick and Harry and Jack - Hurry back, Hurry back- Be quick, do the trick, get it over - Then don't even stop to pack - The tears that we've shed make an ocean - Home without you seems just like an empty shack - So Tom, Dick and Harry and Jack - Hurry back, hurry back, hurry back!" Cover image (with a blue-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillians Bailey and Cowan) by artist Henry Hutt: Four servicemen in various uniforms. Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SING song folio ("They can't stop our singing army! Send a copy of this book...to your Sammy 'over here' of 'over there' Send one to your Jackie afloat or ashore..."). According to the IMDb Web Site: "LYNN COWAN was a composer, songwriter, pianist, actor, director and singer, educated at Iowa State College with a Bachelor of Civil Engineering degree. He was a member of a vaudeville team with BILL BAILEY. During World War II, he was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Corps of Engineers, and he received the Legion of Merit. In Okinawa, he managed the Castle Terrace Club. In 1963, he retired to Kauai, Hawaii. Joining ASCAP in 1942, his chief musical collaborator was Alex Sullivan. His chief popular-song compositions include 'Kisses,' 'Dream House,' 'Just Give Me a Week in Paris,' 'Secret' and 'I'm in Love with You.' " According to the PARLORSONGS.COM Web Site: "...Supposedly, the song ('Won't You Come Home, BILL BAILEY) is based on a 'real' BILL BAILEY who was a...vaudeville performer, member of the team of BAILEY AND COWAN. One night he was locked out of his house by a wife who had reached her limit of tolerance for his late night revelry with friends. It is said that Cannon (the composer) was one of his friends who partook of these nocturnal pleasures with him and Cannon paid for a room for Bailey at a local hotel and assured him that a night away from home would surely cause his wife to plead for his return. The song was so popular it inspired a number of spin-off tunes including I Wonder Why BILL BAILEY Won't Come Home and Since BILL BAILEY Came Back Home..."
9T-43 Trench! Trench! Trench! Our Boys Are Trenching - A single piece of sheet music (Roger Graham Publishing, Chicago - 1918) with words by Wilson Dillen and music by May Hill: "Fourteen million men or more - Fresh from freedom's happy shore - Have gone forth to save the world's Democracy - Heedless of the word 'beware' - They've been going 'Over There' - Where the fighting's thickest they all want to be - Debts we owe the noble French are paid in ev'ry inch - Trench, trench, trench, our boys are trenching - Singing to a Yankee air - When their merry work is done and the Hun is on the run - There will soon be peace and quiet over there - With Old Glory proudly waving - As it always did before - They'll keep fighting till they free all the slaves in Germany - And they'll trench, trench, trench - Till they win the war..." Cover image by artist Grim Natwick: Soldiers charging on a battlefield. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "You Can't Bring Back Yesterday," "A Tear, A Kiss, A Smile," "If You've Never Been In Dreamland, You've Never Been In Love," "You'll Want Me Back Some Day," "I Believe In You," and "You Are The Image Of My Mother."
10U-1 Uncle Sammy Here's My Share - A single piece of sheet music (Sherman, Clay and Co., Distributors, Seattle, Washington - 1919) with words by John Henry Lyons ("Camp Lewis Song Leader") and Jack Quinlan and music by John Henry "Everybody Sing" Lyons ("Officially Adopted for the Victory Loan Campaign" by the "Composer of HERE AT HOME WE'RE BACKING YOU"): "Hear all the people shout, 'The War is O'er' - Victory is the song that fills the air - Great is the cost of triumph to be paid - For what our Yankee lads did over there - So come on get square with Uncle Sammy - Be a Yank and let's come through - We've a debt that will ne'er regret - Pay up for Old Red, White and Blue - Yankee sons and guns brought home the victory - Hear the glad song everywhere - 'My country 'tis of thee' - Uncle Sammy here's my share..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A large blue and white "V" for victory against a red background and blue frame. VICTORY SONGS FOR VICTORY 'SINGS' a 10 cent folio published by Smith-Digby Co., Seattle, Washington is advertised ("To be used Whenever and Wherever People are Gathered Together") on the back cover. According to the ANSWERS.COM Web Site: "The VICTORY LOAN of 1919 was a bond issue intended to help pay World War I costs. The act authorizing this loan provided for the issue of two series of three-to-four-year 4.75 percent and 3.75 percent convertible gold notes; the issue, dated May 29, 1919, totaled $4.5 billion. Bearer notes were issued in denominations ranging from $50 to $10,000, registered notes from $50 to $100,000. The maturity date was May 20, 1923, but both series were callable for redemption in whole or in part on June 15 or December 15, 1922, on four months' notice. Some notes were called at these earlier dates."
10U-2 Uncle Sammy Take Care Of My Girl - A single piece of sheet music (Forster Music Publisher, Inc., Chicago/J. Albert and Son, Sydney, Australia - 1918) with words by Betty Morgan and music by Jimmie Morgan (both with a cover photograph): "I just saw a letter from a soldier boy, who was sailing across the sea - It was addressed to his Uncle Sam - And it was a soldier's plea - I remember ev'ry word he wrote - This is what was in his little note - Uncle Sammy take care of my girl - While I'm over across the sea - Please treat her fair - I'll do my bit and I won't mind as long as you are kind - To the girl I left behind - I'll be thinking of her ev'ry day - She's more precious to me than a pearl - And it may be sometime before we get to the Rhine - So Uncle Sammy take care of my girl..." Cover image (with a blue-tinted publicity inset photograph of composers BETTY and JIMMIE MORGAN) by artist Dan Sweeney: A soldier writes a letter while thinking of his girl, comforted by Uncle Sam. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Military Waltz." No biographical information was found for composers JIMMIE and BETTY MORGAN.
10U-3 Under The American Flag - A single piece of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co., NYC - Chicago - San Francisco - Sidney - London - 1915) with words by Andrew B. Sterling and music by Harry Von Tilzer ( with cover photograph - "The song was also known as "No More I'll Roam, I'll Build A Home Under The American Flag"): "I've trotted all around the globe - I've been in ev'ry clime - I've had a thousand sweethearts and I've had a lovely time - And then the war broke out and I came sailing 'cross the foam - To meet my Waterloo right here - A girl I know down home - My first attack met with repulse - Then pierced by Cupid's dart - With my two arms around her - She surrendered to my hear - No more I'll roam - I'll build a home - Under the American Flag - The land of Honey, Honey - Don't you hear me sonny - Now I've got the girlie and I'm goin' to get the money - Under the American Flag - We'll hug and kiss and also chew the rag - A little Yankee country home - With chickens by the score - A little Yankee sweetheart that I've loved since days of yore - We'll raise a lot of vegetables and may be something more - Under the American Flag..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A man and women hug n front of their home - framed by American flag bunting. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Close To My Heart." According to Wikipedia: Composer and publisher" HARRY VON TILZER...soon proved successful playing piano and calliope and writing new tunes and incidental music for the shows. He continued doing this in Burlesque and Vaudeville shows for some years, writing many tunes which were not published or which he sold to entertainers for 1 or 2 dollars. In 1898 he sold his song 'My Old New Hampshire Home' to a publisher for $15, and watched it become a national hit, selling over 2 million copies of the sheet music. This prompted him to become a professional songwriter. He was made a partner of the Shapiro Bernstein Publishing Company. His 1900 number 'A Bird in a Gilded Cage' became one of the biggest hits of the age. Von Tilzer became one of the best known Tin Pan Alley songwriters. In 1902 Von Tilzer formed his own publishing company, where he was soon joined by his younger brother Albert Von Tilzer. Harry Von Tilzer's hits included 'A Bird in a Gilded Cage,' 'Cubanola Glide,' 'Wait 'Til The Sun Shines Nellie,' 'Old King Tut,' 'All Alone,' 'Mariutch,' 'The Ragtime Goblin Man,' 'I Love My Wife, But Oh You Kid!,' 'They Always Pick On Me,' 'I Want A Girl (Just Like The Girl That Married Dear Old Dad)' - with lyrics by William Dillon, and 'The Green Grass Grew All Around,' 'On the Old Fall River Line" and many others..."
10U-4 U.S.A. Will Find A Way, The - A single piece of sheet music (Eldridge Entertainment House, Franklin, Ohio/Denver, Colorado - 1917) with words and music by Harry C. Eldridge ("A Patriotic Song of Faith"): "There's a strong ungainly fellow, Uncle Sam he's known by name - And he's turning out a mighty lot of work - He's been at it quite a bit and he is handy at the game - There is not a task that he will ever shirk - He's the guardian of a country which has fought full many a fight - And we've never heard where he has had to run - If we can't have peace but find that we must fight for truth and right - You will find that he's quite handy with a gun - Oh the U.S.A. will find a way to sail the Ship of State - And to bring her safely home o'er troubled seas - Through the many unseen dangers for her may lie in wait - She will chart a safe course borne by Freedom's breeze - She has weathered many heavy storms in ages that have past - And we've faith that she can weather many more - With Columbia at the helm and Uncle Sam to man the guns - The old ship will sail back to shore..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A U.S.A. shield with ornate title-lettering.
10U-5 United States Democracy March - A single piece of sheet music (Hyde Park Music Co. Publishing, Chicago, Illinois - 1918) with words and music by Eliza Doyle Smith ("A Patriotic Song for America…Respectfully Dedicated to the Chicago Athletic Association" with a photograph of an unidentified sailor): "We are from the States united - From the great land of the free - We have heard the nations calling - For their rights on land and sea - We have seen our people dying - Underneath the tyrant's chain - So, we rally 'round 'Old Glory' - And we're marching forth again - We are marching, onward marching - From the dear land of our birth - On to join the war of nations - For the freedom of the earth - We are coming! Millions coming! - On the breeze our banners swing - And we'll show the German Kaiser - That our God alone is King..." Cover image (with a sepia-toned photograph of an unidentified sailor) by an unknown artist and photographer: Ornate title lettering. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "All For Norah Daly."
10U-6 U.S.S. Michigan March - A single piece of sheet music (F.J.A. Forster Music Publisher, Chicago, Illinois - 1915) with music by J.R. Shannon ("Respectfully Dedicated to the U.S.S. Michigan and to the Good People of That State" - with a black and white cover photograph of the ship by photographer Enrique Muller). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Love's Golden Dream." According to the ABOUT.COM/MILITARY HISTORY Web Site: "...With the US entry into World War I in April 1917, Michigan received orders to join Battleship Force 2. Tasked with training recruits and serving as a convoy escort, the battleship suffered another accident on January 15, 1918, when its foremast collapsed while in heavy seas off Cape Hatteras. The incident saw six sailors killed and thirteen wounded. Transferring the injured to USS Solace, Michigan proceeded to the Philadelphia Navy Yard for repairs. Completed in April, the battleship shifted south and took up duty as a gunnery training ship in the Chesapeake Bay. It remained in this assignment until the war's end in November..."
10U-7 U.S.S.New York March - A single piece of sheet music (F.J.A. Forster Music Publisher, Chicago, Illinois - 1915) with music by J.R. Shannon ("Respectfully Dedicated to the U.S.S. New York and to the Good People of That State" - with a black and white cover photograph of the ship by photographer Enrique Muller). Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers include: "When The Gray Of The Sky" and "Moon Dreams." According to Wikipedia: The U.S.S. New York entered "...service in 1914, she was part of the U.S. Navy force which was sent to reinforce the British Grand Fleet in the North Sea near the end of World War I. During that time, she was involved in at least two incidents with German U-Boats, and is believed to have been the only U.S. ship to have sunk one, during an accidental collision in October 1918. Following the war, she was sent on a litany of training exercises and cruises in both the Atlantic and the Pacific, and saw several overhauls to increase her armament..."
10V-1 Victory (by M.K. Jerome) - Two pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder, Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Jack Wilson and Ben Bard and music by M.K. Jerome ("As Sung by Kitty Gordon - with cover photograph): "America is in the war - And she is in to stay - Her gallant boys have crossed the foam - And now they're in the fray - They'll fight until the battle's won - They'll fight with all their might - America it is for thee - Your cause is always right - Victory ! Victory! - For what we've sent our boys across the sea - Germany will surely see - Just like Joan of Arc, we're fighting for Miss Liberty - They'll get in to old Berlin - And they'll show the Hun the fighting's just begun - Our boys will never cease - And they will not talk of peace - Till they've reached the goal of victory..." Cover image (with a black and white full-length photograph of vaudevillian Kitty Gordon) by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: Lady Liberty on the battlefield/Cover image by artist Alvan C. Hadley: A U.S. Marine holding his rifle and the U.S. Marine flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Mammy's Chocolate Soldier" and "Hello Central! Give Me No Man's Land." According to Wikipedia: "KITTY GORDON (April 22, 1878 - May 26, 1974) was an English stage and silent film actress. Her first professional stage appearance was at the Princes Theatre in Bristol in 1901 in the touring production of San Toy. She appeared in The Duchess of Dantzic in 1903 and the operetta Véronique in 1904. In 1909, she moved to New York, where she became a regular on the New York stage. She made her first film appearance in 1916 in As in a Looking Glass. During the next three years she made twenty-one films. On October 19, 1911, she starred in the debut of composer Victor Herbert's musical The Enchantress at the New York Theatre. She continued her stage work from 1919 onwards. She also made television appearances. On June 25, 1920, during a Vaudeville performance in Chicago with her husband, Jack Wilson, and her daughter, Vera Beresford, Gordon's stage gun discharged a live round and shot Joseph A. Hack, an offstage acrobat..."
10V-2 Victory (by J. N. King) - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph N. King Publishing, Morristown, Pennsylvania - 1918) with words and music by Joseph N. King ("Respectfully dedicated to the Army and Navy of the United States of America" by the "Author of BEYOND THE MISTS, AS BREAKS THE SUN THROUGH CLOUDS AT MORN, THE SONG OF THE BROWN THRESHER and TIS THEE"): "Our country now unfurls her flag and hands it down to you - Be sure you do your duty while this world you're passing through - God is the Captain of His host - He's with you in the fight - Arm ye for the service and battle for the right - We'll send a song to the battlefield, it must be Victory - That starry emblem keep afloat, it stands for Liberty - While tenting boys we'll think of you - Be ever staunch and true - Don't forget your country or the Red, the White, the Blue - We'll send a song to the battlefield and a pray'r for our flag and you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Various scenes of battle, an ocean liner sails with an escort of biplanes and military ships and an army bugler.
10V-3 Volunteers, The - A single piece of sheet music (Susan Hyman Matlock Publishing, San Antonio, Texas - 1916) with words by Susan Hyman Matlock and music by Hector Gorjux: "Come listen, comrades all! - Our nation needs men brave - her banner and our freedom - She now calls on all to save - But bravely all united - Against the daring foe - To them and all their minions - Our victory'll bring woe! - From hillside and peaceful valley - From lowly home and proudest hall - When trumpets call on us to rally - To the banner loved by one and all - Then it's goodbye to our sweethearts - Farewell our mother's dear - It's a long, long way to glory - But our souls do not know to fear..."Cover image by artist M.A. Santaella: A wounded bugler, on horseback, rides away from the battlefield and the rising sun of "Liberty."
10W-1 Wait For Your Honey Boy - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co., NYC - 1917) with words and music by C. Arthur Pfeiffer ("Song, One Step and Fox Trot - Also Arranged for Orchestra - Inscribed to Mildred Phyllis Sherman"): "Hello, dearie, just received your note - Gee! But I am mighty glad you wrote - I've been kind of blue - Thinking dear of you - Nothing new to write to you about - 'Cept of course to say without a doubt - That I'm strong for you - Wait for your Honey Boy - He'll come back home - Wait for your Honey Boy - No more he'll roam - The days seem lonely - When you're away - I love you only - That's why I say - Wait for your Honey Boy - He'll wait for you - Write to your Honey Boy - He's feeling blue - In my dreams, I hear you calling me - Tho' I'm across the deep blue sea - Wait for your Honey Boy - He'll come back to you..." Cover image (with a blue-tinted photograph of an unidentified soldier and his girl) by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: Soldiers charging on a battlefield. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Honey Girl." No biographical information was found for MILDRED PHYLLIS SHERMAN.
10W-2 Wait Till You Get Them Up In The Air Boys - Two pieces of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President, NYC - 1919) with words by Lew Brown (Portrayed by Ernest Borgnine in the 1956 biopic THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE) and music by Albert Von Tilzer (Older brother of Will Von Tilzer): "Sometimes you try to love a girl and she says 'no' to you - It makes you feel so blue - But there's nothing you can do - You take her for an autoride and start that mushy talk - But if she doesn't like it - She get's out and starts to walk - They've fooled us ever since the world began - But listen boys - I've got a little plan - Wait till you get them up in the air, boys - Wait till you get them up in their - You can make them hug and squeeze you, too - For if they don't - Just say you won't come down until they do - Wait till you get them up in the clouds, boys - There won't be any one to watch you there - You can loop the loop till she can hardly get her breath - It isn't hard to reason with a girl who's scared to death - Wait till you get them up in the air , boys..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: Two women in a biplane waving. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Alcoholic Blues," "Turkestan," Frenchy Come To Yankee Land" and "Smile And The World Smiles With You."
10W-3 Wake Up, America - Three pieces of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1916) with words by George Graff, Jr. and music by Jack Glogau ("This is the song that inspired all America"): "Have we forgotten America - The battles our fathers fought? - Are we ashamed of our history - In the peace that fighting brought? - Must we be laughed at, America - While our swords turn weak with rust - Is the blood of our fathers wasted? - And how have we treated their trust? - Is Columbia the gem of the ocean? Is Old Glory the pride of the Free? - Let's forget ev'ry selfish emotion - United forever let's be! - Wake up, America - If we are called to war - Are we prepared to give our lives - For our sweethearts and our wives? - Are our mothers and our homes worth fighting for ? - Let us pray, God, for peace, but peace with honor - But let's be ready to answered duty's call - So when Old Glory stands unfurled - Let it mean to all the world - America is ready..." Cover image by an unknown artist: An oversized figure of Uncle Sam places a ship in the water with artillery and soldiers in the background. The 'World's Best Music Folios" from Leo Feist are advertised on the back cover.
10W-4 Watch, Hope And Wait Little Girl (I'm/Till Coming Back To You) - Two pieces (various sizes and covers) of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President - 1918) with words by Lew Brown (Portrayed by Ernest Borgnine in the 1956 biopic THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE) and music by Will Clayton: "Had a little time today - So I write these lines to say - I am feeling fine - Soldier life for mine - Hard work and some play - Underneath the pale moon light - Thinking of you ev'ry night - Have no fear sweetheart dear - And while I'm over here - Watch little girl and hope little girl, and wait little girl for me - Pray little girl, ev'ry day, little girl, while I'm across the sea - Give my love to Ma - Say 'Hello' to Pa - And you know I'm looking, dear, to know just how you are - So write little girl, ev'ry night little girl - And promise you'll be true - And I'll fight, little girl with all my might, little girl, 'till I come back to you..." Cover images by artist E. E. Walton: A woman sits at a window (with a letter in her hand) with a scene of a soldier, on guard, in the background mist/ and an unknown artist: A young woman in a sailor suit framed by a red, white and blue heart. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "After You've Gone," "Oh! Frenchy" and "There's Nobody Home But Me."
10W-5 Way Down There, A Dixie Boy Is Missing - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1917) with words by Stanley Murphy and music by Harry Tierney (Featured by Belle Baker - with a cover photograph): "Over there where shot and shell are screaming - Wounded boy from Dixieland lay dreaming - In his dream he seemed to be down home in Tennessee - The nurse came 'round to dress his wounded head - The Dixie boy looked up a her and said - Away down in Tennessee - A dream so fair came over me - I dreamt I heard them singing in the pale moonlight - 'Where is our wan'dring boy tonight' - My mother dear was standing near - Her head bowed down to hide a tear - The neighbors gathered 'round the dear old lady fair - They all knelt down and offered up a prayer - For a Dixie Boy - They're missing way down there..." Cover image (with a blue-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillian Belle Baker ) by an unknown artist: An inset scene of a suburban home with a picket fence backed by battle scenes. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Sweet Little Buttercup." According to Wikipedia: BELLE BAKER (December 25, 1893 or 1895, New York City, New York - April 29, 1957, Los Angeles, California) was an American singer and actress. Popular throughout the 1910s and 1920s, Baker introduced a number of ragtime and torch songs including Irving Berlin's 'Blue Skies' and 'My Yiddishe Mama.' She performed in the Ziegfeld Follies and introduced a number of Irving Berlin's songs. An early adapter to radio, Baker hosted her own radio show during the 1930s. Eddie Cantor called her 'Dinah Shore, Patti Page, Peggy Lee, Judy Garland all rolled into one.' "
10W-6 We're After You - A single piece of sheet music (Jeff Branen Publisher, NYC - 1917) with words by Jeff Branen and music by Evans Lloyd: "The town is full of soldiers, see them here and there - They're headed for the other side, you all know where - They're singing as they march along - It's just another soldier song - Join in the chorus, ev'ry body loud and strong - We're after you, two million strong, you bet - And there are five or ten or twenty millions yet - To fight for dear old France, that gave us Lafayette - Better beat it, Bunco Bill because we're after you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers charging toward the head of Kaiser Wilhelm (framed by a setting moon or sun). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Valley Rose" and "All That I Want Is In Ireland." According to Wikipedia: Wilhelm II or William II (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) - nicknamed "Bunco Bill" in this song - was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, three notable contemporary relations being his first cousins King George V of the United Kingdom, founder of the House of Windsor, Marie of Romania, Queen consort of Romania and the Czarina Alix of Hesse, consort of his second cousin Tsar Nicholas II of the House of Romanov, the last ruler of the Russian Empire before the Russian Revolution of 1917 which deposed the monarchy. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose 'New Course' in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to the First World War. Bombastic and impetuous, he sometimes made tactless pronouncements on sensitive topics without consulting his ministers, culminating in a disastrous Daily Telegraph interview that cost him most of his power in 1908. His top generals, Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, dictated policy during the First World War with little regard for the civilian government. An ineffective war leader, he lost the support of the army, abdicated in November 1918, and fled to exile in the Netherlands..."
10W-7 We're All For Uncle Sam - A single piece of sheet music (Hamilton S. Gordon Publishing - NYC - 1916) with words by James Wells and music by Walter J. Pond ("From Shore To Shore, The Country O'er - We're All For Uncle Sam"): "Our Uncle Sam is a grand old man - He's treated us all right - And we're loyal to him, ev'ry one - And for him we would fight - Though from Russia, England, Spain or France, or from Germany we came - Our home is here and we'll give a cheer - For our Uncle Sam just the same - We're all for Uncle Samuel - A noble chap is he - no other place can e'er compare with the land of the free - We love its hills, its rocks and rills - From Maine to Alabam' - From shore to shore, the country o'er - We're all for Uncle Sam..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Uncle Sam backed by the map of the United States, the American eagle and shield. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Loving Time," "Put Your Moccasins In My Tent," "Down in Alabam' " and "Dreaming Dreams of You."
10W-8 We're All Going Calling On The Kaiser - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc. Music Publishing Company, NYC - 1918) with words by Jack Caddigan and music by James A. Brennan (Arranged by Calvin Grooms): "Oh! John, pack up your kit and come along with me - There's a party 'cross the sea - And they need your company to grace it - Oh! John, kiss her goodbye, you know that she'll be true - It's near the time to fall in line - With a million more like you - And we're all going calling on the Kaiser - For we've got to teach the Kaiser to be wiser - And we'll bring him something good - A Kimono made of wood - We'll wish him well with shot and shell - The son of a gun we'll give him H---! - We're all going calling on the Kaiser - The English, French, The Yanks and Irish, too - Don't forget what Sherman said - That's where he'll be when he's dead - For we're all going calling on the Kaiser..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: From his balcony, the Kaiser is surprised by the Allied troops marching into Berlin. Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SING song folio ("They can't stop our singing army! Send a copy of this book...to your Sammy 'over here' of 'over there' Send one to your Jackie afloat or ashore..."). According to Wikipedia: Wilhelm II or William II (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, three notable contemporary relations being his first cousins King George V of the United Kingdom, founder of the House of Windsor, Marie of Romania, Queen consort of Romania and the Czarina Alix of Hesse, consort of his second cousin Tsar Nicholas II of the House of Romanov, the last ruler of the Russian Empire before the Russian Revolution of 1917 which deposed the monarchy. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose 'New Course' in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to the First World War. Bombastic and impetuous, he sometimes made tactless pronouncements on sensitive topics without consulting his ministers, culminating in a disastrous Daily Telegraph interview that cost him most of his power in 1908. His top generals, Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, dictated policy during the First World War with little regard for the civilian government. An ineffective war leader, he lost the support of the army, abdicated in November 1918, and fled to exile in the Netherlands..."
10W-9 We're All With You Dear America - A single piece of sheet music (SandL Music Publishing Co., NYC - 1919) with words and music by Lew Schaeffer and Phil Leventhal ("Writers of JUST FOR THE SAKE OF YOUR MOTHER, LET US SAY A PRAYER FOR DADDY, etc."): "We're with you, strong for you Uncle Sammy - With that spirit of do or die - We are surely with you dear Sammy - We'll be there with you steady eye - We're with you right or wrong - One hundred million strong - We're all with you dear America - And we'll do just as you say - We're all with you dear American - Now that you are in this fray - O'er the top we will go for you - Even if what Sherman said was true - We're all with you dear America - Three cheers for the Red, White and Blue..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Uncle Sam writing on a blackboard while a group of men cheer.
10W-10 We're Building A Bridge To Berlin - A single piece of sheet music (Oliver Ditson Company, Boston - 1918) with words by C.K. Gordon and music by Bart E. Grady ("The Mastersingers' War Song" - Dedicated "To Charles M. Schwab and the Ship builders of America"): "There's a land of strife and hatred o'er the Rhine - That's where the Yanks will go - To land the knock-out blow - For Democracy has bid them break the line - To civilize the country of the foe - Berlin's their destination at the other end - It's the city that they're driving for - Twenty million fighters Uncle Sam can send - Beneath the Stars and Stripes to end the war - It's the flag the Hun can't beat - It's the flag that won't retreat - We're building a bridge to Berlin - To Berlin - To Berlin - There'll be Yankee Doodle doings when the boys come thro' " Cover image by an unknown photographer and artist: A color-tinted photograph of ship builders flanked by color sketches of a ship builder and a sailor. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "A Long Fight, A Strong Fight," "Come On, America," "God Bless Him! My Boy," "In The U.S. Radio," "We're With You, Boys, We're With You," etc.
10W-11 We're Coming From Cody - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with words and music by Jack Yellen and Private Harry Wessel ("Official Song of the THIRTY-FOURTH DIVISION, U.S. ARMY - Camp Cody, Deming, New Mexico - The Sandstorm Division"): "Oh I've done squads east and I've done squads west - And I've done squads north and south - And I've kick'd and cuss'd while I swallow'd dust - Through my ears and nose and mouth - And I've curs'd the day when I roam'd away - From the fields of hay up north - But I'm glad right now that I left the plow - And I join'd the Thirty Fourth - 'Cause I got a hunch we'll soon be on our way - And the whole wide world is goin' to hear us say - We're coming from Cody, from wild and woolly Cody - And we're going over there - And when we get over there will be some fun - Oh what we won't do to that son of a Hun, son of a Hun - So send the word to Kaiser William - He'd better get down on his German knee - Because we're coming from Cody from wild and woolly Cody - To fight for our Liberty..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: Soldiers marching in the foreground backed by a sketch of a battle scene. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When We Meet In The Sweet Bye And Bye. According to Wikipedia: "Camp Cody, located 3 miles northwest of Deming, New Mexico, was a World War I Army camp from 1916 to 1919. During World War I, Camp Cody was an army training camp for the National Guard units from North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota and Iowa. Soldiers received basic training there before leaving for the war in France. The different National Guard units together formed the 34th Infantry Division and were nicknamed the "Sandstorm Division," a name based on the camp's desert climate...During the US-Mexican Border War the camp was named 'Camp Brooks.' Then with the beginning of the First World War it was renamed 'Camp Deming.' The camp was renamed again shortly after the death of the famous buffalo hunter and showman, William F. Cody (1846-1917), better known as 'Buffalo Bill Cody.' The camp was open from July 16, 1916 until the early months of 1919."
10W-12 We're Custer's Soldier Boys - A single piece of sheet music (Camp Custer Music Co., Battle Creek, Michigan - 1917) with words and music by Vernon T. Stevens (with cover photo of Major General Joseph T. Dickman): "In fourteen hundred and ninety two, Columbus sailed the ocean blue - And found for us a land we call our own - And since that great old day, when they named it U.S.A. - Men from ev'ry nation called it home - In time of strife and need, we have shown by act and deed - That we're loyal to the old Red, White and Blue - And now if fight we must, for a cause we know that's just - We'll show them what a soldier boy can do - For we're Camp Custer's fighting soldier boys - We're Yankee Doodle Doos - And when we start a fighting in that foreign land - There is goin' to be a hot time raised by Uncle Sam - And we will give them all they want boys, 'till the Kaiser has to groan - And when we lick the Hun, our duty will be done - And we'll all come marching home..." Cover image (with brown-tinted inset publicity photograph of Major General Joseph T. Dickman) by an unknown artist: A soldier (with his rifle) backed by two American flags, the seal of the United States and military aircraft flying over marching troops. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "I Want To Go Back To Birmingham." According to Wikipedia: "Joseph Theodore Dickman (October 6, 1857 - October 23, 1927) was born in Dayton, Ohio. He attended the University of Dayton and graduated in the class of 1871. In 1881 he graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and was commissioned in the 3rd Cavalry...Dickman was given command of the 3rd Infantry Division in November 1917, at the onset of World War I. He deployed 3rd Division to France aboard the Leviathan at noon, on March 4, 1918. He was the 3rd Division Commander at Chateau-Thierry in May 1918 and was made famous at the Second Battle of the Marne in July 1918. While allied forces on both flanks retreated, the 3rd Division stood fast in the face of fantastic enemy offensives, which led to their moniker, 'The Rock of the Marne.' Dickman commanded I Corps from October to November 1918, to include the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Third Army was established under the command of Dickman by General John J. Pershing in France to advance to the Rheine and hold the Coblenz bridgehead, then prepare to serve after the war as the Army of Occupation of the Rhineland. The Third Army would have become the Army of Occupation whether or not the enemy signed the peace agreement. American fighting units not sent home were consolidated under Third Army and prepared to attack if Germany did not accept the terms of peace. The United States itself was not to sign the agreement but remained technically at war with Germany for two more years. Dickman returned from World War I to serve as President of the Tactics and Organization Board, which reported on lessons learned during the war from April-July 1919. Dickman served as Commanding General of the VIII Corps Area from 1919-21 He retired on October 6, 1921. He was later recalled to preside over postwar-Army downsizing board in 1922. His memoirs were published in 1927. He died in Washington, D.C., on October 23, 1927..."
10W-13 We're Fighting For Liberty - A single piece of sheet music (C. Walter Wallace Publishing, Williamsport, Pennsylvania - 1918) with words and music by C. Walter Wallace ("The Noted Blind Photo Organist - Member National Association of Organists" - with cover photograph): "Now our Khaki boys are 'cross the ocean - Soon they'll have the Germans in commotion - Ev'ry Kaiser's son will soon be on the run from break of day until the set of sun - And they will be sorry they are in it - For we'll keep them jumping ev'ry minute - For our Yankey boys are not a set of toys - Just watch them spoil the Kaiser's joys - Oh we are going, yes we are going, to fight for our democracy - From Alabama, Louisiana, the Carolinas and Kentucky - From the New Englands and Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Tennessee - Oh we are going by the millions and their submarines can't stop us for we'll fight for liberty..." Cover image (with brown-tinted inset publicity photograph of organist C. Walter Wallace) by an unknown artist: Soldiers marching. Missouri State University offers a scholarship in memory of the noted blind organist C. WALTER WALLACE. No other biographical information for C.WALTER WALLACE was found.
10W-14 We're Going Over - Four pieces of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1917) with words and music by Andrew B. Sterling, Bernie Grossman and Arthur Lange: "The Major wrote the chorus but he fell down on the verse - The Col'nel tried to write it but he only made it worse - They called in Captain Cuttle but he missed it by a mile - So they left it to the Sergeant of the file - Said he, 'we need no verse at all to this here little thing' - So they went and taught the Sammies how to sing - We're going over, we're going over - They want to settle up that fuss and they put it up on us - So what do we care - So what do we care - We'll go sailing 'cross the foam - And we'll show them what the Yankee doodle boys can do - Then we'll all come marching home..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A group of cheering soldiers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When The Parson Hands The Wedding Band From Me To Mandy Lee," "Before The World Began, " "After The War Is Over, Will There Be Any Home Sweet Home?" and "There's A Service Flag Flying At Our House."
10W-15 We're Going O-V-E-R The Top And (We'll Be Marching Thro' Berlin In The Morning) - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Andrew B. Sterling, Bernie Grossman and Arthur Lange ("By the writers of WE'RE GOING OVER and AMERICA, HERE'S MY BOY" - Featured by Jessie Grey - with cover photograph): "The boys out in the trenches have a song you never heard - They wrote it going over, ev'ry man put in a word - The Colonel sent a copy just to give us all a chance - To see just how it goes - The melody just flows - And here's the song they sing all over France - We're going over the top, We're going over the top - We're going O - V - E - R, over the top - When they hear that Yankee cheer - Then they'll know that the gang's all here - And we'll never stop, (I'll bet you) we'll never stop - Until we all go over the top - While the boys back home are waltzing with the girls we left behind - We'll be marching thro' Berlin in the morning..." Cover image (with blue-tinted full-length publicity photograph of vaudevillian Jessie Grey) by artist William Austin Starmer: An American tank fires into a German trench. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When The Parson Hands The Wedding Band From Me To Mandy Lee." "Dainty" JESSIE GREY was a popular pianist/singer/actress in vaudeville. No other biographical information was found for JESSIE GREY.
10W-16 We're On Our Way To France To Fight For Liberty - A single piece of sheet music (Seidel Music Publishing Co., Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana - 1917) with words by D.M. Buchanan and music by Ned Clay ("Patriotic Song" with insert photograph of D.M. Honigfeld - soldier): "America is now aroused - The call from France we hear - Ten million strong, we're marching on - We're coming with good cheer - Your comrades, France - We're proud to be - We'll fight for liberty - And when its o'er we'll leave your shore - Your friends we'll always be - We're on our way to help you - We're sailing right along - We're going to fight by your side - Until we right your wrong - And when the fight is over - Your friends we'll always be - And we will teach our children's children - We fought for liberty..." Cover image (with blue-tinted inset publicity photograph of singer and soldier David M. Honigfeld 86th Division) by an unknown artist: Soldiers marching backed by the Statue of Liberty. No additional biographical information was found for DAVID M. HONIGFELD.
10W-17 We Are Ready - A single piece of sheet music (National Music Company, Chicago - 1917) with words and music by Angie T. Curtis: Americans in heart and in mind are we - Though many have come from over the sea - To protect our lands from without and within - Shall be our task till right shall win - We are ready to give - We are ready to go - We will stand by the flag 'gainst any foe - We are ready to work - We are ready to fight - And to die for our country and the right..." Cover image by and unknown photographer: Blue-tinted photographs of cavalry troops marching down a city street/A small dog sitting in a straw hat. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Promise Me."
10W-18 We Are Uncle Sammie's Little Nephews - A single piece of sheet music (Sgt. Bernard Satz Publisher - Camp Devens, Massachusetts - 1917) with words by Sgt. Bernard Satz and music by Lt. W. E. Sheaffer (Bandmaster Depot Brigade Band, Camp Devens, Massachusetts) - "A Real Yankee Fighting Song - Full of Pep" (Featured by the Two French Fiddlers - Sgts. Satz and Dufault"): "A bunch of Yankee lanky lads they sneaked across the sea - And no one knew they started till they hit Gay Old Paree - The pretty girls from that dear burg just followed them around - And the boys all started singing this - As they pass'd thro' ev'ry town - We are Uncle Sammie's little nephews - And he is our dear old Uncle Sam - He has brought us lots of guns and cannon - So now we can fight on sea or land - He just sent a million 'cross the waters - To show Kaiser Bill what they could do - Yankee Doodle has the noodle - And a dandy big, fat boodle - And the Yanks showed just what they could do..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A blue-tinted publicity photograph of the 151st DEPOT BRIGADE BAND, BUGLE, FIFE and DRUM CORPS - CAMP DEVENS, MASSACHUSETTS. According to Wikipedia: "...The area known as Devens today was originally called CAMP DEVENS, established on September 5, 1917 as a temporary cantonment for training soldiers during World War I. It was a reception center for war selectees and became a demobilization center after the war. Two divisions (the 76th and the 12th) were activated and trained at Devens during the war. Robert Goddard briefly used the post for his rocket operations in 1929. The camp became a permanent installation in 1931 and was named Fort Devens the following year. A few years later, Fort Devens Army Airfield was established..."
10W-19 We're With You, Boys, We're With You! - A single piece of sheet music (Oliver Ditson Company, Boston - 1918) with words by L.M. Townsend and music by J.B. Walter ("Red, White and Blue Series - New Patriotic and War Songs"): "All of us are in this war - At home and 'Over There' - And all of us are fighting for the thing that's fair and square - "Over Here' we pledge again - That we will faithful be - To all our gallant fighting men, so far across the sea! - We're with you, Boys, we're with you - When far away you fight! - We're mighty blue for lack of you - But don't forget we're back of you - We're with you, Boys, we're with you - To prove the might of Right! - So don't forget we're back of you - With heart and mind and might!" Cover image by an unknown artist: Red, white and blue ribbon across the middle of the cover. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "A Long Fight, A Strong Fight," "Come On, America," "Your Boy And My Boy," etc.
10W-20 We Don't Know Where We're Going, But We're On Our Way - A single piece of sheet music (Will Rossiter - The Chicago Publisher - 1917) with words and music by W. R. Williams ("The American TIPPERARY - The Boys Are Singing it...It's on the Phonograph - It's on the Piano Rolls - It's in the Air - It's Everywhere - The Bands and Orchestras are playing it" by "Your Favorite Song Writer - Composer of AMERICA TO-DAY, etc."): "Good-bye ev'rybody - My country's calling me - The time has come when ev'ryone must fight for liberty - Our Uncle Sam's in trouble - Today I got a hunch - That I'm all fit, to do my bit - And so I joined the bunch - We don't know where we're going, but we're on our way - We're not out to make a showing for the U.S.A. - There's goin' to be a hot time for us, some fine day - We don't know where we're going, but we're on our way..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A blue -tinted photograph of soldiers marching down a city street framed by a blue-flower border. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Somewhere, Somewhere in France."
10W-21 We Don't Want The Bacon (What We Want Is A Piece Of The Rhine!) - Two pieces (various sizes) of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by "Kid" Howard Carr, Harry Russell and Jimmie Havens ("Dedicated to Lieut. Joseph Foley, U.S.A."): "If you have read your hist'ry, then your bound to know - That we have always held our own with any foe - We've always brought the bacon home - No matter what they've done - But we don't want the bacon - We're out to get the Hun - We don't want the bacon - We don't want the bacon - What we want is a piece of the Rhine - We'll crown Bill the Kaiser with a bottle of Budweiser - We'll have a wonderful time - Old Wilhelm the Gross will shout 'Vas iss Los' - When we hit that Hindenburg Line - Fine! - We don't want the bacon - We don't want the bacon - What we want is a piece of the Rhine..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier uses his bayonet to carve a piece of bacon as an alarmed (miniature) Kaiser Wilhelm stands on top. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Dreaming Of Home Sweet Home," "Caroline, I'm Coming Back To You," "Three Wonderful Letters From Home," etc. According to Wikipedia: Wilhelm II or William II (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, three notable contemporary relations being his first cousins King George V of the United Kingdom, founder of the House of Windsor, Marie of Romania, Queen consort of Romania and the Czarina Alix of Hesse, consort of his second cousin Tsar Nicholas II of the House of Romanov, the last ruler of the Russian Empire before the Russian Revolution of 1917 which deposed the monarchy. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose 'New Course' in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to the First World War. Bombastic and impetuous, he sometimes made tactless pronouncements on sensitive topics without consulting his ministers, culminating in a disastrous Daily Telegraph interview that cost him most of his power in 1908. His top generals, Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, dictated policy during the First World War with little regard for the civilian government. An ineffective war leader, he lost the support of the army, abdicated in November 1918, and fled to exile in the Netherlands..."
10W-22 We Stand For Peace While Others War - A single piece of sheet music (Will Rossiter - The Chicago Publisher - 1914) with words and music by W.R. Williams ("This PEACE POEM was inspired by President Wilson's appeal to Americans to remain neutral in thought and deed" by the "writer of the famous song I'D LOVE TO LIVE IN LOVELAND, etc.): "The world's turned back a thousand years, since war! is now the cry - The smile of Progress turns to tears - The helpless wonder why? - There's nothing worth the toll of life - Before or since the flood - Is so called 'Honor' worth the price - When rivers flow with blood? - We stand for peace, while others war - Tho' war we know is sin - But Uncle Sam's a neutral pow'r - And we must stand by him - We can't take sides for all the world will suffer for this wrong - And we'll pray that ev'ry nation, right their wrongs by arbitration - And that 'Home Sweet Home' will be their National Song..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: A black and white photograph of President Woodrow Wilson framed by doves of peace. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Down At The Barbecue." The inside front cover includes a full-page reproduction of "President Wilson's Appeal to Americans" speech ("...Shall we not resolve to put upon ourselves the restraint which will bring to our people the happiness and the great and lasting influence for peace we covet fro them?" According to the HISTORY CHANNEL Web Site: "As World War I erupts in Europe, President Woodrow Wilson formally proclaims the neutrality of the United States, a position that a vast majority of Americans favored, on August 4, 1914. Wilson's initial hope that America could be 'impartial in thought as well as in action' was soon compromised by Germany's attempted quarantine of the British Isles. Britain was one of America's closest trading partners, and tension arose between the United States and Germany when several U.S. ships traveling to Britain were damaged or sunk by German mines. In February 1915, Germany announced unrestricted warfare against all ships, neutral or otherwise, that entered the war zone around Britain. One month later, Germany announced that a German cruiser had sunk the William P. Frye, a private American vessel that was transporting grain to England when it disappeared. President Wilson was outraged, but the German government apologized and called the attack an unfortunate mistake. In early May 1915, several New York newspapers published a warning by the German embassy in Washington that Americans traveling on British or Allied ships in war zones did so at their own risk. The announcement was placed on the same page as an advertisement for the imminent sailing of the British-owned Lusitania ocean liner from New York to Liverpool. On May 7, the Lusitania was torpedoed without warning by a German submarine just off the coast of Ireland. Of the nearly 2,000 passengers, 1,201 were killed, including 128 Americans. It was revealed that the Lusitania was carrying about 173 tons of war munitions for Britain, which the Germans cited as further justification for the attack. The United States eventually sent three notes to Berlin protesting the action, and Germany apologized and pledged to end unrestricted submarine warfare. In November, however, a U-boat sunk an Italian liner without warning, killing 272 people, including 27 Americans. Public opinion in the United States began to turn irrevocably against Germany..."
10W-23 We Want Our Daddy Dear, Back Home (Hello Central, Give Me France) - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1918) with words by James M. Reilly and music by Harry De Costa ("Baby Ballad" by the "Writer of THE LITTLE GREY MOTHER WHO WAITS ALL ALONE etc."): "The little girl woke when the dawn was near - And the nurse said 'See your new brother, dear' - She went to her mother with wond'ring stare - And their thoughts were of Dad who's 'over there' - The little girl crept down the stairs all alone - And this love call she sent through the telephone - Hello, Central, give me France - I want to talk to Daddy dear - Because I'd like to tell him while I get the chance - The stork brought a brand new baby here - Won't you say that its 'me' - And he'll answer - You'll see - So hurry, please, and get him on the phone - Hello, Central, give me France - 'Cause we want our Daddy dear back home...." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A color-tinted photograph of six-year old Aida Horton - Greater Vitagraph Star ("Reproduced by Permission") - portraying a young girl on the telephone. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Evening Brings Rest And You." According to the IMDb Web Site: "Aida Horton was born on June 6, 1912 in New York City, New York, USA. She was an actress, known for Compliments of the Season (1918), The Heart of a Gypsy (1919) and An Alabaster Box (1917). She died on November 10, 1983 in Inverness, Florida."
10W-24 We'll Build A Little Home In The U.S.A - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1915) with words by Howard Wesley and music by Charles Elbert ("The Hit of F. Ziegfeld Jr.'s ZIEGFELD FOLLIES - As Introduced and Sung by Bernard Granville" - with cover photograph): "A hundred thousand refugees have fled from the war - Weary and worn, tired and torn - Houses burning, no returning, hearts overflow - They're grieving at leaving wit no place to go - As they toil on their way - Now I seem to hear them say - We will build a little home in the U.S.A. - In the land of the stripes and stars - We'll leave behind us the sorrows and cares of war - And the Kaisers, the Kings and Czars - Uncle Sam spreads his arms across the ocean - And I know he'll never turn us away - So we'll sail across the foam - And we'll build a little home in the U.S.A." Cover image (with a color-tinted inset publicity photograph of vaudevillian Bernard Granville) by an unknown artist: Uncle Sam with outstretched arms welcoming European refugees. Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers include: "When It's Moonlight In Mayo," "Elaine, My Moving Picture Queen," "In The War Of Hearts And Eyes," etc. According to the IMDb Web Site: "BERNARD 'BUNNY' GRANVILLE was born on July 4, 1886 in Chicago, Illinois, USA. He was an actor, known for Love a la Mode (1930), The Hangover (1931) and The Doorway to Hell (1930). He was married to Rosina Timponi, Dorothy Dayne and Eleanor Christie. He died on October 5, 1936 in Hollywood, California, USA..." His daughter was film star Bonita Granville ("Nance Drew," "These Three," Hitler's Children," etc.).
10W-25 We'll Bring Our Heroes Home - A single piece of sheet music (Theodore Presser Co., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - 1919) with words and music by Elizabeth Clayton Bacon ("Official Victory Loan Campaign Song of the 3rd. Federal Reserve District - Approved by Frank R. Wilson, National Director of Publicity, U.S. Treasury Dept."): "Our boys have fought for you and me - They've bled and died for us - And now it's up to us to see - What we can do and must - We'll bring those heroes homeward - Who've fought for Victory - They've won the fray and now we'll pay for glorious liberty - We'll back this Loan of Victory - We will help to clear the debt away - Our boys have died to keep us free - It's now our chance to pay - They said the Yankee couldn't do it - Now they know we have the pep, pep, pep - We'll get behind the Victory Loan - We will fall in line and help to pay..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A black and white sketch of an elderly woman holding a service flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Send Me A Rose From The Homeland," "Long Wave To Old Glory," "The Song Of Victory," etc. According to Wikipedia: "...Peak US indebtedness was in August 1919 at a value of $25,596,000,000 for Liberty Bonds, Victory Notes, War Savings Certificates, and other government securities. As early as 1922 the possibility that the war debt could not be paid in full within the expected schedule was raised, and that debt rescheduling may be needed. In 1921 the Treasury Department began issuing short term notes maturing in three to five years to repay the Victory Loan. According to the Massachusetts Historical Society, 'Because the first World War cost the federal government more than $30 billion (by way of comparison, total federal expenditures in 1913 were only $970 million), these programs became vital as a way to raise funds.' The first three bonds, and the Victory Loan, were partially retired during the course of the 1920s but the majority of these bonds were simply re-financed through other government securities. The Victory Loan, which was to mature in May 1923, was retired with money raised by short term treasury notes which matured after three to five years and issued at 90 day intervals until sufficient funds were raised in 1921...Through the selling of 'Liberty bonds,' the government raised around $17 billion for the war effort. Considering that there were approximately 100 million Americans during that time, each American, on average, raised $170 on Liberty bonds..."
10W-26 We'll Carry The Star Spangled Banner Thru The Trenches - Two pieces of sheet music (Lang and Mendelsohn, Boston, Massachusetts - 1917) with words and music by Daisy M. Erd ("Chief Yeoman, U.S.N.R.F. - Boston Navy Yard" - "This is to certify that every copy of the musical compositions of DAISY M. PRATT ERD, who is Chief Yeoman in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, which bears this certificate, pays a royalty to the Navy Relief Society, as a contribution from her to the funds of the Society." - Charles O'Neill, Admiral U.S.N. Retired/President Navy Relief Society): "Rise to the call of the bugle - Rise to the call of the just - Boys in the trenches are praying - To aid and help them you must - Come comrades rise and go to them - Take them Old Glory so fair - We'll fight for France, our great Ally - The Stars and Stripes shall lead them over there - We'll carry the Star Spangled Banner - Thru the trenches of good old France - Then onward Christian soldiers - Forward we all advance - Our cause is right - Our hearts are light - We march to victory - To France we shall go - Ever crushing the foe - And we'll carry the Star Spangled Banner..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A silhouette of soldiers on the battlefield. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I Am Sending Criss Cross Kisses To Some One's Soldier Boy," "I'm Just A Lonesome Boy And I'm Looking For A Lonesome Girl," "Down In Cranberry Town," etc.
10W-27 We'll Do Our Share (While You're Over There) - Two pieces of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President - NYC - 1918) with words by Lew Brown (Portrayed by Ernest Borgnine in the biopic THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE - 20th Century -Fox - 1956) and Al Harriman and music by Jack Egan: "Ev'ry one wants a little sunshine - And we can make it come to stay - If we all help at one time - We'll drive the clouds away - Mothers are smiling tho' they're longing - For those who are away - I know of one who wrote to her son - Hear what she had to say - I'm over here- You're over there - And ev'ry night - I say this prayer - Though I cannot be there - To bear your troubles and care - I hope you'll do your share - It will comfort me so - You'll always be my baby to me - In dreams, I seem to see you back on my knee - You know the vict'ry must be won - And it's up to you my son - We'll do our share while your over there..." Cover image by artist E. E. Walton: An elderly mother is observed praying through her window - A red service flag hangs above. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I May Be Gone For A Long, Long Time," "Give Me The Moonlight, Give Me The Girl," etc.
10W-28 We'll Knock The Heligo-Into Heligo Out Of Heligoland! - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by John O' Brien and music by Theodore Morse ("Dedicated to the Men of the American Fleet" - Featured by Hudler, Stein and Philips): "The bo'sn blew and a Yankee crew had stopped to hear him say - 'My lads get underway - We're leaving port today, Hooray! - We're going to meet the German fleet and blow them inside out' - Each sailor boy was filled with joy and all began to shout - We're on our way to Heligoland to get the Kaiser's goat - In a good old Yankee boat - Up the Keil canal we'll float - I'm a son-of-a-gun If I see a Hun - I'll make him understand - We'll knock the Heligo into Heligo, out of Heligoland..." Cover image (including a blue-tinted inset publicity photograph of vaudevillians Hudler, Stein and Phillips) by an unknown artist: A confused and startled Kaiser Wilhelm is chased to a high cliff by the U.S. Navy. Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SING song folio ("They can't stop our singing army! Send a copy of this book...to your Sammy 'over here' of 'over there' Send one to your Jackie afloat or ashore..."). According to Wikipedia: "Heligoland (German: Helgoland) is a small German archipelago in the North Sea. Formerly Danish and British possessions, the islands (population 1,127) are located in the Heligoland Bight (part of the German Bight) in the southeastern corner of the North Sea. These islands are the only German islands not in the immediate vicinity of the mainland and are approximately three hours' sailing time from Cuxhaven at the mouth of the River Elbe. In addition to German, the local population, who are ethnic Frisians, speak the Heligolandic dialect of the North Frisian language called Halunder. Heligoland was formerly called Heyligeland, or 'holy land,' possibly due to the island's long association with the god Forseti...Under the German Empire, the islands became a major naval base, and during the First World War the civilian population was evacuated to the mainland. The first naval engagement of the war, the Battle of Heligoland Bight, was fought nearby in the first month of the war. The islanders returned in 1918, but during the Nazi era the naval base was reactivated. Lager Helgoland, the Nazi labor camp on Alderney, was named after the island..." HUDLER, STEIN AND PHILLIPS were a popular song and dance team in vaudeville (Act: "Steps of Harmony"). No additional biographical information was found for HUDLER, STEIN AND PHILLIPS.
10W-29 We'll Never Let Our Old Flag Fall - Two pieces of sheet music (John Hanna/Chappell and Co., NYC - 1915) with words by Albert E. MacNutt and music by M.F. Kelly: "Stars and Stripes, the emblem of our nation - Grand old flag of strength and unity - Best old flag that waves in all Creation - Our Stars and Stripes, the flag of Liberty - Stars and Stripes, our flag of grace and beauty - Each brave heart will answer to thy call - Hand in hand, we stand to do our duty - And we'll never let the old flag fall - We'll never let our flag fall - For we love it best of all - We don't want to fight to show our might - But when we start, we'll fight, fight, fight - In peace or war, our voices ring - 'My country tis of thee,' we sing - At the sound of her call - We'll show them all - We'll never let our old flag fall..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: An American eagle, shield and laurel wreath. Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers include; "Knitting," "Roses Of Picardy," "Laddie In Khaki (The Girl Who Waits At Home)," etc.
10W-30 We Will Win In The War of '17 - A single piece of sheet music (Innella-Pitman Music Co., Boston, Massachusetts - 1917) with words and music by George B. Pitman (Name misspelled on cover - "Pitinan" - "Writer of I FOUND YOU AMONG THE ROSES"): "Battles were lost and battles won - In other years gone by - In our country's wars many a mother's son - Went fighting to win or die - and hist'ry tells us today - Of vict'ries won by the U.S.A. - We were at war in the year of seventy six - Fighting for liberty - A mid shot and shell many brave heroes fell - But we won a great victory - In the war of ninety eight - Now I'm proud to relate we were the victor and all was serene - And our grandfathers won in the war of sixty one - And we will win in the war of seventeen..." Cover image by artist E.S. Fisher: An American eagle clutching arrows and an olive branch framed by a glowing sun. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Just For You Dear" and "There's A Rose That Is Blooming In Ireland (And I Call Her My Wild Irish Rose)."
10W-31 Wee, Wee Marie (Will You Do Zis For Me) - A single piece of sheet music (McCarthy and Fisher, Inc., Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words by Alfred Bryan and Joe McCarthy and music ("Respectfully Dedicated to Our Pal Ed Morton" ) by Fred Fisher (Portrayed by S.Z. "Cuddles" Sakall in the Fred Fisher biopic OH, YOU BEAUTIFUL DOLL - 20th Century-Fox - 1949): "Poor Johnny's heart went pitty, pitty pat - Somewhere in sunny France - He met a girl by chance with ze naughty glance - She looked just like a kitty, kitty cat - She loved to dance and play - Tho' he learned no French when he left the trench - He knew well enough to say - Wee, wee Marie, will you do zis for me - Wee wee Marie, then I'll do zat for you - I love your eyes, they make me feel so spoony - You'll drive me loony, you're teasing me - Why can't we parlez-vous like other sweethearts do - I want a kiss or two from Ma Cherie - Wee, wee Marie if you'll do zis for me - Then I'll do zat for you, wee wee Marie..." Cover image by artist Andrea De Takacs: A soldier communicating (with sign language) with a French woman. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Kisses (The Sweetest Kisses Of All)." According to the ARCHEOPHONE RECORDS Web Site: "...Eddie Morton made a name for himself as a vaudevillian specialty act from about 1903 until 1910, but from 1911 through the rest of his career, he became one of the best-known and most effective song pluggers in the business. He was in high demand from publishers who knew that in Eddie's hands, their song would become a hit....Few people realize today that Morton was responsible for introducing 'I Didn't Raise My Boy to Be a Soldier,' and he made a fantastic hit of it. But his recording career was done, so it was up to others to wax it. Eddie also introduced the pro-war 'Don't Bite the Hand that's Feeding You.' We surmise that Morton's ability to turn a hit may have been what killed his recording career--perhaps his numbers were a little too impermanent? A fickle theatre audience is one thing, but record buyers wanted something a bit longer lasting..."
10W-32 Welcome Home - A single piece of sheet music (A.J. Stasney Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Bud Green and music by Ed Nelson: "Skies of gray have given way to brightness - Hearts that once were sad are feeling gay - The news has flashed around - Our boys are Homeward bound - And we'll be there to meet them just to say - Welcome home, the day of peace on earth is here - Welcome home, what words of cheer - We've kept our home fires burning while yearning for you - Your vacant chair is waiting too - You know you're welcome home - Each mother's heart sings out with joy - Welcome home my soldier boy - And now that all the war clouds safely have past - And God has brought me sunshine at last - Oh welcome, welcome, you are welcome home..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: Soldiers greeted by the folks at home. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "It's Never Too Late To Be Sorry."
10W-33 Welcome Home Laddie Boy, Welcome Home - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1918) with words by Will D. Cobb and music by Gus Edwards (Portrayed by Bing Crosby in the 1939 biopic THE STAR MAKER and by Hal March in the 1953 biopic THE EDDIE CANTOR STORY) : "What's that noise? That's our boys - A-marching up the street - Grab your bonnet, Kate - Hurry, don't be late - You must be there your boys to greet - Oh, good-bye and luck be with you, Laddie Boy - That's what we sang as they marched away - But now they've won their share of glory - And come back to tell the story - Let this be our song today - Welcome home, Laddie Boy, welcome home - To the arms you left for arms across the foam - To the one you loved the strongest on that parting day - To the one you kissed the longest when you marched away - But now you're home again, home again - Never more to roam again - Here's the way I feel about it - From the roof I want to shout it - Welcome home, Laddie Boy, welcome home!" Cover image by artist Walter M. Dunk: A group of Americans greeting the troop ship, L' Marne as it enters port. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Ring Out! Sweet Bells Of Peace."
10W-34 Welcome Home , Our Boys Of The U.S.A. - A single piece of sheet music (Sarah L. Gardner Publishing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - 1919) with words and music by Sarah L. Gardner ("Respectfully Dedicated to the Mothers of Democracy"): We welcome to our dear Homeland - Our Sons of gallantry - In triumph you have nobly won - That we may ever see - The Starry banner of the free - In all its glory wave - For freedom mad victory - For Sons so true and brave - Welcome, welcome America gives cheer - As on you march victorious - To loved ones waiting here - Welcome, yes, welcome, Where home-fires burn for you - We hail with joy our own dear boys - Our heroes brave and true..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A red, white and blue "flag used by permission of the International Flag Co., Jamestown and Pittsburgh." An advertisement for the "Welcome Home, Our Boys Of The U.S.A." sheet music ("Send a copy of this song to your SOLDIER BOY...") is included on the back cover.
10W-35 Welcome Home To The Boys, A - A single piece of sheet music (M. McDowell/ Braedoon Publishers, Newburyport, Massachusetts - 1919) with words and music by M. McDowell: "A welcome home brave boys - God bless your spirit high - You fought for right nor feared to die - You gained the victory - That set the nations free - Hurrah for Uncle Sammy's boys - No hordes of the Kaiser could e'er break thru - The lines of the Yankees who fought for red, white and blue - So with heart and soul we are greeting you - A welcoming home brave boys - A welcoming home boys..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Two young women greet the returning troops as they step of the troop ship.
10W-36 What Are The Poor Girls Going To Do? - A single piece of sheet music (Bickhart's Song Shop, Minneapolis, Minnesota - 1917) with words and music by Elmer Olson: "Ev'rything is ready and they'll soon be on their way - Then you'll hear them say - Farewell old Broadway - My sweetheart was drafted and I fear that spoils my chance - Tho he's dutiful - Girls are beautiful - Over there in France - What are the poor girls going to do - Who will they tell their troubles to - There's no one left to cheer 'em - No one to cuddle near 'em - You just can't blame the girls for feeling lonely - The boys are on their way to France - Where those French girls do the naughty dance - And while we're lonesome at home without 'em - They'll have their arms about 'em - What are the poor girls going to do?" Cover image by an unknown artist: A young women, sitting on a sofa, thinking about her soldier with the women of France . Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Sometime In June," "Panama Bay," "My Moi San," etc.
10W-37 What Are You Going To Do To Help The Boys? - Four pieces of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with words by Gus Kahn (Portrayed by Danny Thomas in the Gus Kahn biopic I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS -Warner Brothers - 1951) and music by Egbert Van Elstyne (Portrayed by Dick Simmons in the Gus Kahn biopic I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS -Warner Brothers - 1951): "Your Uncle Sam is calling now on ev'ryone of you - If you're too old or young to fight there's something else to do - If you have done a bit before don't let the matter rest - For Uncle Sam expects that ev'ry man will do his best - What are you going to do for Uncle Sammy - What are you going to do to help the boys - If you mean to stay at home - While they're fighting o'er the foam - The least that you can do is buy a Liberty Bond or two - If your going to be a sympathetic miser - The kind that only lends a lot of noise - You're no better then the one who loves the Kaiser - So what are you going to do to help the boys?" Cover image by an unknown artist: Uncle Sam framed by a large question mark and backed by an assortment of Liberty Bonds. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Dress Up Your Dollars In Khaki," "Tackin' 'Em Down," etc. According to Wikipedia: "A LIBERTY BOND was a war bond that was sold in the United States to support the allied cause in World War I. Subscribing to the bonds became a symbol of patriotic duty in the United States and introduced the idea of financial securities to many citizens for the first time. The Act of Congress which authorized the Liberty Bonds is still used today as the authority under which all U.S. Treasury bonds are issued..."
10W-38 What Kind Of An American Are You? (What Are You Doing Over Here?) - Two pieces of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President - NYC - 1917) with words by Lew Brown (Portrayed by Ernest Borgnine in the biopic THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE - 20th Century -Fox - 1956) and Charles McCarron and music by Albert Von Tilzer (Older brother of Will Von Tilzer): "The land of the free is for you and me - Or anyone at all who is seeking Liberty - We welcome ev'ry stranger and we help him all we can - And Now that we're in danger we depend on ev'ry man - The Stars and Stripes are calling to lend a helping hand - If you're true blue it's up to you to show just where you stand - What kind of an American are you - It's time to show what you intend to do - If they trample on Old Glory will you think that they are right - Or will you stand behind your land and fight with all your might? - What kind of an American are you? - That's a question you'll have to answer to - If the Star Spangled Banner don't make you stand and cheer - What are you doing over here?" Cover image by an unknown artist: An stern Uncle Sam points his finger at YOU backed by a map of the United States. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When The Sun Goes Down In Dixie (And The Moon Begins To Rises)," etc.
10W-39 What Our Yankee Boys Can Do - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph Collins Publishing, Watervliet, Michigan - 1918) with words and music by Joseph Collins: "Oh! The world is full of trouble, it's scattered ev'rywhere - Our Yankee boys are fighting like the heroes that are rare - And the Kaiser's Hun's eyes opened when they saw we were not joking - As we kept right on a poking till we got them in despair - And they're getting all excited as our heroes keep on fighting - And they're running to hide somewhere - Oh the Kaiser's men are running, they don't know what to do - Our Yankee boys are coming by the millions that is true - We will keep them on a running - On to Berlin we are coming by the millions that is true - And we'll show them what the Yankee boys can do..." Cover image by an unknown artist: American troops chasing the German soldiers inland from the shore.
10W-40 What'll We Do With Him Boys? (The Yanks Made A Monkey Out Of You) - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Andrew B. Sterling and music by Arthur Lange (With a photograph of W.J. Reilly, U.S.N.): " 'Oh Boys' the Sergeant said to us - 'Oh Boys there's joy ahead of us - Heppety hep and watch your step' - And then he read to us - We sail away for France tomorrow morning - We said that we would give the Kaiser 'his' - We waited for the chance and here it is - What'll we do with him boys? - What'll we do? - What'll we doodle-oodle - Yankee doodle do - Will we get old Kaiser Bill? - You can bet your life we will - It's up to me and you - What'll we do with him boys? - What'll we do - We'll cage him up and send him to the zoo - Where the lion and giraffe can take a look at him and laugh and say 'The Yanks made a monkey out of you' " Cover image (with a blue-tinted photograph of W. J. Reilly, U.S.N.) by artist E. H. Pfeiffer: A silhouette of jungle animals. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When The Parson Hands The Wedding Band From Me To Mandy Lee." W. J. REILLY was a gunner on the U.S.S. Michigan who also performed as a singer and piano player in vaudeville (No other biographical information found).
10W-41 When A Blue Service Star Turns To Gold - Two pieces of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Casper Nathan and music by Theodore Morse ("Patriotic War Edition" by the "Composer of MOTHER, DEAR OLD GIRL, SING ME LOVE'S LULLABY, etc."): "Picture a window at sunrise - With a blue service star on display - Then picture that window at sunset - When a soul that was brave passed away - Picture a mother or sweetheart - Proud tho' the worst has been told - Picture that scene, what it must mean - When a blue service star turns to gold - When a blue service star turns to gold - What a tale of affection is told! - Duty to country has cost one of his all - While others at home are bowed down with the call - In their sorrow, the one's left behind - Voice a pray'r that is e'er borne in mind - Till souls meet on high, they must whisper 'Good-bye' - When a blue service star turns to gold..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A red white and blue service flag (with blue star) backed by a battle scene. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "God Spare Our Boys Over There." According to Wikipedia: "A SERVICE FLAG or service banner in the United States is an official banner that family members of service members can display. The flag or banner is defined as a white field with a red border, with a blue star for each family member serving in the Armed Forces of the United States during any period of war or hostilities in which the Armed Forces of the United States are engaged. A gold star (with a blue edge) represents a family member that died during service, without specifying cause of death. The deceased might have been killed in action, or died due to unrelated causes...These flags were first used in World War I, with subsequent standardization and codification by the end of World War II. They were not popular during the Vietnam War, but have come back into use. In modern usage, an organization may fly a service flag if one of its members is serving active duty..."
10W-42 When A Boy Says Good Bye To His Mother And She Gives Him To Uncle Sam - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co./McKinley Music Co., Chicago and NYC - 1917) with words and music by Jack Frost: "Ev'ry time I see a suit of khaki - I am proud, tho' my heart is sad - I think each time I see a Yankee Jackie - He is some Yankee mother's lad - Just think of how she watched and loved him since he was knee high - Then think how her old heart must sigh - When a boy says good-bye to his mother - And the sound of the bugle is heard - He knows that tear in her eye means 'Come back by and by' - Tho' her fond lips breathe never a word - All the angels are praying above her - That he'll comeback to Yankee land - When a boy says good-bye to his mother - And she gives him to Uncle Sam..." Cover image by an unknown artist and photographer: A blue-tinted photograph of a soldier and his mother framed by sketches of a soldier, a sailor and the American eagle. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Down The Sunset Trail To Avalon, I'll Travel On to You," "The Hour Of Memory," "Paradise Blues," "Moonlight Blues," etc.
10W-43 When A Yankee Rolls Up His Sleeves - A single piece of sheet music (Daniel and Wilson Inc., Music Publishers, San Francisco, California - 1917) with words and music by Code Morgan: "There is a great commotion just now across the ocean - All the way from Netherlands to Greece - For there's a big tall fellow who ne'er showed a streak of yellow - And he much prefers the pipe of peace - But they've forced into action, he'll soon get satisfaction - When he starts to scrap someone grieves - For it's an awful breezy story - Mighty short but full of glory - When a Yankee rolls up his sleeve - The 'Y' is for the years that he's been victor - The 'A' is for the arm that's feared by all - The 'N' is for a nation not afraid of all creation - The 'K' is for the kick behind the ball - The double 'EE' makes Yankee, now they've got him good and cranky - From his drubbing no one ever retrieves - For history shows that he can do it - You bet someone will rue it - When a Yankee rolls up his sleeves..." Cover image by unknown artist: Uncle Sam with fixed bayonet protecting the smoking factories behind him. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Love's Prelude."
10W-44 When Alexander Takes His Ragtime Band To France - Two pieces of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder, Co., NYC -1918) with words and music by Alfred Bryan, Cliff Hess and Edgar Leslie ("Successfully Introduced by Belle Baker" - with cover photograph): "What's that tune I hear? - A-ringing in my ear - Come on along - It's a wonderful idea - It's Alexander's band - From down in Dixieland - he's going 'over there' to do his share - When Alexander takes his ragtime band to France - And take them one by one - Those ragtime tunes will put Germans in a trance - They'll throw their guns away - Hip hooray! And start right in to dance - They'll get so excited, they'll come over the top - Two-step back to Berlin with a skip and a hop - Old Hindenburg will know he has no chance - When Alexander takes his ragtime band to France...." Cover image (with a yellow-tinted publicity photograph of vaudevillian Belle Baker) by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: American troops marching with images of dancing German troops above. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "I Cannot Bear To Say Goodbye" and "I'm All Bound 'Round With The Mason-Dixon Line." According to Wikipedia: BELLE BAKER...was an American singer and actress. Popular throughout the 1910s and 1920s, Baker introduced a number of ragtime and torch songs including Irving Berlin's 'Blue Skies' and 'My Yiddishe Mama.' She performed in the Ziegfeld Follies and introduced a number of Irving Berlin's songs. An early adapter to radio, Baker hosted her own radio show during the 1930s. Eddie Cantor called her 'Dinah Shore, Patti Page, Peggy Lee, Judy Garland all rolled into one...' "
10W-45 When God Turns The Trenches To Gardens Again - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co., NYC - 1919) with words and music by Gilbert C. Tennant: "A father and mother sit close to each other, by the fire tonight - Both broken-hearted for they have just parted with one who had gone forth to fight - Things seem so lonely without him she sighs - He draws her close to his heart - And whispers 'My darling, tho' skies may be gray - Remember we're doing our part - When God turns the trenches to gardens again - And the bloom of the rose scents the air -When the fields are all covered with bright golden grain - Where our heroes have fought over there - Tho' our hearts may grow heavy and lonely - For the loved one we cannot regain - Let our next generation be proud of its nation - When God turns the trenches to gardens again' " Cover image by an unknown artist: A man peacefully digging in the soil near the wartime trenches filled with the remnants of war (helmets, swords, guns, etc.). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Don't Cry Little Girl, Don't Cry," "The Statue Of Liberty Is Smiling," "I Dreamt My Daddy Came Home," etc.
10W-46 When I'm Thru With The Arms Of The Army (I'll Come Back To The Arms Of You) - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Earl Carroll ("Lovingly Dedicated To My Little Sweetheart, Mrs. Earl Carroll'): "When a boy tells a girlie his love - That's the sweetest story ever told - But when you hear him say, that he must go away - No sweetness does that story hold - You'll see him wave 'Good-bye' - You'll see her bravely try to dry - The tiny teardrops in her eye - When she hears her sweetheart cry - When I'm thru with the arms of the army - I'll come back to the arms of you - When the lines of the foe we are taking - My arms will be aching - For you they'll be breaking - Oh, you know, I love you - But that old flag above you, you know I love it too - So when I'm thru with the arms of the army - I'll come back to the arms of you..." Cover image by an unknown artist and photographer: A color-tinted photograph of showman/soldier Earl Carroll standing guard, with his rifle, staring at the image of his wife and he on a park bench - backed with black silhouette of trees and an orange sky. Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SING song folio ("They can't stop our singing army! Send a copy of this book...to your Sammy 'over here' of 'over there' Send one to your Jackie afloat or ashore..."). According to Wikipedia: "EARL CARROLL (September 16, 1893 - June 17, 1948) was an American theatrical producer, director, songwriter and composer born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Carroll produced and directed numerous Broadway musicals, including eleven editions of Earl Carroll's Vanities, Earl Carroll's Sketch Book, and Murder at the Vanities, which was also made into a film starring Jack Oakie. Known as 'the troubadour of the nude,' Carroll was famous for his productions featuring the most lightly clad showgirls on Broadway. In 1922, he built the first Earl Carroll Theatre in New York, which was demolished and rebuilt on a grander scale in 1931. He built a second theatre on Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood, California in 1938. In 1926, Carroll became involved in a scandal due to a party he threw in honor of Harry Kendall Thaw, the Pittsburgh-bred murderer of Stanford White 20 years earlier and a potential investor in Broadway shows. During the private party a bathtub was brought out in which there was a nude young woman bathing in illegal liquor. One of the guests at the party was Philip Payne, editor of the New York Mirror. Although Carroll expected his guests would be circumspect about what happened at the party, Payne published a report. This was noted by federal authorities, and they subpoenaed Carroll to appear (with others) before a grand jury. The authorities were apparently determined to learn the source of the illegal alcohol. Carroll denied the incident happened, but others at the party confirmed it. The federal government prosecuted Carroll for perjury, and he was convicted and sent to the Atlanta Penitentiary for six months. Carroll wrote the scores for Broadway shows including So Long, Letty, Canary Cottage, and The Love Mill for which he also wrote the libretto. As a writer of popular songs, his credits include Isle d'Amour, So Long, Letty, Dreams of Long Ago, Give Me All of You, Just The Way You Are, and Dreaming, for which he supplied lyrics to the waltz by Archibald Joyce. Earl Carroll died in the crash of United Airlines Flight 624, which also took the life of his girlfriend, Beryl Wallace, on June 17, 1948, in Aristes, Pennsylvania."
10W-47 When I Come Back To you (We'll Have A Yankee Doodle Wedding) - A single piece of sheet music (Douglas and Newman Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by William Tracey and Jack Stern: "Duty calls and must leave you sweetheart mine - By tomorrow I'll be on my way - Though the great big ocean blue divides us - I'll be with you night and day - Uncle Sam has work for me to do - And when it's over I'll come back to you - Save all your love and I'll save all of mine - 'Till I come back to you - Though we must part while I'm o'er the sea - Down in your heart you'll be proud of me - So light up your face with a smile little girl - You have no cause to feel blue - For we'll have a Yankee Doodle wedding when I come back to you..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A soldier hugs his girl framed by a white wedding bell. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "It Must Have Ben Some Wonderful Boy (Who Taught Her How To Love)," "Havana (Back To Havana And You)," "You'd Better Be Nice To Them Now" and "To Think I Cried Over You."
10W-48 Wen I Get Back (From Over There) - A single piece of sheet music (F.B. Haviland Publishing Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by De Witt Morse and William H. Farrell: "Dearie, I leave you today - I'm going away, but not to stay - Uncle Sam is calling me - And calling ev'ry son of Liberty - Ev'ry Yankee Doodle lad, just like his dad, must march away - You need not yearn, you need not pine - For I'll return and make you mine - When I get back, from over there - When I get back, from over there - We'll have a great big ragtime jubilee, you and me, wait and see - When I get back from over there - I'm going to plan our wedding day - And in my khaki suit, I'll be your honeymoon recruit - When I get back from over there..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: A soldier and his girl. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When It's Cherry Time In Tokio" and "My Broken Rosary."
10W-49 When I Get Back To My American Blighty - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Arthur Fields and music by Theodore Morse ("War Edition" dedicated "To my cousin Michael Cohen, and pals Teddy Meyer and Victor Hilgers" - by the "Writers of IT'S A LONG WAY TO BERLIN, BUT WE'LL GET THERE, ALICE, I'M IN WONDERLAND, SING ME LOVE'S LULLABY, etc."): "Blighty, Blighty, what does it mean? - A Yankee lean was asking a Tommy - I hear it all along the line - Peculiar word but it sounds so fine - Heard it since I landed with the Army - The Tommy said Blighty, lad, means Home, Sweet Home and Ma and Dad - And wife and Kiddies an all you had that you loved and left behind - The Tommy heaved a sigh, as the Yankee made this reply - When I get back to my American Blighty - I'll be mighty glad I'm home - Back from 'Over There' - Glad I did my share - I wouldn't care just where they landed me in Liberty Land - Imagine me in my American Blighty - Smothered to death with kisses from the girls - And Mother and Dad and Uncle Ben will pray I never go 'way again - When I get back to my American Blighty..." Cover image by an unknown artist and photographer: A black and white photograph of a soldier hugging the Statue of Liberty with a background of stars and stripes. Advertised on the back cover is the SONGS THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SING song folio ("They can't stop our singing army! Send a copy of this book...to your Sammy 'over here' of 'over there' Send one to your Jackie afloat or ashore..."). According to Wikipedia: "BLIGHTY is a British English slang term for Britain. It was first used during the Boer War, though it was not until World War I that the word spread widely. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word derives from 'bilayati,' a regional variant of the Urdu word 'vilayati,' meaning 'foreign,' 'British,' 'English' or 'European.' In India, vilayati came to be known as an adjective meaning European, and specifically English or British..."
10W-50 When I Gets Back In No-Man's Land (I Can't Be Bother'd With No Mule) - A single piece of sheet music (Skidmore Music Publishing, Kansas City, Missouri - 1918) with words and music by Will E. Skidmore and Marshall Walker ("Writers of PRAY FOR THE LIGHTS, LONG, TALL, BROWN SKIN GAL and SOMEBODY'S DONE ME WRONG" - "Featured by Billy Beard with Al G. Fields Minstrels" - with cover photograph): "Old Deacon Johnson left his congregation one day to help his country fight - He said he wanted to be sent to France right away 'cause he know'd Uncle Sam was right - They put him on a mule that pulled the cannons around, says this is where you ride - Says he I'd rather do my fightin' on the ground when we reach the other side - I wants a good fair chance when we gets out in France - When I gets out in 'No-Man's Land' - They'll soon find that I'm no fool - I wants to fight for Uncle Sam - But not in pardnership with no mule - Suppose that mule should balk out on the firin' line - I know I'd have to leave him many miles behind - When I gets out in 'No Man's-Land - I can't be bothered with no mule…" Cover image (with an inset photograph of vaudevillian/minstrel Billy Beard) by artist Grim Natwick: A cartoon caricature of an African-American soldier on a mule stopped just before charging the German army (Cheering "Kamerad" in reference to the mule). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Graveyard Blues,' "Indianola," "Hy-Sine," etc. According to Monarchs of Minstrelsy, from "Daddy" Rice to Date By Edward Le Roy : "BILLY BEARD is "This really clever performer, who styles himself 'The Party from the South,' actually is from that interesting part of the country which has produced so many capable burnt corkers His story is best told in his own language and here it is: 'Trouped with Hypnotists, Magicians and sundry other one night organizations including a season in repertoire...several journeys on foot and on top of box cars.' Mr. Beard has an engaging personality which brought him engagements with Ricaby's West's Minstrels, Nankeville's Haverly's Minstrels, George Primrose's Minstrels and Ted Faust's Minstrels As a monologist and comedian he ranks with the best performers of his time which began in 1902...At present he is in vaudeville. Billy Beard was born in Columbia, SC on September 1, 1879." BILLY BEARD died in Atlanta in 1954. According to the HUNTSVILLE HISTORY COLLECTION Web Site: "..."AL G. FIELD (1850-1921) was...one of the last of the great cork artists and managers. His real name was Alfred Griffith Hatfield, and he began as a ballad singer at the age of fifteen with Sharpley, Sheridan, Mack and Days Minstrels. In 1886 he formed his own minstrel troupe, which he operated successfully until his death in 1921 - during which time, so he claimed, he never had a losing season - and became a wealthy man, known as the 'Millionaire Minstrel," from his successful managerial activities in that line of business. He was considered a good minstrel performer, remembered for his monologues. His training in management came from working with the Sells Bros. Circus and with Duprez and Benedicts Minstrels, both outfits being noted for their advertising practices."
10W-51 When I See You, I See Red, White And Blue - A single piece of sheet music (Kalmar, Puck and Abrahams Consolidated Music Publishers, NYC - 1917) with words by Grant Clark and music by Archie Gottler: "I love to watch old glory - Wave in the breeze above - I like to hear somebody cheer - The flag of the land I love - I love to see you too dear - I like to hear your name - Somehow the flag and you dear - Seem very much the same - When I see you dear - I see red and white and blue, dear - Ev'rybody knows your lips are red, your cheeks are rosy, too - Your teeth are bright, they're pearly white - And both your eyes are blue, so I'll be true dear -To the red and white and blue, dear - And ev'ry time that you hear me brag - How I love the flag - I mean you too...." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A young woman, dressed in a sailor suit, salutes the silhouetted image of a soldier. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Rolling Stones."
10W-52 When I Send You A Picture Of Berlin (You'll Know It's Over 'Over There,' I'm Coming Home) - A single piece of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co., NYC - Chicago - San Francisco - Sidney - London - 1918) with words and music by Frank Fay, Ben Ryan and Dave Dreyer: "Johnny Johnson feeling fit - Uniform and army kit - Johnny was a cam'ra fiend - Of that trip had often dreamed - Sweetheart crying at the pier - Said 'I'm proud of you my dear' - Now you'll realize your dreams - Taking pictures of those scenes - Said John 'That's what I'll do - And I'll send them home to you - When I send you a picture of London - Then you'll know I've landed safely 'Over There' - When I send you a snapshot of Paris - You'll know I'm ready to do and dare - (I'll do my share) - You'll know I'm thinking about you - When I send you my photo all alone - But when I send you a picture of Berlin - You'll know it's over, 'Over There' - I'm coming home..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: A color-tinted photograph of a soldier (posed by composer/actor Frank Fay) with a box camera backed by a sketch of soldiers, on horseback, charging through the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Little Good For Nothing's Good For Something After All" and "Bye And Bye." According to Wikipedia: "FRANK FAY (November 17, 1891 - September 25, 1961) was an American vaudeville comedian and film and stage actor. Highly successful in vaudeville, he originated the role of 'Elwood P. Dowd' in the Broadway play Harvey by the American playwright Mary Coyle Chase. He is probably best known as actress Barbara Stanwyck's first husband. Their troubled marriage is thought by some to be the basis of the 1937 film A Star is Born, in which the previously unknown wife shoots to stardom while her husband's career goes into sharp decline..."
10W-53 When Ireland Comes Into Her Own - A single piece of sheet music (Broadway Music Corporation - Will Von Tilzer, President, NYC - 1919) with words by Jeff Branen and music by Jack Stanley: "There's a feeling so grand sweeping over the land - That must thrill you where-e'er you may be - Like the birds and the bees and the breeze o'er the seas - All creation is soon to be free - Alsace is as free as the Holy Land - And so is her Sister, Lorraine - The Slavs ev'rywhere are as free as the air - And Belgium unshackled again - For each State that's given her liberty - A new star up yonder is shown - What a beautiful dream - Sure all Heaven will gleam - When Ireland comes into her own..." Cover image by artist E.E. Walton: Sheep herded on a wooded road leading from a thatched cottage in Ireland. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Watch, Hope and Wait Little Girl (I'm Coming Back To You)." According to Wikipedia: "During World War I (or the Great War) (1914-1918), Ireland was part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, which entered the war in August 1914 as one of the Entente Powers, along with France and the Russian Empire, when due to the effects of chain ganging, it was obliged to declare war on the Central Powers, consisting of the German Empire, the Austrian-Hungarian Empire, the Ottoman Empire, and the Kingdom of Bulgaria. Occurring in the midsts of Ireland's Revolutionary period, the Irish experience of the war was complex and its memory divisive. At the outbreak of the war, most Irish people, regardless of political affiliation, supported the war in much the same way as their British counterparts, and both nationalist and unionist leaders initially backed the British war effort. Their followers, both Catholic and Protestant, served extensively in the British forces, many in three specially raised divisions with others in the Imperial and United States armies, John T. Prout being an example of an Irishman serving in the latter. Over 200,000 Irishmen fought in the war, in several theatres and either 30,000, or, if one includes those who died serving in armies other than Britain's, 49,400 died. A group of combatant Irish republicans took the opportunity of the war to Proclaim Ireland a Republic and to defend it in an armed rebellion against British rule, in Dublin 1916, a rebellion which Germany attempted to help. In addition, Britain's intention to impose conscription in Ireland in 1918 provoked widespread resistance and as a result remained unimplemented. Finally, with the end of the Great War, Sinn Féin won the Irish general election of 1918, this was followed by the Irish Declaration of Independence and immediately following that, the Irish War of Independence (1919-1922) which ended with terms that led to the Irish Civil War (1922-1923) with Ireland partitioned and much of it leaving the United Kingdom as the Irish Free State..."
10W-54 When It Comes To A Lovingless Day - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root/McKinley Music Company, Chicago and NYC - 1018) with words and music by Jack Frost: "Years ago a man named Sherman said that war was - well! - I'd tell you, but I never talk that way - He'd find out those words he spoke were far from being any joke - If he could see our troubles here today - Now each day that comes, I guess, is something or otherless - Because of that war 'cross the sea - But will I find I'm missin' all my huggin' and kissin'? - Gee, that's what is troublin' me - For Tuesdays are meatless and Wednesday's are wheatless - My home is heatless - My bed is sheetless - Now I don't care if all the bars are treatless - Or if I must even sleep or eat less - I live in sorrow, in fear of tomorrow - - I'm worried till my hair is gray - For what will I do if they spring something new - And it comes a loving less day?" Cover image by an unknown artist: A cartoon soldier steals a kiss from his girl as Uncle Sam, with a spyglass, stands in the background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Hour Of Memory," "My Fox-Trot Girl," "Moonlight Blues," etc. According to Wikipedia: "....Although the United States did not have food rationing in World War I, it relied heavily on propaganda campaigns to persuade the public to moderate their food consumption. Through slogans such as 'Food Will Win the War,' 'Meatless Mondays,' and 'Wheatless Wednesdays,' the United States Food Administration under Herbert Hoover reduced national consumption by 15%..."
10W-55 When It's Over, Over There, Molly Darlin' - A single piece of sheet music (Daniels and Wilson Inc. Music Publishers, San Francisco - 1918) with words and music by Benjamin Purrington and Neil Moret: "Hear them trampin' - Hear them trampin' - See the boys in khaki gray - There's an argument in Flanders - And we leave for there today - Come and kiss me - Will you miss me? - Will you promise to be true? - We'll chase von Hindenburg clear into Heidelberg - Before I see the smile of you - When it's over, over there, Molly darlin' - When it's over, over there Molly dear - When we've made the Kaiser wise - Your smiling eyes will shine more safely here - When we've Yankee Doodled under the Linden - When we've wound up the watch on the Rhine - When we give Alsace Lorraine to France again - I'll come sailing home to you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Soldiers advance with the American flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Mickey" (written for Mabel Normand's feature film entitled MICKEY").
11W-56 When Jack Comes Sailing Home Again - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., NYC and Detroit - 1918) with words and music by Nora Bayes-Norworth ("Dedicated to the Home Coming of the Atlantic Squadron" - with cover photograph of Nora Bayes and Jack Norworth): "Down the bay the battleships were slowly leaving - All the crew were feeling blue - From the shore the girls they left behind were grieving - And feeling lonesome too - As the fleet went round the bend - One little lassie with sparkling eye - Said 'girls don't cry' - While your sailor boy's away - Just be patient night and day - He'll come back bye and bye - When Jack comes sailing home again - We'll meet him at the pier - And give a hearty chair - And say, oh look who's here - We'll make him feel so welcome that he'll never care to roam - When Jack comes sailing, sailing sailing home..." Cover image (including the blue-tinted publicity photograph inset of Nora Bayes and Jack Norworth) by artist William Austin Starmer: A troop ship returning to port as a flag-waving group cheers on the pier. Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers include; "Mandy Lane," "I Want Someone To Call Me Dearie, "Sweetheart Days," etc. According to Wikipedia: "...Nora Bayes was performing professionally in vaudeville in Chicago by age 18. She toured from San Francisco, California to New York City and became a star both on the vaudeville circuit and the Broadway stage. In 1908, she married singer-songwriter Jack Norworth. The two toured together and were credited for collaborating on a number of compositions, including the immensely popular 'Shine On, Harvest Moon,' which the pair debuted in Florenz Ziegfeld's Follies of 1908. Bayes and Norworth divorced in 1913. After America entered World War I Bayes became involved with morale boosting activities. George M. Cohan asked that she be the first to record a performance of his patriotic song 'Over There.' Her recording was released in 1917 and became an international hit. She also performed shows for the soldiers. Bayes made many phonograph records (some with Norworth) for the Victor and Columbia labels. From 1924 through 1928, her accompanist was pianist Louis Alter, who later composed the popular songs 'Manhattan Serenade,' 'Nina Never Knew' and 'Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans?' Bayes established her own theater, 'The Nora Bayes Theater' on West 44th Street in New York...Bayes was portrayed by Ann Sheridan in the 1944 musical biopic Shine On, Harvest Moon, which focused on her relationship with Norworth (Dennis Morgan) and ignored her other husbands. She was also portrayed by Frances Langford in the movie Yankee Doodle Dandy, where she and James Cagney (as George M. Cohan) perform Over There. The 1980 Garson Kanin novel Smash is about an attempt to make a Broadway musical out of Nora Bayes' life. The novel serves as the inspiration for the 2012 television series Smash, although the subject of the show's fictional musical is not Bayes but Marilyn Monroe..." According to Keith Allen in his NOTES ON THE U.S. FLEET ORGANIZATION AND DISPOSITION 1898 - 1941: "... Status of the fleet (ATLANTIC SQUADRON) in 1913: All of the battleships were in the Atlantic except Oregon, which was in reserve in Puget Sound. The Pacific Fleet had four armored cruisers in active service and two in reserve. It had some smaller cruisers, monitors, and light craft. The Asiatic Fleet included three cruisers (which ones I don't know), a half dozen each of destroyers and submarines, and eight gunboats. Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy in the Wilson Administration (which came into office in March 1913) was sensitive to political appeals for naval protection on both coasts. He stated the intention to establish parity in battleships on the two coasts after the completion of the Panama Canal. Many in the Navy opposed the division of the battle fleet, among them Daniels's own Undersecretary, one Franklin D. Roosevelt. In this FDR had the support of Cousin Theodore and of Admiral Mahan, all of whom fervently believed that the battle fleet must not be divided. FDR proposed to keep all the battleships on one coast and the armored cruisers on the other. After the United States entered the war nearly all of the major units of the Pacific Fleet, including the armored cruisers, were transferred to the Atlantic, largely operating from South American bases. At the end of the First World War the threat of Germany was seemingly gone, and Daniels finally got his wish. The United States battle fleet was divided, over the protests of the Mahanians. In the summer of 1919 the first dreadnoughts arrived in San Pedro. The battle fleet was split roughly evenly, both in dreadnought and pre-dreadnought categories; I can't find a precise list of ships, though. Most of the armored cruisers went to the Far East or Europe..."
11W-57 When Our Boys Come Marching Home - A single piece of sheet music (M.Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1917) with words and music by Joseph E. Howard ("…Sung with Great Success by Well-Known Composer Joseph E. Howard of Joseph E. Howard and Ethelyn Clark" - with full-length cover photograph of Joseph Howard): "When the boys out in the trenches - Hear the word that they have one - Can you picture out the fun - When they know their work is done? - For their thoughts are bound to wander - To the lass who said 'good-bye' - That's the scene appears before them - As a tear drops from their eye - So we now are homeward bound - For at last we've licked the hound - So when our boys come marching home - From far across the briny foam - We'll all meet them with a willing smile - So hide your tears, if only for awhile - They fought for truth and liberty - The longest fight in history - Raise your voices loud and give three cheers - When our boys come marching home..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A black and white publicity photograph of composer Joseph E. Howard (in white tie and tails). Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Evening Brings Rest And You." According to Wikipedia: "JOSEPH E. HOWARD was a Broadway composer, lyricist, and librettist. A famed member of Tin Pan Alley along with wife and composer Ida Emerson as part of the song-writing team of Howard and Emerson, his hits included 'Hello Ma Baby' and Broadway musicals like 'I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now?' He toured in a stock company production of 'Little Eva,' then he appeared in Vaudeville as a boy soprano at the age of 11. He was married to singer actress Mabel Barrison who died in 1912. At 17, he met a young singer named Ida Emerson who would become Howard's second wife. They played the Midwestern vaudeville circuit, drawing notice enough in Chicago to catch an engagement in New York at Tony Pastor's Music Hall on 14th Street, where they were a bit hit in 1898. Their fortunes would change for the better in 1899 when they wrote the song 'Hello, Ma Baby' which became one of the most popular songs of its day, selling over a million copies of the sheet music, the predominant way of making money on music prior to recordings, in just a few months. They found themselves space at the famed Tin Pan Alley where they continued to write songs for Vaudeville .They penned another hit, 'Goodbye, My Lady Love' in 1904. They moved back to Chicago, where Howard performed and composed his tunes, and produced some of the biggest Chicago Musical hit shows from 1905 to 1915. Howard produced a string of pop jazz hits including 'What's the Use of Dreaming?,' 'I Don't Like Your Family,' and 'A Boy's Best Friend Is His Mother.' The tunes that he is most often associated with in modern times are 'Hello, Ma Baby' and 'I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now?' The latter was a jilted man's waltz that made its debut in the 1909 Broadway musical The Prince of To-Night and became the subject of controversy many years later when one of Howard's employees, a composer, sued and won the right to remove Howard's name from the piece as its primary composer...Howard performed in nightclubs, theaters, radio and television throughout his career. His writing slacked off between 1915 and 1939, then picked up again. In 1939 Howard collaborated with Beatrice Kay, the husky-voice showgirl on a radio program called Gay Nineties, which revisited his hits from the turn of the century and the teens, which by then had become nostalgic American entertainment for listeners during the Big Band Era. He made recordings for the Decca and Vocalion labels in the late 1940s. In 1947, a motion picture was produced based on Howard's biography called "I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now." which starred Mark Stevens with Buddy Clark taking on the singing chores. The film generated legal controversy when a former employee sued, proved his authorship of the composition, and won the right to remove Howard's name from the song. In the late 1950s, he published an autobiography entitled Gay Nineties Troubadour. Howard hosted the early live television series The Gay Nineties Revue (ABC, 1948-1949). Howard died on stage in Chicago while singing Let Me Call You Sweetheart during a curtain call at the Chicago Opera House on May 19, 1961..."
11W-58 When The Bonnie Bonnie Heather Is Blooming (I'll Return Annie Laurie To You) - A single piece of sheet music (Tell Taylor Publishing, NYC and Chicago - 1915) with words and music by James G. Ellis ("Writer of THE TALE THE TEARDROP TOLD, etc."): "Oh where, tell me where, are you going - Said a lass to a laddie one day - He was dressed in his best, in a highland uniform - With the soldiers was marching away - I'm off to the front said the laddie - Don't cry, Annie Laurie, don't cry - It almost breaks my heart to tell you - Good-bye Annie dear good-bye - And as they march'd away - She heard her laddie say - When the bonnie, bonnie heather is blooming - I'll return Annie Laurie to you - I'll be thinking of you always my lassie - For I know your heart is true - When Maxwelton's braes are bonnie - And Scotland's skies are blue - And the bonnie, bonnie heather is blooming - I'll return Annie Laurie to you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A Scottish soldier in a military kilt. According to Wikipedia: "ANNIE LAURIE is an old Scottish song based on a poem by William Douglas (1672?-1748) of Dumfries and Galloway. The words were modified and the tune was added by Alicia Scott in 1834/5. The song is also known as MAXWELTON BRAES..."
11W-59 When The Boys Come Home - Three pieces (various sizes) of sheet music (G. Schirmer Publishing, NYC and Boston - 1917) with words by John Hay ("Written by the late Secretary of State during the Civil War, while he was private Secretary to President Lincoln") and music by Oley Speaks: "There's a happy time coming when the boys come home - There's a glorious day coming when the boys come home - We will end the dreadful story of the battle dark and gory - In a sunburst of glory - When the boys come home - The day will seem brighter when the boys come home - And our hearts will be lighter when the boys come home - Wives and sweethearts will press them in their arms and caress them - And pray -god to bless them - When the boys come home - The thin ranks will be proudest when the boys come home - and our cheer will ring the loudest when the boys come home - The full ranks will be shattered and the bright arms will be battered - And the battle standards tattered - When the boys come home - Their bayonets may be rusty when the boys come home - And their uniforms be dusty when the boys come home - But all shall see the traces of battle's royal graces - In the brown and bearded faces - When the boys come home - Our love shall go to meet them when the boys come home - To bless them and to greet them when the boys come home - And the fame of their endeavor time and change shall not dissever - From the nation's heart forever, from the nation's heart forever..." Cover image by artist P. Van Buren: Battle-weary soldiers marching. Advertised song samples on the back cover includes: "To You," "We Are Coming," "In Flanders Fields The Poppies Grow," etc. According to Wikipedia: "JOHN MILTON HAY (October 8, 1838 - July 1, 1905) was an American statesman, diplomat, author, journalist, and private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln. Hay's highest office was serving as United States Secretary of State under Presidents William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt...John attended the local schools, and in 1849 his uncle Milton Hay invited the precocious child to live with him in Pittsfield, Pike County, and attend a well-regarded local academy. Milton, a lawyer, was also a friend of Lincoln, who had by then served in Congress. Once he had completed his studies there, John, at age 13, was sent to live with his grandfather in Springfield, and attend Illinois State University. This was at the time little more than a high school. Once John's studies were done there, he returned to Warsaw, and his parents and uncle Milton (who financed the boy's education) decided to send him to Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, alma mater of his late maternal grandmother. At Brown, Hay joined Theta Delta Chi and Phi Beta Kappa. He also developed an interest in poetry, and became a part of Providence's literary circle which included Sarah Helen Whitman and Nora Perry. As a salutation to each issue of Benjamin Tucker's Liberty, these lines of poetry by Hay were printed: For always in thine eyes, O Liberty!/ Shines that high light whereby the world is saved;/ And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee. When he graduated, he was named Class Poet. He graduated in 1858 with a master of arts degree and went home to Warsaw to study law with his uncle, Milton Hay...In 1861, he was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of Illinois. Abraham Lincoln's law office was next door to the law office of Milton Hay, and Lincoln thus became acquainted with John Hay. When Lincoln won election as president, his secretary, John G. Nicolay, recommended John Hay to Lincoln as assistant private secretary. Though on the government payroll as a clerk in the Interior Department because the president wasn't authorized to employ a second secretary, Hay served Lincoln until 1864. He lived in the northeast corner bedroom on the second floor of the White House, which he shared with his fellow secretary and Pittsfield Academy schoolmate, Nicolay. For a few months, he served in the Union Army under Generals David Hunter and Quincy Adams Gillmore. He rose to the rank of major and was later brevetted lieutenant colonel and colonel. Hay's diary and writings during the Civil War are basic historical sources. Some have credited him with being the real author of Lincoln's Letter to Mrs. Bixby, consoling her for the loss of her sons in the war. Hay was present when Lincoln died after being shot at Ford's Theatre. Hay and Nicolay wrote a formal 10-volume biography of Lincoln (Abraham Lincoln: A History, 1890) and prepared an edition of his collected works. Portions of Hay's diaries and letters from 1861-1870, published in the book Lincoln and the Civil War, show Lincoln in a far more intimate light..."
11W-60 When The Boys From Dixie Eat The Melon On The Rhine - A single piece of sheet music (Richmond Publisher, NYC - 1918) with words by Alfred Bryan and music by Ernest Breuer: "There's a steamboat coming this way - Loaded down with melons they say - It will be sailing away - To France next Saturday - Won't those boys all open their eyes - When they see those melons arrive? - They'll be so happy and glad they're all alive - When those boys from Dixie eat that melon on the Rhine, on the river Rhine - Won't that be fine, you bet you - There will be a Jubilee - And they'll be in line - To meet them and eat them, like they used to do in Dixie - How they miss that old plantation - And that watermelon rine, so fine - My big brother will be there - And you can bet your dough he'll get his share - When they eat that melon on the Rhine, the River Rhine...." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: Soldiers unload watermelons from a ship with an inset of black children eating watermelon. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Hawaiian Nights."
11W-61 When The Boys Go Marching Over There - A single piece of sheet music (Whitmore Music Publishing Co., Scranton, Pennsylvania - 1918) with words by Thomas Brown and music by Bernard Jablonowski and Floyd E. Whitmore - with a cover photograph of the "Syncopater Band"): "O'er the seas - O'er the seas - Our boys are fighting hard - Fighting for home and country - With the good old U.S. pride - Gone are the boys from sweethearts - From Mother's sons and brides - Under the star spangled banner - Our brave boys go marching o'er there - Marching on to victory - With the Allies over there - Sure our boys will do their share - To fight for the world wide liberty - And to make the U.S. safe as can be - They'll make that Kaiser dance - To a good old Yankee prance - When the boys go marching over there..." Cover image by artist Travis: A blue-tinted photograph of the Syncopater Band with ornate song title lettering. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Take Me To My Sweet Shannon Rose," "Dreams of You," "Someone," "Underneath The Southern Moon," etc. No information was found for the SYNCOPATER BAND.
11W-62 When The Clouds Of War Roll By - A single piece of sheet music (Ted Brown Music Co., Chicago, Illinois - 1917) with words and music by Nat Binns and Earl Haubrich: "Ev'ryone's excited - Let us get united - Shoulder arms to crush the foe - Bugle call is sounding - Boys in blue are rounding - To France they soon will go - Sweetheart have no fears - Come let me dry your tears - When the clouds of war roll by - I'll come marching home to you - Until then I'll bid good-bye - Just say that you will be true blue - Marching to victory - For true democracy - Back, back to you - I'll come - When the clouds of war roll by..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A battlefield scene with a airplane crashing in flames. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Somewhere A Heart is Breaking And Calling Me Back To You."
11W-63 When The Flag Of Peace Is Waving I'll Return - Two pieces of sheet music (Grover Brothers, Brunswick, Georgia - 1917) with words by Mary Ruth Meyer and music by Barney G. Young: "In a crowded railway station a maiden stood in tears - By her side her soldier lover vainly tried to calm her fears - All aboard the train was moving, 'twas the signal they must part - Then I heard him softly whisper, to the girl who'd won his heart - When the flag of Peace is waving and victory we've won - Let the love flame in your heart more brightly burn - For I love you sweetheart only - So remember when your lonely - When the flag of peace is waving - I'll return to you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier embracing his girl. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Everybody's Loved By Someone."
11W-64 When The Great Red Dawn Is Shining - A single piece of sheet music (Chappell and Co., LTD, NYC - 1917) with words by Edward Lockton and music by Evelyn Sharpe: "Though I am far beyond the ocean blue - Each lonely hour my heart remembers you - Each tender look, each word I used to know - Comes back to me from out the long ago - When the great red dawn is shining - When the waiting hours are past - When the tears of night are ended - And I see the day at last - I shall come down the road of sunshine - To a heart that is fond and true - When the great red dawn is shining - Back to home, back to love and you - Dark is the world , but still I wait and pray - Through ev'ry hour to see the rising day - That golden day that dawns on grief and pain - That day of love that calls me home again..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Ornate song title lettering. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Land Of Long Ago."
11W-65 When The Kaiser Does The Goose-Step To A Good Old American Rag - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co,/McKinley Music Co., Chicago and NYC - 1917) with words by Jack Frost and music by Harold Neander: "There are lots of places that I'd like to be - And many, many sights that I would surely like to see - But the greatest thing in all the world to give a man a thrill - Is surely going to happen when the Yanks get Kaiser Bill - They'll make him dance for fair - I'd sure like to be there - When the Kaiser does the goose-step to a good old American rag - They'll play it jerky and make Bill 'walk turkey' and salute our grand old flag - He'll be wiser when he two-steps to the songs of Yankeeland - Or foxtrots to a good old Dixie tune (make it soon, make it soon) - There'll be a jazz band from Dixie - And bill won't dare say "Nixie' - When the Yankees say 'Come, William, dance that drag!' Alexander's band from Tennessee - Will be there to play the music for the Jubilee - When the Kaiser does the goose-step to a good old American rag..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Kaiser Wilhelm forced (with bayonets) to goose-step as a jazz band plays in the background. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "If You've Never been in Dreamland, You've Never Been In Love," "Down The Sunset Trail To Avalon, I'll Travel On To You," "The Hour Of Memory," etc. According to Wikipedia: Wilhelm II or William II (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, three notable contemporary relations being his first cousins King George V of the United Kingdom, founder of the House of Windsor, Marie of Romania, Queen consort of Romania and the Czarina Alix of Hesse, consort of his second cousin Tsar Nicholas II of the House of Romanov, the last ruler of the Russian Empire before the Russian Revolution of 1917 which deposed the monarchy. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose 'New Course' in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to the First World War. Bombastic and impetuous, he sometimes made tactless pronouncements on sensitive topics without consulting his ministers, culminating in a disastrous Daily Telegraph interview that cost him most of his power in 1908. His top generals, Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, dictated policy during the First World War with little regard for the civilian government. An ineffective war leader, he lost the support of the army, abdicated in November 1918, and fled to exile in the Netherlands..." According to Wikipedia: "The GOOSE-STEP is a special marching step performed on formal military parades and other ceremonies. While marching in parade formation, troops swing their legs in unison high off the ground, while keeping their legs straight and unbent. Originating in Prussian military drill in the mid-18th century, the step was called the Stechschritt (literally, 'piercing step') or Stechmarsch. Nearly fifty countries maintain the tradition. 'Goose step' is a pejorative term in English. It originally referred to a British military drill, in which one leg at a time was swung back and forth without bending the knee. Apparently standing on only one leg reminded soldiers of how geese often stand..."
11W-66 When The Lillies Bloom In France Again - A single piece of sheet music (Walter Jacobs, Inc., Boston - 1918) with words by Robert Levenson ("Writer of MY BELGIAN ROSE') and music by George L. Cobb ("Composer of ARE YOU FROM DIXIE"): "There's a field 'over there' where the lilies grew - And the birds sang on ev'ry bough - It was not long ago when the skies where blue - But there is nothing left there now - Oh, they have not died in vain - For those flow'rs will bloom again - That's a part of ev'ry soldier's vow - When the lilies bloom in France again - And the fields are white as snow - Then our work will be done - And I'll come back to one - Who'll be waiting for me I know - Then we'll all see the silver lining - That will soon pierce the dark clouds through - When the lilies bloom in France again - I'll come back, sweetheart, to you..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A peaceful garden scene. The back cover features an advertisement for MELODY - "A Monthly Magazine For Lovers Of Popular Music" published by Walter Jacobs in Boston, Massachusetts.
11W-67 When The Blue Star In The Window Has Turned To Gold - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co./McKinley Music Co., Chicago and NYC - 1918) with words by Paul B. Armstrong and music by F. Henri Klickmann ("By the writers of THERE'S A LITTLE BLUE STAR IN THE WINDOW, AND IT MEANS ALL THE WORLD TO ME"): "A boy bravely fights for his country - A fond mother kneels down in pray'r - he's fighting foul wrong as he forges along - While for him she prays God's tend'rest care - There's a little blue star in the window - And to her it's a treasure untold - But she watches afraid, for she fears it may fade - That its color might change into gold - What star is that high in the heavens - That shines with a strong, steady light? 'Tis the soul of someone, his duty well-done - And all for his country and right - Another name written in glory - With other great heroes enrolled - When the little blue star in the window has turned to gold..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Starlight shines down on a window displaying a service flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I'm Hitting The Trail To Normandy," "Old Glory Goes Marching on," etc. According to Wikipedia: "A SERVICE FLAG or service banner in the United States is an official banner that family members of service members can display. The flag or banner is defined as a white field with a red border, with a blue star for each family member serving in the Armed Forces of the United States during any period of war or hostilities in which the Armed Forces of the United States are engaged. A gold star (with a blue edge) represents a family member that died during service, without specifying cause of death. The deceased might have been killed in action, or died due to unrelated causes. The banner was designed in 1917 by United States Army Captain Robert L. Queisser of the Fifth Ohio Infantry, in honor of his two sons who were serving in World War I. It was quickly adopted by the public and by government officials. On September 24, 1917, an Ohio congressman read into the Congressional Record: 'The mayor of Cleveland, the Chamber of Commerce and the Governor of Ohio have adopted this service flag. The world should know of those who give so much for liberty. The dearest thing in all the world to a father and mother - their children...' "
11W-68 When The Moon Is Shining Somewhere In France - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co., NYC - 1917) with words and music by Private Frederick Rath ("Patriotic Song Success Featured by Francis White of Rock and White - The Official Camp Song of Camp Upton - Dedicated to Col. George Vidmer, 306th Infantry" - with a cover photograph of Frances White and her dog): "No matter where you chance to be - In America or France you'll see - The same old moon shines ev'rywhere - But France is faraway from here - And before we see the stars appear - The moon is shining 'Over There' - So when each soldier boy goes away - To his mother and sweetheart he'd say - When the moon is shining - Somewhere in France - I'll send a wireless to you - I will say 'I'm O.K. and I'm thinking of you, too' - Then when the moon goes sailing over the sea - It will carry my message through - And ev'ry time you see the man in the moon - He'll bring my love and kisses back to you..." Cover image (including a black and white publicity photograph of vaudevillian Frances White and her dog) by artist William Austin Starmer: A biplane flying over silhouetted troops at night. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Sweet Egyptian Rose," "Send Back Dear Daddy To Me," "Wait For Your Honey Boy," etc. According to Wikipedia: "CAMP UPTON was an installation of the United States Army located in Yaphank on Long Island in Suffolk County, New York...Camp Upton was named after Emory Upton, a Union general of the Civil War and was created in 1917 to house and train soldiers for the United States, which had no large standing army at the time of its entry into World War I. The 152nd Depot Brigade was the garrison unit that received new recruits and prepared them for service overseas, and then out processed demobilizing soldiers at the end of the war. Irving Berlin, the composer, and Alvin York, the most decorated soldier of the American army in World War I, were processed at Camp Upton. The 77th Division was first organized there. During part of the war, the 82nd Division was quartered there. According to the STARS OF VAUDEVILLE Web Site: "Diminutive and child-like, FRANCES WHITE (born today in 1896) is best known for her coy rendition of M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-I by Bert Hanlon, Benny Ryan and Harry Tierney. A Seattle native, she was a chorus girl in San Francisco when she teamed up with William Rock of Rock and Fulton. By the mid teens they were stars of big time and Broadway revues. White was the favorite with audiences however; by 1919 she split with Rock and went on her own. For a time, she was married to Frank Fay; in 1922 she was spoken of in connection with film star Raymond McKee. She retired from show business in 1932 and lived another 37 years..." No biographical information for COL. GEORGE VIDMER was found.
11W-69 When The Old Boat Heads For Home - A single piece of sheet music (Douglas and Newman Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Earl Fuller: "Mothers and sweethearts and dads - Waiting for news from your lads - You have no reason to feel blue - For soon they'll be back home with you - Fighting is going to cease - We'll soon have vict'ry and peace - And when the good ship starts to sail o'er the sea - Oh, what a time there will be - When the old boat heads for home - Ploughing her way thru the foam - Ev'ry one happy and gay - Hats in the air, yelling 'Hip, Hip, Hooray!" - We'll bring the old bacon home - Never again will we roam - It's bound to come - Say won't that be some day! - When the old boat heads for home..." Cover image by artist Michael W. Smith (?): An American eagle leads a crowded troop ship back to the United States. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "It Must Have Been Some Wonderful Boy (Who Taught Her How To Love)," "Havana (Back To Havana And You)," "You'd Better Be Nice To Them Now," and "To Think I Cried Over You."
11W-70 When The Sun Goes Down In France - Three pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Gilbert C. Tennant (Featured by Barnes and Lorraine, Lillian Calvert and Connie Lehr Fuller): "Many hearts were filled with pride - When our boys went off to war - Heroes marching side by side like their Daddies did before - There are mothers and brothers and sisters and others - Who write tender letter every day - Letters that are cheery to make the boys feel glad - When they are faraway - When the sun goes down in France - All our hearts are over there - With the ones we love in France fighting, we're writing - I know, I know you'll do your share - When the stars begin to shine - And all the world seems in a trance - When our boys get in the trench - They'll pay all we owe the French - When the sun goes done in France..." Cover image (Featuring inset publicity photographs of vaudevillians Barnes and Lorraine, Lillian Calvert and Connie Lehr Fuller) by an unknown artist: A bugler on a battlefield. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When Tony Goes Over The Top," "Just A Baby's Letter Found In No Man's Land," ""Could The Dreams Of A Dreamer Come True," etc. BARNES AND LORRAINE were vaudeville headliners known as "The Actress and The Bootblack. LILLIAN CALVERT was a vaudeville headliner and actress known as "The Quaker Girl." CONNIE LEHR FULLER was an actress and vaudevillian who appeared in productions of "The Unmarried Mother," Paris By Night," etc.
11W-71 When The War Is Over, I'll Return To You - A single piece of sheet music (Meyer Cohen Music Publishing Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Bide Dudley and music by Fredric Watson ("Dedicated to the Famous Stage Beauty MISS JUSTINE JOHNSTONE"): "When Sammy comes marching home - Hooray, hooray - Then I'll return to you - There's going to be a happy wedding day - Hooray, for sweetheart I've been true - Dry your tears for I am coming - Coming after while - Oh honey girl, my sunny girl - I long to see you smile - When the war is over - I'll return to you - We will live in clover - As true lovers do - O'er my head is flying - The old Red, White and Blue - Right 'Over the top' we'll go my honey darling - Then I'll return to you..." Cover image by photographer Napoleon Sarony: A color-tinted publicity photograph of actress Justine Johnstone. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: A 'Male Quartette' arrangement of "When The War Is Over, I'll Return To You." According to Wikipedia: "Justine Johnstone (January 31, 1895 - September 4, 1982) was an American stage and silent screen actress. She was later a pathologist and expert on syphilis. Working under her married name, Justine Wanger, she was part of the team that developed the modern intravenous drip technique. She attended Emma Willard School in Troy, New York. An original performer in the Ziegfeld Follies and a performer in the Folies-Bergere, she appeared in the 1917 Broadway production Over the Top, which starred Fred Astaire..."
11W-72 When The War Is Over, Over There (I'll Come Marching Back To You) - A single piece of sheet music (Landes-Carlyle Publishing Co., Denver, Colorado - 1918) with words by Billy Mason and music by Joseph L. Mann ("Dedicated to Vernona M. Garnett" by "The Writers of YOU MADE A THOUSAND PROMISES"): "There's a tear in your eye, little girl - There's a fear in your sigh, little girl - I know you're grieving because I'm leaving - But duty calls and we must part - I'll return bye and bye, never fear - For the heart and the hand of my dear - Your kiss will cheer me, be ever near me - Just a loving treasure in my heart! - When the war is over, over there -And at last the struggle's done - When the cannons cease their thunder - And the final vict'ry won - When the foreign foe becomes the friend of our own Red, White and Blue - When the war is over, over there, sweetheart - I'll come marching back to you..." Cover image by artist Hamak: Soldiers march home toward a woman in profile against a background of a flowing American flag. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Beautiful Baby," "You Made A Thousand Promises," "Last Night In My Fairyland Dream," etc. No biographical information was found for VERNONA M. GARNETT.
11W-73 When The 'Yanks' Come Marching Home - Two pieces of sheet music (A. J. Stasny Music Co., NYC - 1971) with words by William Jerome and music by Seymour Furth ("Sung with Great Success by Wm. J. Reilly, U.S.N." - with cover photograph): "Our hearts today are far across the ocean - God spare our boys, at night we kneel and pray - In far off lands troops are now in motion - Among the very bravest in the fray - For right and might must wipe out ev'ry wrong - So let us hope it won't last very long - For there'll be smiles and cheers and miles of tears - When the 'Yanks' come marching home - There'll be tears enough you know -To make a dozen rivers flow - Dressed in their torn and tattered suits of tan - From battlefields across the foam - Hearts will beat with joy for ev'ry boy - When the 'Yanks' come marching home..." Cover image (with blue-tinted inset publicity photograph of entertainer William J. Reilly) by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: Battleships and marching soldiers. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Some Day" and "Just You." W. J. REILLY was a gunner on the U.S.S. Michigan who also performed as a singer and piano player in vaudeville (No other biographical information found).
11W-74 When There's Peace On Earth Again - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1917) with words and music by Roger Lewis, Bob Crawford and Joseph Santly: "Before us lies a mighty task - With all this world at war - A thousand times the question's asked - 'What are we fighting for?' - We're fighting now for wars to cease - So all the world again may live in peace - When there is peace on earth again - The world will be a garden fair - The battlefields, like clouds will fade away - And turn to meadow lands where children can play - Between each land a tie there'll be - Of friendship, love and sympathy - And ev'ry nation, whether large or small - Will know there must be equal rights for all - 'Twill be like sunshine after rain - When there is peace on earth again..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A silhouette of marching soldiers watched over by a guardian angel of peace backed by the Red, White and Blue. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Goodbye Broadway, Hello France," "Where Do We Go From Here?," "Mother, Dixie And You" and "There's Something In The Name Of Ireland."
11W-75 When They Do The Hula Hula On The Boulevard - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with words by Alfred Bryan and music by Ray Lawrence: They're getting ready for that grand affair - That's goin' to happen someday over there - Honey did you hear the news - Honey get your dancing shoes - They're goin' to have a great big holiday - When they drive the Huns away - On the Boulevard, on the Boulevard what a gala day - When they do the Hula Hula on the Boola - Boulevard - When they do the Honolulu-Yakahoola-hoola good and hard - There'll be a hot time in Paree and ev'ry Yankee boy you see - Will grab a pretty baby two or maybe three - Oh gee! - When they do the schimmee-schwable and the hobble-hobble all around - There will be a celebration in each own back yard - They'll begin a new romance with ev'ry girl in France - When they do the Hula Hula on the Boola-Boola, on the Boulevard..." Cover image by artist FSM: Soldiers dancing. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Till We Meet Again."
11W-76 When Tony Goes Over The Top - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Billy Frisch and Archie Fletcher and music by Alex Marr (Featured by Willie Smith - with cover photograph): "Hey! You know Tony the barber - Who shaves and cuts a the hair - He said skabooch to his mariooch - He's gonna fight 'Over There' - Hey! You know how Tony could shave you - He'd cut you from ear to ear - I just got a letter from Tony - And this is what I hear - When Tony goes over the top - He no think of the barber shop - He grab-a-da-gun and chase-a-da-Hun - And make 'em all run like a son-of-a-gun - You can bet your life he'll never stop - When Tony goes over the top - Keep your eyes on that fighting wop - With a fire in his eyes - He'll capture the Kais' - He don't care if he dies - When Tony goes over the top..." Cover image (with a blue-tinted inset publicity photograph of vaudevillian Willie Smith) by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: ornate decorations surrounding the photograph. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Before The World Began." WILLIE SMITH was a vaudeville headliner and emcee. No other biographical information was found for WILLIE SMITH.
11W-77 When Uncle Sammy Leads the Band - A single piece of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co., NYC - Chicago - San Francisco - Sidney - London - 1916) with words by Lou Klein and music by Harry Von Tilzer: "What is that I hear - What is that I hear - Uncle Sammy's band is on parade - Hear the people cheer - Hear the people cheer - Flags are blowing as they're going - Farewell kisses they are throwing - Don't the boys look grand, marching with the band - Uncle Sammy told them what to do - Go get a gun, yes go get a gun, as in the days of yore - You know just what it's for - When Uncle Sammy leads the band - The soldier boys will march so grand - Hip, hip, hooraying, swaying and their sweethearts saying - March on, march on, march on for we are praying for your safe return - Oh soldier boy our hearts will yearn - Your cause is right with might, you'll fight - When Uncle Sammy leads the band..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: Uncle Sam (with baton) leading a marching soldier band. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "You'll Always Be The Same Sweet Girl."
11W-78 When We Meet In The Sweet Bye And Bye - A single piece of sheet music (Jerome H. Remick and Co., Detroit and NYC - 1918) with words and music by Stanley Murphy: "He was true, so would you be too - If you loved a girl like Sally - She was sad when her soldier lad - Left her all alone in the valley - Till her sweetheart wrote her I'll be coming home someday - Be cheery till the war clouds roll away - In the sweet bye and bye - When the skies are clear and blue - We shall meet you and I - And I'll tell you of the battles I've been through - And then we'll dream down by the stream - Beneath the silv'ry moon up in the summer sky - So save your kisses and so will I - Till we meet in the sweet bye and bye..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier and his girl in the moonlight. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "On The Road To Home Sweet Home."
11W-79 When We Reach That Old Port Somewhere In France - Two pieces of sheet music (A.J. Stasny Music Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Al Selden and music by Sam H. Stept ("As sung by Anna Chandler" - with cover photograph): "See this little letter in my hand - It's a summons to serve my native land - Tho' it grieves me dearie to my heart - There is nothing left to do so sweetheart we must part - I'm off today on a ship that sails away - And it's bound for some port, somewhere in France - Dearie don't cry, I will be back bye and bye - When it's all over there, and with France our debt is squared - When with Germany we're through - We'll hoist the old Red, White and Blue - So goodbye old pal - I'll be thinking of you gal - When we reach that old port, somewhere in France..." Cover image by photographer Strauss Peyton (A color-tinted inset publicity photograph of vaudevillian Anna Chandler) and artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle (A soldier embracing his girl as he points to the battlefield overseas). Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Rose Dreams." According to Wikipedia: "ANNA CHANDLER (born July 4, 1884, New Cumberland, Pennsylvania - d. July 10, 1957, El Sereno, California) was an American vaudeville actress and mezzo soprano singer of popular and light classical songs...Chandler sang songs in a Hebrew and Italian languages almost exclusively during her career as a headline artist in the Orpheum Circuit."
11W-80 When We Sang That Song Of Mother,Then I Thought Of Home Sweet Home - A single piece of sheet music (Whitmore Music Publishing Co., Scranton, Pennsylvania - 1918) with words ("Poem") by P.J. Dixon and music by Floyd E. Whitmore: "Over there some soldier boys were singing - Gathered 'round a campfire bright - While the shot and shell were ringing - Thru the darkness of the night - After singing a quaint old mother song - They spied a bowed down head - They asked their comrade what was wrong - And the boy looked up and said - When we sang that song of mother then I thought of home sweet home - For I knew there was no other - To cheer me when alone - I could picture my old mother dear with her head bowed down in prayer - When we sang that song of mother - Then I thought of home sweet home..." Cover image by artist Travis: A blue-tinted inset photograph of an elderly woman surrounded by a floral design. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "When The Boys Go Marching Over There," "Someone," "Underneath The Southern Moon," etc.
11W-81 When We Wind Up The Watch On The Rhine - Two pieces (various covers) of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1917) with words by Gordon V. Thompson and music by Gordon V. Thompson and William Davis ("Sung by the American Troops"): "Now we must part - Heart of my heart - I can hear the bugle sounding with a call so clear - Till I return - My heart will yearn for the girl I leave behind me - In the homeland dear! - When we wind up 'The Watch on the Rhine' - And we grind up the Kaiser's last line - When the war is done and the victory won - I'll come back to the girl that I call mine - When we wind up 'The Watch on the Rhine' - We will bind up two hearts that entwine - Wedding bells will be ringing 'Home Sweet Home' we'll be singing - When we wind up 'The Watch on the Rhine'... " Cover image by artist E.H Pfeiffer: A soldier and his girl sit on top of a large pocket watch. Various song folios are advertised on the back covers of the sheet music.
11W-82 When Yankee Doodle Learns To "Parlez Vous Francais" - Five pieces (various covers) of sheet music (A.J. Stasny Music Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Will Hart and music by Ed Nelson (Featured by Anna Chandler, Julia Dika and Lew Seymour - with cover photographs): "When Yankee Doodle came to Paris Town - Up on his face he wore a little frown - To those he'd meet upon the street he couldn't speak a word - To find a Miss that he could kiss, it seemed to be absurd- But if this Yankee should stay there awhile - Upon his face you're bound to see a smile - When Yankee Doodle learns to parlez vous Francais - Parlez vous Francais in the proper way - He will call each girlie 'Ma Cherie' - To every Miss that wants a kiss he'll say Wee, wee, On ze be, On ze bou - On Ze Boulevard - With a girl with a curl you can see him promenade - When Yankee Doodle learns to parlez vous Francais - 'Oo la la Sweet Papa he will teach them all to say..." Cover image (with inset publicity photographs of vaudevillians Anna Chandler, Julia Dika and Lew Seymour) by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A soldier dances with two French women. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Kiss Me Pretty," "Just You," etc. According to Wikipedia: "ANNA CHANDLER (born July 4, 1884, New Cumberland, Pennsylvania - d. July 10, 1957, El Sereno, California) was an American vaudeville actress and mezzo soprano singer of popular and light classical songs...Chandler sang songs in a Hebrew and Italian languages almost exclusively during her career as a headline artist in the Orpheum Circuit." According to THE NEW YORK CLIPPER (June 1917): "JULIA DIKA was billed as 'the only French singing comedienne in vaudeville.' and has but recently obtained an entirely new routine of exclusive songs and gowns, aptly called 'creations.' Last season she appeared throughout the West and will make her debut at the 81st Street Theatre the first half of this week (June 4). She will be accompanied at the piano by Billy Vanderveer, the composer, who has furnished her with some of the new songs. The act is under the direction of Claude and Gordon Bostock.' LEW SEYMOUR was a vaudeville song and dance comedian who partnered with Jessie Howard. No other biographical information was found.
11W-83 When Yankee Doodle Marches Through Berlin, There'll Be A Hot Time In The U.S.A - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1917) with words by Andrew B. Sterling and music by Arthur Lange ("By the Writers of AMERICA HERE'S MY BOY"): "The whole population of the big French nation - Were lined upon the street one day - Ev'ry flag was flying, ev'ry heart was sighing - For the Yankee boys were coming down that way - When suddenly a Yankee voice cried out - They could tell it was a Yankee when they heard him shout - Here they come - Here they come - And the drums are beating, there'll be no retreating - They'll be there - They'll be there - For there's vict'ry in the air - And they'll win - Yes, they'll win - Then they'll flash the news to old Broadway - And when Yankee Doodle marches thro' Berlin - There'll be a hot time in the U.S.A." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: Troops marching in front of government buildings (Berlin?) with horse drawn artillery. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "In The Sweet Long Ago."
11W-84 When You Come Back, And You Will Come Back, There's The Whole World Waiting For You - Two pieces of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons Publishing, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - 1918) with words and music (March Song - "Dedicated to my friend George MacFarlane" by George M. Cohan (With cover photograph of the composer - Portrayed by James Cagney on film, Mickey Rooney on television and Joel Grey on stage): "From 'Frisco Bay to old Broadway - Today all over the U.S.A. - We know we're fighting the foe - So we all stand steady and ready to go - We know no fear, we know no tear - And all we hear is the Yankee cheer - I heard a girlie say to her boy as he marched away - When you come back - You'll hear the Yankee cry 'At-a -boy, Jack!' - And when you return remember to bring - Some little thing that you get from the king - And drop me a line from Germany, do - Yankee Doodle, do - When you come back - And you will come back - There's the whole world waiting for you ..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A color-tinted inset publicity photograph of Broadway star/composer George M. Cohan backed by red, white and blue scenes of Washington, DC and the Statue of Liberty. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Kiss Me Again."
11W-85 When You Hear The Martial Band - A single piece of sheet music (The Elk Music Co., Binghamton, NY - 1918) with words and music by Leon P. Rundell ("As Sung by the Endwell Quartette" - with cover photograph - Arranged by Brian O' Brien): "Our soldier boys are bravely fighting for democracy, and they need some help from you - It's up to you and I to sacrifice our luxury, and see what we can do - Ev'ry good American is bound his share to help our khaki heroes over there - And when the band begins to play and the boys come home to stay - Gee! What a happy day - When you hear the martial band playing dear old 'Dixie-land' and the boys come marching home - Ev'ry one in step and full of Yankee pep, ready to hold his own - Uncle Sam is there to teach the Kaiser a lesson that is sure to make him wiser - When you hear the martial band playing dear old 'Dixie-land' and the boys come marching home..." Cover image by an unknown photographer and artist: Black and white photographs of a Navy marching band and The Endwell Quartette with ornate title lettering. THE ENDWELL QUARTETTE was a popular vocal group formed in Endwell, New York.
11W-86 When Your Sailor Boy In Blue Comes Sailing Home To You - A single piece of sheet (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Annelu Burns and music by Madelyn Sheppard ("Dedicated to: The Comforts Committee of the United States Navy League"): "Many hearts are aching now as fond farewells are said - Hands are reaching out in love across the sea - Many eyes with tears are wet for the boys they can't forget - Many lips are praying now so tenderly - When your sailor boy in blue comes a-sailing home to you - When the dreary hours of parting shall be o'er - Then will care and sorrow flee and you will so happy be - When the dear old days of love return once more - What if skies seem lined with gray - Sun beams chase the clouds away - And tomorrow's dawn shall be of rainbow hue - Then no matter if it's long - Let your heart still hold a song - Till your sailor boy comes sailing home to you..." Cover image by artist Jessie Banks: Navy ships at sea with insets of a sailor and a woman knitting. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Girls of France." According to the CONNECTICUT STATE LIBRARY Web Site: "On July 4, 1915, a group of women in Washington, D.C. formed the Women's Section of the NVAY LEAGUE. The League hoped to band women of various philosophical backgrounds under the banner of "Patriotism, Americanism, and National Defense." Twenty-five members of the Women's Section in any town could organize a chapter, with chapters being named for a town, patriotic event or historic place, or historical character no longer living. The materials in this record group were created by the Comforts Committee of the Admiral Bunce Section of the Navy League. The function of a COMFORTS COMMITTEE was to knit woolen garments for men serving in the United States Navy..."
11W-87 Where Do We Go From Here - Eleven pieces of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1917) with words and music by Howard Johnson and Percy Wenrich (Featured by Bailey and Cowan, Brice and King, Belle Brooks, Emma Carus, Collins and Harlan, Larry Comer, Beatrice Lambert, Frank Mullane, W.J. Reilly, U.S.N. and Moe Thompson - with cover photographs): "Paddy Mack drove a hack - Up and down Broadway - Pat had one expression and he'd use it ev'ryday - Anytime he'd grab a fare to take them for a ride - Paddy jumped up on the seat, cracked his whip and cried - Where do we go from here, boys - Where do we go from here? - Anywhere from Harlem to a Jersey City pier - When Pat would spy a pretty girl, he'd whisper in her ear - Oh joy, Oh boy, Where do we go from here?" Cover image (with inset publicity photographs of the various vaudevillians) by an unknown artist: A soldier steps from the battlefield through the "torn" sheet music cover. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Hawaiian Butterfly," "Hong Kong," "Mother Dixie and You," "If I Had A Son For Each Star In Old Glory," "I Called You My Sweetheart," "Goodbye Broadway, Hello France," etc. According to the PARLORSONGS.COM Web Site: "...Supposedly, the song ('Won't You Come Home, BILL BAILEY) is based on a 'real' BILL BAILEY who was a...vaudeville performer, member of the team of BAILEY AND COWAN. One night he was locked out of his house by a wife who had reached her limit of tolerance for his late night revelry with friends. It is said that Cannon (the composer) was one of his friends who partook of these nocturnal pleasures with him and Cannon paid for a room for Bailey at a local hotel and assured him that a night away from home would surely cause his wife to plead for his return. The song was so popular it inspired a number of spin-off tunes including I Wonder Why BILL BAILEY Won't Come Home and Since BILL BAILEY Came Back Home..." According to the IMDb Web Site: "CHARLES KING (October 31, 1886 - January 11, 1944) was a vaudeville and Broadway actor who also starred in several movies. He starred as the leading actor in the hit MGM movie, The Broadway Melody (1929), the first all-talking film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture...By 1908, King had begun acting on the Broadway stage; his first known role came in the revue The Mimic World. In the 1910s his most frequent partner was ELIZABETH BRICE with whom he appeared in The Slim Princess, A Winsome Widow, Watch Your Step and Miss 1917. King continued to appear in many major Broadway successes during the 1920s, including George White's Scandals (1921 edition), Little Nellie Kelly, Keep Kool, Hit the Deck and Present Arms, before turning his attention to Hollywood and the nascent genre of film musicals...Charles King died in London in 1944 from pneumonia, aged 57, while on a USO tour..." BELLE BROOKS was a popular vaudeville performer married to vaudeville headliner Irving Kaufman. According to Wikipedia: "EMMA CARUS (March 18, 1879 - November 18, 1927) was a contralto singer from New York who was in the cast of the original Ziegfeld Follies in 1907. Her given name was Emma Carus. She frequently sang in vaudeville and sometimes in Broadway features. One columnist described her as a sort of combination of Sophie Tucker and Fay Templeton with a little of Eva Tanguay and Eddie Foy thrown in for good measure..." According to Wikipedia: "COLLINS AND HARLAN, the team of Arthur Collins and Byron G. Harlan formed a popular comic duet between 1903 and 1926. They sang ragtime standards as well as what were known as 'Coon songs' - music sung by white performers in a black dialect. Their material also employed many other stereotypes of the time including Irishmen and farmers. Fellow recording artist Billy Murray nicknamed them 'The Half-Ton Duo' as both men were rather overweight. Collins and Harlan produced many number one hits with recordings of minstrel songs such as 'My Gal Irene,' 'I Know Dat I'll be Happy Til I Die,' 'Who Do You Love' and 'Down Among the Sugarcane.' Their song 'That Funny Jas Band from Dixieland,' recorded November 8 of 1916, is among first recorded uses of the word 'Jas,' which eventually evolved from 'jas,' to 'jass,' to the current spelling 'jazz'..." LARRY COMER was a vaudeville headliner billed as "Vaudeville's Beau Brummel." BEATRICE LAMBERT was a popular vaudeville singer known as "The International Girl." According to the ARTSMEME.COM Web Site: ""FRANK MULLANE - 'The Irish-American Hebrew,' the celebrated character singing comedian is the second feature. He is a big jovial fellow and every joke he tells is a hit..." W. J. REILLY was a gunner on the U.S.S. Michigan who also performed as a singer and piano player in vaudeville (No other biographical information found). According to the CELESTIAL MONOCHORD Web Site: "MOE THOMPSON, the Tin Pan Alley-style songwriter and vaudevillian, was behind the founding of The Victoria Cafe (nightclub in St. Paul , Minnesota)..."
11W-88 While You're Away - A single piece of sheet music (Gilbert Friedland Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words and music by L. Wolfe Gilbert and Anatol Friedland ("Songland's Favorite Composers - Writers of ARE YOU FROM HEAVEN?"): "His furlough time was over, he was told to say goodbye - And though his heart was staunch and true - A teardrop dimmed his eye - His little mother by his side - She smiled to hide her pain - And whispered softly let's be brave - Your teardrop is in vain - While you're away - While you're away - I'll keep the lovelight bright - So at night it will light your way dear - Just think of me where-e'er you'll be - I'll do my share, and bear, for someday - While you're away - You'll write and say - Our work is done and I am sailing home toward today - Pack up your cares in a bundle of joy - I'll wait for you till it's over my boy - May God bless you while you're away..." Cover image by artist Andrea de Takacs: A soldier embraces his mother. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Are You From Heaven?"
11W-89 Who's Afraid Of The Kaiser!!! - A single piece of sheet music (Gilbert Friedland Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words and music by L. Wolfe Gilbert and Anatol Friedland ("Songland's Favorite Composers - Writers of ARE YOU FROM HEAVEN?"): "Private Jerry, so gay and merry - He landed in Paree - The Frenchmen cheered with glee - Said you look good to me - But they told Jerry don't be so merry - The Kaiser's kind of tough - I should worry said Private Jerry - I'm gonna call his bluff - Who's afraid of the Kaiser - He's a lot of noise - He'll be sorry that we came in - When we're marching into Berlin - Who's afraid of the Kaiser - I would Like to know - With Yankee courage and Yankee cash - We're gonna capture his big moustache - Who's afraid of him - Come let's go..." Cover image by artist William Austin Starmer: Two soldiers (with scissors) cut off the Kaiser's moustache. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Are You From Heaven?" According to Wikipedia: Wilhelm II or William II (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, three notable contemporary relations being his first cousins King George V of the United Kingdom, founder of the House of Windsor, Marie of Romania, Queen consort of Romania and the Czarina Alix of Hesse, consort of his second cousin Tsar Nicholas II of the House of Romanov, the last ruler of the Russian Empire before the Russian Revolution of 1917 which deposed the monarchy. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose 'New Course' in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to the First World War. Bombastic and impetuous, he sometimes made tactless pronouncements on sensitive topics without consulting his ministers, culminating in a disastrous Daily Telegraph interview that cost him most of his power in 1908. His top generals, Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, dictated policy during the First World War with little regard for the civilian government. An ineffective war leader, he lost the support of the army, abdicated in November 1918, and fled to exile in the Netherlands..."
11W-90 Won't You Come Back To Me - A single piece of sheet music (Joe Morris Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Harry E. Rose and music by Anson C. Jacobs: "I never knew - I never dreamed - You were so dear to me - Until your absence brought to mind each tender memory - You left an aching heart behind - So sad and filled with pain - I pray and ask fate to be kind - And bring you back again - I've ben longing - I've been longing - I've been longing all along for you - I've been sighing - I've been crying - Til I don't know what to do - I've been watching - I've been waiting - I've been wond'ring just how long 'twill be - How my heart does yearn for your return - Won't you come back to me?" Cover image by an unknown artist: Ornate song title lettering. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When Tony Goes Over The Top" and "After The War is Over."
11W-91 Will The Angels Guard My Daddy Over There? - A single piece of sheet music (Frank K. Root and Co./McKinley Music Co., Chicago and NYC - 1918) with words by Paul B. Armstrong and music by F. Henri Klickmann ("By the writers of THERE'S A LITTLE BLUE STAR IN THE WINDOW, AND IT MEANS ALL THE WORLD TO ME"): "There's a quiet little cottage where the flowers are in bloom - And the perfume of the roses fills the air - But sadness comes at twilight when the work of day is done - As a child sees her father's vacant chair - She is just a dimpled darling and she's asking ev'ry day - Just why her dear old daddy marched away - Will the angels guard my daddy over there?- Will they watch him and protect him ev'rywhere? - Then she nestles down to rest on her loving mother's breast - And murmurs soft and slow her evening pray'r - How I love you, dear old daddy, how I miss you ! - I pray to Heav'n each night that God will bless you - Now I lay me down to sleep - I pray the Lord YOUR soul to keep - Angels guard daddy over there..." Cover image by an unknown photographer and artist: A black and white photograph of a mother comforting her praying daughter. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "There's A little Blue Star In The Window, And It Means All The World To Me," "I'm Hitting The Trail To Normandy," "Old Glory Goes Marching On," etc.
11W-92 Will You Wait Little Girl For Me - Three pieces of sheet music (D.W. Cooper Publishing Co., Boston, Massachusetts - 1916) with words and music by Max Clay (The song is also known as "Till The Breezes Blow Old Glory Over Mexico, Will You Wait Little Girl For Me" - "Dedicated to the National Guard"): "Honey don't you hear the bugle calling - Calling me to go - Honey don't you see my teardrops falling - 'Cause I love so - Soon I will be marching away from you - Far away to fight a foreign foe - So 'ere we part just give me one more loving kiss - And Honey tell me this - Will you wait, little girl - Will you wait little girl - Will you wait all alone for me? - And when I'm in the fray - Fighting for the day - Don't you let another fellow steal you heart away - Ev'ry night, little girl - By the light, little girl - Of the campfire your face I'll see - And till the breezes blow Old Glory over Mexico - Will you wait, little girl, for me?" Cover image by an unknown artist: A soldier comforting his sad girlfriend. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "When The Sun Sets In Galway," "I'm Going Back To The Girl I Love," etc.
11W-93 Worst Is Yet To Come, The - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co. Music Publishing, NYC - 1918) with words by Sam M. Lewis and Joe Young and music by Bert Grant: "In childhood day, we'd sing and play - A game we loved so well - I oh! The cherry oh! -The farmer in the dell - But since the war, the words of yore - Have changed to fit the times - The melody is the same to me -But the kids have changed the rhymes - The Kaiser has the measles - The Crown Prince has the croup - And ev'ryone of his other sons - Will soon be in the soup - But the worst is yet to come - The worst is yet to come - You won't know what it's all about or where it's coming from - You said you'd plaster Paris with your Hindenburg machine - But now it looks as if you're on the road to Paris green - But the worst is yet to come - The worst is yet to come - You tried to put the whole world on the bum - Now you crazy Kaiser, you've gotta give up - You've got to give up - You've got to give up - But don't let it worry you - The worst is yet to come..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: An American soldier attacks the Kaiser (who is cowering in bed) with a bayonet. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Tell That To The Marines." According to Wikipedia: Wilhelm II or William II (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, three notable contemporary relations being his first cousins King George V of the United Kingdom, founder of the House of Windsor, Marie of Romania, Queen consort of Romania and the Czarina Alix of Hesse, consort of his second cousin Tsar Nicholas II of the House of Romanov, the last ruler of the Russian Empire before the Russian Revolution of 1917 which deposed the monarchy. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose 'New Course' in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to the First World War. Bombastic and impetuous, he sometimes made tactless pronouncements on sensitive topics without consulting his ministers, culminating in a disastrous Daily Telegraph interview that cost him most of his power in 1908. His top generals, Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, dictated policy during the First World War with little regard for the civilian government. An ineffective war leader, he lost the support of the army, abdicated in November 1918, and fled to exile in the Netherlands..."
11W-94 Would You Rather Be A Colonel With An Eagle On Your Shoulder Or A Private With A Chicken On Your Knee - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Sidney Mitchell and music by Archie Gottler ("Successfully Sung by EDDIE CANTOR in Ziegfeld Follies" - with cover photograph of Cantor): "Once I heard a father ask his soldier son - Why can't you advance like other boys have done? - You've been a private mighty long - Won't you tell me what is wrong? - And then the soldier lad said listen to me, Dad - I'd rather be a private than a colonel in the army - A private has more fun, when his day's work is done - And when he goes on hikes - In ev'ry town he strikes - Girls discover him - And just smother him with things he likes - But girlies act so shy - When colonel passes by - He holds his head so high with dignity - So would you rather be a colonel with an eagle on your shoulder or a private with a chicken on your knee..." Cover image (with black and white inset publicity photograph of Broadway star Eddie Cantor) by the Rosenbaum Studios, NYC : Ornate song title lettering. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Good Morning, Mr. Zip-Zip-Zip" and "If I Am Not At The Roll Call (Kiss Mother Good-Bye For Me)." According to Wikipedia: "EDDIE CANTOR (January 31, 1892 (exact date unknown) - October 10, 1964), born Isidore Itskowitz, was an American 'illustrated song' performer, comedian, dancer, singer, actor and songwriter. Familiar to Broadway, radio, movie and early television audiences, this 'Apostle of Pep' was regarded almost as a family member by millions because his top-rated radio shows revealed intimate stories and amusing anecdotes about his wife Ida and five daughters. Some of his hits include 'Makin' Whoopee,' 'Ida,' 'If You Knew Susie,' 'Ma! He's Makin' Eyes at Me,' 'Margie' and 'How Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down on the Farm (After They've Seen Paree?)' He also wrote a few songs, including 'Merrily We Roll Along,' the Merrie Melodies Warner Bros. cartoon theme. His eye-rolling song-and-dance routines eventually led to his nickname, 'Banjo Eyes.' In 1933, the artist Frederick J. Garner caricatured Cantor with large round eyes resembling the drum-like pot of a banjo. Cantor's eyes became his trademark, often exaggerated in illustrations, and leading to his appearance on Broadway in the musical Banjo Eyes (1941). His charity and humanitarian work was extensive, and he is credited with coining the phrase and helping to develop The March of Dimes..."
12Y-1 Yankee Boys Have Made A Wild French Baby Out of Me!, Ze - A single piece of sheet music (Charles K. Harris Publishing - NYC - Chicago - Toronto - 1919) with words by Eugene West and music by Joe Gold ("Sung and Introduced by Lillian Herlein" - with cover photograph): "Miss Fifi in gay Paree saw our soldier boys and oh they looked so grand - With their military band - This maid of France, she took a chance and winked her roguish eyes - And when they taught her Yankee love - She said 'la la that's nice' - Since ze Yankee boys have come to France, I'm happy as can be - No more I say oui, oui - I speak like ziz 'oh gee' - I've learned to do ze ragtime and I ball ze jack - Ze Yankee glide, ze Yankee hug, it almost breaks my back - And when it comes to loving, oh, la, la, what ze can do - They've forgotten more about that thing than ze Frenchman ever knew - They've put ze pep in dear old France and woke up gay Paree - Ze Yankee boys have made one wild French baby out of me..." According to Wikipedia: "Lillian Herlein (March 11, 1895 - April 13, 1971) was an actress and singer in theater and vaudeville in the early 20th century. Herlein was in The Rose of Algeria produced by the Herald Square Theatre in New York City in September 1909. She sang the role of Zoradie, which had been sung by Ida Brooks Hunt in the previous season. The audience demanded an encore of her rendition of The Rose of the World, part of the Victor Herbert music. She played the 5th Avenue Theatre with Keith and Proctor in vaudeville afterward. The venue was located at Broadway and 28th Street in Manhattan. Herlein performed at the Brighton Beach Music Hall in July 1911. She was in a charity benefit at the New York Hippodrome, for the Christmas Fund of the New York American and Evening Journal, in December 1911. She was joined by Gaby Deslys, Lillian Shaw, Gertrude Bryan, and numerous stage and comedy artists of the era. Proceeds were donated to the poor of New York City. The Orpheum Theatre in Brooklyn, New York presented A Hungarian Rhapsody and the musical comedy, Sweeties, in June 1919. Herlein was among the players along with Harry Mayo and Basil Lynn. In July Herlein was a member of the Alla Maslova Ballet. The troupe presented Kiss Me in Washington, D.C., at the B.F. Keith Theatre, 675 15th Street NW. Herlein also appeared at the Palace Theater and Winter Garden Theater on Broadway and in Europe. In her later years she was on radio and television and was a character actor in films. Her movie credits are for a role as Mrs. Levy in Solomon In Society (1922) and an uncredited part in Thanks For The Memory (1938). Lillian Herlein died at French Hospital, 8th Avenue and West 30th Street, in 1971. She was the widow of Charles G. Strakosch, who died in June 1965. They had a son, Charles Jr. Herlein was in her 70s."
12Y-2 Yankee Division, The - Two pieces of sheet music (D.W. Cooper Music Co., Boston, Massachusetts - 1918) with music by Chick Story. Cover image by photographer David Bachrach, Jr. and artist V.C. Plunkett: A sepia-toned photograph of General C.R. Edwards surrounded by various military symbols and insignias. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Flower Of France Bloom Again." According to Wikipedia: "CLARENCE RANSOM EDWARDS (January 1, 1859 - February 14, 1931) was an American general, known as the first Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs, and commander of the 26th Division in World War I...Upon the outbreak of World War I, Edwards was placed in charge of the Department of the Northeast, comprising all the New England states. In August 1917, he was promoted to major general in the National Army and given the task of organizing the 26th Division. The division arrived in France in September 1917, the first complete American division to do so. The division also became the first complete American division to go into combat at Chemin-des-Dames in February 1918, where they remained for 46 days. Going back to his days at West Point, Edwards had earned a reputation for being sharp-tongued and contentious. John J. Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force, particularly despised him. Edwards made another enemy in General Robert Lee Bullard during the 26th Division's relief of the 1st Infantry Division near Toul in April 1918. Edwards found fault with everything he saw, and accused the 1st Division of leaving behind classified documents. Bullard was enraged, but Pershing always favored the 1st Division, and reassured him, and nothing came of the incident. In July 1918, during the Second Battle of the Marne, I Corps commander Hunter Liggett found that, although the 26th Division did not lack for heroism and fought valiantly, he could not depend on its commanders, especially Edwards, to subjugate his unit to Regular Army Divisions. Edwards' final demise came in October 1918, when he reported an incident to Liggett involving information two of his soldiers had obtained from German soldiers with whom they had been fraternizing. The Germans had expressed their belief that the war would be over soon, and that they were reluctant to continue fighting. While Edwards thought he was reporting the enemy's poor morale to Liggett, he instead gave Liggett an excuse to get rid of Edwards for his zeal in supporting the National Guard. Liggett reported the incident to Pershing, who took the opportunity to act on his personal vendetta and relieve Edwards of his command..."
12Y-3 Yankee Doodle Dixie - A single piece of sheet music (Weile Publishing Co., Baltimore, Maryland and St. Louis, Missouri - 1917) with words by Lilla Clark (Arranged by Lilla Clark) and music by Daniel Emmett: "Our Uncle Sam, though keeping still - Across the mighty ocean - To Hindenburg and Kaiser Bill - Has taken quite a notion - And so we've doffed our blue and gray - For khaki suits quite fixey - And come now singing on the way - Our Yankee Doodle Dixie - Columbia listened to the awful din - And said 'Boys, we must enter in - So away, far away, from dear Freedom's land' - From Yankee Land and Dixie - We come as one - To stop these deeds so tricksy - And see the battle won - To stop this din - And all these deeds so tricksy - And sing ere while our Yankee Doodle Dixie..." Cover image by an unknown artist: Uncle Sam observing Lady Liberty. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Alice Of The Pines" and "Fight For Our Uncle Sam."
12Y-4 Yankee Doodle In Berlin - A single piece of sheet music (Daniels and Wilson Inc. Music Publishers, San Francisco, California - 1919) with words by Harry Williams and music by Charles N. Daniels (The title theme for Mack Sennett's Latest comedy in Five Parts - A perfect Scream of Laughter' - With cover photograph of Mack Sennett - "King of Laughter With His Studio Bathing Girls"): "Yankee Doodle rode upon a bony pony - He was just a clown, but still he gets to town - Hindenburg although his heart was stony, phony - Never got to see Dear Old Paree - But Yankee Doodle always goes to town - And Yankee Doodle's in Berlin - Each tearful German who calls it 'cheek' - Tells it to Herman, then he 'bawls' a week (cry baby) - Yankee Doodle made a German thin - He's even lost his double chin - All the Linden trees shake a 'shimmie' in the breeze - For lanky Yankee Doodle in Berlin..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: Sepia-toned photographs of Mack Sennett and his bathing beauties. Mack Sennett's "latest comedy in 5 parts" YANKEE DOODLE IN BERLIN is advertised on the back cover of the sheet music. According to Wikipedia: "MACK SENNETT (January 17, 1880 - November 5, 1960) was a Canadian-born American director and actor and was known as the innovator of slapstick comedy in film. During his lifetime he was known at times as the 'King of Comedy.' His short Wrestling Swordfish was awarded the Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film in 1932 and he earned an Academy Honorary Award in 1937..."
12Y-5 Yankee Doodle's Going To Berlin - A single piece of sheet music (Shapiro, Bernstein and Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words and music by Kent Perkins (Featured by Vernon Stiles - Army Song Leader): "Yankee Doodle's gone across the pond - To teach the German Kaiser better manners - Helmet, mask and khaki he has donned - His fighting bird is perched upon his banners - All keyed up the lessons to begin - He'll start the backward William with his letters - Yankee Doodle's going to Berlin - To show the Kaiser how to treat his betters - Yankee Doodle's clever with his gun - His baseball arm at throwing bombs is handy - Yankee Doodle's gone to hunt the Hun - And make him dance to 'Yankee Doodle Dandy.' " Cover image (with a blue-tinted inset publicity photograph of Army Song Leader Vernon Stiles) by artist E.E. Walton: Yankee Doodle (with a feather in his cap) throws a bomb from a tank. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Three Wonderful Letters From Home," Lafayette! We Hear You Calling," "A Little Bit Of Sunshine From Home," etc. VERNON STILES was a leading tenor for the Chicago Opera Company and a concert artist who was the company song leader at Camp Devens, Massachusetts, etc.
12Y-6 You're A Grand Old Flag - A single piece of sheet music (Maurice Richmond Music Co., Inc., NYC - 1916) with words and music by George M. Cohan ("Sensational Patriotic Song Originally Introduced in GEORGE WASHINGTON, JR."): "There's a feeling comes a stealing and it sets my heart a reeling - When I'm list'ning to the music of a military band - Any tune like 'Yankee Doodle' simply sets me off my noodle - It's that patriotic something that no one can understand - 'Way down South in the land of cotton' - Melody untiring - Ain't that inspiring! - Hurrah! Hurrah! We'll join the jubilee - And that's going some for the Yankees, by gum! - Red, White and Blue, I am for you - Honest, you're a grand old flag - You're a grand old flag - You're a high flying flag - And forever may you wave - You're the emblem of the land I love - The home of the free and the brave - Ev'ry heart beats true under Red, White and Blue - Where there's never a boast or brag - But should auld acquaintance be forgot - Keep your eye on the grand old flag..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A young George Washington portrait. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "In The Valley of Sunshine And Love." Broadway star GEORGE M. COHAN was portrayed by James Cagney on film, Mickey Rooney on television and Joel Grey on stage. According to the MUSICALS 101.COM Web Site: "GEORGE WASHINGTON, JR. (1906). - Cohan starred as a patriotic lad who refuses to marry the British aristocrat his US Senator father has selected for him. Jerry and Nellie Cohan and Ethel Levy were featured. A brief Broadway run was followed by a long national tour. (81 performances)."
12Y-7 You're As Dear To Me As 'Dixie' Was To Lee - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1917) with words and music by 'The Misses Campbell" ("The Misses Campbell's Southern Song Success" - with a cover photograph): "In the quaint old town of Richmond - Of Civil Wartime fame - Lived a sweet young Southern beauty - Virginia was her name - She loved a gay West Pointer - And so gallant was he - That when he came to tell her of his love - He sang out cheerily - You're as dear to me as Dixie was to Lee - And you know that's going some - Your smiling eyes light up the skies - And thrill me like the drum - And I love you, love you, love you, my Virginia - You're as sweet as a girl can be - And believe me when I tell you - You're as dear to me as Dixie was to Lee..." Cover image by an unknown photographer and artist: A color-tinted photograph of vaudeville stars "The Misses Campbell." Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Goodbye Broadway, Hello France," "Where Do We Go From Here?" "Mother , Dixie And You," etc. According to VINTAGE COSTUMES FOR THE CHICAGO VAUDEVILLE by Mary Carol Freidrich and Valerie Lane: "The Campbell Duo was a Vaudeville sister act documented to have performed in Chicago in the early part of the twentieth century. One of the sisters, Leola C. Donald (1901-1983) was married at the age of twenty-five to Harry S. Donald of Calumet, Michigan. At this time, Calumet was still a bustling city built upon the prosperity of the copper mines of the area. Upon the death of their daughter, Jayne Lee Donald (1934-2000)…Little is known about the Campbell Duo act. Census information from 1930 indicates the sisters were originally from Wisconsin. Some contemporary residents of Calumet observed that they remember that Leola was 'in the theatre.' In 1919, a review of the Campbell Duo act by Robert Conkey, a reporter for the Chicago Vaudeville newspaper, was mostly positive: 'At the Calumet theatre, South Chicago, daily matinees are offered to very good houses, and Manager Rayfield presents bills of excellent quality. Campbell Duo - Two women who secure many laughs and frequent applause with a consistent singing and talking skit along rural lines. One portrays an unusually good character throughout, while the other makes two changes of beautiful costumes and is equally good in the character delineation. As visitors to the city, they afford much mirth and merriment. The Campbell Duo has improved wonderfully since last seen and did what is looked at as stopping the show.' (Chicago Vaudeville - Vol. 1, No. 31, March 22, 1919)…"
12Y-8 You're The Greatest Little Mothers In The World (Mothers Of America) - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words by Joe Young and Sam M. Lewis and music by Archie Gottler: "Who gives our nation its heroes? - Who bears the burden alone? - Who gives and gives as long as she lives? - There's Joan of Arc in ev'ry home - Mothers of America - The eyes of the world are on you - When you gave your lad, you gave all you had - Your courage will guide us through - There's a tear behind your smile - Ev'ry time that our flag is unfurled - Mothers of America - you're the greatest little mothers in the world..." Cover image by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle: A mother smiles while observing her soldier son. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "I Cannot Bear To Say Goodbye."
12Y-9 You Keep Sending 'Em Over And We'll Keep Knocking 'Em Down - A single piece of sheet music (Waterson, Berlin and Snyder Co. Music Publishers, NYC - 1918) with words by Sidney D. Mitchell and music by Harry Ruby ("Successfully Introduced by EDDIE CANTOR in Ziegfeld Follies"): "Our Yankee soldiers fighting in the trenches 'over there' - All sing a little air - That makes the Germans swear - The Huns attack and then our boys go at 'em with a swing - It drives the Germans crazy to hear the Yankees sing - You keep sending 'em over and we'll keep knocking 'em down - We'll plant 'em under the clover - Six feet under the ground - Send on ev'ry Hun - No matter how tall - The bigger they come - The harder they fall - So you keep sending 'em over and we'll keep knocking 'em down..." Cover image (with a blue -tinted inset publicity photograph of Broadway star Eddie Cantor) by artist Albert Wilfred Barbelle; A soldier swinging his rifle from a trench. Advertised song samples on the back cover include; "Oh! How I Wish I Could Sleep (Until My Daddy Comes Home)." Composer Harry Ruby was portrayed by Red Skelton in the 1950 MGM biopic THREE LITTLE WORDS. According to Wikipedia: "EDDIE CANTOR (January 31, 1892 - October 10, 1964), born Edward Israel Iskowitz, was an American 'illustrated song' performer, comedian, dancer, singer, actor and songwriter. Familiar to Broadway, radio, movie and early television audiences, this 'Apostle of Pep' was regarded almost as a family member by millions because his top-rated radio shows revealed intimate stories and amusing anecdotes about his wife Ida and five daughters. Some of his hits include 'Makin' Whoopee,' 'Ida,' 'If You Knew Susie,' 'Ma! He's Makin' Eyes at Me,' 'Margie' and 'How Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down on the Farm (After They've Seen Paree?)' He also wrote a few songs, including 'Merrily We Roll Along,' the Merrie Melodies Warner Bros. cartoon theme. His eye-rolling song-and-dance routines eventually led to his nickname, 'Banjo Eyes' In 1933, the artist Frederick J. Garner caricatured Cantor with large round eyes resembling the drum-like pot of a banjo. Cantor's eyes became his trademark, often exaggerated in illustrations, and leading to his appearance on Broadway in the musical Banjo Eyes (1941). His charity and humanitarian work was extensive, and he is credited with coining the phrase and helping to develop The March of Dimes..."
12Y-10 You'll Be Proud To Be A Soldier Boy - A single piece of sheet music (Clark Publishing Co., San Francisco, California - 1918) with words by John J. Clark and music by Pat Paderewsky ("Dedicated To Our Army and Navy"): "When our ships sail o'er the ocean - All at peace with every land - And old Glory waves in splendor - O'er a nation proud and grand - When we meet and greet our heroes - From the land across the foam - Then each heart will beat in rapture - As we welcome them back home - You'll be proud to be a soldier boy - You'll be proud to share your country's joy - When with Pershing oe'r the main - You come sailing home again - And we meet you once again, soldier boy - We'll be proud to take you by the hand - Bid you welcome to this land so grand - It will be a happy day - In this good old U.S.A. - You'll be proud to be a soldier boy..." Cover image by an unknown artist; A silhouette of a soldier with a bayoneted rifle.
12Y-11 You'll Be There To Meet Them (When The Boys Come Home) - Two pieces of sheet music (A.J. Stasny Music Co., NYC - 1918) with words by Jeff Branen and music by Dick Heinrich: "Just wait until this war is over - You'll be happy then - To see the hometown boys who marched away get back again - You'll all be there and I'll be there - Our anxious hearts will yearn - 'Twill be a sight to watch the faces when the boys return - For ev'ry sad one there'll be lots of glad ones - For ev'ry tear there'll be a lot of cheers - For ev'ry heart-sob there'll be lots of heartthrobs - That will be remembered in future years - For ev'ry bow'd head there'll be lots of proud heads - There'll be banners streaming from hill and dome - That tells the story in a blaze of glory - You'll be there to meet them - When the boys come home..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A young woman (looking concerned) standing and an older man (looking sad) sitting before a window overlooking a victory parade. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "A Soldier's Rosary" and "Rose Dreams."
12Y-12 You'll Find Old Dixieland In France - Two pieces of sheet music (Leo Feist Inc., NYC - 1918) with words by Grant Clarke (French text by Louis Delamarre) and music by George W. Meyer ("Introduced by Bert Williams in Ziegfeld Midnight Frolic"): "No more darkies on the Swanee shore - No more singin' round the cabin door - Dixie ain't Dixie now, I vow - In the village all the streets are bare - Doesn't seem to be a soul down there - It made me blue somehow - I asked old Mammy Gray - You remember Dancin' Mose? - Folks all called him 'Tickle Toes' - You'll find him 'Over There' in France - Alexander's band left old Dixieland - They used to play the 'lovin' blues' for ev'ryone - Now they're playin' blues upon a Gatling Gun - Don't forget 'Old Shimme Sam' - Famous boy from Alabam' - He marched away in khaki pants - Instead of pickin' melons off the vine - They're pickin' Germans off the Rhine - You'll find old Dixieland in France..." Cover image by unknown photographers: A black and white photograph of the Eiffel Tower with a black and white inset photograph of African - Americans picking cotton somewhere in the Southern United States. The back cover features an advertisement for the SONGS OF CHEER folio ("For Camp, Fireside, Liberty and Community Singing - A Pocket Book of Songs - the soul of America's war-time spirit..."). According to Wikipedia: "BERT WILLIAMS (November 12, 1874 - March 4, 1922) was one of the pre-eminent entertainers of the Vaudeville era and one of the most popular comedians for all audiences of his time. He was by far the best-selling black recording artist before 1920. In 1918, the New York Dramatic Mirror called Williams "one of the great comedians of the world." Williams was a key figure in the development of African-American entertainment. In an age when racial inequality and stereotyping were commonplace, he became the first black American to take a lead role on the Broadway stage, and did much to push back racial barriers during his career. Fellow vaudevillian W.C. Fields, who appeared in productions with Williams, described him as 'the funniest man I ever saw - and the saddest man I ever knew.' "
12Y-13 You'll Have to Put Him To Sleep With The Marseillaise And Wake Him Up With A Oo-La-La - A single piece of sheet music (Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co., NYC - Chicago - San Francisco - Sidney - London - 1918) with words by Andrew Sterling and music by Harry Von Tilzer: "Girls - Have you heard the very latest news - Girls - When you do, you'll surely get the blues - You had better learn to parlez -vous - When your soldier boy comes back to you - Girls - He has learned a lot of things in France - Girls - When you marry him you'll get your chance - You'll have to do your talking in French - When he comes back from the trench - You'll have to do your little parlez vous - You'll have to coo - Just like the French girls do - You'll have to tease in French - You'll have to squeeze in French - You'll have to la-la-la-la all in French - You'll have to learn to say 'come -ci (see), come-ca (sah) - And when you sing for your Pa-Pa - It's up to you to sing ze French songs too - Because when you get through with Yankee Doodle-doo - You'll have to put him to sleep with the Marseillaise - And wake him with the Oo-la-la..." Cover image by artist E.H. Pfeiffer: An American soldier kisses a young French girl. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "The Pickaninnies Paradise" and "Somebody's Waiting For Someone." According to Wikipedia: "LA MARSEILLAISE is the national anthem of France. The song was written and composed in 1792 by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle during the French Revolutionary Wars, and was originally titled 'Chant de guerre pour l'Armée du Rhin.' The French National Convention adopted it as the Republic's anthem in 1795. It acquired its nickname after being sung in Paris by volunteers from Marseille marching on the capital. The song is the first example of the "European march" anthemic style. The anthem's evocative melody and lyrics have led to its widespread use as a song of revolution and its incorporation into many pieces of classical and popular music..."
12Y-14 Young America, We're Strong For You - A single piece of sheet music (F.B. Haviland Publishing Co., NYC - 1915) with words and music by William McKenna (with a cover photograph of The Six Brown Brothers with Montgomery and Stone in CHIN-CHIN at the Globe Theatre in NYC ): "Hear the school bell ringing - Hear the children's happy shout - Let us stand and see them passing by when school is out - See the faces representing ev'ry race and clime - Our little men and women - They'll be Yankees too in time - We pin our hopes on Young America - You'll keep the Nation great and grand - You hold our future Young America - In the hollow of each tiny hand - Yankees and youngsters from across the sea - To Uncle Sam you'll all prove true - You're the rising generation - The backbone of the nation - Young America we're strong for you..." Cover image (with a black and white inset publicity/production photograph of vaudeville and Broadway stars THE SIX BROWN BROTHERS and MONTGOMERY AND STONE) by artist "Walt" of Universal Art Services (NYC): A young boy draws Uncle Sam on his school slate. Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers include: "On The Bark Of An Old Cherry Tree," "I Seem To Hear You Gently Callin ('Cross The World So Wide)," "When I Dream Of Killarney And You," "When The Twilight Comes To Kiss The Rose Good-Night," etc. According to Wikipedia: "THE SIX BROWN BROTHERS were a Canadian vaudeville era saxophone sextet consisting of six brothers. The brothers were, William, Tom (1881-1950), Alec, Percy, Fred and Vern Brown. The Brown Brothers lived in Lindsay, Ontario until 1893. The first instrumentation consisted of a saxophone quintet (bass, baritone, tenor, and 2 alto saxes. A soprano sax was never used with the group, except as a feature for Tom Brown). But in 1913, they added a second baritone sax. Success in 1912-14 lead to touring to Scotland and elsewhere in Europe. Additional non-family members also played with the group. After they broke up in 1933 only the leader, Tom Brown, continued as a musician but with limited success." According to WIKIPEDIA: "FRED ANDREW STONE (August 19, 1873 - March 6, 1959) was an American actor. Stone began his career as a performer in circuses and minstrel shows, went on to act on vaudeville, and became a star on Broadway and in feature films, which earned him a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame...He was particularly famous for appearing on stage opposite DAVID C. MONTGOMERY, a 22-year partnership until Montgomery's death in 1917, in shows such as The Wizard of Oz premiering in 1902, the Victor Herbert operetta The Red Mill in 1906, and CHIN CHIN, A Modern Aladdin, in 1914. In 1939, he appeared in a radio program promoting the new MGM film of The Wizard of Oz, in which he got to meet the actor who played the Scarecrow, Ray Bolger, who was a great admirer of Stone's work, and although Bolger was too young to have seen Stone play the Scarecrow in the stage play, he did see Stone in The Red Mill..."
12Y-15 Your Boy Is On The Coal Pile Now - A single piece of sheet music (Leo Feist, Inc., NYC - 1918) with words and music by Seaman Sam Ward (of the Pelham Naval Training Station, Pelham Bay, NY): "I just received your letter wrote a sailor boy one day - And Mother it was good to hear from home - But you say that you worry and ev'ry night you pray - That when I sail I'll safely cross the foam - I've just finished training and now I have been sent to a shipping regiment - So weep no more, dear mother - I'm working on the coal pile now - I shovel all the day - But nothing moves away - And Oh! how the sweat runs off my brow - I joined the Navy to sail across the sea - But somebody went and wished a shovel on me - Oh, say can you imagine mother - Your boy is on the coal pile now!" Cover image by an unknown artist: A sailor (with shovel), a cat and a dog on a coal pile. The back cover features an advertisement for the SONGS OF CHEER folio ("For Camp, Fireside, Liberty and Community Singing - A Pocket Book of Songs - the soul of America's war-time spirit..."). According to the FRIENDS OF THE PELHAM BAY PARK Web Site: "The PELHAM NAVY BASE opened on October 1, 1917 and by March 1918 held 4,777 sailors. (To put it in perspective, the 2000 U.S. Census population of City Island was 4,520.) Some 1,000 personnel rotated in and out of the facility each week. The base consisted of 537 buildings, most used for barracks. Additional structures included a drill hall, a 3,000 book library with a 15,000 book capacity, a YMCA, a Knights of Columbus, a Jewish welfare building, an Officer's Club, a Post Office, Police and Fire buildings, a photo studio, 16 mess halls, and also pools, tennis courts and numerous canteens. Most structures were made of wood, the largest a 640×220-foot Drill Hall that lasted into the 1930s. More substantial concrete buildings included two hospitals, a brig, an armory, a paymaster's office, and boiler and electrical plants. By its sheer size and public waterfront, Pelham Bay Park provided the perfect location to drill the sailors in both actual naval launches and sham ground battles and maneuvers. It also allowed for numerous recreational 'exercises' like baseball, golf, tennis, band marches, drills, boxing matches and theater. Numerous newspaper articles reported the positive influence the base had on folks in neighboring City Island. On November 11, 1918, World War I was over and sailors began to be shipped home from the base. The Treaty of Versailles, signed on June 28, 1919, signaled the sale of the buildings, which was completed by the end of 1919..." No biographical information was found for Seaman SAM WARD.
12Y-16 Your Country Needs You Now - A single piece of sheet music (M. Witmark and Sons, NYC - Chicago - Philadelphia - Boston - San Francisco - London - 1917) with words by Al Dubin ("Author of ALL THE WORLD WILL BE JEALOUS OF ME, 'TWAS ONLY AN IRISHMAN'S DREAM, etc.") and music by Rennie Cormack and George B. Mc Connell ("Dedicated to Frank Brockway" with a cover photograph of a scene featuring Eulalie Jensen, Mary Maurice and Harry Morey - a trio of Vitagraph silent film stars): "Volunteer, Volunteer, Volunteer - Can't You hear, can't you hear, can't you hear - Uncle Sammy is calling you - What are you goin' to do? - Must he call in vain? - Fall in line, fall in line, fall in line - Now's the time, now's the time, now's the time - Don't be a slacker, son - Go get yourself a gun - Your country needs you now - Your country needs you - Now what will you do? - It's time to stand together - For the Red, White and Blue - Sweethearts and mothers want you to keep your vow - They love you, I know - But they want you to go - For your country needs you now..." Cover image by an unknown photographer: A color-tinted photograph of Vitagraph silent film stars EULALIE JENSEN, MARY MAURICE and HARRY MOREY - "Reproduced by Permission." Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "My Rosary For You," There's a Long, Long Trail," "Evening Brings Rest And You" and "Too-Ra Loo Ra- Loo Ral (That's An Irish Lullaby)." No biographical information was found for FRANK BROCKWAY. According to Wikipedia: "EULALIE JENSEN (December 24, 1884 - October 7, 1952) was an American actress on the New York stage and in silent films...She was selected as one of six extra girls from the 200 applicants responding to a New York newspaper ad inserted by Sarah Bernhardt. The famed actress was making a visit to New York City. At this time, Miss Jensen was completely unknown, but this was the beginning of her film career. A number of years of stage experience enabled Jensen to become a fine emotional actress. Her stage engagements included a role in The Million at the 39th St. Theatre. This was a four-act farce by M. M. Ber and Guille Ward. The show was also featured in New Haven, Connecticut at the Hyperion Theatre. Both productions were in 1911. In 1912, Jensen wired the managers of the Panama-Pacific Exposition of her candidacy for the model of the Spirit of the Golden Gate. The event was to be in San Francisco, California in 1915. She was selected as the model for the decorative design of the St. Louis, Missouri exposition in 1904. Jensen denied she was the most beautiful woman in America. She believed her features 'adapted for decorative design.' Her film career began in 1914 with eight films. Among these were Eve's Daughter, Maria's Sacrifice, The Moonstones of Fez, My Official Wife, and Romantic Josie. Jensen made The Goddess (1915) at the old Vitagraph studio in New York, appeared in The Spark Divine (1919) and co-starred with Norma Talmadge in The Passion Flower (1921). She became known for her vivid character portrayals. She played a Salvation Army worker and a bird woman among many others. The latter character was a prominent member of the cast of Freckles (1928). The film was adapted from the novel by Gene Stratton-Porter. Eulalie's film career continued into the sound medium with her final films, A Lost Lady (1934) and Society Doctor (1935)..." According to Wikipedia: "MARY MAURICE (November 15, 1844, Morristown, Ohio - April 30, 1918, Port Carbon, Pennsylvania) was an American actress, who appeared 139 films between 1909 and 1918. This Vitagraph 'mother lady' was a Philadelphian. During her long stage career, she appeared in support of Booth, Barrett, Jefferson, Modjeska and her last engagement was with Robert B. Mantell. She did not mind admitting that she was past sixty, but she had the heart of youth and was the best loved of screen mothers. She played in both The Goddess and The Battle Cry of Peace. She, Russell Bassett, Sarah Bernhardt, W. Chrystie Miller, Ruby Lafayette, Kate Meek (b. 1838), the veteran character actor Matt B. Snyder and Harold Lloyd regular Anna Townsend were the eight oldest people working in film during the 1910s..." According to Wikipedia: "HARRY TEMPLE MOREY (1873 - January 24, 1936) was an American stage and motion picture actor who appeared in nearly two hundred films during his career. Born in Charlotte, Michigan, Morey began acting career on the stage. In 1909, Morey joined the Vitagraph Film Company, making him a member the original Vitagraph stock company of actors. He had his first substantial film role in 1910, opposite actors Maurice Costello and Earle Williams in the Van Dyke Brooke-directed dramatic short Capital vs. Labor. He would spend the early 1910s appearing opposite such popular actors of the era as John Bunny, Flora Finch, Julia Swayne Gordon, Florence Turner, Edith Storey and William Shea. Morey would make his final film appearance in the 1934 Ralph Staub-directed comedy short Very Close Veins opposite actors Ben Blue and Shemp Howard. Morey died in Brooklyn, New York, USA in 1936 at the age of 62 of a lung abscess."
12Y-17 Your Flag And Country Want You (We Don't Want To Lose You) - A single piece of sheet music (Chappell and Co., Ltd, NYC - 1915) with words by Paul A. Rubens and Frank North and music by Paul A. Rubens: "It's forward to the trenches - It's forward to the foe - The fifes and drums are sounding - They call the men to go - In mansion and in cottage - There rings the loud command - For the foe-man is advancing - With destruction in his hand - So come and join the forces - For the glory of the Land! - Oh, we don't want to lose you - But we think you ought to go - For your flag and your country - Both need you so - We shall want you and miss you - With all the might and main - We shall cheer you, thank you, bless you - When you come back again - Oh, we don't want to lose you - But we think you ought to go - For your Flag and your country - Both need you so - We shall want you and miss you - With all our might and main - We shall cheer you, thank you, bless you - When you come back again..." Cover image by artist John Hassall: A woman with arms outstretched. Advertised song samples on the inside and back covers; "Good- Bye Girls, I'm Through," "Wonderful Garden Of Dreams," "Two Eyes Of Grey," etc.
12Y-18 Your Flag And My Flag - A single piece of sheet music (P.F. Volland and Company, NYC - Chicago, Toronto - 1917) with words by Wilbur D. Nesbit and music by Frederic L. Ryder ("The Song For All Americans"): "Your flag and my flag! - And, oh, how much it holds - Your land and my land - Secure within its folds! - Your heart and my heart - Beat quicker at the sight - Sun-kissed and wind-tossed - Red and blue and white - The one flag - The great flag - The flag for me and you - Glorified all else beside - The red and white and blue..." Cover image by an unknown artist: A waving American flag.
12Y-19 Your Lips Are No Man's Land But Mine - A single piece of sheet music (Joseph W. Stern and Co., 1918) with words by Arthur Guy Empey ("A Real Romantic War Ballad" by the "Author of the Famous Book OVER THE TOP" - with a cover photograph of ARTHUR GUY EMPEY in the Vitagraph silent film OVER THE TOP) and music by Charles R. McCarron and Carey Morgan ("Successfully Sung by Carl S. Graves in Gus Hill's Minstrels" - with inset photograph of Carl S. Graves): "At the dock a transport was rocking - Ev'ry chap from his cap to his stockings - Dressed to 'kill' - To kill old Kaiser Bill - On the pier a dear little girlie - With tear-dimmed eyes - Time to go - Whistles blow - 'Au Revoir' her sweetheart cries - I'm coming back home someday when the fray is over, my darling - I know you'll be true, dear - So I'll never be blue, dear - Across the foam in No-Man's Land I'll soon be fighting - But I know your lips are no man's land but mine..." Cover image by the Brown Brothers Photography, NYC: A color-tinted production photograph of author/composer/actor Arthur Guy Empey in a scene from OVER THE TOP - "Reproduced by Courtesy of The Vitagraph Co. of America"/A black and white inset publicity photograph of Carl S. Graves of the Gus Hill Minstrels. Advertised song samples on the back cover include: "Our Country's In It Now! (We've Got To Win It Now)," "Liberty Statue Is Looking Right At You," etc. According to Wikipedia: ARTHUR GUY EMPEY (December 11, 1883, Ogden, Utah - February 22, 1963, Wadsworth, Kansas) was a soldier in both the British and American armies of World War I, and an author, screenwriter, actor and movie producer. Empey served for six years in the US Cavalry and was performing duty as a recruiting sergeant for the New Jersey National Guard in New York City when World War I began. He left the United States at the end of 1915 frustrated at its neutrality in the conflict at that point and travelled to London, England, where he joined the 1st London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers), Territorial Force, of the British Army, going on to serve with it in the 56th (London) Infantry Division on the Western Front as a bomber and a machine-gunner. He was medically discharged from the British Army after he was wounded in action at the commencement of the Battle of the Somme. On returning to the United States, Empey wrote a book of his experiences titled Over the Top, which became a publishing sensation in 1917 with over a quarter of a million copies sold, and was turned into a film in 1918 with Empey writing the screenplay and playing the lead role. Empey had attempted to re-join the US Army in 1917 but was rejected due to his wounds. On the basis of the book's success, he played a major propaganda role for the Federal Government's policy of moving the nation from a position of neutrality in World War I to a combatant role, and toured widely throughout the USA giving public performances and readings from it to rally the American people to the nation's entry into the conflict. He was commissioned a Captain in the US Army's Adjutant General's Department, but the commission was withdrawn three days later amidst speculation that the cause was that whilst appearing as an actor in a play of Pack Up Your Troubles, Empey gave a speech praising the American volunteers but not the draftees who were being conscripted at that time, suggesting that the latter lacked the right stuff because they had waited 'until they were fetched' before enlisting for war service. In the audience was President Woodrow Wilson. Empey wrote several more screenplays, and more books on World War I, and formed his own production company called the Guy Empey Pictures Corporation. He was also a popular song-writer during the war years, writing the lyrics for numbers such as Your Lips are No Man's Land but Mine, and Liberty Statue is Looking Right at You..." CARL S. GRAVES was a popular tenor in various minstrel organizations including GUS HILL'S MINSTRELS and Vogel's Mastodon Minstrels. According to Wikipedia: "GUS HILL (February 22, 1858 - April 20, 1937) was an American vaudeville performer who juggled Indian clubs. He later became a burlesque and vaudeville entrepreneur. Hill was one of the founders of the Columbia Amusement Company, an association of burlesque shows and theaters, and became president of the American Burlesque Association. He also staged drama and musical comedies. He launched a highly popular series of 'cartoon theatricals,' musical comedies based on comic strips or cartoons. At one time he was running fourteen different shows..."



Selected Subjects and Access Terms

War songs -- United States -- 20th century

World War, 1914-1918 -- Songs and music




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