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A Guide to the Martin Harris Collection

Finding aid created by Jim Liversidge

University of Florida Smathers Libraries - Special and Area Studies Collections

October 2016



Descriptive Summary

Creator: Harris, Martin, 1908-71
Title: Martin Harris Collection
Dates: Circa 1925-1970
Abstract: Professional photographs (color and black and white), photo negatives (color and black and white), color photo slides, proof (or contact) sheets, publications, books and biographical ephemera featuring the work of career news and entertainment photographer Martin Harris whose art was featured in most of the major newspaper and magazines of the mid 2Oth Century (PM NEW YORK, THE NEW YORK TIMES, THE LITERARY DIGEST, PICTURE POST, LIFE, COLLIER'S, STARS AND STRIPES, YANK, FORTUNE, PRINTER'S INK, BUSINESS WEEK, WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION, U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT, THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE, THIS WEEK, THE SATURDAY EVENING POST, CUE, TIME, ESQUIRE, et cetera).
Extent: 27 Linear feet. 44 Boxes.
Identification: MSS 0368
Language(s): English

Biographical/Historical Note

From the 1930s through the late 1960s, photographer Martin Harris was an eyewitness to the history and culture of the mid-20th Century. He recorded images of Depression-era labor unrest for PM NEW YORK, the horrors of World War II for STARS AND STRIPES and the stars of stage screen, radio and television for COLLIER'S MAGAZINE, LIFE MAGAZINE and THE SATURDAY EVENING POST. His iconic images of Dwight Eisenhower, Albert Einstein, Clark Gable, Sophia Loren, Steve Allen, et cetera graced the pages of daily newspapers and weekly magazines across the United States and Europe. Mr. Harris began taking amateur photographs in the late 1920s graduating to "guest photographer" at hotels in the Catskills and "double truck" color photography for LIFE MAGAZINE in the mid-1930s. Born on February 4, 1908 in Manhattan, as Moses Haber, he legally changed his name to Martin Harris, for professional reasons, in 1939. The vast bulk of his work during this period was as a "people photographer" capturing the every-day life of the average American citizen. In his capacity as a staffer for STARS AND STRIPES during the Second World War, he served in North Africa, Italy, France and Germany photographing most of the Allied military brass as well as world leaders, weary GIs and Nazi POWs. Martin Harris' most famous work included a portrait of Albert Einstein at the Palestine Pavilion at the 1939 World's Fair (a LIFE MAGAZINE "Picture of the Week"), multiple photo essays featuring film legend Gloria Swanson, a color layout (COLLIER'S MAGAZINE) of Gary Cooper in an emotion-filled meeting with his "foster child" in a rural Italian village, a tour of Europe and the Middle East with the then New York City Mayor Robert Wagner in1955, the definitive documentation of the post-war rebirth of the German army under the supervision of NATO and a colorful tour of the1958 Brussels World's Fair. In his 40 year career, for various publications, Harris photographed an extensive list of celebrities including Mae West, Babe Ruth, Walter Winchell, artist Marc Chagall, Nelson Rockefeller, Paul Robeson, Richard and Dorothy Rodgers, Marilyn Monroe (at the famous NYC street photo-shoot for THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH), Marlon Brando, Yul Brynner, Burl Ives, Bert Parks, Samuel Goldwyn, photographers Margaret Bourke-White and Alfred Eisenstaedt, Jimmy Durante, NYC Mayor Lindsay, and many, many more. In his later years, he collaborated on children's books with his wife, Johanna Johnston (WHAT DOES A POLICEMAN DO? - 1959, et cetera), and he became a still promotional photographer for motion picture productions (BETRAYED starring Clark Gable, THE BIG COUNTRY starring Gregory Peck, SCANDAL IN SORRENTO starring Sophia Loren, ROB ROY: THE HIGHLAND ROGUE starring Richard Todd and Glynis Johns GIGOT starring Jackie Gleason, THE PRODUCERS starring Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder, THE ODD COUPLE starring Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau, et cetera). Martin Harris died in 1971.


Scope and Content

Representing over 40 years (from the late 1920s through the 1960s) in the professional career of photographer Martin Harris, the collection includes three boxes (1-3) of biographical ephemera (official documents from his private and military life, newspaper and magazine clippings, et cetera) and photo images of Martin Harris (with his family, with various celebrity photo subjects, humorous poses, et cetera). Six Boxes (4-9) contain various monographs and newspaper and magazine articles (in full or partial condition - often Harris only preserved the pages that contained his photographs) featuring published photographs by Martin Harris (subjects include: Airlines, American Express, playwright Philip Barry, Ingrid Bergman, the Brussels World's Fair, bullfighting, entertainers Eddie Cantor and Maurice Chevalier, comic books, jazz artist Eddie Condon, Albert Einstein, Dwight David Eisenhower, Clark Gable, artist Edward Hopper, Israeli tourism, stage and film director Elia Kazan, the Lambs Club, Willie Mays, Zero Mostel, record producer Mitch Miller, aviator William Piper, the Second World War, the United Nations, the West Point Military Academy, et cetera). Boxes 10 through 14 contain various photographs, slides and proof (contact) sheets by Martin Harris (filed alphabetically by subject). Subject headings include "Artists and Writers"- Box 10 (Peter Arno, Doris Caesar, Giorgio de Chirico, et cetera), "Business and Industry: - Box 11 (Bethlehem Steel, IBM, Massachusetts Investors Trust, Migros Grocery Stores, RCA. PM NEW YORK, et cetera) and "Miscellaneous Subjects" - Boxes 12 -14 (Baseball, Bullfighting, Fashion, boxer Joe Louis, Narcotics, Babe Ruth, Sarah Lawrence College, et cetera). Photographs of "Performers and Show Business Personalities" are filed in Boxes 15-19 (alphabetically by the subject name) including images of Steve Allen, Ray Bolger, Marlon Brando, Pablo Casals, Maurice Chevalier, Gary Cooper, Clark Gable, Jackie Gleason, Burl Ives, Boris Karloff, Sophia Loren, et cetera The work of Martin Harris as a theatre and motion picture still photographer is showcased in Boxes 20 - 23 with production photographs from stage, screen and television. His extensive work as a staff photographer for STARS ANDSTRIPES during the Second World War is documented in Boxes 24-27 and miscellaneous color photo slides (Transportation and travel) have been collected in Boxes 28-31. Mid-20th Century "World Leaders and Politicians" photographs are alphabetically filed in Boxes 32 and 33 (Fidel Castro, Winston Churchill, Allen Dulles, Andrei Gromyko, Nikita Khrushchev, Adlai Stevenson, Josip Tito, Harry Truman, et cetera). The following boxes (34- 43) contain the photo negatives for all of the subject areas listed above. The last Box (44) contains an original 12 x 24 inch (22 x 32 inch with matting) pen and ink sketch of the "Bucks County Playhouse Grand Opening - Springtime for Henry" (July 1939) by famed theatrical artist Al Hirschfeld. The sketch (which includes a caricature of LIFE MAGAZINE photographer Martin Harris) was presented to Mr. Harris, by the artist, in 1939.


Access or Use Restrictions

Access

The collection is open for research, but researchers should speak with the curator, Jim Liversidge, prior to using the materials.


Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Martin Harris Collection, Special and Area Studies Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

Acquisition Information

Donated by Dr. Gregg M. Harris and David Harris (Grandchildren of Martin Harris) in 2009.


Contents List

MARTIN HARRIS BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Information and ephemera pertaining to the private life and career of Martin Harris. Filed chronologically.



Box Folder
11 Birth Certificate : A "Certification of Birth" for Martin Harris issued by the City of New York Bureau of Records and Statistics/Department of Health: This is to certify that MARTIN HARRIS...was born in the City of New York on February 4, 1908 according to Birth Record No. 9143 filed in the office of this Bureau on February 17, 1908..." The certification document was issued on August 27, 1952.
12 Autobiography: A single page/typed autobiography written as an introduction to his professional work as a photographer: "I have been a magazine photographer (or photo-reporter, if you will) since the middle thirties...The vast bulk of my work has been as a "people photographer." In my capacity as a staffer on STARS AND STRIPES (North Africa, Italy, France and Germany) I photographed most of the brass from General Eisenhower down...The World's Fair of 1939 provided me with a PICTURE OF THE WEEK in LIFE. It was a portrait of Einstein by the Palestine pavilion...For COLLIER'S I did a color layout of Gary Cooper in an emotion-charged meeting with his "foster child" in a rural Italian village. Clark Gable was another subject while making a film in Holland. There were other adventures with Glynis Johns in the highlands of Scotland, Sophia Loren in southern Italy with DeSica, Charles Boyer in Paris. For NATO I did the definitive layout on the rebirth of the German Army. My work for NATO included official portraits of all the top brass..." Also included, a "Biography on Martin Harris" (2 pages) provided by the Harris family: "...With wife Johanna Johnston, he collaborated on children's books with her as writer, and him as photographer. In his later years, he became "still" photographer for motion picture productions and other locations. Martin died in 1971 from chronic renal failure at the young age of 63...Ironically, his photograph was on the cover of local New York newspapers as one of the first patients to receive dialysis for kidney disease. He was buried at the U.S. Military Cemetery in Islip, Long Island, New York."
13 Name Change : A notarized military document (June 15, 1943) signed by Martin Harris (Private, Army of the United States) stating "...I was born on February 4, 1908 in the Borough of New York, in the City of New York, and was named MOSES HABER. However, I was commonly known as, and called Morris Haber and/or Murray Haber by members of my family, neighbors, friends and acquaintances. I have been known as and used the names of Murray, Morris and Moses. I was married to Gussie Feldman in the year 1931...and the marriage license bears the name of Murray. A son, Bruce Edward Haber, was born of this marriage on January 3, 1935...On December 19, 1939, an order was issued by the City Court of the City of New York, authorizing the legal use of the name Martin Harris, for myself and the name Bruce Edward Harris for my son..."
14 Address (Registered - NYC): A certificate from THE CENTRAL BUREAU FOR REGISTERED ADDRESSES (June 28, 1950) "received of Martin Harris, 22 West 9th Street, NYC...for the registration of he code address "MAHARRIS NEWYORK" from June 28, 1950 to June 28, 1951..." for official cable and telegraph communications.
15 Furniture Workers Industrial Union: Newspaper and additional ephemeral material pertaining to the 1934 Jersey City , New Jersey Furniture Workers Industrial Union strike in which Martin Harris ("Crack photographer" for the Film and Photo League was arrested while taking photos of the strike (June 7, 1934). According to a (June 16, 1934) Film and Photo League printed statement: "...For a full week now Martin Harris...lies in Hudson County Jail, Jersey City, N.J. Harris on assignment by his organization and by the Federated Press, was covering the peaceful picketing in the strike of the Furniture Workers Industrial Union...In front of the Miller Parlor Furniture Co. he was photographing the police attack on the two union pickets. Because this photo would prove the collaboration between the police and the owners of the Miller Parlor Furniture Company in violently attempting to smash the strike, Martin Harris was thrown in jail together with the two pickets and the union organizer Gail Strauss...The arrest of Lester Balog and Martin Harris are flagrant instances of attempts to suppress news..."
16 Works Progress Administration (WPA): Works Progress Administration (WPA) Federal Music Project dance photos (taken by Martin Harris) published in the BROOKLYN DAILY EAGLE (September 11, 1937) under the headline "WPA Free Dances Attract 8,000 Steppers to Boro Parks." ("..the WPA Federal Music Project dances are no nightclub affairs but they draw crowds just as large and offer as much fun - and all for nothing...")
17 Newspaper and Magazine Articles (miscellaneous): Newspaper articles (collected by Martin Harris from 1936-48) pertaining to the professional career of Martin Harris including clippings featuring his photos (FLYING STORIES featuring a photo of test pilot Jimmy Collins, "The Young Look" photos featured in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE, et cetera).
18 Bloor, Ella Reeve (Labor organizer): A "Mother Bloor 75th Birthday Souvenir Book" (July 1937) inscribed and signed by the labor leader and author (Ella Reeve Bloor) to Martin Harris ("...with loving greetings and thankfulness for your good work...") whose photograph of Bloor ("Mother Bloor Today") is featured on the front cover of the souvenir book. The birthday event was held at Grant City Park on Staten Island in New York City on July 18, 1937. The entertainment included a salute from the Children's Bugle and Drum Corps of the International Workers Order, an address by Elizabeth Gurley Flynn (chairman of the event), an address by Israel Amter (Organizer, New York State Committee Communist Party), dances by Allison Burroughs and Edna Gay, folk dancing from the I.W.O. Children's Troupe and a play ("The Spirit of '75") starring Howard Da Sylva (later "Da Silva") and others, et cetera. A newspaper clipping describing the event is also included. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica: Ella Reeve Bloor was an "...American political organizer and writer who was active as an American socialist and communist, both as a candidate for public office and in labor actions in several industries..."
19 Nassau Magazine (February 1940): A (February 1940) issue of NASSAU MAGAZINE OF INTERNATIONAL LIFE IN THE BAHAMAS featuring photos by Martin Harris accompanying the article "First Air Cruise Brings Fifteen Land and Sea Planes to Nassau" (Page 1) plus a photograph of Martin Harris (Life Photographer) at a party given by Sir Frederick and Lady Williams-Taylor (page 2 - bottom right). The photo is part of an article titled "Aviation Editors Fly Here to Cover Opening of Coral Airport" by Helen Waterhouse (Aviation Editor of the Akron Beacon Journal).
110 Eustis, Helen (Mrs. Martin Harris): Magazine articles and ephemeral material pertaining to the life and career of Helen Eustis (Martin Harris' second wife) including the short stories "An American Home" published in HARPER'S BAZAAR (February 1947), "The Honeymoon" published in HARPER'S BAZAAR (February 1949) and "Portrait of a Divorce" published in HARPER'S BAZAAR (April 1949). According to "The Editor's Guest Book" in the February 1947 issue of HARPER'S BAZAAR: "If it is a variety of experience that provides the most fruitful background for a writer, HELEN EUSTIS has spent her first thirty years wisely. Since her birth in Cincinnati, she has been, she says brat, schoolgirl, college girl, debutante, advertising copywriter, faculty wife at Smith, mother of a lively boy, insurance adjusterette (that's what they called them), graduate student and, for a while, she adds 'a nervous wreck. 'Through all these changes and since e the age of eleven, she has never stopped writing..."
111 Second World War: Ephemera collected by Martin Harris during his service in the Second World War (circa 1943- 45) including maps used as a STARS AND STRIPES photographer, postcards and museum tour books, an information pamphlet (THE YUGOLSLAV STRUGGLE THROUGH AMERICAN EYES by Staff Sgt. Ralph G. Martin, Stoyan Pribichevich, John Talbot and Edd Johnson- May 1944) published by THE UNITED COMMITTEE OF SOUTH SLAVIC AMERICANS, a copy of THE THUNDERBOLT ACROSS EUROPE (circa 1944) publication ("This document tells a little of the life we have known during the past year. It is dedicated to all officers and men of the 83rd Infantry Division..."), an official (1945) military guide (published by the Headquarters, Communications Zone - European Theater of Operations - U.S. Army) for "Special Orders for American-German Relations" ("1. To remember always that Germany, though conquered, is still a dangerous enemy nation. 2. Never trust Germans, collectively or individually, 3. To defeat German efforts to poison my thoughts or influence my attitude..."), various propaganda cartoons and leaflets (Allied and German), a theatrical program featuring The United States Army Band (presented by the Special Service Section - North African Theater Operations at the Algiers Opera House - December 1943), a 1943 Red Cross/ Stars and Stripes (North Africa) Christmas dinner menu, a 1943 guide to "cablese" language to reduce costs for sending cable and radio messages, various German and Allied newspapers and newsletters, et cetera.
112 Stars and Stripes (Miscellaneous - Part 1): Information, memoranda and ephemeral material collected by Martin Harris as a STARS AND STRIPES photographer including "Regulations for War Correspondents Accompanying Allied Expeditionary Force in the Field (1944)," an invitation (circa 1945) for all correspondents to attend a press conference called by the Communist Party (Italy), a (May 17, 1944) NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS that Charles de Gaulle "will not grant an interview to the press during his (Naples) visit..." but '...will hold a press conference in Sessa...," A 1945 STARS AND STRIPES "Editorial Policy" memo on "Non-fraternization" ("...STARS AND STRIPES will print the news on the subject whether it be pleasant or unpleasant..."), a 1945 STARS AND STRIPES memo pertaining to poor editorial judgement illustrated by the publication of a piece on "Luxembourg and...Polish Girls..." ("There might have been some excuse for these articles if ancient whores with bunions are still news and if there remains any novelty in the fact that American soldiers are reputed to enjoy dalliance with girls , Polish or otherwise...," a copy of "A Short History of THE STARS AND STRIPES (1945), various copies of THE STARS AND STRIPES newspapers and a specific articles, et cetera.
113 Stars and Stripes (Miscellaneous - Part 2): Information, memoranda and ephemeral material collected by Martin Harris as a STARS AND STRIPES photographer including identification, motor vehicle operator permit, cards, expense accounts (southern France) and passes (Algiers and Naples), various correspondence (NEW YORK PM DAILY gossip), various letters of commendation (STARS AND STRIPES 1st Edition published on the same day as the liberation of Rome - June 5, 1944, et cetera), miscellaneous newspaper articles (noting the service activities of Martin Harris), et cetera.
114 Pope Pius XII: Ephemera pertaining to the (June 10, 1944) press reception and Papal audience (Pope Pius XII and war correspondents) at the Vatican including photographs of Martin Harris accepting a Rosary and signed photo (items not include in folder) from Pope Pius XII.
115 U.S. Army (Second World War - Part 1): U.S. Army information, memoranda and ephemeral material pertaining, specifically, to the military service (as a STARS AND STRIPES photographer) of Martin Harris including a "Soldier's Individual Pay Record," an "extra duty" memo (1943), various commendation letters, liberty passes and furlough forms, et cetera.
116 U.S. Army (Second World War - Part 2): U.S. Army information, memoranda and ephemeral material pertaining, specifically, to the military service (as a STARS AND STRIPES photographer) of Martin Harris including various GI JIVE radio scripts (c. 1943-44) as performed (announcer) by Martin Harris.
117 U.S. Army (Second World War - Part 3): U.S. Army information, memoranda and ephemeral material pertaining, specifically, to the military service (as a STARS AND STRIPES photographer) of Martin Harris including caption scripts for Martin Harris photos taken during the liberation of Rome (1945), a mimeographed G.I. newsletter, various 83rd Infantry combat update memoranda, et cetera.
118 U.S. Army (Second World War - Part 4): U.S. Army information, memoranda and ephemeral material pertaining, specifically, to the military service (as a STARS AND STRIPES photographer) of Martin Harris including a "Regimental Order of the Day" memo (recapping combat activities and the "first break into the so called GUSTAV LINE" - February 2, 1944), various military mimeographed newsletters, various mimeographed newsletters produced by the "PM (NY) Copy Boys" on the warfronts of Europe (1944), various Third Infantry mimeographed Daily News reports ("Read and Burn"), various 83rd THUNDERBOLT Infantry Division mimeographed newsletters, an amended "Campaign and Bronze Service Stars" memo, a December 1944 news report on the "Fantastic Feats Along the FORGOTTEN FRONT - From the Riviera to the Snow-Capped Alps," et cetera.
119 U.S. Army (Second World War - Part 5): U.S. Army information, memoranda and ephemeral material pertaining, specifically, to the military service (as a STARS AND STRIPES photographer) of Martin Harris including various restricted European Theatre of Operations - U.S. Army memoranda, a mimeographed history of the 83rd Infantry Division, various PS Newsletters (Published by the PM Unit - Newspaper Guild of NY) reporting on former NY newspaper staffers in the military in Europe and the Pacific, various confidential 83rd Infantry Division government reports (detailing activities in occupied Germany - 1945), et cetera.
120 U.S. Army (Second World War - Part 6): U.S. Army information, memoranda and ephemeral material pertaining, specifically, to the military service (as a STARS AND STRIPES photographer) of Martin Harris including various confidential 83rd Infantry Division government reports (detailing activities in occupied Germany - 1945), a (November 1945) newsletter update sent to "all YANK (the Army Weekly) men unfortunate enough to be still overseas and to all YANK men and ex-YANK men at home..." describing the future of the magazine "...after this weekly rat race of the last three and a half years..." from publisher Joe McCarthy, et cetera.
121 Biographical Ephemera (Miscellaneous): Information, promotional material and ephemera representing photographer Martin Harris during the pre and post war years including photo negative sleeves from Israel (Ilford-Selo Films) and Scope Associates (NYC), a mini-biography printed in LIFE MAGAZINE (circa mid 1930s), various photos and postcards, a 1961 letter from the College of Home Economics at Michigan State University, to Martin Harris, pertaining to the use of dry milk in bakery products ("...I understand you are contemplating opening an American restaurant in Paris..."), a 1971 Society of the New York Hospital letter, to Martin Harris, announcing the publication of an article on the new dialysis unit in which his photograph appears in THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL NEWS, et cetera.
122 Fortune Magazine: An undated/authorized pass for Martin Harris (as the authorized representative of FORTUNE MAGAZINE) "to visit Military Reservations in Puerto Rico under such restrictions and orders are currently effect thereat by command of General Daley."
123 Compton, Grant (author): An inscribed /signed (September 3, 1964) - by the author Henry Grant Compton ("To Martin, With special thanks for getting me into this sort of thing - Most sincerely, Harry") hardback copy of WHAT DOES A VETERINARIAN DO? (Dodd, Mead and Company, New York, 1964) By Grant Compton (with photographs by the author)..
124 Johnson, Arte (Actor/Comedian): A black and white (8 x 10 inch) inscribed/signed ("Herr Harris...Arte Johnson 'Very Interesting'") publicity photograph of actor/comedian, Arte Johnson, in character as the German soldier on the NBC-TV comedy-variety show ROWAN AND MARTIN'S LAUGH-IN (circa 1969).



MARTIN HARRIS BIOGRAPHICAL PHOTOGRAPHS

Photo Images (various sizes) of Martin Harris at work and at play. Filed alphabetically.



Box Folder
21 Celebrity Photographs: Photographs (various sizes) of Martin Harris with various celebrities including Esther Williams (actress and swimming champion), Allen Dulles (first Director of the CIA), Billy Wilder (film director), Richard Harris (actor), Albert Einstein , Grover Whalen (NYC Police Commissioner and president of the 1939 World's Fair Corporation), Joe Sullivan (Jazz pianist), Luis Marin (First Governor of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico - "Father of Modern Puerto Rico"), General Jimmy Doolittle (aviation pioneer), Ish Kabibble (aka Merwyn Bogue - Musician and comedian with the Kay Kyser Orchestra), New York Mayor Jimmy Walker, Zero Mostel (nightclub and Broadway star), Federico Fellini (film director), Truman Capote, Bill Mauldin (cartoonist and author), Clark Gable, et cetera.
22 Horseback Riding : Photographs (various sizes) of Marin Harris horseback riding (1945).
23 Humorous Poses: Photographs (various sizes) of Martin Harris posed in humorous photographs (circa 1945 - 1970s).
24 Loren, Sophia: A n 8.5 x 11 inch/11 x 13 inch matte (black and white) photograph of Martin Harris with Sophia Loren (1955) taken during a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (September 16, 1955) photo shoot ("Sophia in Sorrento") in Italy. Sophia Loren was filming "Scandal in Sorrento" (aka "Bread, Love and Lady Sophia") for director Vittorio De Sica.
25 Miscellaneous Photographs (Part 1): Posed/candid black and white photographs (various sizes) and color slides of Martin Harris at work and at play (circa 1930s-70s).
26 Miscellaneous Photographs (Part 2): Posed/candid black and white/color photographs (various sizes) of Martin Harris at work and at play (circa 1930s-70s).
31 Photographs: Posed/candid black and white/color photographs (various sizes) of Martin Harris at work and at play (circa 1930s-70s).
32 Photo Negatives (Part 1): Posed/candid black and white/color photo negatives (various sizes) of Martin Harris at work and at play (circa 1930s-70s).
33 Photo Negatives (Part 2): Posed/candid black and white/color photo negatives (various sizes) of Martin Harris at work and at play (circa 1940s - 60s).
34 NATO Unclassified: An 8x 10 inch (black and white) group photograph of press photographers (including Martin Harris - front row/2nd from left) taken outside the Supreme Headquarters/Allied Powers- Europe (near Paris) - September 19, 1960.
35 Puerto Rico (San Juan): Group souvenir nightclub photograph featuring Martin Harris (right side/front in white dinner jacket) at Jack's Club and Hotel, San Juan (circa mid 1950s).
36 Second World War (Stars and Stripes - Part 1): Black and white photographs (8 x 10 inch or smaller) of Martin Harris (posed portraits and candid photos with others) - staff photographer for STARS AND STRIPES.
37 Second World War (Stars and Stripes - Part 2): Black and white photographs (8 x 10 inch or smaller) of Martin Harris (posed portraits and candid photos with others) - staff photographer for STARS AND STRIPES.



NEWSPAPER AND PERIODIAL ARTICLES

Publications (newspaper, periodicals and books) featuring photographs by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically.



Box Folder
41 Advertising: "Making Agency Men Generalists" (2 copies) - a 2-page article published in PRINTER'S INK MAGAZINE (May 27, 1960) in the "Trends and Developments" section with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Kenyon and Eckhardt believes agencies should have upper-level 'generalists' as well as specialists. Executives from its branch offices and headquarters were schooled in the concept at a four day seminar..."
42 Airlines (Pan Am): "What Does an Airlines Crew Do? (2 copies) - a 63 -page/ hardcover monograph (Dodd, Mead and Company, NY - 1968) by E. Roy Ray with photographs by Martin Harris. Typed photo descriptions and a printed biography of Juan T. Trippe, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive of Pan American World Airways, Inc., also included in folder. Text (aimed at pre-teen and early teen readers): "Nearly 50, 000 men and women go to work daily above the clouds as crew members on United States Airlines. What, exactly, do they do? Explicit text and action photographs take you behind the scenes..."
43 Airplane Pilots (Amateur "Spooks") : "LIFE Goes to a Flying Party" (2 copies) - a 4-page article published in LIFE MAGAZINE (September 11, 1939 with cover image of Benito Mussolini) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): " 'Spooks' are a standard feature of every U.S. airport. They are air-hungry amateur and novice pilots who haunt the hangars, hire planes and learn to fly, not just to get places or to save time but mostly for fun of flying. One Saturday last month 23 spooks, as they are called at Floyd Bennett Field, Brooklyn, took off for a week-end flight under the command of Flying Instructor Carl Evers..."
44 Amahl and the Night Visitors (NBC-TV): "There Were Three Kings (2 copies) - a 2-page article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (December 27, 1952) with color photographs by Martin Harris (on the set). Text (by an unidentified author): "TV hails Christmas with Menotti's tender tale about Amahl and the Night Visitors...At six o'clock on Christmas day, Gian -Carlo Menotti's TV opera, AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS, will join the colorful company of holiday celebrations. Since its debut on NBC last Christmas Eve, and a repeat performance on Easter, by popular demand, this legend of a crippled shepherd boy and his mother who play host to a trio of kings has won a reputation as a modern classic..."
45 American Express: "Travel Giant Makes A Neat Profit in 'Banking' " - a 2-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (July 20, 1957) in the "Business Abroad/European Tourism" section with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Most American tourists visiting Western Europe take in Paris. And in Paris they end up-at one time or another - at 11 Rue Scribe, local headquarters of the American Express Company...This is the travel business on a department-store basis-at Rue Scribe almost every thing a tourist needs is concentrated in one building..."
46 Automobile Collecting (Antique): "Old Cars Make a Broadway Show" - a 2-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK (July 24, 1954) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "...the hobby of collecting and refurbishing antique cars is gaining popularity. Some 10,000 people in the U.S. now dote on some 20,000 pre-World War I autos, spending about $1 million a year on rebuilding and maintenance..."
47 Bank Teller ("Girl"): "Girl Bank Teller" (2 copies) - an 8-page article published in WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION (March 1949) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "...No longer a for-men-only business, many banks - like the Millerton National Bank in New York State - employ more women than men. Typical young counting-house careerist is bright-faced Isabelle Shadick from Copake, one of villages in dairy farm country around Millerton..."
48 Barry, Philip (Playwright): "Author of PHILADELPHIA STORY Brings New Play to Broadway" - Newspaper photograph of playwright Philip Barry by Martin Harris published in PM-NEW YORK (February 2, 1941). Photo caption: "...Philip Barry, one of U.S.A.'s best-known and least-photographed playwrights. He was photographed at the Theater Guild as he prepared to open a new play. Right now Mr. Barry is known best for PHILADELPHIA STORY, which passed all attendance records at the Music Hall this week..."
49 Bergen, Edgar (and David Sarnoff): A newspaper photograph of radio ventriloquist Edgar Bergen with RCA president David Sarnoff by Martin Harris published in an unidentified publication (circa 1942). Photo caption: "Charlie McCarthy, here with a friend Edgar Bergan...for last night's Navy show, took time out yesterday for a chat with David Sarnoff, RCA president."
410 Bergman, Ingrid: "Ingrid's New Role" - a 2-page article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (September 18, 1953) with color photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "The beautiful Swede who went to Rome via Hollywood now helps Swedish starlets (Mai Britt and Marta Toren) grapple with their own careers. As wife, mother, actress and benefactress, she has her capable hands full. And Bergman, as you can see, never looked lovelier..."
411 Berlin, Germany: Various articles with photographs by Martin Harris published in U.S. NEWS and WORLD REPORT (June and July 1959). Article titles include: "Berlin: Still a Danger Spot?'," "The Lessons of Geneva," "The Next Crisis: What Red's Are Up To" and "What It's Like to Live in Berlin."
412 Blakeley, Jerry (Real Estate Executive): "After the Cabots - Jerry Blakeley" (2 copies) - an 8-page article published in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (November 1960) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Freeman Lincoln): "The sedate old Boston real-estate firm of Cabot, Cabot and Forbes has lately been transforming the landscape in several parts of the U.S. The firm itself has been transformed by a young man named Blakeley..."
413 Bloodhounds (Scent Dogs): "Tracked by Bloodhounds" - a 3-page (incomplete) article published in an unidentified magazine (circa 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Daniel P. Mannix): "Two thousand times this Wisconsin soda clerk has set his keen-scented dogs on the trail of criminals , escaped lunatics and lost children. Their amazing feats explain why baffled sheriffs and frantic parents so often cry: 'Get George Brooks and his bloodhounds.' "
414 Boston Symphony Orchestra: "What Makes A Symphony Go/How They Stay in Business" - an 8-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK (November 8, 1952) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author):"When Charles Munch conducts the Boston Symphony, he's supported by a full-fledged business and financial organization behind the scenes..."
415 Bullfighting (Matadors): "Medical Care of Matadors: Physicians see action in bull rings of Spain" - a 4-page article published in ROCHE MEDICAL IMAGE MAGAZINE (SUMMER 1959) with photographs (including cover image) by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "When the late afternoon sun sends long shadows across the blood and sand of Spanish bull rings, the contest usually ends with the triumphant matador receiving the plaudits of the crowd. Yet it can also sometimes end in a bleak , aseptic room beneath the arena, its black door marked 'Enfermeria," where the crowd's roar sounds but dimly and the chief actors are swiftly working surgeons..."
416 Business Abroad: "French Brass Returns to Class to Learn U.S. Ways" - a 2-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK (December 1, 1956) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Many French businessmen would consider a lecture on management policy an affront to their intelligence - and a slap at tradition. But swallowing their Gallic pride, a few are these days taking a fresh look at U.S. methods of running a business, at such centers new ideas as the Catholic University in Lille..."
417 Business Management (Harvard Business School): An incomplete article (just the photo page is included) published in BUSINESS WEEK (December 1, 1956) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "...Ideas taken home to France by a Harvard Business School graduate are causing a renaissance in the education of management. Instead of clinging to archaic ways, even elder executives go to school..."
418 Business (Miscellaneous): "The 30,000 Managers" - a 3-page (incomplete) article published in an unidentified publication (circa 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Earning $15,000 to $200,000 plus, they drive the economic system and coddle 56,000 capitalists..." Also included in the folder is an outline (with a rejection letter from Garden City Books, NYC) of a book proposal for THE STORY OF THE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA..
419 Business Week Magazine: Various issues of BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE, articles and magazine covers (1950-59) with photographs by Martin Harris including images of John Jay Hopkins (General Dynamics), Charles H. Weaver (Atomic Power Division), Walter Reuther and Allan Haywood (Congress of Industrial Organization), Woody Herman (Jazz musician and orchestra leader), Thomas Macey (Frenchtown Porcelain Company), et cetera.
420 Brussels World's Fair: "We Look at Them, They Look at Us" - a 3-page (incomplete) article published in THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE (May 11, 1958) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Walter H. Waggoner): "At Brussels, a group of Americans visited the Soviet pavilion and a group of Russians visited ours. Here is how each reacted..."
421 Cabbage (Wartime Recipes): "Glamourizing the Lowly Cabbage" - a 2-page article published in CLICK MAGAZINE (April 1942) with color photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Jessie Bakker): "War times bring rising food prices. It is comforting to know, however, that the lowly cabbage, which used to be associated with the 'smell-it-a-block-from- the -house -odor,' is just as good for you as spinach, and costs about a third as much. It is one of the most economical green vegetables to be found in the markets. The greener it is the better..."
422 Cantor, Eddie: "His Brother's Keeper" - a 2-page (incomplete) article describing the charity work of Broadway, film, radio and television star, Eddie Cantor, published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (December 4, 1948) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text (by Vivian Bowes): "Everybody's troubles are Eddie Cantor's and whatever the charity it can count on him. No one has a more positive answer to 'Am I my brother's keeper?' "
423 Cerebral Palsy: "Our Child Has Cerebral Palsy" (2 copies) - a 3-page (incomplete) article published in an unidentified magazine (May 1949) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Genevieve Langston): "An estimated 300,000 parents in the U.S. are bearing the heartache of knowing their children are victims of cerebral palsy. The mother of one of these children tells her own story - a story of hope and understanding..."
424 Chagall, Marc (Artist): "Marooned Three Days in Bay" - A newspaper photo layout depicting the passengers, including artist Marc Chagall, on the stranded passenger liner Athos II anchored off of Staten Island, New York published in PM-DAILY (September 10, 1946). All photographs by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "Marc Chagall, famous modern artist, is bedded with grippe aboard ship. He's here to attend exhibit of his paintings in Chicago.
425 Chevalier, Maurice: "Jeanette's Old Partner Still Warbling 'Louise' " -a newspaper article published in STARS AND STRIPES (January 20, 1945) with a photograph of French entertainer Maurice Chevalier by Martin Harris. Text (by Paul S. Green): "The man who charmed American movie audiences of the early '30s with a French accent, a protruding lower lip, a straw hat and a bow tie has come to Marseilles on his first visit since the liberation with plans to entertain American troops..."
426 Children's Art: "Your Child's Pictures Can Talk" (2 copies) - a 3-page (incomplete) article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (circa 1950) with color photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Julian Bach, Jr.): "Parents who throw away messy daubs their children make are missing a chance to learn what makes the young hopeful tick. after 10 years of study, two Chicago educators have found answers. Here they tell of their findings..."
427 Children's Fashion: "The Young Look" (2 copies) - a 2-page article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (March 20, 1948) with color photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Ruth Carson): "Children's clothes are bigger and bigger business. More children - more clothes. It's automatic..."
428 Clark, Mark W. (U.S. Army General): "Invasion Flashes" - a newspaper photo layout published in STARS AND STRIPES (June 10, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "Pfc. Alton W. Knappenberger is introduced to General Sir Harold Alexander by Lt. General Mark W., Clark after the soldier had received the Congressional Medal of Honor...S. Sgt. Paul B. Huff also received the Medal of Honor at the ceremony."
429 Click Magazine: CLICK MAGAZINE cover (color) photograph of a female airplane pilot (April 10, 1942) by Martin Harris. The photograph accompanies the article "They Make 'Em - They Fly 'Em" (not included).
430 Comic Books (and Childhood Crime): "Horror in the Nursery" (2 copies) - a 3-page (incomplete) article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (March 27, 1948) with color photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Judith Crist): "There are books of well-known comics which make life better by making it merrier. There are others which make it clear, even to the dullest mind, that crime never pays. With such there is no quarrel. The books deplored here are those which attempt to make violence, sadism and crime attractive, which ignore common morals, which appeal chiefly to the worst in human nature..."
431 Condon, Eddie (Jazz Musician): "Brother Jazz: The Story of Eddie Condon" (2 copies) - an 8-page/2-part (incomplete) article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (August 23 - 30, 1947) with color photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Eddie Condon and Thomas Sugrue): "...Jazz had been in and out of New York for years before Condon and other Chicagoans arrived, it was considered of no value...In New York, Condon by instinct and interest became a free-lance jazz missionary..." A PM NEW YORK newspaper photo (taken by Martin Harris) of Eddie Condon (with fellow musicians John Kirby and Pee Wee Russell) at a Town Hall jazz concert (March 9, 1942) is also included in the folder
432 Consumerism (Selling): "Crisis in Selling - 1960: Why Consumers Hate to Shop" - a 6-page article published in PRINTERS' INK MAGAZINE (June 10, 1960) with photographs (including cover photograph) by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "In the 1957-'58 recession, you could blame sluggish salesmanship on the economy; but not today. In these times of easy money, the most positive comment on the phenomenon is, paradoxically, the most negative: Salesmanship and the salesman are obsolete..."
433 Consumers/Goods (Europe): "Great Britain - It Has Come From Austerity to Abundance" (Photo caption) - an incomplete article (only photo page included) published in U.S. NEWS and WORLD REPORT (June 1, 1959) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "...So enticing is the prosperity of the world outside U.S. that American investors are sending more than 3 billion dollars of private capital abroad each year for investment. A growing number of American companies are entering the foreign field - often to produce goods not only for markets abroad, but for sale back in the U.S...."
434 Cooper, Gary: "Gary Cooper: An American Tourist" - a 3-page article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (1953) with color and black and white photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "See that tall, tweedy tourist buying a ticket to the Eiffel Tower? That's no stranger. It's Gary Cooper. The slowest-talkin', fastest-drawin' hombre in films and his womenfolk have been on a sight-seeing tour..."
435 Crusader (British Forces' Weekly): "Soldier of the Week" - A (front page) photograph (by Martin Harris) published in THE CRUSADER BRITISH FORCES' WEEKLY (April 23, 1944). Photo Caption: "He's tough and typical - of the British Commandos who have been in action in the Anzio beach-head, winkling the Huns out of their strong-points, stopping them from infiltrating our positions and mopping up their observation posts. They fight by night, and do not wear steel helmets when out on patrol. His name is Pte. K. Lowe and comes from Bolton."
436 Dance Bands (Resurgence): "Americans Are Dancing Again" - a 2-page (incomplete) article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (October 18, 1952) with a photograph of band leader Woody Herman by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "The American people have lately been getting a new hankering after an old pastime - ballroom dancing. The major dance studios report that they have graduated more people within the past few months than for many years. And in many parts of the country, you'll find that on Saturday night you can scarcely get into a restaurant ballroom, or any other place, which has a dance orchestra..."
437 Dewey , Francis Eileen: "Dinner With the Deweys" - A 2-page article published in THIS WEEK MAGAZINE ("How America Eats" column - May 6, 1951) with a photograph of Mrs. Thomas Dewey - Francis Eileen Dewey - wife of New York Governor Thomas E. Dewey) by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "The Governor's Lady knows her husband likes foods that stick to the ribs. Try the pot roast and his favorite applesauce cake..."
438 Diamonds: "The Diamond Trade: At Home on 47th Street" - a 4-page (incomplete) article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (October 4, 1952) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text(by an unidentified author): "Mention diamonds to the average New Yorker and he thinks of Maiden Lane. The crowded, crooked little downtown street - just a few blocks north of Wall Street - is the time-honored nexus of the diamond trade in the diamond marketing hub of the world..."
439 Ditisheim, Hanns (Banker): "Swiss Charmer in the Stockyards" - an 8-page article (3 copies) published in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (September 1959) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by T. A. Wise): "In taking on United Stockyards, Hanns Ditisheim has acquired a plodding, ailing old business. But this Swiss-born banker has a nose for values and a talent for turning unpromising situations into profit..."
440 Dixieland Music: "Dixieland - New Orleans Jazz Has Returned As Part of Universal Nostalgia" (2-copies) - a 2-page article published in an unidentified magazine (circa 1950) with photographs (of Eddie Condon and Phil Napoleon) by Martin Harris. Text (by Emory Lewis): "Those who were young in the Twenties must be a little aghast these days - aged before their time. For they must stand by and observe the nostalgic spectacle of a Lorelei Lee doing very well for herself on Broadway, young girls shingling their hair and doing the Charleston like crazy and now, a new tribulation, fuzzy-cheeked ex-beboppers digging the musty likes of Phil Napoleon and His Memphis Five! For jazz is the latest example of the Twenties renascence which is sweeping all American modes and manners along in its 'Jada' upsurge..."
441 Durante, Jimmy: "The Mantles of Ziegfeld and Barnum" - a 2-page (incomplete) article published in THE LITERARY DIGEST (November 30, 1935 with photographs of Jimmy Durante, Paul Whiteman and "Big Rosie" - the elephant star of Broadway's JUMBO) by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Billy Rose, the smallest manager in the world, produces JUMBO, a gargantuan pageant of song and circus, and critics agree. He inherits the thrones of two great showman..."
442 Duttweiler, Gottlieb: "Who's Who in Foreign Business - Gottlieb Duttweiler" - a single-page article published in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (January 1956) with a photograph of Gottlieb Duttweiler (President of the Migros Cooperative Food Chain) by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "This thoughtful looking man with a cigar is Europe's most spectacular grocer. Swiss housewives regard him as a saint. His competitors are convinced he is a devil. At sixty-seven Gottlieb Duttweiler is president of the famous Migros cooperative food chain, which, by price cutting and aggressive salesmanship, has made a name for itself throughout Switzerland..."
51 Einstein, Albert: "Picture of the Week - Albert Einstein Leaves the Palestine Pavilion at the New York World's Fair" - a single-page photograph, taken by Martin Harris, published in LIFE MAGAZNE (1939). Photograph caption (by an unknown author): "On the wall above Albert Einstein's head, as he emerges from the Jewish Palestine Pavilion at the New York World's Fair, is inscribed in Hebrew and English a verse from the Book of Psalms, the vow of Judaism. In his long exploration of the mysteries of the universe, Albert Einstein has not forgotten the arid patch of earth on which Jerusalem stands. For years he has actively supported the efforts of his people, hunted from their homes in Europe, to build a national home in Palestine. To the New York World's Fair on Sunday, May 28, he went with his sister, Mrs. Maja Wintler-Einstein, to dedicate the Jewish Palestine Pavilion, The fact that the British White Paper had been published ten days before turned the dedication into a Zionist rally, brought 10,000 Jews to protest against Britain's promise breaking."
52 Eisenhower, Dwight David: Photographs, taken by Martin Harris, of 5-star General Dwight David Eisenhower (Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces and victorious 1952 Presidential candidate) published in STARS AND STRIPES (1945) and in THE SATURDAY EVENING POST (1948). The STARS AND STRIPES photographs record General Eisenhower with General Charles de-Gaulle and various soldiers in 1945. The SATURDAY EVENING POST photograph depicts the possible Eisenhower draft by the Republican Party in 1948 ("The general, who once refused to be a candidate under any circumstances, has changed his mind. This article, revealing that decision, tells what kind of candidate - and President - he would be...").
53 Feinberg, J.M (Freewax Corporation): "How Feinberg Brought Freewax to the Big City" - a 9-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (November 1, 1952) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unknown author): "J.M. Feinberg, president of the Freewax Corporation, came up from Florida a few weeks ago to set the stage for his product's debut in the New York market. Freewax, a liquid self-polishing floor wax and insecticide in one ('the greatest discovery since soap'), is already being sold in the South and Southwest. Now Feinberg is arranging for its introduction to the East..."
54 Field Hockey (British Women's Team): One Game America Can't Win - a single-page photo essay published in PICTURE POST MAGAZINE (January 3, 1948) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (photo captions): "England's Women Hockey Team, just returned, is the first English side to win anything in the U.S.A. for a decade. They won all eighteen games, scoring 203 goals to their opponents' five."
55 Fontainebleau Lycee (Paris): "Le Lycess International du Fontainbleau" a 4-page (incomplete) article published (in French) in LE PATRIOTE ILLUSTRE (c. late 1940s) with photographs by Martin Harris. The article subject deals with education in France.
56 Freeport, Long Island (New York): "Killings Give Freeport New Party, Old Issue" - a single page article published in PM NEW YORK (March 18, 1946) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Donald D. Ross): "Patrolman Joseph Romeika killed two Negroes and wounded a third early on the morning of Feb. 5 in Freeport L.I. By this act, which was bitterly denounced by many whites and Negroes in the quiet little town, the policeman unwittingly fathered a new Freeport political party which is shattering Long Island precedent by running a Negro and a white woman in the elections tomorrow for village trustees..."
57 Fresh Air Fund: "Summer's for Discovery" - a 2-page (incomplete) article published in THIS WEEK MAGAZINE (June 25, 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Barbara Woollcott) : "Foster parents and tenement children both can find new thrills in any friendly town...This summer, we've promised ourselves a treat. It's all arranged and we're going to have a couple of Fresh Air Fund kids staying at our house for a two-week vacation..."
58 Gable, Clark: "Who, Gable?" - a 2-page article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (January 8, 1954) with color and black and white photographs (of Gable taken in Arnhem, Holland while filming BETRAYED ) by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "If you don't seek, you seldom find. Which is why a living legend like Clark Gable can stroll through a town like Arnhem, Holland, in broad daylight, unnoticed by people who would spot him at 200 paces on any movie screen..."
59 General Electric (GE): "GE Sells Industrial Goods...With Broadway Stage Show" - a single-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (February 28, 1953) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Broadway and Hollywood have done their bit to zip up sales meetings for consumer appliance distributors. Now General Electric has turned on the glamor to promote its heavy goods - industrial products and power distribution equipment. GE's program dubbed the Time of your Life, got off to a start last week at Hershey, PA...At the meetings, salesmen learn how a product works and above all, how to sell it. Between serious moments, girls in bathing suits, ventriloquists and funnymen keep the boys interested..."
510 Geneva "Big 4" Conference (1955): Various photographs, taken by Martin Harris, of President Dwight David Eisenhower, First Lady Mamie Eisenhower, John Eisenhower (son), Secretary of State Allen Dulles, Russian Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov, et cetera at the Geneva "Big 4" Conference in Switzerland to determine the future of German and European security. All photographs published in the New York Times between July 19 - 24, 1955.
511 Germany (Army - Part 1): "The Rise of the Citizen's Wehrmacht" - a 3-page article published in PICTURE POST MAGAZINE (May 12, 1956) with NATO photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "How is Western Germany setting about the task of rebuilding its armed forces within the framework of NATO? Rigid control is intended to ensure that there shall be nor re-birth of Nazi militarism. The German soldier must be 'a citizen doing his duties only as a citizen.' The old Iron Cross blots out the swastika as newly appointed officers receive their commissions..." The PICTURE POST May 12, 1956 issue cover (with Janet Leigh) is also included in the folder.
512 Germany (Army - Part 2): "Tournant decisif a Bonn: le Rearmement" - a 4-page article published in LE PARIOTE ILLUSTRE (May 29, 1956) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (in French) by Georges Blun. The LE PATRIOTE ILLUSTRE May 29, 1956 issue cover (with bike riding nuns) is also included in the folder.
513 Germany (Army - Part 3): "Germany Rearms With U.S. Help" (2-copies) - a 2-page article published in PICTURE POST MAGAZINE (June 9, 1956) with color NATO photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "The new West German armed forces are now receiving supplies from the United States of a wide range of weapons permitted under the NATO agreements. But the level of these specified armaments held by Germany - as well as by other members of the seven-nation Western European Union - will be subject to regular inspection by an agency created for this task..." The PICTURE POST June 9, 1956 issue cover (with Kim Novak) is also included in the folder.
514 Germany (Army - Part 4): "In der Luft spricht man nur Englisch" (2-copies) - a 2-page article published in DIE WOCHE MAGAZINE (June 24, 1956) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (in German) by an unidentified author. The DIE WOCHE MAGAZINE June 24, 1956 issue cover (with bike riders) is also included in the folder.
515 Germany (Army - Part 5): "Communique on the New German Army" - a 3-page (incomplete) article published in THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE (December 1, 1957) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Hanson W. Baldwin): "Formed last year, it has so far avoided the old militaristic tradition and now seeks a compromise between the conflicting demands of democracy and discipline..."
516 Gracie Mansion (NYC Mayoral Residence): A photograph of Gracie Mansion (the official residence of the NYC mayor) by Martin Harris published in the National Affairs section of TIME MAGAZINE (June 7, 1948).
517 Gromyko, Andrei A. (Russia): A photograph of Andrei A. Gromyko (Russian delegate to the United Nations) taken by Martin Harris and published in the PM NEW YORK (March 31, 1946) "Newsreel section ("Good Pictures of Things Really Happening"). Photo caption: "Gromyko leaving the UNO session."
518 Harness Racing (Roosevelt Raceway - NY): "Harness Racing Gets a $20-Million Track" - a 2- page article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (August 10, 1957) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "A glamorously efficient operation to attract a crowd and part them from their cash was set in motion one night last week when Long Island's new $20 Million Roosevelt Raceway threw open its gates to the public..."
519 Hearing Loss (Childhood): "Boy! I Can Hear Now" (2 - copies) - a 4-page article published in THE SATURDAY EVENING POST (circa 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Joe Alex Morris): "Some 3,000,000 school age children are now sentenced to spend their days in the gloomy world of partial deafness. This is what one organization - The New York League for the Hard of Hearing - is doing about it..."
520 Hecht , Ben (Playwright): "Picture Stem" photographs by Martin Harris (published in PM NEW YORK - August 25, 1946) of playwright Ben Hecht (THE FRONT PAGE, et cetera) with actors Mercedes McCambridge, Lawson Zerbe and Paul McGrath as they present the CBS radio drama INNER SANCTUM. Text (by an unidentified author): "Ben Hecht who has done pretty well as an author, playwright and screenwriter, made his first venture into radio dramatics on Monday when he turned up as narrator on the INNER SANCTUM mystery show...Hecht was on familiar grounds, the show being an adaptation of his newest film SPECTER OF THE ROSE, which revolves around a ballet dancer with an incurable yen for murdering beautiful ballerinas..."
521 Hill, Gladwin (New York Times Reporter): "No Time To Stare" magazine advertisement for THE NEW YORK TIMES promoting the work of NYT reporter Gladwin Hill published in various magazines (circa 1960) with a photograph of Hill by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Gladwin Hill's hobby, he confides, is 'sitting and staring into space.' Readers of THE NEW YORK TIMES know he rarely gets a chance to indulge it. He's too busy covering space to stare into it..."
522 Homeless (NYC Derelict Population): "City's Derelict Population Doubles Since End of War" - a 2-page article published in PM NEW YORK (March 18, 1946) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Edmund Scott): "New York City's derelict population - the old, crippled, the men who can't work or won't work - has doubled since the end of the war and is facing, in its own miserable way, the same problem almost everybody is facing today. They need a place to sleep..."
523 Hopkins, John Jay (President, General Dynamics): "Building a Business for War and Peace" (2 - copies) - a 5-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (October 18, 1952) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "If we have another war, it will be fought under the sea and in the air, says John Jay Hopkins, board chairman and president of General Dynamics Corp. His company draws cards both ways, It owns Electric Boat of Groton , Conn., the only private U.S. builder of submarines and Canadair, Ltd., of Montreal, Canada's biggest aircraft builder..."
524 Hopper, Edward (Artist): "Painter Edward Hopper Has Show at Whitney Museum" - a single-page article published in an unidentified publication (circa 1950) with a photograph of Edward Hopper and his wife, artist Jo N. Hopper, taken by Martin Harris. Text (by Emory Lewis): "...Painter Edward Hopper is pleased that Greenwich Village is finally honoring him with a huge one-man show of 171 oils, watercolors and prints at the Whitney Museum...he has steadfastly refused to change his style. He still paints his lonely architectural studies of America - the handsome Classic revival houses, the eclectic suburban mansions of the President Grant period, the spare wooden houses of New England, often thrown together in one picture in the wild mixture which is American architecture..."
525 Hotel Design: "A Hotel Design is Never Quite Good Enough" - a 4-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (March 19, 1955) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "...In the old days, a hotel was often merely a large building with habitable rooms, a few miscellaneous services, and a clerk to collect the guests' money. Today it is usually much more. Hotels are in hot competition with one another, and with motels. Since World War II, many of them have had trouble keeping rooms filled and profits up. The hotels' weapons in this struggle have been the things that attract guests: Every big hotel has tried to make itself one degree more comfortable, more pleasant, more efficient, more luxurious or homelike than its rivals..."
526 Household Cleaning Products: "Chemicals Clean Up on a Multimillion-Dollar Market" - a 4-page (incomplete) article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (March 7, 1953) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "In New York last week, John Wanamaker's department store finished up its 10-day Chemical Carnival, and multitudes of housewives toted home shopping bags full of products - some new, some old, but all with strange sounding names: Odor-Ban, Whink, Easy-Off, Quel, Trav, Tutchon and Dri-Clean-A-Garage. ...The fact that Wanamaker could gather together scores of cleaners, polishes, menders, shiners, gleamers, and removers into one special department shows how far the chemical housewares industry has traveled since before World War II..."
527 Hyldoft, Joan (Professional Ice Skater): Articles published in PARADE MAGAZINE, WHERE and THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE featuring photographs (by Martin Harris) of ice show star Joan Hyldoft in 1947. The cover photographs, also by Martin Harris, are included in the folder. Text (by an unknown author for PARADE MAGAZINE): "...In an extravaganza like ICETIME OF 1948, which has been playing New York's Center Theater almost without a break for seven years, the current star is a young woman with flying blonde locks who performs on ice as though she had wings on her shoulders, springs on her toes. She is Joan Hyldoft, 19, of Huntington , W.VA., whose roots in the art of skating , significantly enough, are not especially deep..."
528 Ice Skaters : Photographs, taken by Martin Harris, of professional ice skaters for various publications (1949). "My Best Unpublished Photograph - NO. 1" - a single-page article written by Martin Harris for PIX MAGAZINE (July 8, 1949) is also included in the folder. Text (by Martin Harris with photograph of "Skippy" Baxter): "I consider this picture of "Skippy" Baxter executing an outside axel one of my best unpublished photographs because of the high degree of coordination achieved in making it..."
529 Ismay, Hastings Lionel "Pug" (NATO): "Lord Ismay As I Know Him" - a 4-page article published in NATO LETTER (February 1966) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Geoffrey Parsons): "Lord Ismay's first direct association with the Atlantic Alliance was at the critical decision-burdened Lisbon Ministerial Meeting in early 1952. Prime Minister Churchill, who was also his own Defense Minister, had dispatched Ismay, his Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations to Lisbon to watch out for Britain's defense interests, particularly in the cost-sharing exercise for the pending multi-million dollar infrastructure programme, which was to provide the Alliance with urgently needed airfields and pipelines. It was not a happy introduction to NATO for Lord Ismay..."
530 Israel (Tourism): "Israel Books Spring Tourism in Private Homes" - a single-page article published in THE NEW YORK TIMES (February 28, 1960) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "Old and Young - Tourists wandering in the remains of Herod's tomb in Jerusalem. Spire in the background is of the Church of Dormition." Text (by Moshe Brilliant): "The demand for accommodations by spring tourists to Israel this year is unprecedented. Heretofore, the season has started at Passover time in April. Now, however, the tourism hotels are fully booked from March 1 through May and applications for reservations are still pouring in..."
531 Italy (Second World War): "Italy's Cabinet Sworn In, But Sans Badoglio" (2 copies) - a single-page article published in PM NEW YORK (June 23, 1944) with photographs (of Marshal Pietro Badoglio, 1st Duke of Addis Abeba, 1st Marquess of Sabotino) by Martin Harris. Text (by Alexander H. Uhl): "After two weeks of more than vigorous debate over whether Badoglio would get into the Cabinet and what form of oath of allegiance should be taken, the Bonomi Government finally became official yesterday. In the end, Badoglio didn't get into the cabinet, although he may get into it yet. And the oath of allegiance was not to the monarchy, but to the nation as a whole..."
532 Ives, Burl: "New Yorkers at Home: Mr. and Mrs. Burl Ives" - a 3-page article published in CUE MAGAZINE (October 1949) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Emory Lewis): "The bearded folksinger whom poet Carl Sandburg recently called 'the greatest balladeer of our time' should live in some rural retreat in the backwoods mountain country. But Burl Ives, the 'Wayfaring Stranger,' lives instead high up in a Riverside Drive apartment house, with the huge Ford and Spry neon signs blinking at him from Jersey across the Hudson..."
533 Janney, Leon (Actor): "Junior's in a Hurry" - a 2-page (incomplete) article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (or possibly CUE MAGAZINE - circa 1949) with a photograph (of Janney performing on radio's HOUSE OF MYSTERY show with announcer John Griggs) by Martin Harris. Text (by John Kobler): " '...It's no life for people who like to know whether they're coming or going.' That's what radio's Leon Janney says about the career that keeps him eternally on the run, pays him $30,000 a year..."
534 Jones, Spike (Orchestra Leader and Comedian): "A Night at the Uproar" (2-copies) - a 3-page article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (circa 1940) with color photographs (of Jones, singer Helen Grayco, comic Freddie Morgan and musician Earle Bennett) by Martin Harris. Text (by Jim Marshall): "About Spike Jones, the musical maniac of California, who has suddenly found himself the idol of ten million bobby-soxers and the maker of a million bucks a year..."
535 Kaiser, Henry J. (Shipbuilding Industrialist): "Labor - Model in Reverse" - a 2-page article published in TIME MAGAZINE (August 11, 1947) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Labor's offensive against the Taft-Hartley Act hit Detroit. John L. Lewis had won one battle with a coal contract which had laid a few detours around the new law..."
536 Kazan, Elia (Part 1): "Elia Kazan, Prizewinner of the Year" (2 copies) - a 3-page article published in CUE MAGAZINE (April 17, 1948) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Elia Kazan's present eminence in the entertainment world isn't much of a surprise to anybody Kazan himself, who dismisses his enormous success as the result of 'accidents, accidents , accidents...' "
537 Kazan, Elia (Part 2): "Hits by Kazan" - a 2-page (incomplete) article published in THIS WEEK MAGAZINE (February 20, 1949) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text (by James R. Miller): "If Arthur Miller's new drama DEATH OF A SALESMAN, isn't THE great American play, it will do until a greater one comes along. At least it will settle for our generation the question of who is Broadway's top director. Elia Kazan, of course... The director...has been called erratic, childlike, a hermit who loves people - and just plain genius..."
538 Kazan, Elia (Part 3): "Mister Genius" - a 2-page article published in an unidentified magazine (circa 1949) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text (by Sidney Carroll): "The stage may have lost a great actor when Elia Kazan decided he would take up the chores of a director, but one thing is certain: as a director he's right on top..."
61 Labor Demonstrations: "Students Learn Art of Picketing" - a single page article published in PM NEW YORK (July 22, 1940) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Most college students come from upper or middle class homes. Most become -or try to become- solid, sedate citizens. A handful junks family blue-prints and enlists as union organizers, labor journalists, labor lieutenants in one way or another. One training ground for them is the League for Industrial Democracy summer school. Next week the League's class of 1940 - 14 from eight states - ends its six-week sojourn in 'a laboratory of labor and social action'..."
62 La Guardia, Fiorello: "Mayor La Guardia's New York" (2 copies) - a 3-page (incomplete) article published in an unidentified magazine (circa 1940) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "In size and cost his government is second only to the federal. He runs it with a showman's flair, a businessman's eyes, a politician's astuteness. Annual budget $600,000,000..."
63 Lambs Club (NYC ): "All-Star Hangout" - a 3-page (incomplete) article published in THE SATURDAY EVENING POST (April 22, 1950) with photographs (of comedian Bobby Clark, Broadway star Jimmy Savo, radio star Phil Baker, musical comedy star William Gaxton, et cetera) by Martin Harris. Text (by Maurice Zolotow): "The wittiest and highest-priced talent in show business can be found at The Lambs club, where famous actors like Danny Kaye, Fred Astaire and Spencer Tracy meet for offstage fun and an annual show that may include Toscanini leading a ragtime band..."
64 Landon, Alfred M. "Alf": "McNary Confers With Kingmaker Landon" - a single-page newspaper photograph, by Martin Harris, published in PM NEW YORK (June 30, 1940). Photo caption in the "News of the Nation" section: "This photograph was made in Alf. M. Landon's Washington hotel room on his trip to the capital to lunch with President Roosevelt and shows him conferring with Senator Charles L. McNary. Was the deal, 'Landon for Willkie, McNary for vice-president,' made at this conference?"
65 Lassalle, Rev, Hugo: A single-page newspaper photograph published in PM NEW YORK (August 27, 1946) by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "Explosion of the atom bomb, which flattened Hiroshima last August, is recalled by the Rev. Hugo Lassalle, Superior of all Jesuits in Japan, only as 'a wave of heat and a flash like a photographer's bulb.' Lassalle said at a press conference at St. Ignatius Loyola rectory here yesterday that 'I had a bath in my own blood' from cuts suffered in the explosion, and that it became 'dark from the dust of flattened houses' while he rescued three persons trapped in demolished buildings on the church grounds."
66 Lawrence, Gertrude: "New Yorkers at Home: Mr. and Mrs. Richard Aldrich" - a 3-page article published in CUE MAGAZINE (June 10, 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Emory Lewis): "Suave, tall, sandy-haired Richard Aldrich is unique in the theatre world. He is a producer who works at his trade year round and would not have it any other way. For nine months of the year, Mr. Aldrich lives in a fifth-floor apartment on West Fifty-fourth street, is one of the busiest and most successful men along Broadway...The Aldriches (she is attractive, enormously talented actress Gertrude Lawrence) are perhaps the most tireless couple in show business. Miss Lawrence, in fact, feels she should be more properly labelled New Yorker NOT at Home, for she is involved in film-making in Hollywood, plays in London and New York and road tours, radio and television assignments..."
67 Ledbetter, Huddie ("Leadbelly"): A single-page newspaper photograph published in PM NEW YORK (October 21, 1941) by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "Huddie Ledbetter, better known as Leadbelly, one of America's greatest songspinners, is almost recovered from a recent serious illness. On Sunday afternoon, Nov. 2, at Cafe Society downtown, a host of entertainers-admirers will join their music with his in a testimonial to which the public is invited at $1 a head. Libby Holman will sing and Josh White, who, like Leadbelly, learned his music from the fabulous sightless Southern folksinger, Blind Lemon Jefferson, will try to 'carve' Leadbelly down with his guitar playing, just as they used to compete in other days. Other volunteers among the entertainers: Golden Gate Quartet, Pete Johnson and Albert Ammons, Burl Ives, Woodie Guthrie and the Almanac Singers. The woman in the picture above is Mrs. Ledbetter. Says Leadbelly: My guitar is half my life. My wife is the other half."
68 Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA): "At Lehigh They Are Treating Engineers Like People" -a 7-page (incomplete) article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (August 16, 1952) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Fifty years ago, industry employed 250 workmen to every graduate engineer. Today it employs 52 workmen per graduate engineer - and complains because it can't hire 50,000 more engineers right now..."
69 Lewyt, Alex (Vacuum Cleaner Inventor): What Makes Alex Go (2-copies) - a 2-page (incomplete) article published in an unidentified magazine (1950) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text (by Mort Weisinger): "Millionaire inventor Lewyt works 50 hours a week, hasn't had a vacation in 10 years. He counts ideas instead of sheep when he's trying to sleep. .."
610 Loren, Sophia: "Sophia in Sorrento" a 2-page article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (September 16, 1955) with color photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Evelyn Harvey): "Latest in a lengthening line of Italian screen beauties slated for export is Sophia Loren. Even as a fish vendor, she films like a femme fatale..."
611 Lunt, Alfred: "Alfred Lunt Teaches Acting to Ex-GIs" - a single page photo essay (8 photos) published in PM NEW YORK (October 3, 1946) by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Alfred Lunt, distinguished star of the Broadway hit O MISTRESS MINE has volunteered his services to teach acting to ex GIs at the American Theatre Wing's professional school. Lunt began his eight-week course last week, delighted his eager students with his pointers on expression of character. At the first class he held a reading of George Bernard Shaw's ARMS AND THE MAN, a comedy satirizing war and empty heroism. The play is set in a tiny Bulgarian village in 1885 during a battle between Bulgaria and Serbia." The photo shoot/layout is complimented (in red ink) by PM NEW YORK editor Simon Nathan : "This is the old Martin Harris - good work - keep it up."
612 McCauley. Robert (US Air Force): "Junge Ehe in New York" (2-copies) - a 3-page photo essay (on a U.S. Air Force pilot's newlywed life in New York City) published (in German) in MEHR MAGAZINE (circa 1948) by Martin Harris.
613 Manhattan (Post War): "It All Happened in New York" a single page photo essay (of everyday life in New York) published in PM NEW YORK (September 19, 1946) by Martin Harris. Photograph subjects include the Hollywood "Goldwyn Girls" promoting their film THE KID FROM BROOKLYN starring Danny Kaye and "Fall Planting" at Rockefeller Center.
614 Massachusetts Investors Trust: "Big Money in Boston" - an 11-page article published in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (circa 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "But money isn't everything, according to the Massachusetts Investors Trust, which has prospered by selling the small investor peace of mind. Its invention: the open -end fund. The future: wide-open..."
615 Massed Pipers of the Scot's Guard: "Highlanders on American Fling" - a single-page newspaper photograph, by Martin Harris, published in THE NEW YORK TIMES (June 26, 1960). Photo caption: "Marching and playing in Madison Square Garden these nights are the Massed Pipers of the Scot's Guards. This group is part of some 532 British service men who will be appearing in the Military Tournament and Tattoo thorough July."
616 Mauldin, Bill (Editorial Cartoonist): " ' Lo Joe' - "Well I'm a Sad Sack' " - a single-page photograph, by Martin Harris, published in THE STARS AND STRIPES WEEKLY (April 29, 1944). Photo caption: "One of the more important conferences of the war took place in Italy when GI Joe and The Sad Sack got together for the first time since the start of hostilities for a front line bull session. The occasion was the meeting of S-Sgt. George Baker, creator of the Sack for YANK MAGAZINE and T-4 Bill Mauldin, who draws Joe for THE STARS AND STRIPES."
617 Mays, Willie: "Senor Mays - Big Hit in San Juan" (2-copies) - a 4-page article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (January 7, 1955) with color and black and white photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Tom Meany): "Willie doesn't savvy the Spanish lingo, but he feels right at home in Puerto Rico's ball parks. And he's playing better than ever - even hitting home runs again...When Willie Mays learned he could play winter baseball, he was like a kid who'd been told there were two Christmases. Ripping out base hits and roaming the outfield for Santurce in the Puerto Rican League, the New York Giant star is completely happy, even though so far hasn't picked up much Spanish. Willie can hit and field in any language..."
618 Menagh, Louis R. (Prudential Insurance, CEO): "Businessmen in the News - Menagh of Prudential Insurance" - a 3-page article published in in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (March 1961) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Louis R. Menagh, who now presides over the investing of some $6 million a day for the Prudential Insurance Co., was talking recently about the problem some insurance executives have in retaining any perspective on money. He mentioned a former Prudential president whose wife called one day to say that their account at the bank was overdrawn, and who told her in alarm to 'get after that - that's real money... ' "
619 Merman, Ethel: A color photograph (of Ethel Merman, Charles Laughton, Guy Lombardo and recording executive Jack Kapp), by Martin Harris, published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (circa 1945). Photo caption: "Jack Kapp holds a business conference in his New York home with three of his leading record makers, Ethel Merman, Charles Laughton and Guy Lombardo."
620 Miller, Arthur (Part 1): "Arthur Miller at Home" (3-copies) - a 3-page article published in CUE MAGAZINE (May 7, 1949) with a photograph (of Miller with actor Lee J. Cobb) by Martin Harris. Text (by Seymour Peck): "If the people on Arthur Miller's block in Brooklyn are aware of the impact Miller and his powerful drama, DEATH OF A SALESMAN, have had upon the American theatre, they make no show of it. To the schoolboys who play stick ball noisily in the street, to the women who stand in front of the houses with their baby carriages, to the families going to the venerable church on the corner, to the businessmen who get into their backyards on Sunday mornings to pull weeds of their scrubby gardens, Miller is, first of all, a nice guy and a good neighbor. That he writes plays for a living is merely a fact, no more significant than the fact that other men on the block run small shops, practice law or fix automobiles..."
621 Miller, Arthur (Part 2): "Brooklyn Boy Makes Good" (2-copies) - a 3-page (incomplete) article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (July 16, 1949)with photographs (of Miller with his family and with actors Lee J. Cobb, Shirley Booth, and Nanette Fabray, et cetera ) by Martin Harris. Text (by Robert Sylvester): "Arthur Miller, author of the Broadway hit, DEATH OF A SALESMAN, has been called the ablest playwright since Eugene O' Neill. At least he stands to make $2,000,000 from a play he wrote in just six weeks..."
622 Miller, Arthur (Part 3): "A Regular Death Call" - a 3-page (incomplete) article published in ESQUIRE MAGAZINE (circa 1949) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text (The "latest" short story by Arthur Miller): "The reasons why a man wants to live , or why he wants to die, are not always clear even to himself, but in this particular case the little old man knew exactly..." - "...We of ESQUIRE take pleasure in giving you, Mr. Miller's latest story. Like the play (DEATH OF A SALESMAN), it has a preoccupation with the basic stuff of living and the Miller trade mark - the rhythm and poetry of American speech."
623 Miller, Mitch (Musician/Recording Producer): "Mitch Miller: Listening for Columbia/Miller Nurses the Talent/Out of Confusion: A Hit Record?" (2-copies) - a series of articles (13 pages) published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (October 18, 1952) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "...Columbia used to be at the bottom of the heap. Its climb in the pops field dates from a few months after the day Mitch Miller took over as A .and R. man - director of popular artists and repertoire . That was Feb. 15, 1950. Miller came to Columbia from a three-year stint at Mercury Records, first as a classical music supervisor and as a wizard of the pops..."
624 Miscellaneous Published Photographs: Published Images by photographer Martin Harris from various newspapers and magazines (circa 1935 - mid 1960s) including photographs of dancer Paul Draper, singer Lena Horne, society pianist Eddy Duchin, Orson Welles, the "Big Four " Geneva Conference (1955), et cetera.
625 Mostel, Zero (Part 1): "Podden the Expression" - a 3-page article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (September 19, 1942) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Take a talent for comedy, a gum-rubber pan and a mind like a scalpel, and you have the makings of the most meteoric rise in entertainment history. Please meet Zero Mostel...."
626 Mostel, Zero (Part 2): "Zero Mostel Makes With the Face at Café Society" - a single page newspaper article published in an unidentified publication (circa 1942) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Although Downtown Café Society has built a reputation for serious Boogie-Woogie, it has also produced a new candidate for comedy honors. He's Zero Mostel, a hulking, rubber-faced gent who ribs poll-tax politicians, movie stars, lecturers, and anything that occurs to him. He works with expansive gestures and the faces shown above..."
627 Murray, Arthur (Dancer/Dance Instructor): "New Yorkers at Home: Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Murray" (3-copies) - a 3-page article published in CUE MAGAZINE (January 7, 1950) with photographs (of Murray, his wife and dancing partner Kathryn Murray, radio and television star Bert Parks, magazine editor Henry Sell, et cetera) by Martin Harris. Text (by John Keating): "Until 11 years ago, the pattern of Arthur Murray's life was dictated by the schedules of the New York Central Railroad and his cook. Before 1938, the man who is far and away the most successful dancing teacher of all time , was the perfect picture of a harassed and time-bound commuter...."
628 Murrow, Edward R. : "Murrow Sticks to the News" - a 2-page (incomplete) article published in an unidentified magazine (1949) with a photograph (of Murrow with CBS reporter Richard Hottelot) by Martin Harris. Text (by Wesley Price): "He peddles no gossip, repeats no rumors, exhorts no listener to write his congressman. Yet Ed Murrow has built a huge national audience for his fair-minded radio reporting..."
629 NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization): "Vest -Tysklands nye scerd slipes langsomt" - 4-page (incomplete) article published (in German) in AKTUELL MAGAZINE (July 14, 1956) with NATO photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Eilert Eriksen.
630 New York Circulating Library of Paintings: "A Circulating Library That Rents Paintings" - a 2-page newspaper article published in PM NEW YORK (1946) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Unique among the art galleries along 57th Street, New York's Paint and Canvas Alley, is one you see here. It's the New York Circulating Library of Paintings, where you can go pick out a painting, take it home and hang it on your wall for $3 to $50 a month. The enterprise is a partnership of sisters, Ruth S. Butler and Eleanor S. Sadowsky, who induced their father, H. Leonard Simmons, an art collector, to let them set up the gallery in the basement of his fur salon..."
631 Nyaradi, Nicholas (Hungarian Defector): Magazine articles (with photographs by Martin Harris) written by Nicholas Nyradi (1949), a Hungarian politician, who served as Minister of Finance between 1947 and 1948. In November 1948 he did not return home from an official visit abroad to the United States. He settled down in the United States around 1949.
632 O' Dwyer, Sloan Simpson (NYC First Lady): "Mrs. O' Dwyer Makes Bow as Hostess - The New First Lady Presides Graciously Over Historic Gracie Mansion" - a 2-page article published in an unidentified magazine (May 29, 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "If the job of running New York City is, as it is supposed to be, the most demanding in the country next to the Presidency, the job of New York's first lady must be equally demanding on a woman..."
633 Orthopsychiatry: "Psychiatrists Meet in Paris" - a single-page article published in the MEDICAL TRIBUNE (October 24, 1960) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Paris - The first European Congress on Orthopsychiatry, held here in September, attracted physicians and psychiatrists from many countries, including the United States. Discussions of various aspects of maturation were held at the Paris Medical School..."
634 Otello (Opera): "Reflected Rehearsal - a single-page photograph, by Martin Harris, published in THE NEW YORK TIMES (January 17, 1960). Photo caption: "Participants in Opera Society's OTELLO, photographed facing a mirror. The opera will be given in Washington for three days beginning Friday. Singers are grouped around the piano, and Paul Callaway is the conductor. At table is Bliss Hebert, stage director. James McCracken, right rear, sings title role."
635 Overseas Woman (Magazine): A Monthly Publication of the Information and Education Division - U.S. Army (August -September 1945) with various photographs (including a photo of radio star Clifton Fadiman - page 10) by Martin Harris.
636 PM New York (Newspaper): Published Images by photographer Martin Harris from PM NEW YORK (1940-46) including NYC Police (1940), Ladies Garment Workers Union (1941), pin-up girls (1943), Occupied Rome (1944), the Queen Mary troop ship (1945) the NYC Chelsea neighborhood (undated), AFL Shipping Strike (undated), et cetera.
637 Personal Investing (Sugar): "Personal Investing: The Great Sugar Binge/Some Sugar Users Took Their Lumps" (2 -copies) - a 5-page article published in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (August 1963) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (Edited by Daniel Seligman): "Frantic trading was something new on the New York Coffee and Sugar Exchange, whose members have usually yawned their way through trading sessions, in recent years. This spring, as futures prices for sugar took off on a roller-coaster ride, the floor vibrated with excitement..."
638 Police Woman (NYC): "I Was a Lady Cop" - a series of articles published in THE NEW YORK DAILY NEWS (November 1959) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by Kitty Hanson):"She's gone up against cocaine-users who thought they were gods...tough, dirty-fighting homosexuals...armed thugs...three-time losers...stool pigeons...'big shots.' She holds a gun as easily as she holds a cigarette. She's a tough cop - and all woman. Begin reading prize-winning reporter Kitty Hanson's 5-part series on Kathryn Barry..."
639 Pinocchio (Federal Theatre Project): "Pinocchio: WPA (WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION) Stages a Children's Classic" (2 copies) - a 2-page article published in LIFE MAGAZINE (1939) with color photographs by Martin Harris. Text (by an unidentified author): "Nobody knows just how the legend of Pinocchio began. Probably, like FAUST, it came out of morality plays acted in medieval churchyards. A retired Florentine soldier snatched it from oblivion in 1880 and made of it a universal children's classic. Now dramatized into English verse by Yasha Frank, the wistful tale of the little wooden puppet who, after many a heartbreak on land and sea, became a human boy, is converted by the Federal Theatre into one of Broadway's most charming productions..."
71 Piper, William (Piper Cub Airplane): "Count the Cubs" - a 4-page article (incomplete) published in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (May, 1940) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "Bill Piper bet $100, 000 that the count of his planes would go up fast. It did: in 1931 he made 24 planes; in 1939, 1, 806, more than any other manufacturer in the world..."
72 Policeman (NYC): "What Does a Policeman Do?" - a 64 -page/ hardcover monograph (Dodd, Mead and Company, NY - 1959) by Johanna Johnston and Martin Harris with photographs by Martin Harris. Text (aimed at pre-teen and early teen readers): "When he puts on a uniform like this, pins on a shield, straps on a gun, he has one main job - to uphold the law and protect life..."
73 Pool, Leonard (Air Products): "Pool's Fight for Air" (3-COPIES) - A 9- page article published in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (March 1960) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Richard Hammer: "In producing fuel for the space age, Leonard Pool's Air Products, Inc., has stolen a march on big Union Carbide. To hold its lead in the face of growing competition it will need plenty of ingenuity..."
74 Producers, The (1967 film) : "Camera Action 'All Around the Town" - a 4-page article published in PHOTO BULLETIN (October 1967) featuring photographs (on the New York City location-set of THE PRODUCERS starring Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder) by Martin Harris. A typed photo-contact sheet descriptive-list is also included in the folder. Text by an unidentified author: "Newest spectator sport in New York is movie-watching - at first hand. Film crews are 'on location' in so many places chances are fairly good for the casual onlooker to get in the act..."
75 Public Relations: "How an Agency Meets the Press" - a 6-page (incomplete) article published in PRINTER'S INK MAGAZINE (March 11, 1960) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "Agencies make news especially when the agency is, like BBDO shown here, one of the big four. Usually an agency communicates with the press via the mailed mimeographed release generally accompanied by a glossy photo. Now and then, when there is an announcement of importance, the agency brass calls a press conference...Although corporations have used the press conference and other public relations techniques for years (since Ivy Lee introduced its mysteries to John D. Rockefeller), it is only in recent years that the modern advertising agency has stepped forward as a corporate entity to make news of its doings available to the public..."
76 Puerto Rico (Part 1): "National Affairs" - a 2-page (incomplete) article published in TIME MAGAZINE (June 12, 1950) with a photograph ("Puerto Rican Immigrants at a Travel Agency") by Martin Harris.
77 Puerto Rico (Part 2): "San Juan, Puerto Rico" (2-copies) - a 9 -page article (incomplete) published in an unidentified publication (circa 1944) with a photograph ("As U.S. Citizens Puerto Ricans Must Register for the Draft") by Martin Harris.
78 Radio Broadcasting: "Revolution in Radio"- a 3-page article (incomplete) published in an unknown publication (circa 1940) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "After years of battle a fighting inventor is in a position to cause replacement of 40,000,000 radio sets and $75,000,000 worth of broadcasting equipment..."
79 Rank, J. Arthur (Part 1): "We Ask Mr. Rank Six Questions On Film" - A 2-page article published in PICTURE POST MAGAZINE (August 30, 1947) with photographs (including the magazine cover) by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "News of the 75 per cent tax on the earnings of American films in Britain threw the chiefs o f both industries into confusion and secret session. The items on the British agenda included such as the ones put to Mr. Rank's image below. 'Have you any light to shed, Mr. Rank?,' Does this really mean no American films?,' 'If it doesn't, what d'you think's the solution?,' 'If it does is it a disaster or an opportunity?,' 'What would you do yourself about the dollars?,' and 'You can't answer just at the moment?'..."
710 Rank, J. Arthur (Part 2): "Town and Country" - a photograph by Martin Harris published in CUE MAGAZINE (October 1947). Photo caption: "J. Arthur Rank, right, the British film producer, and Eric Johnston, president of our Motion Picture Association, snapped at a 'hands across the sea' reception which was given at the Waldorf-Astoria in honor of Mr. Rank."
711 Religion (Miscellaneous): "Greek Catholics Secede From Rome" - "Young Franciscan Friars Get Tonsure and Habit At Graymor" - Brooklyn Pastor in Pulpit Jail Pleads for Martin Niemoeller" - miscellaneous single-page articles (circa 1940) published in unidentified publications with photographs by Martin Harris.
712 Retail Sales: "Hard Work at the Retail Counter" - a 2-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (June 26, 1954) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "The sort of thing that was happening in New York this week has been happening in one form or another all over the country lately. Merchants looking at the level of retail sales, concluded that while they weren't doing too badly, they obviously weren't doing too well either. And having decided that, the merchants got out to hustle some more business..."
713 Rice (Processing): "Revolution in Rice" - a 2-page (incomplete) article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (January 10, 1948) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text by Frank J. Taylor: "Thanks to the persevering efforts of an art lover (M. Yonan Malek) the world's output of rice may be increased 25 per cent. Mr. Malek's amazing invention will help feed millions now starving..."
714 Richards, Amy (Fashion Model): Cover photograph (5-copies) by Martin Harris and Gleb Derujinsky, Jr. published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (February 28, 1948). Costume by Lillian Abbott.
715 Rodgers, Richard: "New Yorkers at Home- Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rodgers" (2-copies) - a 3-page article published in CUE MAGAZINE (May 6, 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "The composer, whose music has bewitched New Yorkers for the past twenty-five years, and his lovely wife are gay, busy, popular members of the theatre's innermost circle..."
716 Roosevelt, Leila : "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. William Westley" (2-copies) - a 3-page article published in CUE MAGAZINE (circa 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Philip Minoff: "The former Leila Roosevelt (first cousin of Teddy Roosevelt) and her husband set up housekeeping in Manhattan, and find the city as fascinating as any unconquered jungle..."
717 Rorimer, James: "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. James Rorimer" - a 3-page article (incomplete) published in CUE MAGAZINE (circa 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "A curator of medieval art at the august Metropolitan Museum of Art is not the man one would expect to have been a center of international intrigue far exceeding the imaginative tales of the whodunit-makers. Publication the other day, however, of James J. Rorimer's SURVIVAL, a taut, fast-moving account of his tracking down of looted European art during the war, proves pipe-smoking, scholarly Mr. Rorimer as man Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot might grudgingly admire..."
718 Royal Seal (Great Britain): "The Seal of Royal Use"- a 2-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (May 30, 1953) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "When a country gets a new queen, a lot of things happen. New stamps are printed. New coins are minted. In Britain's case, some new merchants will break out with the royal arms over the door and the magical words, 'By appointment to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II...' "
719 Ruark, Robert (Newspaper Columnist): "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ruark" (2-copies) - a 3-page article published in CUE MAGAZINE (June 25, 1949) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Philip Minoff: "When the Robert C. Ruarks came to New York three years ago, Ruark had just launched the breezy, hard-hitting column that now appears in the World-Telegram and more than a hundred other newspapers throughout the country. The couple's first 'permanent' address in the city was an apartment in the East Fifties, and the move into the ornate, $350-a-month duplex was prompted not so much by a design for living as by a design for succeeding..."
720 Sarnoff, David (RCA Chairman/Founder): "RCA: The General Never Got Butterflies" (2-copies) - an 8 -page article published in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (October 1962) with color photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Walter Guzzardi, Jr.: "Five years ago R.C.A., as pioneers sometimes must, was climbing an uphill trail. Now the company, with its color television sets selling well, is beginning to reap the rewards of those cheerless years of low return. To pioneer and to profit - these two motivating forces have run like impulses of alternating current through the history of the Radio Corporation of America. Indeed, General David Sarnoff believes that the secret of corporate success lies in the ability to push forward the frontier, at the same time never forgetting the importance of making substantial deposits back at the bank..."
721 Seafarer's International Union (Maritime Strike): "The Worker's Point of View" - a 2-page article (incomplete) published in THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE (October 6, 1946) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text by A. H. Raskin: "Sketches from a reporter's notebook which throw light upon the motives of the strikers." Additional newspaper articles from PM NEW YORK pertaining to the strike (with photographs by Martin Harris) are also included in the folder.
722 Savo, Jimmy (Broadway Star): "Jimmy Savo, the Well-Dressed Bum" (2-copies) - a publicity photograph by Martin Harris published in PM NEW YORK (July 22, 1943). Photo caption: "Jimmy Savo, the well-dressed bum, who has been entertaining at Café Society Uptown for the past six weeks and is going to continue there indefinitely. For Cafe Society patrons, Jimmy does his usual pantomime routines plus take-offs on popular crooners."
723 Sing Me No Lullaby (Broadway Play): "Behind the Scenes" - a publicity photograph by Martin Harris published in THE NEW YORK TIMES (October 2, 1954). Photo caption: "First reading of SING ME NO LULLABY opening at Phoenix Theatre on October 14, holds attention of members of company. Left to right, Jessie Royce Landis, Beatrice Straight and Director Paul Stewart. In background is Robert Ardrey, the author."
724 Skinner, Cornelia Otis (Actress): "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Alden S. Blodget" (3-copies) - a 3-page article published in CUE MAGAZINE (March 11, 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by John Keating: "Cornelia Otis Skinner, actress and writer, forms the distaff side of the Blodget household. Her husband is an active sportsman and her manager..."
725 Stars and Stripes (July 24, 1943): "Reunion in Gela" - a battlefield photograph by Martin Harris (Army Pictorial Service) published in STARS AND STRIPES (July 24, 1943). Photo caption: "Lt. General George S. Patton, Jr., commanding the American 7th Army in Sicily, points out an abjective to Sgt. Nathan Pruitt, formerly his stable boy at Fort Riley, Kansas, who was one of the first soldiers to greet him on the beach at Gela. Sgt. Pruitt, an Army man for 34 years, hadn't seen General Patton for the past 10 yeas."
726 Stars and Stripes (circa 1944): "Before and After" (Mobile Unit Picture Section) - battlefield photographs (Page 2) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (circa 1944). Photo caption: "First stop of all front-line leave-takers is the GI bathhouse where the fox-hole veterans strip off their dirty OD's, have preview of paradise under hot showers and walk off feeling like new men."
727 Stars and Stripes (circa 1944): "The Italian Front (Mobile Unit Picture Section - 2-copies) - battlefield photographs (page 2-3) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (circa 1944). Photo caption: "UNDER FIRE! 600 yards from enemy held Cassino..."
728 Stars and Stripes (January 1, 1944): "Women in Uniform Play Important Role in War" - A 2 -page article published in STARS AND STRIPES (January 1, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris (page 6 and 7). Text by an unidentified author: "It's a woman's war as well as a man's, as anyone can see who let's his eyes wander over these pictures of nine girls representing nine women's services with the overseas armed forces of the United States, Great Britain and France..."
729 Stars and Stripes (January 15, 1944): "Behind the Scenes With Army Bandmen" - (2 copies) - a single-page article published in STARS AND STRIPES (January 15, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "In the serene surroundings of Monastere du Bon Pasteur, French counterpart of institutions conducted by the House of the Good Shepherd in America, the United States Army Band lives, eats, sleeps and rehearses faithfully for its public appearances in this theater..."
730 Stars and Stripes (January 22, 1944): "Tank Crews Polish and Test in Italy Waiting to See Action" - a single-page article published in STARS AND STRIPES (January 22, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Sgt. Ralph G. Martin: "Somewhere on the Italian Front - There has been little use for tanks in the Italian campaign so far. You can't use tanks in thick, sticky, knee-deep mud and you can't use tanks in the terrain of high-clustered hills and jagged, snow-covered mountain peaks and swollen streams and rivers...There can be no big show in this campaign until the 5th Army infantry sweeps farther north where the hills are low and rolling, where there are longer stretches of flat ground..."
731 Stars and Stripes (February 12,1944): "Surgeons Save Lives in Combat Zone" (3-copies) - a single-page article published in STARS AND STRIPES (February 12, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Sgt. Ralph Martin: "ON THE 5TH ARMY FRONT - "Speedy surgery is probably the chief reason why so many seriously wounded soldiers are still living today..."
732 Stars and Stripes (February 15, 1944): "99th Fighter Squadron Scores Again" (2-copies) - a single-page article published in STARS AND STRIPES (February 15, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Sgt. Ralph G. Martin: "...The men of the 99th-----almost 40 of them-----were all carefully selected because of their background or previous flying experience. The first batch of six cadets who began training at Tuskegee Institute in March 1940, included the son of Brig. Gen. Benjamin O. Davis. The son, named after his father, was himself a West Pointer and now is a lieutenant colonel. At the present he is back in the States to form a new Negro fighter group...Half the original cadre of 120 men have applied already for cadet training as fighter pilots, bombardiers (there's a Negro bombing unit now being organized), navigators and engineering officers..."
733 Stars and Stripes (February 19, 1944) : "They Blasted Jerry from Hill 213" (2-copies) - a single-page article published in STARS AND STRIPES (February 19, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "Fighting the last few miles to Cassino turned out to be almost as tough a job as crossing the Rapido River. Once the Yanks reached the other side of the river, they had to blast the Jerries out of the hills before they could advance across the valley to reach Cassino..."
734 Stars and Stripes (February 26, 1944): "Showers at Front...Before and After" - a single-page photo essay by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (February 26, 1944). Photo caption: "U.S. Artillerymen of the 5th Army were seen by staff photographer Pfc. Martin Harris before and after they took hot showers at a portable unit just behind the front lines. They were loud in praise of the Engineer's shower system."
735 Stars and Stripes (April 12, 1944): "These Slavs Await Chance to Slay Germans" - a single-page article published in STARS AND STRIPES (April 12, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Sgt. Ralph G. Martin: "SOMEWHERE IN ITALY - Only a few months ago most of these people were still in concentration camps. As they dribbled out , the Partisans collected, trained and equipped them. Now they were waiting to get back to Yugoslavia to kill Nazis..."
736 Stars and Stripes (April 27, 1944): "The Grim Story of Yugoslav Partisans" - a 2-page article (incomplete) published in STARS AND STRIPES (April 22, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Sgt. Ralph G. Martin: "SOMEWHERE IN ITALY - "Tito's vast army of men, women, children battle side by side to liberate nation..."
81 Stars and Stripes (April 22, 1944): "A People's Army Fights For Freedom" - a 2-page article (incomplete) published in STARS AND STRIPES (April 22, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "The look in his eyes tells the story. Little Pave Bizaca is one of the wounded refugees evacuated from Yugoslavia to Italy. The same German bomb that killed his older brother smashed Pave's left leg. The boy is 7 years old..." Martin Harris' critical notes ("Pix ...badly cropped...lose their effectiveness...") on the original newspaper page layout are included in the folder.
82 Stars and Stripes (May 6, 1944): "Anzio Papers Dig Up Dirt, Then Dig In to Publish It" - a single-page article published in STARS AND STRIPES (May 6, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Pfc. Edgar Clark: "WITH THE 5TH ARMY BEACHHEAD FORCES - The Anzio beachhead is one place where news is truly what you make it...There are about 30 organizational news sheets at the beachhead, ranging from dailies to bi-weeklies. Volunteer staffs, who do the work in addition to their regular duties, collect the news and grind it out in mimeograph machines...Editorial staffs have liberties which would be envied by newsman working under the double cudgel of censorship and second class newspaper mailing privileges. The news they print in Anzio is so hot that it is labeled secret, to be destroyed by burning as soon as possible after reading. That's because the troops get the inside stuff on tactical situations, stuff fit for friendly foxholes only..." Typed photo captions and descriptions are also included in the folder.
83 Stars and Stripes (May 6, 1944): "German Prisoners" - battlefield photographs by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (May 6, 1944). Photo caption: "German prisoners give their aching feet a rest while awaiting interrogation at an American POW collecting station on the beachhead. The one in the center got his PX rations just before being captures and enjoys a drag on a good Aryan cigar..."
84 Stars and Stripes (May 6, 1944): "Tips to the Traveler" - battlefield photograph (page 1) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (Italy Edition - May 6, 1944). Photo caption: "A sign posted at the approaches to the combat zone on the main 5th Army front passes on a few tips on how to avoid mishaps in the vicinity. A list of fines is also advertised in case any traveler becomes indifferent to the rules of the road." An additional photograph by Martin Harris is printed on page 5 of this issue of Stars and Stripes ("Milkman's Matinee"). See, also, Box 8/Folder 6.
85 Stars and Stripes (May 13, 1944): "Lucky Dog" - battlefield photograph by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (May 13, 1944). Photo caption: "MONTY is the mascot of a field hospital on the 5th Army main front and he's partial to nurses when they're as attractive as Lt. Virginia L. Haase, Crawfordsville, Ind."
86 Stars and Stripes (May 13, 1944) : "Soldiers Heading for the Combat Zone" (3-copies) - battlefield photograph by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (May 13, 1944) and TIME MAGAZINE (May 22, 1944). Photo caption: "Soldiers heading for the combat zone on the main 5th Army front get a ground briefing from this sign posted at the approach to the area as well as a few tips on the cost should any traveler become hazy about the rules." See, also, Box 8/Folder 4.
87 Stars and Stripes (May 20, 1944): "Break Before Battle" - battlefield photograph (page 1) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (May 20, 1944). Photo caption: "These are the faces of men about to go into battle. American soldiers rest before moving into the attack on the lower 5th Army front."
88 Stars and Stripes (May 27, 1944): "Either Too Young, Or Too Old" (2-copies) - battlefield photograph by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (May 27, 1944). Photo caption: "These are German prisoners taken in the Allied drive on the Gustave and Hitler Lines. Their expressions reveal them as far different from the prisoners taken in the North African campaign. These men slouch and shuffle; their clothing is shabby and patched; their shoes often have been taken from the Italians. These are not the trim, arrogant soldiers of the Afrika Korps. Many of them are Poles, Alsatians, and Luxemburgers who have fought with the Germans because they were ordered to, because of reprisal threats against their families, and because of the difficulties of deserting..."
89 Stars and Stripes (May 27, 1944): "First Invasion Blow Falls in Italy" - battlefield photos by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (May 27, 1944). Photo caption: "Men share the load with mules in keeping supplies moving over the mountainous terrain. Here American soldiers carry ammunition up a trail to support the attack on Santa Maria in the first days of the offensive..."
810 Stars and Stripes (May 30, 1944): "A Couple of Supermen" - battlefield photograph by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES - SICILY (May 30, 1944). Photo caption: "Two Kraut prisoners are escorted out of the forward line in the Minturno sector...shortly after the new Allied offensive got under way."
811 Stars and Stripes (June 5, 1944): "Where's Il Duce?" - wartime Rome photograph (page 2) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (June 5, 1944). Photo Caption: "The balcony scene, but not the one from ROMEO AND JULIET, is enacted by happy GIs for an audience of enthusiastic Romans." Additional photographs by Martin Harris, printed in this issue of Stars and Stipes, also included in this folder ("Yanks Enter Gates of Ancient Rome" and "Old Order Changeth").
812 Stars and Stripes (June 6, 1944): "Roman Priests Greet GIs" - wartime Rome photograph (page 3) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES -ROME EDITION (June 6, 1944). Photo Caption: "Before a backdrop provided by the ancient walls of the Colosseum, American soldiers pause on their way through Rome to confer with a pair of padres. Judging from the smiles, the subject at discussion is anything but serious." Additional photographs by Martin Harris, printed in this issue of Stars and Stripes, also included in this folder ("Rome at Last" - page 4).
813 Stars and Stripes (June 8, 1944): "Commanders in Rome" - wartime Rome photograph (page 4) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES - ITALY EDITION (June 8, 1944). Photo caption: "Lt. General Mark W. Clark confers with Maj. Gen Geoffrey Keyes and Maj. General Lucien K. Truscott in the streets of conquered Rome."
814 Stars and Stripes (June 10, 1944): "Signposts On the Raod to Rome" - a full-page photo essay (page 8) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (June 10, 1944).Various images of road signs in wartime Italy.
815 Stars and Stripes (June 10, 1944): "Victory March" - wartime Rome photograph by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (June 10, 1944). Photo caption: "American doughboys are shown as they marched triumphantly through a Roman gate into the Eternal City. When the town was theirs, they rested."
816 Stars and Stripes (June 17, 1944): "Salute to the Infantry - a single page article published in STARS AND STRIPES (June 17, 1944) with a photographs by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "When the enemy pulls back he leaves behind snipers and small pockets of resistance in every town our forces take. To the infantryman falls the task of ferreting out the enemy's expendables driving them from shattered houses, blasting them out of church steeples with hand grenades..." An additional photograph ("Bugs in their Britches") by Martin Harris, printed in this edition, is also included in the folder.
817 Stars and Stripes (June 17, 2016): "Infantrymen Still Win the Wars" - two photographs by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (June 17, 1944) . Photo caption: "Close behind the rifleman come the heavy weapons. A heavy machine gunner crouches behind his water-cooled, 30 caliber weapon, pouring lead at enemy positions. His only protection is the shallow depression in which he has set up his gun..."
818 Stars and Stripes (June 17, 1944): "Mule With a Mission" - a photograph (page 7) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (June 17, 1944). Photo caption: "The pony express, Italian style, gets a workout at an airbase where an American sergeant delivers mail from the back of a donkey. Bracing himself against a 50 caliber machine gun, the sergeant reaches up from the donkey to hand a letter to the tail gunner of a B-24."
819 Stars and Stripes (July 8, 1944): "The Wounded Fly Back" - battlefield photographs by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (July 8, 1944). Photo caption: "The C-47 called 'Cuanto l Casta' carries a brightly-painted picture of a sultry suntanned wench on the left side of her nose. Inside, she's rigged out for litters. Her daily assignment is the transport run with the wounded soldiers of the 5th Army from the front to general hospitals in the rear. While the offensive raged before Rome, she and her sister ships averaged two flights a day. Each plane can carry 13 patients..."
820 Stars and Stripes (July 15, 1944): "Donkey Who Makes With the Brains" - a full-page photo-essay by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (July 15, 1944). Photo caption: "Edda is a smart little mule who belongs to T-Sgt. Richard Wallen, of a remount station in Italy. IN fact, Edda can do about everything except blow the bugle for reveille, which she is too nice a jenny to do even if she knew how..."
821 Stars and Stripes (July 19, 1944): "Wal, Waddya Know, Podner! This Hyar Wuz a Real Rodeo" - a single-page article published in STARS AND STRIPES (July 19, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "FOGGIA - It was roundup time in Italy last week with the Air Forces pooling their talents for a high-falutin', rip-snortin' rodeo complete to bowlegged cowboys and ten-gallon hats, chaps, boots and spurs and even a silver-handled six -shooter..."
822 Stars and Stripes (August 15, 1944): "Hitler's Woes Made Here" - a full-page article (page 5) published in STARS AND STRIPES (August 15, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "A chamber of horrors for Hitler's Fortress Europe is the paneled war room of the 15th Army Air Force. Fliers gather here before each mission to learn where and when they will pour their loads of destruction on strategic targets in Germany and German occupied territory..." An identical page of photographs published in STARS AND STRIPES on August 9, 1944 under the banner headline "Where Hitler Headaches Are Made" is also included in the folder. Also included: 6 pages of typed photo descriptions and captions from Martin Harris.
823 Stars and Stripes (August 17, 1944): "The Dogs of War" - a full-page photo essay spotlighting wartime footwear by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (August 17, 1944). Photo caption: "EDITOR'S NOTE - Under the impression that feet can be as fascinating and as indicative of character as faces, THE STARS AND STRIPES sent Staff Photographer Martin Harris out as an official 'dog catcher' to record a variety of pedal extremities for posterity..."
824 Stars and Stripes (November 11, 1944): "Only the Tall Mountains Know the Mystery of War in the Alps" - a single-page article published in STARS AND STRIPES (November 11, 1944) with a photograph ("In the Maritime Alps") by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "Trained for the jungle these fighting men find themselves on skis, scouring the strange Maritime Alps in ceaseless search of an enemy who knows how to fight and hides only because he fights better that way."
825 Stars and Stripes (November 14, 1944): "A Bane on Such Douches" - a battlefield photograph by Martin Harris published on the front page of STARS AND STRIPES - MARSEILLES EDITION (November 14, 1944). Photo caption: "A couple of German soldiers take some of their ammunition out of a Bains and Douches 'establishment' which never afforded a bath or a shower in its entire existence. The sign was a phony, painted on a Southern French coast promenade turned pillbox."
826 Stars and Stripes (December 29, 1944): "Performing Surgical Miracles at Frontlines" - 2 photographs by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES - MARSEILLES EDITION (December 29, 1944). Photo caption: "The operation was a success, AND the patient LIVED. Major 'Frosty' Lowry, head of a surgical team, performs another one of his frontline miracles under conditions which would have caused him to lift his brow back in the States. The patient caught a pistol slug in his belly, creating ten punctures in his intestines. After four hours in the surgical tent he came out as good as new...well, almost. A surgical team consists of a surgeon, an anesthetist, a nurse and a GI assistant."
827 Stars and Stripes (circa 1944-45): Miscellaneous photographs (Italy, France and New York City) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (circa 1944-45). Typed photo descriptions and captions also included in the folder.
828 Stars and Stripes (January 9, 1944): "Soldier's All" - a battlefield photograph (page 2) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (January 9, 1945). Photo caption: "Soldier's all, here are three GI tars of Marseilles. Directly above is diver Pvt. Bull Huckins, Seattle. Top left, S. Sgt. Melvin C. Beckman, Burlington, Iowa, skipper of a mammoth 100-ton crane which lifts such heavy stuff as locomotives from ship to lighter. At right, skipper of a 'J' boat, T-4 Anthony Staula, Dedham, Mass."
829 Stars and Stripes (February 10, 1945): "The Girl We Wouldn't Mind Sleeping With" (2-copies) - a photograph (page 4) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (February 10, 1945). Photo caption: "This, one of our latest flying models, has all the advantages usually found only in the higher-priced line. The special no-pants feature guarantees a faster take-off, steady climb, easy operation, low maintenance cost and a smooth, quiet landing. The 'extra' touch throughout the model assures the owner of comfort and pleasure wherever he goes."
830 Stars and Stripes (March 23, 1945): "The Bishop Returns to His Task" - a single -page article (page 4) published in STARS AND STRIPES (March 23, 1945) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "This is the sight that greeted the bishop (Wilhelm Stockums) upon his return to his (Cologne) cathedral. Bomb explosions caused the damage shown. Sunlight streams through the scattered windows above the high alter as Bishop Stockums talks with two U.S. Catholic chaplains and members of his staff."
831 Stars and Stripes (May 31, 1945): "Conquered Hero" - 3- photographs of captured Nazi leader Hermann Goering by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (May 15, 1945). Photo caption: "Conquered hero of the Nazis, Hermann Goering, still wearing his gaudy Luftwaffe uniform sweats under a Bavarian sun during a grilling by his Yank captors."
832 Stars and Stripes (June 7, 1945): "It Was a Year After D-Day, and a Long Way from Normandy" - a single-page photo essay published in STARS AND STRIPES (June 7, 1945) by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "M/Sgt. Henry R. Krolfifer of Monterey, California one of a group of D-Day veterans found by Stars and Stripes photographer in Paris yesterday..."
833 Stars and Stripes (August 5, 1945): "Spotlight on Britain" - a special magazine issue of STARS AND STRIPES (August 5, 1945) featuring photographs ("Sweatin' It Out" - page 11). Text by Hugh Conway: "Sometimes it's like a rip roarin; boomtown, and sometimes a small college campus - at the Army's redeployment centers where thousands of soldiers awaiting shipment to the Pacific and the U.S. are sweatin' it out..."
834 Stars and Stripes (August 11, 1945): "Bottoms Up...A Votre Sante...Cheers...Gluck Auf...Skol" - a photograph (page 8) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (August 11, 1945). Photo caption: "For a speedy return to the states - 'points or no points' is the toast these GIs are drinking at Rainbow Corner's coke bar after learning - Japan had indicated her willingness to surrender to the Allies."
835 Stars and Stripes (August 11, 1945) : "It May Be a Little Early - But What the Hell" - a photograph (Page 5) by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (August 11, 1945). Photo caption: "Impulsive Pfc. Joe Tournay of Chicago, and the Sixth Inf. Div. didn't wait for official confirmation when he heard the Japs were willing to call it quits. Tournay planted a big kiss - a la Francaise - on Pfc. Andrew Loefoed, of the 78th MP Det. near Rainbow Corner, keeping a promise he had made to his buddies that he would kiss the first MP he saw when the war was over."
836 Steel (Strike): "Strike Over: Steel Struggles to Start Up" (2-copies) - a 4-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (August 2, 1952) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "A fortunate few among Bethlehem's 16,000 steelworkers got back to work on July 27. Yet these people were a lot less jubilant than the entire Pennsylvania city had been when the plant reopened the night before. True, everybody - supervision and labor both - was relieved to be getting back to work after the 55-day strike. But it's difficult to exult over the strange and dangerous problems you face when you set about awakening a slumbering steel mill..."
837 Stefansson, Vilhjalmur (Explorer): "Journal About Town" - a photograph ("Explorers Yeoman Bob Schwartz and Vilhjalmur Stefansson discuss stranded seaman's diet") by Martin Harris published in THE LADIES' HOME JOURNAL (circa 1945). Text by an unidentified author: "...The day we took Yeoman Bob Schwartz, who wants to be an explorer, up to see Vilhjalmar Stefansson, who wanted to be one and certainly is, the young sailor first made a voyage through the famous map-and-globe-filled study, then heard his hero tell about his trips to the Arctic..."
838 Stoppers (Photo Models): "Stopper" - Miscellaneous photographs of amateur models ("Unpublicized glamour") by Martin Harris published in various issues of THIS WEEK MAGAZINE (circa 1950-51). Photo caption (sample): "Photographers choice for this week is 19-year-old Suzanne Hirsch. She was spotted by Martin Harris on the campus of Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, NY, where she's a psychology student. She's never had her picture published before. What's more , she says, modeling is not for her..."
839 Swanson, Gloria (Part 1): "Grandma Gloria Swanson Comes Back" (2-copies) - a 3-page article (incomplete) published in THE SATURDAY EVENING POST (July 22, 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Stanley Frank: "She was the most glamorous woman in the world. She made $20,000 a week, and spent more than that. Now she's disproving the adage that a fallen star can never rise: At fifty-two she's on top again - and more fabulous than ever..."
840 Swanson, Gloria (Part 2): A single-page photograph (page 51) by Martin Harris published in PRINTERS' INK MAGAZINE (1950). Photo caption: "Gloria Swanson talks mink with fur merchant Tracy Jaeckel. Martin Harris, recording star's daily routine with a Leica, had to shoot directly into glaring windows and Venetian blinds..."
841 Swanson, Gloria (Part 3): "La Swanson Tours America" - a single-page article published in CUE MAGAZINE (August 5, 1950) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text by John Keating: "The most glamorous grandmother in America was in Salt Lake City 'finding out about my wonderful country.' Gloria Swanson, who emerged from the obscurity of retirement to star in SUNSET BOULEVARD and make one of the great comebacks of our time, was collecting keys to the city and finding out that, outside the frenetic cities of New York and Hollywood, there was something substantial in America, a quiet culture the entertainment capitals never knew..."
842 Swanson, Gloria (Part 4): "Look Picture Personality" - a 4-page article published in LOOK MAGAZINE (1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Patricia Coffin: "...of her many honors, the one she cherishes most is a silver cigarette box inscribed by the cast and crew of SUNSET BOULEVARD 'to proclaim that Gloria Swanson is the Greatest Star of Them All'..."
843 Swanson, Gloria (Part 5): "Gloria Reverts to Type" - a single-page article published in an unidentified magazine (1950) with a photograph by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "Gloria Swanson is a legend come to life. A small graying woman in her fifties, with an indifferent figure and three grandchildren, she has recaptured what she lost 20 years ago - fame, glamour, fortune. In Paramount's SUNSET BOULEVARD, her first success in two decades she plays a passé movie queen so brilliantly that she makes most of today's stars seem as sophisticated as Howdy Doody..."
844 Sweatt, Harold W. (Honeywell Chairman): "Minneapolis - Honeywell: 'The Darn Thing Works' " - an 11-page article published in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (May 1959) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Carl Rieser: "From tending furnaces, this company has grown up to tending missiles in space. It is the world's biggest maker of controls. Despite its old-fashioned ways, its sales have increased almost sixfold in ten years..."
845 Sydney, Australia : "Summer's Only Just Beginning Down Under" - a 2-page article (incomplete) published in PICTURE POST MAGAZINE (September 4, 1948) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "Some go out and stalk the sun. Some just set their snares and sit around. In Sydney the strong men strut on the beaches and sail in the bays. But the extraordinary fellow just lies back and lets the sun seep gently through his hairy hide..."
91 Taxi Drivers (New York City): "From the Driver's Seat: It's No Easy Life" - a 7-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (August 23, 1952) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "Next to the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, and the pitchman, the most familiar sight in New York is probably the taxicab. Its principal habitat is Manhattan's narrow cross streets, where it seems to outnumber all other fauna. But like the antelope of the West, the cab abounds for the tourist, but hides from the hunter. Try to find one on a rainy day or between 5pm and 10pm..."
92 Tchad Au Rhin, Du (Commemorative Magazine): "L'Armie Francaise Dans La Guerre" - a 1945 French souvenir magazine commemorating the liberation of France with photographs by Martin Harris.
93 Teacher's Strike (Norwalk, CT): "Norwalk Teachers Win Recognition as Strike Bars School Opening" - a single -page article published in PM NEW YORK (September 5, 1946) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Jerry Bakst: "Eight hours after they had shut down Norwalk's 16 schools as tight as a drum, 232 of the city's teachers who failed to report for yesterday's scheduled Fall opening won an important victory in a wage and collective bargaining fight with the city..."
94 Tobin, Austin (New York Port Authority): "Racing a Motorized Age" - cover photo of NY Port Authority Executive Director Austin Tobin by Martin Harris published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (July 14, 1956). Business Week cover, but not the article, included in folder.
95 Traubel, Helen (Metropolitan Opera): "The Prima Donna is a Roughneck" - a 3- page article (incomplete) published in an unidentified magazine (circa 1950) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Stanley Frank: "Corn-fed Helen Traubel, whose Metropolitan Opera roles and radio laugh earn her $250,000 a year, is perhaps the world's finest soprano. But she just won't behave like a great diva..."
96 Travel (Business): "Here is America" -a 3-page (incomplete) article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE (October 11, 1947) with a color photograph of writer Thomas H. Wolf by Martin Harris. Text by Thomas H. Wolf: "A reporter travels from coast to coast on a bus, talking to the people who take the rap in war and peace, prosperity and depression. Here are no pronouncements from big-shot authorities, but the opinions of everyday Americans worried about prices, jobs and their Christian duty..."
97 Union Organization: "New White-Collar Roundup" - a single-page article published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (July 5, 1952) with a photograph by Martin Harris. "Text by an unidentified author: "Aircraft, insurance, bank drives mean that both AFL and CIO are getting set to bolster their lagging drives to tap pool of 13-million unorganized employees..."
98 United Nations (UN): "Elizabeth Docks With Delegates to UN Meeting" - a full-page of photos by Martin Harris published in PM NEW YORK (October 22, 1946). Photo caption: "Repainted in a glistening black, white and red the Queen Elizabeth was welcomed by New Yorkers as she slid gracefully up the Hudson River. Aboard the liner - which carried over 800,000 troops to Europe in 62 trips during the war - were 2,249 passengers, including many delegates to the United Nations conference. The crossing from Southampton took four days, 16 hours an 18 minutes..." A complete issue of PM NEW YORK (October 24, 1946), with various photos of the United Nations Conference (President Harry Truman, Bess Truman, Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov, Bernard M. Baruch, Polish Foreign Minister W. Rzynowski, actor Roland Young, et cetera) by Martin Harris (Pages 4, 12-14, et cetera), is also included in the folder.
99 U.S. Air Force Hospital (Westover, Massachusetts): Letter and notes from Captain S. K. Willis, Jr., Chief of Aviation Medicine at the Westover Strategic Air Command Base in Massachusetts, pertaining to a Martin Harris photo assignment for Scope Associates in 1959. The Scope Associates, Inc. note from Martin Harris.
910 Universities (USA): "The Private World of the Class of '66" - a 9-page article published in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (February 1966) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Duncan Norton-Taylor: "When President Barnaby Keeney of Brown was asked what he thought of the flock of students under his wing, he observed: ' I'd like to wring their necks' - which might have been the response of any number of exasperated elders involved with today's undergraduates. Know-it-all airs, an inordinate amount of clamor, and a derisive attitude toward authority have appeared to mark a whole generation ..."
911 Veterans (US Military): "Vets at Home in Shanks Village" - a full-page photo essay (page 15) by Martin Harris published in PM NEW YORK (September 19, 1946). Photo caption: "Neighbors are getting to know each other at the Camp Shanks (New York) housing project for collegiate veterans..."
912 Von Ripper, Rudolph C. (Battlefield Artist): "Famous Artist" - a battlefield photograph by Martin Harris published in STARS AND STRIPES (1945). Photo caption: "Lt. Rudolph C. Von Ripper stops to sketch an American soldier who was killed in the bitter fighting as Allied troops delivered unceasing blows against German-held Cassino."
913 Wagner, Jr., Robert F. (New York City Mayor): "The Mayor's Grand Tour Album" - a 2-page article published in THIS WEEK (TW) MAGAZINE (July 17, 1955) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "New York's Robert Wagner is just back from his 11,000 -mile transatlantic trip. Here are moments he'll remember..." A signed note, a negative proof sheet of the magazine article and typed photo descriptions from Martin Harris also include in the folder.
914 Watson, Arthur K (IBM Executive): "Q: What Grows Faster Than I.B.M.? A: I.B.M. Abroad" (2-copies) - a 10-page article published in FORTUNE MAGAZINE (November 1960) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Robert Sheehan: "Many U.S. companies rushing toward booming foreign markets, find I.B.M. on the ground in eighty-seven countries. From young Dick Watson's operation, newcomers can take some lessons on how to behave..."
915 Welfare Department (New York City): "Low Pay Forces Hundreds to Quit City Welfare Department" - a single-page article published in PM NEW YORK (October 18, 1946) with photographs by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "Louis Liberman...starts out from the Bronx Office of the Welfare Department out of which he works. He makes a net salary of $48.20 weekly, after 13 years with the Department...Clients seldom suspect that Liberman himself is more than $500 in debt because of the inadequate salary the city pays him..."
916 West Point Military Academy (New York): "Revolution at West Point" (2 copies) - a 2-page article published in THIS WEEK (TW - THE BALTIMORE SUN) MAGAZINE (April 4, 1948) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Bob Deindorfer: "For Army Day, Let's take a look at the Institution that may make or break our future. It's turning out a new kind of leader for a democratic army..."
917 Woolworth Department Store (New York City): "Woolworth Tries Self-Service" - a 2-page article (incomplete) published in BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE (August 30, 1952) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by an unidentified author: "Self-service elbowed its way into one of the nation's biggest retail chains last week. F.W. Woolworth Co.'s Stuyvesant Town shop, New York City, is the guinea pig for the big variety's store's experiment. Though other variety stores tried self-service - in fact, they really pioneered the idea - this is Woolworth's first try at it..."
918 Yank - The Army Weekly (December 9, 1942): "Information Booth" (2-copies) - cover photograph by Martin Harris published in YANK MAGAZINE (December 9, 1942). Cover photo caption: "In the North African desert, Sgt. Robert Miller, of Cranston, R.I., finds further confirmation of a fact he already knew - that it's a long way home."
919 Yank - The Army Weekly (January 6, 1943): "A Hero Comes Home" - cover photograph by Martin Harris published in YANK MAGAZINE (January 6, 1943). Cover photo caption: "A hero comes home. The battle-scarred cruiser SAN FRANCISCO enters the harbor of the city for which she was named. Repairs were necessary following her performance against much heavier Japanese ships of Guadalcanal."
920 Yank - The Army Weekly (February 26, 1943): "Mountain Fighters" (3-copies) - a 2-page cover story published in YANK MAGAZINE (February 26, 1943) with photographs (including cover) by Martin Harris. Text by Cpl. H. N. Oliphant: "On snowy peaks of the Colorado Rockies, our new skiing, cliff-scaling troops are mastering all the tricks of mountain warfare..."
921 Yank - The Army Weekly (March 7, 1943): "Mountain Fighters"- a 2-page article with photographs (page 22 -23) by Martin Harris published in YANK MAGAZINE (March 7, 1943). Photo caption: "Under stormy clouds, men of pack artillery unit lead mules, laden with 75-mm howitzers, through a defile..."
922 Yank - The Army Weekly (March 19, 1943): "The Barnes Twins" - a full-page photograph (page 18) published in YANK MAGAZINE (March 19, 1943) by Martin Harris. Photo caption: "The opposite page brings you a bargain this week, with two girls instead of one. They are Lois and Lucille, one of the attractions in SOMETHING FOR THE BOYS, Broadway musical."
923 Yank - The Army Weekly (July 29, 1945): "The Czech New Deal" (2-copies) - a 3-page article published in YANK MAGAZINE (July 29, 1945) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Sgt. Allan B. Ecker: "Germans and Germanism are getting a vicious brush-off in plans for the new Czechoslovakian republic, whose leaders set off the revolt that preceded the Russian liberation push to Prague..."
924 Yank - The Army Weekly (December 28, 1945): Possible photographs (unidentified) by Martin Harris published in YANK MAGAZINE (December 28, 1945).
925 Yugoslavia (Second World War): Tito's Partisans Tell Their Story...Women and Children Fight and They Know Why" - a 2-page article published in PM NEW YORK (August 23, 1944) with photographs by Martin Harris. Text by Staff Sgt. Ralph G. Martin: "SOMEWHERE IN ITALY (April 22): In the long line of wooden barracks, most of the Yugoslav Partisans were busy packing. Only a few months ago many of them were in concentration camps. Now trained and equipped by the Partisans, they were waiting to go back and kill more Nazis..." Typed photo captions and descriptive text sent by Martin Harris also included in folder.



PHOTOGRAPHS/PHOTO SLIDES - ARTISTS and WRITERS

Photographs, slides and proof sheets by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by name of subject.



Box Folder
101 Adams, Franklin Pierce (Columnist): Three 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs and four (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of columnist ("THE CONNING TOWER" - THE NEW YORK TRIBUNE), radio panelist ("Information Please") and "Algonquin Round Table" member, Franklin Pierce Adams (shaving in the early 1940s, at a cookout at home with his family in Westport , CT in 1938 and on a 1945 USO tour in Paris) by Martin Harris. According to THE POETRY FOUNDATION website: "Franklin P. Adams, or F. P. A. as he was known to his readers, was best known for his witty and satirical column "The Conning Tower," which was syndicated in the New York Tribune, the New York World, the New York Herald Tribune and the New York Post. In his column, to which he had a cult-like following, Adams wrote limericks, puns, and satirical prose to dissect political events, review books and plays, and parody the age. A forthright writer who had the freedom to comment on whatever he chose, F. P. A. peppered his column with light verse. He scorned unrhymed free verse, and his poetry was clever and catchy, utilizing the kind of quipping that was the very spirit of his column. His audience was known to repeat these "F. P. A.-isms" everywhere. The verse he wrote for "The Conning Tower" prompted the New York Times to refer to him as "the direct intellectual descendant of Charles Stuart Calverly and Sir William Gilbert," according to Dictionary of Literary Biography contributor Nancy L. Roberts...Adams will be remembered for the manner in which he impudently and cleverly scrutinized the world. Nearly daily, he wrote his comments and criticism in a manner accessible to all people, appearing on the pages of America's most widely circulated and important newspapers."
102 Arno, Peter (Cartoonist): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of cartoonist Peter Arno performing on an NBC - Radio broadcast (circa 1940s) by Martin Harris. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica: "Peter Arno...was a cartoonist whose satirical drawings, particularly of New York café society, did much to establish The New Yorker magazine's reputation for sophisticated humor. While at Yale University (1922-24), Arno was particularly interested in music and organized his own band. He also decorated screens and panels for restaurants. After leaving Yale he went to New York City, where he joined the bohemian life of Greenwich Village and continued to do decorative painting. He was about to give up art to join a band when one of his cartoons was accepted by the newly established New Yorker. His association with the magazine lasted until his death. In the late 1920s Arno's cartoons for The New Yorker, dealing with the city's aristocracy, became well known, and by 1931 he was the author of four cartoon books. In 1931 he was co-author of HER COMES THE BRIDE, a musical satire produced in October of that year. A good-looking, sophisticated man, Arno played an active part in the world he satirized. Lecherous clubmen and sabled dowagers appeared frequently in his cartoons, collections of which include Man in the Shower (1944) and Sizzling Platter (1949)."
103 Bourke-White, Margaret (Photographer): Six 5 x 8 inch (black and white) passport photographs (circa 1940s) of photographer (LIFE MAGAZINE, et cetera) by Martin Harris. According to the ABOUT EDUCATION website Bourke- White is "Known for: first woman war photographer, first woman photographer allowed to accompany a combat mission; iconic images of the Depression, World War II, Buchenwald concentration camp survivors, Gandhi at his spinning wheel... In 1929, Margaret Bourke-White was hired by Henry Luce as the first photographer for his new magazine, Fortune. Margaret Bourke-White traveled to Germany in 1930 and photographed the Krupp Iron Works for Fortune. She then traveled on her own to Russia. Over five weeks, she took thousands of photos of projects and workers, documenting the Soviet Union's first Five Year Plan for industrialization. Bourke-White returned to Russia in 1931, at the invitation of the Soviet government, and took more photographs, concentrating this time on the Russian people. This resulted in her 1931 book of photographs, EYES ON RUSSIA. She continued to publish photographs of American architecture, as well, including a famous image of the Chrysler Building in New York City. In 1934, she produced a photo essay on Dust Bowl farmers, marking a transition to more focus on human interest photographs. She published not only in Fortune, but in Vanity Fair and The New York Times Magazine...Henry Luce hired Margaret Bourke-White in 1936 for another new magazine, Life, which was to be photograph-rich. Margaret Bourke-White was one of four staff photographers for Life, and her photograph of Fort Deck Dam in Montana graced the first cover on November 23, 1936. That year, she was named one of America's ten most outstanding women..."
104 Broun, Heywood (Columnist): One 5 x 7 inch (black and white) photograph (1936) of journalist Heywood Broun (Founder of the American Newspaper Guild) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Heywood Campbell Broun, Jr. was an American journalist. He worked as a sportswriter, newspaper columnist, and editor in New York City. He founded the American Newspaper Guild, now known as The Newspaper Guild. Born in Brooklyn, New York, he is best remembered for his writing on social issues and his championing of the underdog. He believed that journalists could help right wrongs, especially social ills...Along with his friends the critic Alexander Woollcott, writer Dorothy Parker and humorist Robert Benchley, Broun was a member of the famed Algonquin Round Table from 1919 to 1929, where his usually disheveled appearance led to him being likened to 'an unmade bed.' He was also close friends with the Marx Brothers, and attended their show THE COCOANUTS more than 20 times. Broun joked that his tombstone would read, 'killed by getting in the way of some scene shifters at a Marx Brothers show'...Broun was portrayed by the actor Gary Basaraba in the 1994 film MRS. PARKER AND THE VICIOUS CIRCLE..."
105 Caesar, Doris (Sculptor): Various (black and white) 8 x 10 inch proof sheets and 11 x 14 inch photographs (1950) of sculptor Doris Caesar (in her art studio) by Martin Harris (NEW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE assignment). According to the ASKART website: "Doris Porter Caesar, a sculptor of bronze figures, was once described by John I. H. Gauer as 'an expressionist in the northern tradition. She owes an obvious debt to Lehmbruch and Barlach, and like them traces her sculptural ancestry back to the romantic elongations of . . . north Gothic art'..."
106 Caniff, Milton (Cartoonist) #1: Five 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photographs (circa 1940s) of cartoonist Milton Caniff ("Terry and the Pirates," "Steve Canyon," et cetera) and Miriam Cordwell (Beauty and fashion expert - author of HAIR DESIGN AND FASHION: PRINCIPLES AND RELATIONSHIPS, et cetera) by Martin Harris ( an unidentified photo assignment of Cordwell cutting Caniff's hair). According to the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) biography by Mike Konczewski: "Milton Caniff was the world-renowned comics artist known as the 'Rembrandt of the Comics.' His influence can be seen not only in the works of such comics artists as Jack Kirby and Will Eisner, but also in the works of Federico Fellini and Orson Welles. Caniff entered the comics world as an office boy for a local Ohio newspaper. After working at several papers, he moved to New York in 1932, where he obtained a job with the Associated Press. His first comic, 'The Gay Thirties,' was a single panel comic. In 1933, when he heard that the newspaper syndicate was looking for a new weekly, he spent the weekend creating 'Dickie Dare,' about an imaginative little boy who liked to dream about the adventure stories he'd read. The strip was moderately successful, and caught the eye of the editor of the Chicago Tribune, Captain Joe Patterson. Patterson had the idea for an adventure strip featuring a young boy and his adult guardian/sidekick. The strip, 'Terry and the Pirates,' was a huge hit, spawning a radio show, movie serials, dozens of tie-ins, and a huge fan base... In 1946, unhappy over the fact that he could not obtain ownership of the 'Terry' strip, Caniff turned the work over to artist George Wunder (that same year, Caniff received the very first Rueben award from the National Cartoonists' Society for his work on the strip). Caniff went over to Field Enterprises Syndicate with an idea for a new strip. This strip, instead of having a young boy as the hero, would have an adult, but would still have the rollicking adventures (and sexy women) of 'Terry.' The new strip, 'Steve Canyon,' was an even bigger success than 'Terry,' and ran for the next 41 years. While it's true that the storylines in 'Canyon' may not have moved with the times (especially during the Vietnam era), the strip was able to survive as long as it did because of the strength and power of Caniff's drawings. When Caniff died in 1981, so did 'Steve Canyon.' The final June 5th strip contained a farewell from Bill Mauldin's Willie and Joe characters, as well as signed farewells from dozens of Caniff's fellow artists..."
106A Caniff, Milton (Cartoonist) #2: Fifteen (color) photo slides (circa 1940s) of cartoonist Milton Caniff ("Terry and the Pirates," "Steve Canyon," et cetera) by Martin Harris ( an unidentified photo assignment of Caniff at home with his dog). According to the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) biography by Mike Konczewski: "Milton Caniff was the world-renowned comics artist known as the 'Rembrandt of the Comics.' His influence can be seen not only in the works of such comics artists as Jack Kirby and Will Eisner, but also in the works of Federico Fellini and Orson Welles. Caniff entered the comics world as an office boy for a local Ohio newspaper. After working at several papers, he moved to New York in 1932, where he obtained a job with the Associated Press. His first comic, 'The Gay Thirties,' was a single panel comic. In 1933, when he heard that the newspaper syndicate was looking for a new weekly, he spent the weekend creating 'Dickie Dare,' about an imaginative little boy who liked to dream about the adventure stories he'd read. The strip was moderately successful, and caught the eye of the editor of the Chicago Tribune, Captain Joe Patterson. Patterson had the idea for an adventure strip featuring a young boy and his adult guardian/sidekick. The strip, 'Terry and the Pirates,' was a huge hit, spawning a radio show, movie serials, dozens of tie-ins, and a huge fan base... In 1946, unhappy over the fact that he could not obtain ownership of the 'Terry' strip, Caniff turned the work over to artist George Wunder (that same year, Caniff received the very first Rueben award from the National Cartoonists' Society for his work on the strip). Caniff went over to Field Enterprises Syndicate with an idea for a new strip. This strip, instead of having a young boy as the hero, would have an adult, but would still have the rollicking adventures (and sexy women) of 'Terry.' The new strip, 'Steve Canyon,' was an even bigger success than 'Terry,' and ran for the next 41 years. While it's true that the storylines in 'Canyon' may not have moved with the times (especially during the Vietnam era), the strip was able to survive as long as it did because of the strength and power of Caniff's drawings. When Caniff died in 1981, so did 'Steve Canyon.' The final June 5th strip contained a farewell from Bill Mauldin's Willie and Joe characters, as well as signed farewells from dozens of Caniff's fellow artists..."
107 Chagall, Marc (Painter): One 8 x 9 inch (black and white) proof sheet and two 11 x 14 black and white photographs (1946) of artist Marc Chagall (with his daughter and cat) by Martin Harris (PM NEW YORK photo assignment - September 10, 1946). According to the Biography.com website: "Marc Chagall was born in Belarus in 1887 and developed an early interest in art. After studying painting, in 1907 he left Russia for Paris, where he lived in an artist colony on the city's outskirts. Fusing his own personal, dreamlike imagery with hints of the fauvism and cubism popular in France at the time, Chagall created his most lasting work—including I and the Village (1911)—some of which would be featured in the Salon des Indépendants exhibitions. After returning to Vitebsk for a visit in 1914, the outbreak of WWI trapped Chagall in Russia. He returned to France in 1923 but was forced to flee the country and Nazi persecution during WWII. Finding asylum in the U.S., Chagall became involved in set and costume design before returning to France in 1948. In his later years, he experimented with new art forms and was commissioned to produce numerous large-scale works. Chagall died in St.-Paul-de-Vence in 1985."
108 de Chirico, Giorgio (Painter): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet (October 1944) of artist Giorgio de Chirico (in the Rome studio of Assen Peikov) by Martin Harris (STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to the ARTNET website: "Giorgio de Chirico was an Italian Surrealist painter. His inimitable eerily empty, dreamlike landscapes have made him an influential artist of the 20th century, notably impacting the work of Max Ernst, Giorgio Morandi, and René Magritte. Often depicting imaginary of architectural spaces populated only with a unusual selection of objects, de Chirico embraced ambiguity and mystery, memorably saying, "What shall I love if not the enigma?" Born on July 10, 1888, in Volos, Greece, the artist went to study at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich in 1906. He travelled to Paris in 1911 to exhibit works at the Salon d'Automne, among them his seminal painting, Enigma of an Afternoon (1910), the first of his "metaphysical town square" series. He subsequently founded the Scuola Metafisica movement in 1917, but later explicitly renounced both metaphysical and Surrealist painting in an article published in 1919, titled "The Return of Craftsmanship." In his writing, de Chirico espoused a return to traditional iconography and techniques that reflecting the return of Classicism throughout Europe at the time. By the 1930s, he adopted a Neo-Baroque style which failed to elicit the same level of critical acclaim of his earlier, Surrealist works. He settled in Rome in 1944, where his former house is now a museum. In 1974, he was elected to the Académie des Beaux-Arts in France, and died four years later in Rome, Italy on November 20, 1978."
109 Eisenstaedt, Alfred (Photographer): Two 1.5 x 4.5 inch (black and white) proof sheets and one 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph (c.1940s) of photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt (LIFE Magazine, et cetera) by Martin Harris. According to Encyclopedia Britannica: "Alfred Eisenstaedt was a pioneering German-American photojournalist whose images, many of them for Life magazine, established him as one of the first and most important photojournalists. Eisenstaedt served in the German army in World War I from 1916 to 1918, sustaining injuries in both legs. He became an enthusiastic amateur photographer, turning professional in 1929 and joining the lively photojournalism scene in Germany. During the 1920s and early '30s he was especially influenced by Erich Salomon, a pioneer in documentary photography. Eisenstaedt was particularly skilled in the use of the 35-mm Leica camera. His work, often created in this format, had appeared in many European picture magazines by the early 1930s. He covered the rise of Adolf Hitler and in 1935 created a notable series of photographs of Ethiopia, just before the Italian invasion. That same year he immigrated to the United States, and in April 1936 he became one of the first four photographers hired by the new picture magazine Life. One of his images was published on the cover of the second issue, and he went on to become the leading Life photographer, eventually having some 2,500 photo-essays and 90 cover photos featured in the magazine. Eisenstaedt photographed kings, dictators, and motion picture stars, but he also sensitively portrayed ordinary people in workaday situations. His aim, he once said, was 'to find and catch the storytelling moment.' Anthologies of his photographs include Witness to Our Time (1966), People (1973), and Eisenstaedt: Germany (1981). He described his life and work in The Eye of Eisenstaedt (1969)."
1010 Goldberg, Rube (Illustrator): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph (circa 1940) of illustrator Rube Goldberg (in checkered night shirt with illustrator Arthur William Brown and publisher Conde Nast at the Annual Society of Illustrators Show) by Martin Harris (unidentified photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: Rube Goldberg was an American cartoonist, sculptor, author, engineer, and inventor. He is best known for a series of popular cartoons depicting complicated gadgets that perform simple tasks in indirect, convoluted ways, similar to Heath Robinson devices in the UK, as well as the Storm P devices in Denmark. Goldberg received many honors in his lifetime, including a Pulitzer Prize for his political cartooning in 1948 and the Banshees' Silver Lady Award in 1959. Goldberg was a founding member and the first president of the National Cartoonists Society, and he is the namesake of the Reuben Award, which the organization awards to the Cartoonist of the Year. He is the inspiration for various international competitions, known as Rube Goldberg Machine Contests, which challenge participants to make a complicated machine to perform a simple task...In 1931 the Merriam-Webster dictionary adopted the phrase "Rube Goldberg" as an adjective defined as accomplishing something simple through complicated means..."
1011 Goren, Lou (Photographer): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph(circa 1940s) of photographer Lou Goren by Martin Harris. No biographical information available.
1012 Hayter, Stanley William (Painter/printmaker): One 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph (circa 1940s) of painter and printmaker Stanley William "Bill" Hayter (with artists Henry Varnum Poo and Abe Ratner at Hayter's NYC studio) by Martin Harris. According to the TATE.ORG website: " Stanley William Hayter was an English printmaker, draughtsman and painter, active in France and the USA. In 1926 he settled in Paris, where he enrolled at the Académie Julian and studied burin engraving. In 1929 Hayter was introduced to Surrealism by Yves Tanguy and André Masson. The often violent imagery of Hayter's Surrealist period was stimulated in part by his passionate response to the Spanish Civil War and to the rise of Fascism. Hayter joined the exile of the Parisian avant-garde in 1939, moving to New York. He ran a course entitled ‘Atelier 17'. His theoretical writings on automatism and the expressive abstraction of his own work were a formative influence on Pollock and others. Hayter's first book, New Ways of Gravure (1949), became an indispensable text for printmakers. In the 1930s Hayter had concentrated his technical experimentation on adapting the traditional black-and-white techniques of etching and engraving to the aesthetic concerns of modern art. From the 1940s his primary technical preoccupation was with color printing. In the 1950s, when he reopened the workshop in Paris, Hayter explored an entirely different method of color etching, in which inks of contrasting viscosities were applied with rollers to a plate etched to different levels. This technique suited the increasingly Tachist look of his prints, in which he explored chance effects and his fascination with waves. From the 1970s Hayter reintroduced figurative elements in combination with a vibrant palette and lyrical freedom of brushstroke or burin line in some of his most fluent and imaginative works."
1013 Hellman, Lillian (Playwright): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet of playwright Lillian Hellman (in the audience at an unidentified theatrical presentation with writers Dashiell Hammett and Dorothy Parker - c. early 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Lillian Florence 'Lilly' Hellman (June 20, 1905 - June 30, 1984) was an American dramatist and screenwriter known for her success as a playwright on Broadway, as well as her left-wing sympathies and political activism. She famously was blacklisted by the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC) at the height of the anti-communist campaigns of 1947-52. Although she continued to work on Broadway in the 1950s, her blacklisting by the American film industry caused a precipitous decline in her income during which time she had to work outside her chosen profession. Hellman was praised by many for refusing to answer questions by HUAC. However, many doubted her denial that she had belonged to the Communist Party; the skeptics included war correspondent Martha Gellhorn, former wife of Ernest Hemingway, and author/literary critic Mary McCarthy. Hellman was romantically involved with fellow writer and political activist Dashiell Hammett, author of the classic detective novels The Maltese Falcon and The Thin Man, who also was blacklisted for 10 years until his death in 1961. The couple never married. As a playwright, Hellman had many successes on Broadway, including Watch on the Rhine, The Autumn Garden, Toys in the Attic, Another Part of the Forest, The Children's Hour and The Little Foxes. She adapted her semi-autobiographical play The Little Foxes into a screenplay, starring Bette Davis, which received an Academy Award nomination in 1942..."
1014 Hopper, Edward (Painter): Various (black and white) proof sheets (different sizes) of painter Edward Hopper (with his wife in their NYC/Washington Square apartment and at their Truro. Massachusetts beach house) by Martin Harris (a 1950 CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Edward Hopper (July 22, 1882 - May 15, 1967) was a prominent American realist painter and printmaker. While he was most popularly known for his oil paintings, he was equally proficient as a watercolorist and printmaker in etching. Both in his urban and rural scenes, his spare and finely calculated renderings reflected his personal vision of modern American life..."
1015 Joyce, James (Novelist/poet): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and one 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of attendees (Nick Kenny, Christopher Morley, Frances Steloff, Wilbur Macy Stone , William Carlos Williams, et cetera) at the Gotham Book Mart (NYC) publication party (May 4, 1939) for FINNEGAN'S WAKE by James Joyce (not pictured) by Martin Harris (unidentified publication photo shoot). According to Wikipedia: "...Reaction to the work was mixed, including negative comment from early supporters of Joyce's work, such as Pound and the author's brother, Stanislaus Joyce. To counteract this hostile reception, a book of essays by supporters of the new work, including Beckett, William Carlos Williams and others was organized and published in 1929 under the title Our Examination Round His Factification for Incamination of Work in Progress. At his 57th birthday party at the Jolases' home, Joyce revealed the final title of the work and Finnegan's Wake was published in book form on May 4, 1939. Later, further negative comments surfaced from doctor and author Hervey Cleckley, who questioned the significance others had placed on the work. In his book, The Mask of Sanity, Cleckley refers to Finnegan's Wake as "a 628-page collection of erudite gibberish indistinguishable to most people from the familiar word salad produced by hebephrenic patients on the back wards of any state hospital..."
1016 Kent, Rockwell (Painter/Illustrator): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph (c. early 1940s) of painter Rockwell Kent (playing the flute) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Rockwell Kent was an American painter, printmaker, illustrator, and writer...Approached in 1926 by publisher R. R. Donnelley to produce an illustrated edition of Richard Henry Dana, Jr.'s Two Years Before the Mast, Kent suggested Moby-Dick instead. Published in 1930 by the Lakeside Press of Chicago, the three-volume limited edition (1,000 copies) filled with Kent's haunting black-and-white pen/brush and ink drawings sold out immediately; Random House produced a trade edition which was also immensely popular. A previously obscure book, Moby-Dick had been rediscovered by critics in the early 1920s. The success of the Rockwell Kent illustrated edition was a factor in its becoming recognized as the classic it is today...When Kent died of a heart attack in 1971, The New York Times described him as '... a thoughtful, troublesome, profoundly independent, odd and kind man who made an imperishable contribution to the art of bookmaking in the United States.' Richer, more accurate accounts of the scope of the artist's influential career as a painter and writer have since superseded this cursory summing-up of an American life. Retrospectives of the artist's paintings and drawings have been mounted, most recently by The Rooms in St. John's, Newfoundland, where the exhibition Pointed North: Rockwell Kent in Newfoundland and Labrador was curated by Caroline Stone in the summer of 2014. Other recent exhibitions include the Richard F. Brush Art Gallery and Owen D. Young Library at St. Lawrence University (Canton, New York) in the autumn of 2012; the Farnsworth Art Museum (Rockland, Maine) during the spring through autumn of 2012; the Bennington Museum in Vermont during the summer of 2012; and the Philadelphia Museum of Art in the spring through summer of 2012. An exhibition marking the centennial of Kent's time in Winona, Minnesota, took place there in 2013. Among the many notes of increasing awareness of Kent's contributions to American culture is the reproduction of one of Kent's pen-and-ink drawings from Moby Dick on a U.S. postage stamp, part of the 2001 commemorative panel celebrating such American illustrators as Maxfield Parrish, Frederic Remington, and Norman Rockwell..."
1017 Kieran, John (Columnist): One 9 x 12 inch (black and white) photograph (c. early 1940s) of sports columnist John Kieran (at his typewriter) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: " John Francis Kieran was an American author, journalist, amateur naturalist and radio and television personality...Kieran began his newspaper career in 1915 as a sportswriter for The New York Times. He continued on the sports beat during his entire career, working for a number of New York City newspapers and becoming one of the country's best known sports columnists. During his 1927-1943 tenure as The Times' senior sports columnist, he was profiled in the January 9, 1939 issue of Time magazine, which described him as 'short, wiry, grey, bristly and brilliant.' Although Kieran is widely credited with first applying the term 'grand slam' to tennis, to describe the winning of all four major tennis tournaments in a calendar year, sports columnist Alan Gould had used the term in that connection almost two months before Kieran. A noted 'intellectual,' he gained extensive personal popularity with his 10-year stint as a panelist on NBC's most widely heard radio quiz program Information, Please! (May 17, 1938 - June 25, 1948). His seemingly encyclopedic erudition and quick wit, combined with an aura of gentle modesty, endeared him to the listening audience and assured his place on the show. Along with fellow 'intellectuals' Franklin P. Adams and host Clifton Fadiman, Kieran entertained and educated radio audiences through the Great Depression, World War II and the Cold War. Within eight months of Information, Please! leaving the air, Kieran entered the new medium of television with TV's first widely syndicated show John Kieran's Kaleidoscope. A 15-minute program produced from February 1949 to April 1952, John Kieran's Kaleidoscope presented its writer and host in his well-acquainted role as the learned and witty guide to the complexities of human knowledge. The 104 episodes touched on any and every subject from the mating habits of insects to the properties of magnetic attraction to the theories surrounding the creation of the solar system. Kieran became a familiar face on 1950s television, guesting on numerous panel and quiz shows, including CBS' 13-week revival of Information, Please! as a 1952 summer replacement show, the only time it would be seen on TV..."
1018 Lipschitz, Jaccqes (Sculptor): One 10 x 11 inch (black and white) photograph (c. early 1950s) of sculptor Jacques Lipchitz (with artists Bill Hayter and Ruthven Todd at "Atelier 17" - the engraving school in Greenwich Village) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Jacques Lipchitz was born Chaim Jacob Lipschitz, in a Litvak family, son of a building contractor in Druskininkai, Lithuania, then within the Russian Empire. At first, under the influence of his father, he studied engineering, but soon after, supported by his mother he moved to Paris (1909) to study at the École des Beaux-Arts and the Académie Julian. It was there, in the artistic communities of Montmartre and Montparnasse, that he joined a group of artists that included Juan Gris and Pablo Picasso as well as where his friend, Amedeo Modigliani, painted Jacques and Berthe Lipchitz. Living in this environment, Lipchitz soon began to create Cubist sculpture. In 1912 he exhibited at the Salon de la Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts and the Salon d'Automne with his first solo show held at Léonce Rosenberg's Galerie L'Effort Moderne in Paris in 1920. In 1922 he was commissioned by the Barnes Foundation in Merion, Pennsylvania to execute five bas-reliefs. With artistic innovation at its height, in the 1920s he experimented with abstract forms he called transparent sculptures. Later he developed a more dynamic style, which he applied with telling effect to bronze compositions of figures and animals. With the German occupation of France during World War II, and the deportation of Jews to the Nazi death camps, Jacques Lipchitz had to flee France. With the assistance of the American journalist Varian Fry in Marseille, he escaped the Nazi regime and went to the United States. There, he eventually settled in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. He was one of 250 sculptors who exhibited in the Third Sculpture International Exhibition held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in the summer of 1949. He has been identified among seventy of those sculptors in a photograph Life magazine published that was taken at the exhibition. In 1954 a Lipchitz retrospective traveled from The Museum of Modern Art in New York to the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and The Cleveland Museum of Art. In 1959, his series of small bronzes To the Limit of the Possible was shown at Fine Arts Associates in New York. Beginning in 1963 he returned to Europe for several months of each year and worked in Pietrasanta, Italy. He developed a close friendship with fellow sculptor, Fiore de Henriquez. In 1972 his autobiography, co-authored with H. Harvard Arnason, was published on the occasion of an exhibition of his sculpture at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Jacques Lipchitz died in Capri, Italy. His body was flown to Jerusalem for burial..."
1019 McCullers, Carson (Novelist): Three 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photographs (circa 1940s) of novelist Carson McCullers (smoking a cigarette) by Martin Harris. According to Amazon.com: "Carson McCullers (1917-1967) was the author of numerous works of fiction and nonfiction, including The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, The Member of the Wedding, Reflections in a Golden Eye, and Clock Without Hands. Born in Columbus, Georgia, on February 19, 1917, she became a promising pianist and enrolled in the Juilliard School of Music in New York when she was seventeen, but lacking money for tuition, she never attended classes. Instead she studied writing at Columbia University, which ultimately led to The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, the novel that made her an overnight literary sensation. On September 29, 1967, at age fifty, she died in Nyack, New York, where she is buried."
1020 Marsh, Reginald (Painter): One 6.5 x 9 inch (black and white) photograph(c. early 1940s) of painter Reginald Marsh (speaking at a microphone) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Reginald Marsh (March 14, 1898 - July 3, 1954) was an American painter, born in Paris, most notable for his depictions of life in New York City in the 1920s and 1930s. Crowded Coney Island beach scenes, popular entertainments such as vaudeville and burlesque, women, and jobless men on the Bowery are subjects that reappear throughout his work. He painted in egg tempera and in oils, and produced many watercolors, ink and ink wash drawings, and prints...Many of his prints and thousands of unpublished sketches were found in his estate after he died. They revealed more of the true depth of his work. Because Marsh made good records of his work, often on a daily basis, it was easy to find his unpublished works and publish them. A set of prints that were acquired by William Benton from Marsh's wife are now all in the William Benton Museum of Art, the New York Public Library, and the Middendorf Gallery in Washington, D.C."
1021 Mauldin, Bill (Cartoonist): Various snap shot-sized/8 x 10 inch photographs of editorial cartoonist Bill Mauldin (during World War II and at a STARS AND STRIPES staff reunion after the war) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "William Henry "Bill" Mauldin (October 29, 1921 - January 22, 2003) was an American editorial cartoonist who won two Pulitzer Prizes for his work. He was most famous for his World War II cartoons depicting American soldiers, as represented by the archetypal characters 'Willie and Joe,' two weary and bedraggled infantry troopers who stoically endure the difficulties and dangers of duty in the field. These cartoons were widely published and distributed in the American army, abroad and in the United States..."
1022 Morrison, Jean (Painter): One 10 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph of painter Jean Morrison (at work, with Bill Hayter and students, at a roller press at "Atelier 17" - the engraving school in Greenwich Village) According to the Susan Teller Gallery website: "Jean Morrison Becker (1917-1994) worked as a modernist painter and teacher throughout her career. She was a community and artists' advocate and in her later years, a gallery director. She met her husband, the artist Fred Becker (1913-2004), at Atelier 17 in New York. They lived and worked in St. Louis, Missouri, and Amherst, Massachusetts."
1023 Noguchi, Isamu (Sculptor): One 10 x 13 inch (black and white) mounted photograph (1939) of sculptor Isamu Noguchi ('washing a statue") by Martin Harris (LIFE Magazine photo assignment). According to The Noguchi Museum website: "Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988) was one of the twentieth century's most important and critically acclaimed sculptors. Through a lifetime of artistic experimentation, he created sculptures, gardens, furniture and lighting designs, ceramics, architecture, and set designs. His work, at once subtle and bold, traditional and modern, set a new standard for the reintegration of the arts. Noguchi, an internationalist, traveled extensively throughout his life. (In his later years he maintained studios both in Japan and New York.) He discovered the impact of large-scale public works in Mexico, earthy ceramics and tranquil gardens in Japan, subtle ink-brush techniques in China, and the purity of marble in Italy. He incorporated all of these impressions into his work, which utilized a wide range of materials, including stainless steel, marble, cast iron, balsa wood, bronze, sheet aluminum, basalt, granite, and water..."
1024 Robinson, Boardman (Illustrator): One 8 x 9 inch (black and white) proof sheet (March 22, 1942) of artist and illustrator Boardman Robinson (with other unidentified colleagues) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: " Boardman Robinson was born September 6, 1876 in Nova Scotia, Canada. He spent his childhood in England and Canada, before moving to Boston in the first half of the 1890s. Robinson worked his way through normal school, following a program to learn mechanical drafting. Robinson first studied art at the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston. He would later go on to study at the Académie Colarossi and the École des Beaux-Arts, both in Paris, where he was influenced by the political cartooning of Honoré Daumier, as well as Forain and Steinlen. In 1903, Robinson married Sarah Senter Whitney. The couple moved to Paris where Robinson briefly worked as art editor for Vogue, before returning to the United States in 1904. Upon returning to the United States, Robinson worked as an illustrator, drawing cartoons and theater illustrations for the New York Morning Telegraph. He freelanced for a wide range of other popular publications, including Pearson's Magazine, Scribner's Magazine, Collier's, Harper's Weekly, and others. In 1910, Robinson took a job on the staff of the New York Tribune drawing editorial cartoons, a position which he retained for four years. With the eruption of World War I in 1914, Robinson's increasingly radical anti-militarist political views brought him into conflict with his employer and he quit the publication. In 1915, Robinson travelled to Eastern Europe on behalf of Metropolitan Magazine along with journalist John Reed. The pair saw first hand the effects of the European war in Russia, Serbia, Macedonia and Greece. In 1916 Reed's account of the journey was collected in a book called The War in Eastern Europe, to which Robinson contributed illustrations. On his return from Europe, Robinson worked at the socialist monthly The Masses. His highly political cartoons as well as the general anti-war stance of The Masses was deemed to have violated the recently passed Espionage Act of 1917, and The Masses had to cease publication. Robinson, along with the other defendants were acquitted on October 5, 1918. Following The Masses, Robinson became a contributing editor to The Liberator and The New Masses, working with former Masses editor Max Eastman. Robinson would later go on to teach art at the Art Students League in New York City (1919-30) and head the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center (1936-47). Some of his students include Bill Tytla, Edmund Duffy, Jacob Burck, Russel Wright, Eric Bransby, Rifka Angel, Mary Anne Bransby, Gerhard Bakker, and Esther Shemitz (who soon after married Whittaker Chambers: both Burck and Shemitz contributed illustrations to The New Masses as their mentor did.) Robinson is also known as a muralist. Some of his mural commissions include Rockefeller Center, the Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. and a nine-panel mural on the History of Trade for Kaufmann's flagship department store in Pittsburgh completed in 1929. Robinson also illustrated several books, among these are editions of Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass (1921), Dostoyevsky's The Brothers Karamazov (1933), Edgar Lee Masters' Spoon River Anthology (1941), and Herman Melville's Moby Dick (1942)..."
1025 Rorimer, James (Museum Curator): Three 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheets and one 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph (c. late 1940s) of art museum curator James Rorimer (cooking at home and at work) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "James Joseph Rorimer (September 7, 1905 - May 11, 1966), was an American museum curator and former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where he was a primary force behind the creation of the Cloisters, a branch of the museum dedicated to the art and architecture of Medieval Europe. During World War II, Rorimer served in the U.S. Army's Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives Section, a.k.a. the 'Monuments Men,' protecting cultural sites and recovering stolen art work...Rorimer was an inspiration for the character of James Granger, portrayed by Matt Damon in the George Clooney-directed film THE MONUMENTS MEN, released in February 2014..."
1026 Ruark, Robert (Author): Four (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of author Robert Ruark (and his wife at home) by Martin Harris (late 1940s). According to Wikipedia: "Robert Ruark (December 29, 1915 in Wilmington, North Carolina - July 1, 1965 in London, England) was an American author, syndicated columnist, and big game hunter. In the 1930s, Ruark was fired from an accounting job in the Works Progress Administration, and did a hitch in the United States Merchant Marine. He worked for two small town newspapers in North Carolina: the Hamlet News Messenger and, later, the Sanford Herald. In 1936, Ruark moved to Washington, D.C., and was hired as a copy boy for The Washington Daily News, a Scripps-Howard newspaper. In just a few months he was the paper's top sports reporter. During World War II, Ruark was commissioned an ensign in the United States Navy, and served ten months as a gunnery officer on Atlantic and Mediterranean convoys. In 1938, Ruark married Virginia Webb, an interior designer from an upper-middle-class family in the Washington, D.C. area, and a graduate of Georgetown University. They divorced in 1963, and had no children. Virginia Webb-Ruark died in 1966. Upon his return to Washington, Ruark joined the Scripps-Howard Newspaper Alliance. As his obituary in The New York Times stated, Ruark was "sometimes glad, sometimes sad, and often mad - but almost always provocative." Some of his columns were eventually collected into two books, I Didn't Know It Was Loaded (1948) and One for the Road (1949). As he became recognized, Ruark began to write fiction, first for literary magazines, and then his first novel, Grenadine Etching, in 1947. The novel parodied the popular historical romances of the time and set the stage for his many humorous novels and articles published in the Saturday Evening Post, Esquire, and other popular publications..."
1027 Van Dyke , Willard (Photojournalist/filmmaker): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph (c. late 1930s) of photojournalist and filmmaker Willard Van Dyke (walking on an unidentified city street) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Willard Van Dyke (December 5, 1906 - January 23, 1986) was an American filmmaker, photographer, arts administrator, teacher, and former director of the film department at the Museum of Modern Art. Van Dyke went to the University of California, dropping out for a time to avoid taking an ROTC course...Van Dyke's involvement with photography started when he was young. He recalled that 'I had been playing around with a camera and developing my own pictures since I was 12 years of age.' In 1928, he went to see a photographic exhibition at the Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco, where he not only saw some Edward Weston's work but met him. It was a life-changing experience. In 1928, he apprenticed with Edward Weston and by 1932 co-founded Group f/64, with Imogen Cunningham, Ansel Adams, and Weston. The group's approach emphasized both sharp and deep focus (sometimes called straight photography) in contrast with the painterly approach of many other photographers. Van Dyke soon abandoned still photography, saying in a 1982 documentary based on his life that he did not want to compete with his closest friend, Weston. Van Dyke's photographs were marked by a tendency to address social issues, as in portraits of migrant workers, as well as purely formal subjects. This interest apparently led him to documentary films. "The effects of the Depression were very disturbing to me, and I felt anxious to promote change," he once said to an interviewer. "I was young and impatient, and felt that the documentary film would more effectively communicate issues to more people than would still photography." (New York Times) He also suggested that he abandoned photography because he did not want to compete with his closest friend, Weston. In 1935, Van Dyke moved to New York City and began making documentary films. He served as a cameraman on The River (1938) directed by Pare Lorentz. He also worked with NYKINO, the film organization that involved Paul Strand, Ralph Steiner, and Henri Cartier-Bresson. His film The City (1939) with Steiner, ran for two years at the New York World's Fair of 1939. During World War II, he worked the OWI Overseas Motion Picture Bureau, acting as liaison officer between the OWI and a Hollywood writers. From 1946 to 1965, he was a producer/director of films for television and in the field of adult education. He directed films for the CBS Television programs, The Twentieth Century and The Twenty-First Century. In 1948, Van Dyke made the documentary film The Photographer about Edward Weston. In 1960, he was nominated with Shirley Clarke and Irving Jacoby for an Academy Award for the short documentary film Skyscraper (1959). The Academy Film Archive has preserved a few of Willard Van Dyke's films, including 'The 21st Century/The Shape of Films To Come,' 'Journey Into Medicine' and 'The American Scene Number 6: Steel Town.'.
1028 Van Vechten, Carl (Writer/photographer): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph (c. late 1930s) of writer and photographer Carl Van Vechten (standing with two unidentified women) by Martin Harris. According to the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art website: "Born in Cedar Rapids, Carl Van Vechten (1880-1964) developed an interest in music and theater at an early age. He left Iowa in 1899 to attend the University of Chicago, where he explored art, music, and opera. He became interested in writing and contributed to the University of Chicago Weekly. When he moved to New York in 1906, he was hired as the assistant music critic at The New York Times. He eventually became the first American critic of modern dance at The New York Times, in a period when Isadora Duncan, Anna Pavlova, and Loie Fuller were performing in New York. He left his newspaper position in 1914 but continued to write, publishing several collections of essays relating to music and ballet. His first novel, Peter Whiffle, was published in 1922. In the early 1930s, after being introduced to the 35mm Leica camera, Van Vechten began to photograph his large circle of famous friends and acquaintances, including such subjects as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Langston Hughes, Alfred A. Knopf, Bessie Smith, and Gertrude Stein, usually bust- or half-length poses in front of backdrops. He is perhaps best known for his many portraits of the creative forces of the Harlem Renaissance. Van Vechten remained active, writing and photographing, until his death in 1964..."



PHOTOGRAPHS/PHOTO SLIDES - BUSINESS and INDUSTRY

Photographs, slides and proof sheets by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by subject.



Box Folder
111 Armstrong, Edwin Howard (Inventor): Two 11 x 14 inch (black and white) proof sheets and one 11 x14 inch (black and white) photograph of inventor Edwin Howard Armstrong (shown with his FM static-less radio antenna) by Martin Harris (LIFE MAGAZINE photo assignment - July 1939). According to the Swift Papers website: "The American electrical engineer and radio inventor Edwin Howard Armstrong (1890-1954) was one of a small group who made fundamental contributions to the development of radio. Edwin Armstrong was born in New York City, where his father was the American representative of the Oxford University Press. Armstrong rode his motorcycle to classes at Columbia University, and he took a degree in electrical engineering in 1913. He remained at Columbia for the rest of his life, serving as research assistant to Michael Pupin and, on the latter's death in 1934, as professor of electrical engineering. Armstrong had one of those turbulent careers typical of so many inventors, especially those working in new and rapidly developing industries. Driven by a thirst for historical vindication and a love of legal combat, perhaps more than by the desire for money, inventors have plagued each other's lives to a remarkable degree. Armstrong took out his first patent before he finished college in 1913, and patents and disputes over them always seem to have occupied an inordinate amount of his time and effort. His early and long association with Prof. Pupin gave Armstrong direct access to one of the best and most fertile minds in the electrical field. Armstrong's academic base also kept him free of connection with any of the many companies then vying for dominance in the radio field; he was one of the few men to successfully maintain such independence. The radio was not one invention but a combination of inventions, many of them of disputed origin. Armstrong's first important contribution was his realization of the value of Lee De Forest's audion vacuum tube as a means of amplifying current. To Armstrong this realization appeared to rank alongside the invention of the audion itself. Armstrong's second contribution was the feedback circuit, another means of amplifying current, which he (and others independently) worked out in 1912. The following year he discovered that the audion could be used to generate high-frequency oscillations; again, there were several contemporary claims to this discovery. While serving as a signal officer in World War I, Armstrong developed in 1918 the superheterodyne circuit, in which incoming high-frequency signals were beaten against low-frequency signals from a local oscillator so that they could be detected. After the war he sold his feedback and superheterodyne patents to the Westinghouse Company for $350,000 and received even more from the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) for a superregenerative invention. His last great contribution was frequency modulation (FM), a method of overcoming static in broadcasting, on which he worked from 1924 to 1933 in the face of indifference and even hostility from large manufacturers and broadcasters. During his last years perhaps 90 percent of Armstrong's time was taken up by court battles with the National Broadcasting Company, and others; this poisoned his life. He died, an apparent suicide, in 1954."
112 Bethlehem Steel (Pennsylvania): Four (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and ten (black and white) photographs (various sizes - some mounted ) of workers at the Bethlehem Steel plant in Pennsylvania photographed by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - circa 1950s/60s). According to Wikipedia: "Bethlehem Steel Corporation was America's second-largest steel producer and largest shipbuilder. Bethlehem Steel and a subsidiary company, Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, were two of the most powerful symbols of American industrial manufacturing leadership. Their demise is often cited as one of the most prominent examples of the U.S. economy's shift away from industrial manufacturing, its failure to compete with cheap foreign labor, and management's penchant for short-term profits. After a decline in the American steel industry and other problems leading to the company's bankruptcy in 2001, the company was dissolved and the remaining assets sold to International Steel Group in 2003. In 2005, ISG merged with Mittal Steel, ending American ownership of the assets of Bethlehem Steel..."
113 Ditisheim, Hanns (Investment banker): Five (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of investment banker Hanns Ditisheim (w/Bernard Cantor of Cantor-Fitzgerald in the NTA offices in NYC and at home in Tarrytown, NY) by Martin Harris (SCOPE MAGAZINE photo assignment - 1959). According to the TIME MAGAZINE web site (March 1956): "Manhattan Investment Banker Hanns Ditisheim, 55, is a spruce, Swiss-born millionaire with a speculator's sharp eye for an underpriced stock and a burning desire to control a big company. Last week, after having a foot in the door for nearly two years, Ditisheim and a syndicate of backers bought enough stock (55%) to get control of Chicago's Butler Bros., which owns 2,375 Ben Franklin 5 and 10¢ stores, 90 variety and department stores, $9,000,000 of Chicago and" Dallas real estate, and had 1955 sales of $117 million..."
114 Duttweiler, Gottlieb (Migros Grocery Stores founder): Two (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of the Migros Grocery store chain founder, Gottlieb Duttweiler (in his warehouse and office in Switzerland) by Martin Harris (A FORTUNE MAGAZINE photo assignment - c. mid 1950s). According to the SensAgent website: "Gottlieb Duttweiler (15 August 1888 - 8 June 1962) was a Swiss businessman and politician, founder of both the Migros chain of grocery stores and the (LdU) party. Duttweiler was born in Zürich. Starting with five vehicles in 1925, his Migros eventually opened stores and is today one of the main grocery chains in Switzerland. The original secret to his success was bringing daily necessities to the consumer by excluding the middlemen. As a result, many producers initially chose to boycott Migros, and Duttweiler's Migros would itself manufacture or package those missing products. In 1941 Gottlieb and his wife Adele Duttweiler transferred ownership of Migros to their customers, as a cooperative. Duttweiler also required that Migros contribute a percentage of profits (actual from the total revenue) to cultural, athletic, and hobby-related activities. This led to the Migros-club-schools and several hobby courses. Duttweiler also founded the political party Landesring der Unabhängigen (national ring of independents). Duttweiler died in Rüschlikon. The Gottlieb Duttweiler Institute was founded after his death."
115 International Business Machines (IBM): One 9 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph (mounted) and one 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph (November 1960) of Arthur K. Watson, Jr. - Head of Foreign Operations for IBM (in his office in NYC) by Martin Harris (A FORTUNE MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to the IBM Archives website: " In the late 1940s, Watson -- known as Dick by his friends and colleagues -- assisted his father, IBM's president Thomas J. Watson, Sr., in the incorporation and organization of the IBM World Trade Corporation -- the subsidiary which handled IBM's business outside the United States. As president and later board chairman of the IBM World Trade Corporation, Dick Watson expanded its operations throughout the world. During his 21 years of leadership, he spent a large part of his time traveling abroad, often accompanied by his family. He established numerous new country operations, selected managers and guided the expansion of the international businesses. When he began in IBM in February 1947, Dick Watson spoke fluent French. During the next five years of his business career, he spent more than an hour a day to master Spanish and German, and to develop a working knowledge of Portuguese. These linguistic skills were a major asset to Watson throughout his international career. At the time Watson joined the IBM World Trade Corporation subsidiary upon its formation in 1949, IBM sales outside the United States were less than $50 million. When he resigned in 1970 to become Ambassador to France, IBM World Trade Corporation sales had grown to more than $2.5 billion, and the company had established business operations in 108 countries. By then, net income from World Trade operations equaled those of the U.S. company. From his first European business trip with his father in 1948, Dick Watson held to a conviction that Western Europe would eventually emerge in the postwar period as a united economic community. He supported the formation of the European Economic Community and made sure that the IBM World Trade Corporation was one of the first U.S.-based companies to build up its manufacturing and development capabilities within the Common Market. He was also convinced that the U.S. business community should play a larger role in aiding the developing countries of the world. He sought ways to build up local economies in Asia and Latin America. He went on two U.S. government missions to Latin America. In 1964, Watson, with New York Senator Jacob Javits and others, formed ADELA, an investment institution in Lima, Peru. Funded by a worldwide group of banks and corporations, it provided capital for local businesses in Latin America. In Nigeria, he established an IBM educational facility at Ibadan University to provide training in computer skills. Dick Watson served at the requests of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson on two distinguished panels established to simulate U.S. trade. The 14-member panel he headed for President Johnson reported a number of findings later adopted by the U.S. Agency for International Development. He was a member of New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller's Commission on Critical Choices for Americans. As president of the International Chamber of Commerce in 1967 and 1968, Dick Watson became an international advocate for "freer" trade. In 1968 he also founded, with David Rockefeller, the Emergency Committee for American Trade, a public affairs organization that was eventually joined by the heads of 60 of the largest corporations in the United States. Its purpose was to muster support against protectionism in the United States. In 1970, Watson resigned his positions as a chairman of the board of IBM World Trade, and vice chairman and director of IBM, to become U.S. Ambassador to France. He was also the first official liaison of the United States with the People's Republic of China through its then Ambassador to France, Huang Chen. Dick Watson's contributions to international relations were recognized with honors from several countries. He received the Vatican's Equestrian Order of St. Sylvester. He had already won the French Legion of Honor prior to his ambassadorship. Before he returned from France, President Georges Pompidou awarded him the rank of Grand Cross of the Republic's Order of Merit, one of France's highest honors. Upon his return from France in 1972, Watson was reelected to IBM's board of directors and its executive committee. He also founded partnership Dankist, a venture capital firm located in Stamford, Conn. Arthur K. Watson died on July 26, 1974 in New Canaan, Conn., at age 55."
116 LEWYT Vacuum Cleaners (Sales office): Five (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of activities in the LEWYT vacuum cleaners sales offices (1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the New York Times obituary (March 21, 1988): " Alexander M. Lewyt, a manufacturer and inventor who developed a vacuum cleaner that bore his name, died Friday at his home in Sands Point, L.I. He was 79 years old and also lived in Manhattan and Chartres, France. Mr. Lewyt (pronounced LOO-it), who held patents for scores of inventions and once said he had chronic insomnia from thinking them up, was best known for the Lewyt vacuum cleaner, a compact machine with no dust bag that was designed to operate without distorting television and radio reception. For the last 30 years, he was president of the North Shore Animal League on Long Island and was credited with restoring it to solvency and turning it into one of the largest animal shelters in the country. Mr. Lewyt, a compulsive worker, was praised for the sales techniques used to promote his vacuum cleaners, which his company, the Lewyt Corporation, sold door to door after World War II. He visited 100 homes to see, he said, what housewives were looking for in vacuums. Award for Vacuum Cleaner. In the first eight years after his vacuum cleaner was introduced, the company sold two million, and Mr. Lewyt received an award from the American Society of Industrial Engineers for ''leadership in the vacuum-cleaner field.' He was born in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan in 1908, the son of an Austrian immigrant who ran a shop near Gramercy Park in Manhattan that made metallic gadgets like coat hangers. By the time he was in high school, he was working for his father, fashioning such things as metal holders for harmonicas. When he heard an undertakers' supplier complain that it was hard to fasten neckties around corpses, Alex, who was not yet 16, devised a new kind of bow tie that would clip on. He sold 50,000 of them, but it is unclear whether he ever patented the concept. After his father died, Mr. Lewyt took over the family shop and turned it into the Lewyt Corporation. During World War II the company did a multimillion-dollar business, manufacturing such items as radar antennas and popcorn poppers. Mr. Lewyt was made a member of the French Legion of Honor for his company's work in making equipment for the Allies during World War II. After selling his interest in the Lewyt Corporation to the Budd Corporation, Mr. Lewyt retired in the late 1950's..." .
117 Massachusetts Investors Trust (Mutual Fund): Six (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of office activities at Massachusetts Investors Trust (c. early 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the Celebrate Boston website: "In 1924, Massachusetts Investors Trust began operating in Boston, the first mutual fund company in the United States. A mutual fund pools the savings of a large group of individual investors, and uses the capital to buy a basket of many different stocks. This allows a single investor to diversify their investment, and not buy just one or two stocks which is more risky. Another great benefit of a mutual fund is that it is managed by professionals in the industry. In 1926, Mass Investors Trust began publishing comprehensive reports to its investors, a benchmark procedure that all regulated mutual fund companies comply with today. The company was also one of the first investment companies to establish an in-house research department. An article in the July 16, 1926 Boston Globe describes the new mutual fund company: 'The Massachusetts Investors Trust, organized in 1924 to afford the investor an opportunity to purchase a broad list of sound common stocks in convenient units, has grown in the interim from $50,000 paid in to more than $2,500,000 and now numbers just short of 1000 shareholders. Its funds are invested in the common stocks of 136 leading American corporations. The trustees have acquired the holdings of common stocks for permanent investment, not for speculation. Their selection to date has show the following interesting results: Of the 136 stocks held, three have passed their dividends, paid extras, or stock dividends or issued results. The result of market fluctuations has been equally favorable. At today's market, 26 of the 136 stocks are selling at less than they cost, but the other 110 issues are selling for enough more so that the value of the trust shares is more than 10 points above t he offering price of 52-1/2.' Mass Investors Trust was a real trailblazer in the financial services industry. Boston was a huge competitor to New York as a global financial capital, and still is today, due to innovation and integrity. L. Sherman Adams is credited with initiating Mass Investors Trust in 1924, which eventually evolved into MFS Investment Management and still thrives today."
118 PM New York (Daily newspaper): Three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and five (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of activities in the PM NEW YORK offices (1947) by staff photographer Martin Harris. According to the Behold: The Photo Blog website: "During its brief lifetime, there was no mistaking PM New York Daily for any other newspaper. The tabloid, which existed between 1940 and 1948, didn't run advertisements. Catering largely to workers and unions, it was an unabashed crusader against economic and racial inequality, fascism, and, as its first issue stated, 'people who push other people around.' And it gave more space for photographs than any of its competitors...PM, which was founded by former managing editor of Time-Life publications Ralph Ingersoll, drew top writers, including Ernest Hemingway and Dorothy Parker, and illustrators, including Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss). Its photographers were among the best in the city, and they were celebrated in the newspaper's pages. Unlike most tabloids, PM published full-page photographs on expensive, high-quality paper, and on weekends, it ran a one-of-a-kind photography supplement. The paper's progressive stance extended to its hiring practices: PM's Margaret Bourke-White and Mary Morris were the first female photographers ever to serve on staff of a daily American newspaper. Helen Levitt, Morris Engel, Irving Haberman, Lisette Model, and Weegee—whose work Behold has featured several times—also appeared in PM. In addition to covering PM's cardinal political topics—rallies, strikes, and the trials facing laborers on the job and at home—the paper's photographers also captured the vibrancy of New York's working class. Together, the anger and the joy constitute a portrait of the city that's, in some ways, timeless. 'They wanted to show the workers' lives in a good way. They didn't just want to show that the living and work conditions were bad. They also wanted to show that these workers had an everyday life where they had some fun...' " .
119 Radio Corporation of America (RCA): Forty-eight (color) photo slides (1962) of RCA management executives (posed formerly or informally in their offices) by Martin Harris (an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the RCA website: "RCA is an icon of American innovation. We popularized the radio in the 1920s, developed television in the 1930s, created color TV standards in the 1950s, and became a computer innovator in the 1960s. Today, the RCA brand is working to attract a new generation of families to RCA—establishing the brand as a clear choice for electronics. We create emotional connections with products that have and always will deliver innovation, quality and value..."



PHOTOGRAPHS/PHOTO SLIDES - MISCELLANEOUS SUBJECTS

Photographs, slides and proof sheets by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by subject.



Box Folder
121 Allen, Dr. William H. (Central Moravian Church, PA): Two (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and nine 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of Dr. Walser H. Allen - Pastor of the Central Moravian Church in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania (in his office) by Martin Harris (A COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - c. mid 1950s). No additional biographical information available.
122 Alphabet (Blocks): Nine (color) photo slides of alphabet blocks and corresponding animals (D- dog, H- horse, et cetera) by Martin Harris for an unidentified photo assignment or project. No additional information available.
123 Americans in a Chinese Restaurant (NYC): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and two 8 x 11 inch (black and white) photographs of Americans in a Chinese restaurant in NYC (c. early 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo assignment). No additional information available.
124 Animals (Miscellaneous): Two 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs of animals (turtle and cat) by Martin Harris (for unidentified photo assignments - circa 1950s/60s). Two different photo shoots with no additional information available.
125 Baroness of Capri (Aviatrix): Two (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and eight (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the aviatrix, the Baroness of Capri (at home and at Roosevelt Field in Mineola (Long Island), New York) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - June 1941). No additional biographical information available.
126 Baseball (Paris, France): One 7.5 x 9.5 inch (black and white) proof sheet of a pick-up baseball game in a Paris, France park (circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
126A Basketball (NYC): One 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of a professional basketball game in New York City (circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
127 Bellevue Hospital (NYC): Seven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of Bellevue Hospital (NYC) nurses attending classes and at work (the photo shoot spotlights nursing student Patricia Gannon - 1956) by Martin Harris. According to the NYC Health and Hospitals/Bellevue website: "Bellevue is the oldest hospital in America. We trace our roots back to 1736 when a six-bed infirmary opened on the second floor of the New York City Almshouse. This was just four years after the birth of George Washington and 40 years before the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Since its humble beginnings as a haven for the indigent, NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue has become a major academic medical institution of international renown. Over the centuries, we served as an incubator for major innovations in public health, medical science and medical education. Often referred to as a national treasure, NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue defines the very best traditions of public medicine as a public service vital to the well being of our civil society."
128 Bloor, Ella Reeve (Labor organizer): Nine (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of labor organizer Ella Reeve Bloor ("Mother Bloor") and other labor organizers (Michael Gold, Clarence Hathaway - Editor of THE DAILY WORKER and Leo Seltzer) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - 1937). According to Wikipedia: "Ella Reeve "Mother" Bloor (July 8, 1862-August 10, 1951) was an American labor organizer and long-time activist in the socialist and communist movements. Bloor is best remembered as one of the top-ranking female functionaries in the Communist Party USA." According to the Workmen's Circle website: "Michael 'Mike' Gold (April 12, 1894 - May 14, 1967) is the pen-name of Jewish American writer Itzok Isaac Granich. A lifelong communist, Gold was a novelist and literary critic. His semi-autobiographical novel Jews Without Money (1930) was a bestseller. During the 1930s and 1940s Gold was considered the preeminent author and editor of U.S. proletarian literature." According to Wikipedia: "Clarence A. 'Charlie' Hathaway (1892-1963) was an activist in the Minnesota trade union movement and a prominent leader of the Communist Party of the United States from the 1920s through the early 1940s. He is best remembered as the party's leading organizer of the Federated Farmer-Labor Party in 1923 and 1924, as the editor of The Daily Worker, and as a longtime member of the Communist Party's governing Central Committee." According to the Digplanet website: "Leo Seltzer (1910-2007) was an American social-documentary filmmaker whose career spanned over half a century, having made more than sixty films. One of the founders of the Workers' Film and Photo League, Seltzer received many international awards for his work, including an Academy Award for Best Documentary. In 1962 he served as cinema-biographer to the White House for President John F. Kennedy."
129 Budge, Donald (Tennis champion): Two 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs (circa 1937) of tennis champion Donald Budge (in his hotel room) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the New World Encyclopedia website: "John Donald ('Don') Budge (June 13, 1915 - January 26, 2000) was an American tennis champion who was a World Number One player for five years, first as an amateur and then as a professional. Supremely athletic and powerful, the red-haired Budge stood six-foot-one and weighed 160 pounds, giving him an imposing body, ideal for tennis players. His one-handed backhand is considered to have been the best backhand of all time. Budge was held in high regard by fellow players, spectators, and officials. His historic firsts include being the first man to win Wimbledon's men's singles, men's doubles, and mixed doubles in the same year (1937) and being the first man to win in a single year the four major tournaments that compose the Grand Slam, a feat he accomplished in 1938. He is also remembered for leading the 1937 U.S. team to a Davis Cup victory for the first time in 11 years. From January of 1937 until late in 1938, Budge won an amazing 92 consecutive matches and 14 tournaments. In 1937, he became the first tennis player to ever be voted the James E. Sullivan Award as America's top amateur athlete. In both 1937 and 1938, he was named Athlete of the Year by the Associated Press."
1210 Bullfighting (Spain): One 4 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and eleven (black and white) photographs (various sizes ) of professional bullfighting in Madrid, Spain by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - 1959). No additional information available.
1211 County Auction : Twelve (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of a rural county auction (no specific location is available) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
1212 Defend Spain (Street demonstration): One 8 x 10 in (black and white) proof sheet of a large "Defend Spain" (Spanish Civil War) street demonstration (on Broadway in NYC - circa 1937) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information is available.
1213 Dolls (Miscellaneous): Seventy (color) photo slides of a miniature 'family" of dolls (mother, father and children) posed performing household activities (cooking, vacuuming, decorating the Christmas tree, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo project). No additional information available.
1214 Stephen Donohue (Roman Catholic Bishop - NYC): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of Roman Catholic Bishop Stephen Donahue (at St. Patrick's Cathedral in NYC - circa 1950). According to his 1982 New York Times obituary: "... Bishop Donahue, one of the youngest bishops in the American church when he was consecrated in 1934 at the age of 41, was a protégé of Patrick Cardinal Hayes and served as secretary to the Cardinal from 1922 to 1934. Bishop Donahue was born Decirca 10, 1893, the fifth of nine children. He attended schools run by the Christian Brothers, and a teacher encouraged him to study for the priesthood. He entered St. Joseph's Seminary in Westchester County in 1912, and was sent to the North American College in Rome a year later, a sign that he was being groomed for leadership in the archdiocese. After his ordination in 1918, he was appointed professor of scripture and Latin at Cathedral College. He also served as curate in several Manhattan parishes until Cardinal Hayes made him his personal secretary in 1922. He was named a monsignor in 1924. When Cardinal Hayes died in 1938, Bishop Donahue was diocesan administrator for the eight months before the arrival of Francis Cardinal Spellman. Bishop Donahue later became permanent pastor of Holy Name Catholic Church on Amsterdam Avenue and 96th Street, the parish in which he had grown up..."
1215 Einstein, Albert (Physicist): Six (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of theoretical physicist Albert Einstein (at the 1939 New York World's Fair - including the LIFE MAGAZINE "Picture of the Week" of Einstein emerging from the Palestinian Pavilion at the fair) by Martin Harris (his most famous photograph). According to Wikipedia: "Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist. He developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). Einstein's work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. Einstein is best known in popular culture for his mass-energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed 'the world's most famous equation'). He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for his 'services to theoretical physics,' in particular his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect, a pivotal step in the evolution of quantum theory..."
1216 Fall Foliage (New York State): Thirty-one (color) photo slides of fall foliage in upstate New York (1958) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo assignment). No additional information available.
1217 Fashion (Miscellaneous): Eighteen 3 x 5 inch (black and white) proof sheets of fashion models (being made up and positioned for a fashion shoot - circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
1218 Ice Skaters (Strobe light images): One 10 x 14 inch (black and white) strobe light multi-image/stop action photograph (circa 1940s) of a professional ice skater (unidentified) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
131 Labor Defender (and Staff): One 7 x 8 inch (black and white) proof sheet of a "labor defender (lawyer)" and his staff at work (circa 1930s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
132 Labor Rally (Madison Square Garden - NYC): Two 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheets of a labor rally (circa 1940) at Madison Square Garden (NYC) with speakers Alan Hayward, Mike Quill, Vito Marcantonio and an unidentified woman speaker by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Michael Joseph Quill (September 18, 1905 - January 28, 1966) was one of the founders of the Transport Workers Union of America (TWU), a union founded by subway workers in New York City that expanded to represent employees in other forms of transit, and the President of the TWU for most of the first thirty years of its existence. A close ally of the Communist Party USA for the first twelve years of his leadership of the union, he broke with it in 1948. He drove his former allies out of the union as they tried to control the union rather than continue to help it..." According to Wikipedia: "Vito Anthony Marcantonio (December 10, 1902 - August 9, 1954) was an Italian-American lawyer and democratic socialist politician. Originally a member of the Republican Party and a supporter of Fiorello LaGuardia, he switched to the American Labor Party. He was on the far left of the American political spectrum, and was nationally known for his support from Communists in the 1940s..." Biographical information for Alan Hayward was not found.
133 Louis, Joe (Boxer): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet featuring former heavyweight boxing champ Joe Louis with former middleweight boxing champ Rocky Graziano and former heavyweight boxing champ Jersey Joe Walcott filming a television commercial (Vick's Vaporub in the 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo assignment). According to a biography on the IMDb website (by "Angels unchained"): "Joe Louis is considered by many fistic experts and fans as the greatest Heavyweight Boxing Champion in the sport's history. Born into a poor family, Joe Louis's mother felt the only way her son could escape poverty was through music. She bought him a violin and sent him off daily to lessons. On his way there, young Joe would pass by a boxing gym. In no time, he was working out at the gym, training for a boxing career. His amateur career started off disastrously, as he was knocked-out down 16 times in losing the fight. However, he was determined to continue and posted an outstanding amateur career with only 5 defeats in 60 fights. He turned professional and quickly racked up one of the most impressive winning streaks in boxing history. He was nicknamed, The Brown Bomber, and became the first boxer to defeat six heavyweight champions (Primo Carnera, Max Baer, Jack Sharkey, Jimmy Braddock, Max Schmeling, and Jersey Joe Walcott). After winning the championship, he held it almost 12 years to set a record, plus set another record with 25 successful title defenses. He retired with a 60-1 record, only to make an unsuccessful and very sad comeback at the age of 37. While champion, Joe Louis volunteered to join the U.S. Army at the height of his career. He made two title defenses in which he donated his entire purses to relief funds to help both the Army and the Navy. He spent almost five years in the service and boxed hundreds of exhibitions. However, after the war, he was hounded by the Internal Revenue Service to pay back taxes on the purses he had donated. He suffered terribly through this ordeal. and soon found himself broke. He launched a "controversial" pro-wrestling career and was undefeated in some 20 matches before retiring with a heart problem. He was helped by his good friend Frank Sinatra and acted in a few films, worked as a host in Las Vegas, and made numerous appearances for boxing. He died a few years after suffering a massive stroke. Joe Louis was buried with full-military honors, and it was said that he was 'most' proud of his European-African-Middle Eastern Medal and his Victory Medal World War II. In or out of the ring, Joe Louis was a Champion." According to the Encyclopedia Britannica: "Rocky Graziano, original name Thomas Rocco Barbella (born January 1, 1919, New York, New York, U.S.—died May 22, 1990, New York) American boxer and world middleweight champion (1947-48). In his youth Graziano was close friends with future fighter Jake La Motta, and both troubled youths attended the same juvenile reform school. Graziano was drafted during World War II, but he later deserted from the U.S. Army after punching an officer. During his brief time with the military, Graziano became a professional boxer and adopted his new name to evade the army. He was found nonetheless, sentenced to nine months in the federal penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kansas, and dishonorably discharged from military service. He began fighting again soon after his release from Leavenworth in 1943 and became known for his powerful right-hand punches and for his relentless animal-like fury. Graziano defeated fighters Al Davis, Marty Servo, and Harold Green to get his first shot at a title against Tony Zale. Graziano battled Zale for the title three times in less than two years; these epic battles were his best-known fights. Zale knocked Graziano out in six rounds in the first fight, in 1946; Graziano won the second fight by knocking out Zale in the sixth, thereby becoming middleweight champion; Zale won the third fight by a knockout in the third to regain the championship. Graziano lost his last middleweight title challenge to Sugar Ray Robinson in 1952 and retired from boxing the next year. He subsequently became a comic actor and wrote, with Rowland Barber, his autobiography, Somebody Up There Likes Me, which was made into a popular film starring Paul Newman in 1956. Graziano's career record was 67 wins (52 by knockout), 10 losses, and 6 draws. He was inducted into The Ring magazine's Boxing Hall of Fame in 1971" According to Wikipedia: "Jersey Joe Walcott, was an American world heavyweight boxing champion. He broke the world's record for the oldest man to win the world's heavyweight title when he earned it at the age of 37 years, 168 days. That record would eventually be broken on November 5, 1994, by 45-year-old George Foreman, who defeated the 26-year-old heavyweight champion of the world Michael Moorer, to win the WBA and IBF heavyweight titles. After retiring from boxing, Walcott did some acting, playing small parts in a few movies and television shows. He also refereed several boxing matches, but after the controversial ending to the second fight between Muhammad Ali and Sonny Liston, Walcott was not asked to referee again. From 1971 to 1974, Walcott held the elected position of Camden County, New Jersey, sheriff, the first African-American to do so. From 1975 to 1984, he was the chairman of the New Jersey State Athletic Commission..."
134 Mays, Willie (Baseball player) - Part 1: Thirteen 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs, one 10 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph and eleven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of major league baseball (San Francisco Giants) player Willie Mays playing off-season winter ("Santurce") baseball in Puerto Rico (1954) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931), nicknamed 'The Say Hey Kid,' is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) center fielder who spent almost all of his 22 season career playing for the New York and San Francisco Giants, before finishing with the New York Mets. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979, his first year of eligibility..."
135 Mays, Willie (Baseball player) - Part 2: One hundred and seventy-three (color) photo slides of major league baseball (San Francisco Giants) player Willie Mays playing off-season winter ("Santurce") baseball in Puerto Rico (1954) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931), nicknamed 'The Say Hey Kid,' is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) center fielder who spent almost all of his 22 season career playing for the New York and San Francisco Giants, before finishing with the New York Mets. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979, his first year of eligibility..."
136 Military Physician (USAF Hospital): Ten (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and sixteen (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of Captain S. K. Willis, Jr., Chief of Aviation Medicine at the Strategic Air Command (SAC) base in Westover, Massachusetts (1959) by Martin Harris (A SCOPE ASSOCIATES photo assignment). No additional information available.
137 Narcotics (NYC woman detective): Three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and eighteen (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of Kitty Barry a "woman detective" in the New York City police department (Narcotics Squad) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE phot assignment - 1954). No additional information available.
138 New York City Police Department: Eleven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and five (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the New York City Police Department (1940s, 1950s and 1960s) at work by Martin Harris (for various photo assignments). No additional information is available.
139 Mooney, Tom (Labor leader): Three 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of labor leader Tom Mooney (with NYC Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, journalist Heywood Broun and writer Dorothy Parker) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - circa 1939). According to the Encyclopedia Britannica: "Tom Mooney (born Dec. 8, 1882, Chicago, Ill., U.S.—died March 6, 1942, San Francisco) U.S. Socialist union organizer and activist convicted of murder in connection with a 1916 San Francisco bomb explosion. Mooney was a coal miner's son who became an apprentice iron molder at the age of 14 and a member of the iron molders' union not long after. He became committed to Socialist politics after several trips to Europe, joined the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and helped to publish Revolt, a Socialist newspaper. During 1913-14 in California he and Warren Knox Billings, a young drifter from New York, were involved in a long, violent strike of electrical workers against the Pacific Gas and Electrical Company. Billings was arrested for carrying dynamite and briefly imprisoned; Mooney was arrested on similar charges but acquitted. In 1916 Mooney, his wife Rena Ellen Mooney (née Hermann), Billings, and several others were all indicted and convicted for the bombing of the Preparedness Day Parade in San Francisco, which killed 10 people and injured 40 others. The death sentence passed on Mooney set off protests and agitations that lasted two decades and that led, first, to the commutation of the sentence to life imprisonment and, then, to a pardon by the governor of California in 1939. (He was officially pardoned in 1961). A report on the Mooney-Billings case prepared in 1931 by the National Commission on Law Observance and Enforcement cast serious doubt on the evidence that led to Mooney's conviction." .
141 New York City Quarantine (U.S. Public Health Service): Five (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes), eight (8 x 10 inch) black and white photographs and one 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of the activities of an unidentified U.S. Navy examining physician making his rounds during a unidentified disease quarantine in NYC (August 1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
142 North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) - Part 1: Eighty-eight (color) photo slides of the activities of the post-war German armed forces (under the jurisdiction of NATO - circa 1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
143 North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) - Part 2: Fourteen (color) photo slides of Lord Hastings Ismay (First Secretary General of NATO , 1952-57) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "General Hastings Lionel Ismay, 1st Baron Ismay, nicknamed Pug, was a British Indian Army officer and diplomat, remembered primarily for his role as Winston Churchill's chief military assistant during the Second World War and his service as the first Secretary General of NATO from 1952 to 1957.
144 Political Demonstrations (Washington, DC): One 3.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photograph of an injured (?) woman on the street during an unidentified Washington, DC street demonstration (April 1932) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
145 Religion (Miscellaneous images): Four (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of religious subjects (priests, nuns, churches, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for unidentified photo assignments). No additional information available.
146 Rickover, Hyman (U.S. Navy): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of U.S. Navy Admiral Hyman Rickover (with NYC Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. - c. early 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Hyman George Rickover (January 27, 1900 - July 8, 1986) was a United States Navy admiral who directed the original development of naval nuclear propulsion and controlled its operations for three decades as director of Naval Reactors. In addition, he oversaw the development of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, the world's first commercial pressurized water reactor used for generating electricity. Rickover is known as the 'Father of the Nuclear Navy,' which as of July 2007 had produced 200 nuclear-powered submarines, and 23 nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and cruisers, though many of these U.S. vessels are now decommissioned and others are under construction. On November 16, 1973, Rickover was promoted to four-star admiral after 51 years of commissioned service. With his unique personality, political connections, responsibilities, and depth of knowledge regarding naval nuclear propulsion, Rickover became the longest-serving naval officer in U.S. history with 63 years of active duty service..."
147 Rural Community Life: Twenty-Four (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of the daily activities in an unidentified rural community (circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
148 Ruth, Babe (Baseball Player): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of baseball legend Babe Ruth and his wife (circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "George Herman Ruth Jr. (February 6, 1895 - August 16, 1948), better known as Babe Ruth, was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed The Bambino and The Sultan of Swat, he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting (and some pitching) records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand today. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its 'first five' inaugural members..."
149 Sarah Lawrence College (Yonkers, NY): Seven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of daily student and faculty activity at Sarah Lawrence College in Yonkers, New York (1948) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the Sarah Lawrence College website: "Sarah Lawrence is a prestigious, residential, coeducational liberal arts college. Founded in 1926 and consistently ranked among the leading liberal arts colleges in the country, Sarah Lawrence is known for its pioneering approach to education, rich history of impassioned intellectual and civic engagement, and vibrant, successful alumni. In close proximity to the unparalleled offerings of New York City, our historic campus is home to an inclusive, intellectually curious, and diverse community..."
1410 Tobin, Austin (NYC Port Authority): Eleven (color) photo slides of the activities of New York City Port Authority Executive Director, Austin Tobin (July 1956) by Martin Harris (for a BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Racing a Motorized Age - July 14, 1956 - including cover photo). According to his February 9, 1978 NEW YORK TIMES obituary: "Austin J. Tobin, the autocratic Brooklyn?born lawyer who built the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey into the most powerful agency of its kind in the world...When Mr. Tobin joined the agency as a law clerk it had 300 employees. When he retired as executive director in 1972, the agency had 8,000 employees and an investment of $2.6?billion in bridges, airports, ship terminals and other facilities, including the vast World Trade Center. At the time of his retirement he was reputed to be the highest?paid public official in the United States except for the President. His salary was $70,000 a year. Mr. Tobin saw the agency's image change from one of benevolent servant of the area's millions to that of a conservative, money?oriented, banker-dominated organization bent on defending its profit?making activities in the face of public demands that it take on such tasks as improving mass transportation...Under Mr. Tobin's guidance, the agency completed the second and third tubes of the Lincoln Tunnel, added a second level to the George Washington Bridge, undertook the financing and development of the four major airports of the metropolitan district—Kennedy International, Newark International, La Guardia and Teterboro, a general aviation airport—and built the city's first commercial heliports, at 30th Street and the Hudson River and at Wall Street on the East River. The agency also constructed and operated the Port Authority Bus Terminal at Eighth Avenue and 41st Street, the largest in the world, and developed the harbor's waterfront. Starting with the Brooklyn piers, the Port Authority reconstructed docks in Hoboken, remade Port Newark and Port Elizabeth into modern containership centers and, most recently, designed and built the new passenger ship terminal on the West Side of Manhattan. Also under Mr. Tobin, the Port Authority embarked on two of its most controversial projects, acquisition and re, habilitation of the former Hudson and Manhattan Railroad, now known as PATH, an acronym for Port Authority Trans Hudson, and the I10?story, twin towers of the World Trade Center. Actually, the two were closely allied. New Jersey, which had long felt slighted by the agency, agreed to permit construction of the Trade Center only if the Port. Authority took over the decrepit Hudson and Manhattan. Both New York's and New Jersey's Governors have the power to veto the authority's minutes and thus prevent its carrying out plans. In agreeing to take on the Hudson and Manhattan, the agency got both states to agree that it would never again have to involve itself in a deficit commuterrail project. It was this pact that so enraged critics of the agency and of Mr. Tobin almost a decade later when the region's financial difficulties led political and civic leaders to look at the Port Authority's full coffers with considerable envy. The World Trade Center has been mired in controversy since it was first proposed in the early 1960's. It's enemies have blamed it for most of the real?estate problems of lower Manhattan in recent years and charged that it has never been a success. It would have been a disaster, they contend, if the State of New York had not come to its aid by renting most of the space in one of the two towers. Mr. Tobin's critics saw the two huge towers, at their completion the tallest in the world, as a manifestation of his ego and of his conception of the Port Authority as larger and more important than almost anything in the region. Mr. Tobin never even attended the dedication ceremonies of the World Trade Center on April 5. 1973. a year after his retirement, He said at the time that he had decided not to go because it was raining..."
1411 Vietnam War (Protests): Seven (color) photo slides of a Vietnam War street demonstration in New York City ("The War is Not Over") by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - 1967). No additional information available.
1412 Wagner, Gerhard (German Navy): One 7 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of Rear Admiral Gerhard Wagner (German Navy of West Germany/NATO Commander of Naval Forces Baltic Approaches) by Martin Harris (for an official NATO photo assignment - c. early 1960s). According to Wikipedia: "...In the Navy of West Germany Wagner became deputy of Navy Inspector Friedrich Ruge. He was the first flag officer to hold the position of the integrated NATO Commander Naval Forces Baltic Approaches (1961 to 1962), in the beginning called Commander Allied Naval Forces Northern Area Central Europe. In this role, he held the temporary rank of Vice Admiral..."
1413 Washington Market (Buffalo, New York): Two 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of street scenes around the Washington Market area of Buffalo, NY (circa 1960) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo assignment of project). No additional information available.



PHOTOGRAPHS - PERFORMERS and SHOW BUSINESS PERSONALITIES

Photographs by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by name of subject.



Box Folder
151 Aherne, Brian (Actor): One 7 x 9.5 inch (black and white) photograph of film and stage actor Brian Aherne (signed by the actor - photographed in uniform, smoking a pipe on a USO tour) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment - circa 1943). According to his biography (by Jon C. Hopwood) on the IMDb website: "Brian Aherne was an Oscar-nominated Anglo-American stage and screen actor who was one of the top cinema character actors in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. Born on May 2, 1902 in King's Norton, Worcestshire, England, Aherne performed as an actor as a child. At age 18 he made his debut as an adult with the company that would evolve into the world-famous Birmingham Repertory Theatre. Three years later, he made his debut in London's West End, the English equivalent of Broadway. After his experience in Birmingham, Aherne studied architecture, but a life as an actor was too strong to resist, so he returned to the theater in 1923. For the next eight years, he toured the provinces and appeared in the West End in various productions. In 1931, he made his Broadway debut playing Robert Browning in 'The Barretts of Wimpole Street.' He alternated between the New York and London stage in the early 1930s. Aherne made his movie debut in 1924, and by the mid-1930s, he moved to Hollywood. In 1940, he was nominated for an Academy Award as Best Supporting Actor for Juarez (1939) for playing the Emperor Maximillian. Brian Aherne published his autobiography in 1969, and 10 years later, he published a biography of his friend George Sanders, entitled 'A Dreadful Man.' He died at age 83 of heart failure on February 10, 1986 in Venice, Florida."
152 Baseheart, Richard (Actor): One 7.25 x 7.5 inch (black and white ) photograph (late 1940s) of film and stage actor Richard Basehart (in three-piece suit browsing through a record album collection) by Martin Harris (Notation by Martin Harris: "When he was married to my friend Stephanie Klein"). According to his biography by pusquets@lander.es on the IMDb website: "Richard Basehart came to Hollywood in 1947, after beginning an acting career on Broadway. He made his mark in the gritty film-noir classic He Walked by Night (1948), among others, and proved his versatility in several international productions, most notably in Federico Fellini's poignant masterpiece La Strada (1954)."
153 Allen, Steve (Television personality): Thirteen (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of the daily activities (at home and at work) of "Tonight Show" host Steve Allen (with guests Jack Palance, Buddy Hackett, comedian Milt Kamen, Julie Wilson, Agnes Moorehead, Hal March, et cetera, "Tonight Show" regular cast members Louis Nye, Skitch Henderson, Gene Rayburn, et cetera and his son Steve Allen, Jr.) by Martin Harris (for a PAGEANT MAGAZINE photo assignment - 1956). According to Wikipedia: "Steve Allen (December 26, 1921 - October 30, 2000) was an American television personality, musician, composer, actor, comedian, and writer. Though he got his start in radio, Allen is best known for his television career. He first gained national attention as a guest host on Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts. He graduated to become the first host of The Tonight Show, where he was instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. Thereafter, he hosted numerous game and variety shows, including The Steve Allen Show, I've Got a Secret, and The New Steve Allen Show, and was a regular panel member on CBS' What's My Line? Allen was a creditable pianist and a prolific composer, having written (by his own estimate) over 8,500 songs, some of which were recorded by Perry Como, Margaret Whiting, Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme, Les Brown, and Gloria Lynne. Allen won the 1964 Grammy Award for Best Original Jazz Composition, with his song written with Ray Brown, 'The Gravy Waltz.' Allen wrote more than 50 books, has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and a Hollywood theater named in his honor..."
154 Baker, Carroll (Film actress): Five (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and six 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of film star Carroll Baker at home and on various movie sets (with Ben Gazzara, Ed Sullivan and the cast and production team of THE BIG COUNTRY: William Wyler, Charles Bickford, Charlton Heston, Jean Simmons, Burl Ives, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment circa 1957-58). According to her biography by Ed Stephn on the IMDb web site: "Carroll Baker was born Karolina Piekarski on May 28, 1931 in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, the daughter of a traveling salesman. She attended community college for a year and then worked as a dancer and magician's assistant. After a brief marriage, she had a small part in Easy to Love (1953), did TV commercials, and had a bit part on Broadway. She studied at the Actors Studio and was married to director Jack Garfein (one daughter, Blanche Baker). Warner Brothers, sensing a future Marilyn Monroe, cast her in Giant (1956), Baby Doll (1956) (Oscar nomination for her thumb-sucking role), The Carpetbaggers (1964) and Harlow (1965) (title role). Moving to Italy, she made films there and in England, Germany, Mexico and Spain . After returning to American films, she married Donald Burton in 1982 and resided in Hampstead, London in the 1980s. They remained together until Burton's death from emphysema in their home in Cathedral City, California in 2007."
155 Bankhead, Tallulah (Stage and film actress): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and one 10.25 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of stage and film star Tallulah Bankhead (with actor Henry Hull at a American Federation of Arts (AFA) meeting in Atlantic City, NJ in 1939 and at home in July 1952) by Martin Harris (for various photo assignments). According to Wikipedia: "Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 - December 12, 1968) was an American actress of the stage and screen, and a reputed libertine. Bankhead was known for her husky voice, outrageous personality, and devastating wit. Originating some of the 20th-century theater's preeminent roles in comedy and melodrama, she gained acclaim as an actress on both sides of the Atlantic. Bankhead became an icon of the tempestuous, flamboyant actress, and her unique voice and mannerisms are often subject to imitation and parody..." According to his biography (by Hal Erickson) on the Fandango web site: "Henry Hull, the son of a Louisville drama critic, made his Broadway acting debut in either 1909 or 1911, depending on which 'official' biography one reads. After leaving the stage to try his luck as a gold prospector and mining engineer, Hull was back on the boards in 1916, the same year that he made his first film at New Jersey's World Studios. While his place of honor in the American Theater is incontestable (among his many Broadway appearances was Tobacco Road, in which he created the role of Jeeter Lester), Hull's reputation as film actor varies from observer to observer. An incredibly mannered movie performer, Hull was a bit too precious for his leading roles in One Exciting Night (1922) and The Werewolf of London (1935); he also came off as shamelessly hammy in such character parts as the crusading newspaper editor in The Return of Frank James (1940). Conversely, his calculated mannerisms and gratuitous vocal tricks served him quite well in roles like the obnoxious millionaire in Hitchcock's Lifeboat (1944) and the Ernie Pyle-like war correspondent in Objective Burma (1945). A playwright as well as an actor, Hull worked on such plays as Congratulations and Manhattan. One of Henry Hull's last film appearances was the typically irritating role of a small-town buttinsky in The Chase (1966)."
156 Bergman, Ingrid (Film actress): Two (black and white) proof sheets and four (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of film actress Ingrid Bergman (with actresses Mai Britt and Marta Toren0 by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Ingrid's New Role" - September 18, 1953). According to Wikipedia: "Ingrid Bergman...was a Swedish actress who starred in a variety of European and American films. She won three Academy Awards, two Emmy Awards, four Golden Globe Awards, a BAFTA Award, and the Tony Award for Best Actress. She is best remembered for her roles as Ilsa Lund in Casablanca (1942) and as Alicia Huberman in Notorious (1946), an Alfred Hitchcock thriller starring Cary Grant and Claude Rains..."
157 Bernstein, Leonard (Composer and conductor): One (black and white) proof sheet of Leonard Bernstein (with a producer in a recording studio) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - c. late 1940s). According to his biography on the IMDb web site: "Renowned composer ('West Side Story,' 'Candide,' 'On The Town'), conductor, arranger, pianist, educator, author, TV/radio host, educated at the Boston Latin School and Harvard University (BA) with Walter Piston. Edward Burlingame Hill and A. Tillman Merritt. He studied piano with Helen Coates, Heinrich Gebhard and Isabelle Vengerova, at the Curtis Institute with Fritz Reiner, and at the Berkshire Music Center with Serge Koussevitzky (and became an assistant to Koussevitzky). He was assistant conductor of the New York Philharmonic in 1943-1944, and conductor of the New York Symphony, 1945-1948. He was music advisor to the Israel Philharmonic from 1948-1949, and a member of the faculty at the Berkshire Music Center from 1948 (though he did take leaves of absence), and head of the conducting department there in 1951. He was Professor of Music at Brandeis University, 1951-1956; and co-conductor of the New York Philharmonic, 1957-1958, and music director there after 1958. He won an Emmy award for his televised Young People's Concerts. He was guest conductor of symphony orchestras in the USA and Europe, and conducted the Israel Philharmonic seven times between 1947 and 1957. He toured the US with Koussevitzky in 1951, and was the first American to conduct at the La Scala Opera House in Milan, in 1953. He was awarded the Sonning Prize in Denmark, and was a member of the National Institute of Arts and Letters. He joined ASCAP in 1944, and his chief musical collaborators included Betty Comden, Adolph Green, John Latouche, and Stephen Sondheim..."
158 Blue, Ben (Nightclub and film comedian): Three 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of comedian Ben Blue (clowning with photographers) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - circa 1940s). According to his biography on the Find a Grave web site: "Vaudeville comedian...Ben Blue immigrated to the United States where he became a dance instructor, dance school owner, and a successful nightclub owner. He began his movie career in short films for Warner Brothers in 1926 and later worked at Hal Roach Studios, Paramount and later at MGM. Some of his notable film appearances were in The Big Broadcast of 1938 (1938), For Me and My Gal (1942) which starred Judy Garland, One Sunday Afternoon (1948) which was a remake of the 1933 film of the same name and It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963) in which he had a cameo as a biplane pilot. He was also on television and frequently appeared on Ed Sullivan's 'Toast of the Town' variety series and on the popular, long-running variety show 'The Hollywood Palace.' "
159 Bolger, Ray (Stage and film actor/dancer): One 3.5 x 4.5 inch (black and white photograph of stage and film star Ray Bolger (rehearsing, in a bed, with an unidentified actress for an unidentified show - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 - January 15, 1987)[3] was an American entertainer of vaudeville, stage (particularly musical theatre) and actor, singer and dancer best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz...His entertainment aspirations evolved from the vaudeville shows of his youth. He changed his surname to Bolger and began his career in a vaudeville tap show, creating the act 'Sanford and Bolger' with his dance partner. In 1926, he danced at New York City's legendary Palace Theatre, the premier vaudeville theatre in the U.S. His limber body and improvisational dance movement won him many leading roles on Broadway in the 1930s. Eventually, his career would also encompass film, television and nightclub work..."
1510 Brando, Marlon (Stage and film actor): Three (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of actor Marlon Brando (sitting on a waste basket and speaking on the phone in his bedroom) by Martin Harris (for an unknown publication photo assignment - April 1950). According to the IMDb web site: "Marlon Brando is widely considered the greatest movie actor of all time, rivaled only by the more theatrically oriented Laurence Olivier in terms of esteem. Unlike Olivier, who preferred the stage to the screen, Brando concentrated his talents on movies after bidding the Broadway stage adieu in 1949, a decision for which he was severely criticized when his star began to dim in the 1960s and he was excoriated for squandering his talents. No actor ever exerted such a profound influence on succeeding generations of actors as did Brando. More than 50 years after he first scorched the screen as Stanley Kowalski in the movie version of Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and a quarter-century after his last great performance as Col. Kurtz in Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now (1979), all American actors are still being measured by the yardstick that was Brando. It was if the shadow of John Barrymore, the great American actor closest to Brando in terms of talent and stardom, dominated the acting field up until the 1970s. He did not, nor did any other actor so dominate the public's consciousness of what WAS an actor before or since Brando's 1951 on-screen portrayal of Stanley made him a cultural icon. Brando eclipsed the reputation of other great actors circa 1950, such as Paul Muni and Fredric March. Only the luster of Spencer Tracy's reputation hasn't dimmed when seen in the starlight thrown off by Brando. However, neither Tracy nor Olivier created an entire school of acting just by the force of his personality. Brando did..."
1511 Brown, Cecil (Radio commentator): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of radio commentator and war correspondent Cecil Brown (circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Cecil Brown (September 14, 1907 - October 25, 1987) was a war correspondent who worked closely with Edward R. Murrow during World War II. He was the author of the book Suez to Singapore, which describes the sinking of HMS Repulse in December 1941. He also has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his contribution to radio...CBS hired Brown in 1940 as their correspondent in Rome, where he openly criticized the regime of Benito Mussolini. In 1941 the Italian government cited Brown's "continued hostile attitude" and expelled him from the country. After his expulsion from Italy, CBS sent Brown to Singapore. In December 1941, while Brown was in Singapore, he was invited to go out on a mission on the British cruiser HMS Repulse. The Repulse and the 'Prince of Wales' were attacked by land based Japanese bomber aircraft and sunk. Brown narrowly escaped with his life. His experiences in his long journey and dealings with Italian, British, and other censorship authorities led him to write Suez to Singapore which was published in 1942. His criticism of the British in Singapore caused him to have his 'war correspondent' credentials revoked and made him a persona non-grata. He narrowly escaped from Singapore before its fall to the Japanese. He was part of a larger group of reporters known as Murrow's Boys. In September 1943, Brown resigned from CBS after being rebuked by CBS news director Paul White for expressing an editorial opinion during an August 25 news broadcast. Brown had stated that "a good deal of the enthusiasm for this war is evaporating into thin air." Announcing his resignation Brown said that he could not subscribe to what he characterized as CBS' policy of 'non-opinionated' news ...After leaving CBS Brown covered the rest of the war at home, in the United States, for the Mutual Network. When WWII ended Brown continued to work in broadcast journalism as a correspondent for Mutual, NBC and ABC. He retired from broadcasting in 1967 and went to work as a professor of communication arts at Cal Poly Pomona where he worked until he died in 1987..."
1512 Brynner, Yul (Stage and film actor): Five (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of stage and film actor Yul Brynner (with hair and his wife -actress Virginia Gilmore - seated at a table - 1949) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Yul Brynner (July 11, 1920 - October 10, 1985) was a Russian-born, United States-based film and stage actor. Brynner was best known for his portrayals of Rameses II in the 1956 Cecil B. DeMille blockbuster The Ten Commandments, and of King Mongkut of Siam in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I, for which he won two Tony Awards and an Academy Award for the film version. He played the role 4625 times on stage. He portrayed General Bounine in the 1956 film Anastasia and the gunman Chris Adams in The Magnificent Seven. Brynner was noted for his distinctive voice and for his shaved head, which he maintained as a personal trademark long after adopting it in 1951 for his role in The King and I. Earlier, he was a model and television director, and later a photographer and the author of two books..." According to Wikipedia: "Virginia Gilmore was born as Sherman Virginia Poole in El Monte, California. Her father was a retired officer of the British Army. She began her stage career in San Francisco at the age of 15, but moved to Los Angeles in 1939 to pursue work in films. When her movie career was not progressing, Gilmore mustered the nerve to approach Samuel Goldwyn at his home. As a result of their meeting, he promised her a screen test. She did soon land some small movie roles. Her better known film appearances both occurred in 1941: Western Union, directed by Fritz Lang, and Swamp Water directed by Jean Renoir..."
1513 Carlisle, Kitty (Actress and personality): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of stage, film and television actress and panelist Kitty Carlisle (wearing a large light-colored scarf at an unidentified rally - c. WWII) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Kitty Carlisle (also known as Kitty Carlisle Hart; September 3, 1910 - April 17, 2007) was an American singer, actress and spokeswoman for the arts. She is best remembered as a regular panelist on the television game show To Tell the Truth. Carlisle served 20 years on the New York State Council on the Arts. In 1991, she received the National Medal of Arts from President George H. W. Bush. Eight years later, in 1999, she was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame..."
1514 Casals, Pablo (Cellist): Three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of cellist Pablo Casals (with crowds and musicians - c. late 1950s /early 1960s) by Martin Harris (for Scope Associates). According to the Encyclopedia of World Biography web site: "Pablo Casals was regarded as one of the greatest cello players and composers (writers of music) of the twentieth century. He was also an active protester against oppressive governments (those that misuse their power and mistreat citizens), including that of the Spanish tyrant Francisco Franco (1892-1975). Pablo Casals was born on December 29, 1876, in Vendrell, in the Catalonian region of Spain. He was the second of eleven children of Carlos Casals and Pilar Defillo de Casals. Casals's father, the local church organist, would play the piano while the infant Casals rested his head against it and sang along. By the age of four Casals was playing the piano, and at five he joined the church choir. At six he was composing songs with his father, and by the age of nine he could play the violin and organ. From the age of ten Casals began each day with a walk, taking inspiration from nature. He would then play two Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) pieces on the piano when he returned home. Casals became interested in the cello after seeing the instrument in a music recital at age eleven; soon, his father built him one. His parents argued about his future; his father wanted him to study carpentry, but his mother would not hear of it and enrolled him in the Municipal School of Music in Barcelona, Spain. Casals clashed with his strict instructors, preferring to play the cello in his own, more expressive, manner. His progress was extraordinary, and Casals's new way of playing made the cello a more popular instrument. Among those impressed by Casals was the Spanish composer Isaac Albéniz (1860-1909). After hearing Casals play, Albéniz gave him a letter of introduction to Count Guillermo de Morphy, secretary to the Queen Regent of Spain, Maria Cristine. In 1894 Casals traveled to Madrid, Spain, and gave concerts for the queen and her court. Over the next few years his reputation spread as he played with various orchestras in Madrid. With his formal debut as a concert soloist in Paris, France, in 1899, Casals's career was assured..." .
1515 Chevalier, Maurice (Cabaret and film star): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and three 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of Maurice Chevalier (greeting Allied soldiers during World War II) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to his biography (by Volker Boehm) on the IMDb web site: "His heavy French accent, melodic voice and Gallic charm made Maurice Chevalier the prototype of the gallant French monsieur in the American cinema of the 1930s. Before he went to Hollywood he worked as a farmer, circus acrobat, cabaret singer and, starting in 1908, a comical actor in French films, a few times even with the celebrated Max Linder. Chevalier fought as an infantryman in the French army during World War I and was taken prisoner by the Germans in 1914, spending two years in a POW camp. After the war he returned to the entertainment field, and eventually tried his luck in Hollywood. He made his first American movie in 1929, The Love Parade (1929). The film was a success, and Chevalier made more successful films with directors like Ernst Lubitsch (The Merry Widow 1934). He retired from films in 1967, his last few roles being mainly friendly patriarchs."
1516 Clair, Rene (Film director/writer): Two 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs of French filmmaker and writer Rene Clair (circa 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication phot assignment). According to Wikipedia: "René Clair was a French filmmaker and writer. He first established his reputation in the 1920s as a director of silent films in which comedy was often mingled with fantasy. He went on to make some of the most innovative early sound films in France, before going abroad to work in the UK and USA for more than a decade. Returning to France after World War II, he continued to make films that were characterized by their elegance and wit, often presenting a nostalgic view of French life in earlier years. He was elected to the Académie française in 1960. Clair's best known films include The Italian Straw Hat (1928), Under the Roofs of Paris (1930), Le Million (1931), À nous la liberté (1931), I Married a Witch (1942), and And Then There Were None (1945)..."
1517 Condon, Eddie (Jazz musician/bandleader): Three 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheets, two 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photographs and eleven (black and white) photographs of jazz musician and bandleader Eddie Condon (with his family and with his band and images of "Nick and Eddie Condon's" nightclub patrons and other jazz musicians including Joe Sullivan) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE series of articles - "Brother Jazz - The Story of Eddie Condon" - August 23 and September 6, 1947). According to the Red Hot Jazz web site: " Eddie Condon was one of the gang of young white Chicago jazz musicians in the 1920s. He started out playing banjo with Hollis Peavey's Jazz Bandits when he was 17. He worked with several members of the famed Austin High School Gang in the 1920s. In 1927 he co-led with Red McKenzie the McKenzie-Condon Chicagoans record that was popular among white Chicago jazz musicians. After organizing some other record sessions, Condon switched to guitar and moved to New York in 1929, where he worked with Red Nichols' Five Pennies and Red McKenzie's Mound City Blue Blowers. He participated in several recording sessions including one with Louis Armstrong and his Savoy Ballroom 5 in 1929. In 1938 he led some sessions for the Commodore label and he became a star. He had a nightly gig at Nick's in New York City from 1937 to 1944. From 1944 to 1945 he led a series of recordings at Town Hall that were broadcast weekly on the radio. Condon opened his own club in 1945, and recorded for Columbia in the 1950s."
1518 Connelly, Marc (Playwright/acreenwriter): Three (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of playwright and screenwriter Marc Connelly (Meeting with unidentified men - circa 1940s). According to Wikipedia: "Marcus Cook Connelly was an American playwright, director, producer, performer, and lyricist. He was a key member of the Algonquin Round Table, and received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1930. Connelly was born to actor and hotelier Patrick Joseph Connelly and actress Mabel Louise Cook in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. He began writing plays at the age of five, and would later become a journalist for the Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph until he moved to New York City. In 1919 he joined the Algonquin Round Table. Connelly had contributed to several Broadway musicals before teaming up with his most important collaborator, George S. Kaufman, in 1921. During their four-year partnership, they wrote five comedies - Dulcy (1921), To the Ladies (1922), Merton of the Movies (1922), The Deep Tangled Wildwood (1923) and Beggar on Horseback (1924) - and also co-directed and contributed sketches to the 1922 revue The '49ers, collaborated on the book to the musical comedy Helen of Troy, New York (1923), and wrote both the book and lyrics for another musical comedy, Be Yourself (1924). Connelly received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for The Green Pastures in 1930. The play, a re-telling of the Old Testament, was a landmark in American drama; boasting the first all-black Broadway cast. He contributed verse and articles to Life, Everybody's, and other magazines. Connelly was one of the wittiest members of the Algonquin Round Table. He said, 'I always knew children were anti-social. But the children of the West Side - they're savage.' In 1968, Connelly published his memoirs, Voices Offstage. Over the years, Connolly appeared as an actor in 21 movies, including The Spirit of St. Louis (1957) with James Stewart. A film about the Round Table members, The Ten-Year Lunch (1987), won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature and featured Connelly, who was the last survivor. The 1994 film Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle, a fictional account of the group, featured actor Matt Malloy as Connelly..."
1519 Cooper,Gary (Film actor): Thirteen (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and twenty-six 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of film star Gary Cooper (with his wife and daughter touring Europe) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Gary Cooper: An American Tourist - 1953). According to Wikipedia: "Gary Cooper was an American film actor known for his natural, authentic, and understated acting style and screen performances. His career spanned thirty-five years, from 1925 to 1960, and included leading roles in eighty-four feature films. He was a major movie star from the end of the silent film era through the end of the golden age of Classical Hollywood. His screen persona appealed strongly to both men and women, and his range of performances included roles in most major movie genres. Cooper's ability to project his own personality onto the characters he played contributed to his appearing natural and authentic on screen. The screen persona he sustained throughout his career represented the ideal American hero. Cooper began his career as a film extra and stunt rider and soon landed acting roles. After establishing himself as a Western hero in his early silent films, Cooper became a movie star in 1929 with his first sound picture, The Virginian. In the early 1930s, he expanded his heroic image to include more cautious characters in adventure films and dramas such as A Farewell to Arms (1932) and The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935). During the height of his career, Cooper portrayed a new type of hero—a champion of the common man—in films such as Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Meet John Doe (1941), Sergeant York (1941), The Pride of the Yankees (1942), and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943). In the post-war years, he portrayed more mature characters at odds with the world in films such as The Fountainhead (1949) and High Noon (1952). In his final films, Cooper played non-violent characters searching for redemption in films such as Friendly Persuasion (1956) and Man of the West (1958). He married New York debutante Veronica Balfe in 1933, and the couple had one daughter. Their marriage was interrupted by a three-year separation precipitated by Cooper's love affair with Patricia Neal. Cooper received the Academy Award for Best Actor for his roles in Sergeant York and High Noon. He also received an Academy Honorary Award for his career achievements in 1961. He was one of the top ten film personalities for twenty-three consecutive years, and was one of the top money-making stars for eighteen years. The American Film Institute (AFI) ranked Cooper eleventh on its list of the twenty five greatest male stars of classic Hollywood cinema..."
1520 Cornell, Katherine (Stage actress): Two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of stage actress Katherine Cornell (with actor Brian Aherne on a USO tour - circa 1943) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to the IMDb web site: "Katharine Cornell was born on February 16, 1893 in Berlin, Germany. She is known for her work on Stage Door Canteen (1943), The Unconquered (1954) and There Shall Be No Night (1957). She was married to Guthrie McClintic. She died on June 9, 1974 in Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts, USA... At the age of 58, she recreated the role of 'Elizabeth Barrett' in 'The Barretts of Wimpole Street' episode of Producers' Showcase (1954) on live television in 1956, twenty-five years after she first played it in the original 1931 Broadway production. Born in Germany to U.S. parents, but raised in New York State. She appeared in only one Hollywood film (playing herself) - Stage Door Canteen (1943), but she is considered one of the great American stage actresses of the twentieth century. Won Broadway's 1948 Tony Award as Best Actress (Dramatic) for a revival of Shakespeare's 'Antony and Cleopatra' - an award shared with Judith Anderson for 'Medea' and Jessica Tandy for 'A Streetcar Named Desire.' In the film The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942), a film noted for dropping the names of famous persons of the day, Cornell's name is dropped more than that of any other celebrity..."
1521 Davis, Ossie (Stage and film actor): One 4.5 x 11 inch (black and white) proof sheet of stage and film star Ossie Davis (circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Ossie Davis (born Raiford Chatman Davis; December 18, 1917 - February 4, 2005) was an American film, television and Broadway actor, director, poet, playwright, author, and civil rights activist. He was married to Ruby Dee, with whom he frequently performed, until his death in 2005. He and his wife were named to the NAACP Image Awards Hall of Fame; were awarded the National Medal of Arts and were recipients of the Kennedy Center Honors. He was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame, in 1994..."
1522 de Havilland, Olivia (Film actress): One 7 x 9 inch (black and white) photograph of film star Olivia de Havilland (serving sandwiches to military guests at the Hollywood Canteen - circa 1943) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: " Olivia Mary de Havilland (born July 1, 1916) is a British-American actress whose career spanned from 1935 to 1988. She is one of the last surviving stars from the Golden Age of Hollywood. She appeared in forty-nine feature films, and was one of the leading movie stars during the golden age of Classical Hollywood. She is best known for her early screen performances in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) and Gone with the Wind (1939), and her later award-winning performances in To Each His Own (1946), The Snake Pit (1948), and The Heiress (1949). Born in Tokyo to English parents, de Havilland and her younger sister, actress Joan Fontaine, moved to California in 1919. They were raised by their mother Lilian, a former stage actress who taught them dramatic art, music, and elocution. De Havilland made her acting debut in amateur theatre in Alice in Wonderland and later appeared in a local production of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, which led to her playing Hermia in Max Reinhardt's stage production of the same play and a movie contract with Warner Bros. Olivia de Havilland made her screen debut in Reinhardt's A Midsummer Night's Dream in 1935. She began her career playing demure ingénues opposite popular leading men, including Errol Flynn, with whom she made nine films. They became one of Hollywood's most popular romantic on-screen pairings. She achieved her initial popularity in romantic comedy films, such as The Great Garrick (1937), and in Westerns, such as Dodge City (1939). Her natural beauty and refined acting style made her particularly effective in historical period dramas, such as Anthony Adverse (1936), and romantic dramas, such as Hold Back the Dawn (1941). In her later career, she was most successful in drama films, such as Light in the Piazza (1962), and unglamorous roles in psychological dramas including Hush... Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964)..."
1523 D'Orsay, Fifi (Stage and film actress): One 3.5 x 4 inch (black and white) photograph of stage and film actress Fifi D'Orsay (with actor Edmund Lowe and a soldier at the Hollywood Canteen - circa 1943) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to her biography (by the Vaudeville Memories web site) on the IMDb web site: "Although she made her career playing the quintessential Parisian coquette, Fifi D'Orsay was actually a Canadian. She was born Yvonne Lussier in Montreal, Québec, in 1904. At the age of 20 she arrived in New York, determined to become an actress. She was met by Helen Morgan, whom she knew from Montreal. Morgan put up the young Yvonne and taught her the ropes about finding jobs. She was soon hired to appear in The Greenwich Village Follies after an audition in which she sang 'Yes! We Have No Bananas' in French and told the director that she was an ex-Follies Bèrgere showgirl from Paris. The director renamed her 'Mademoiselle Fifi.' During the run she became involved with vaudeville veteran Edward Gallagher (who, with Al Shean, formed the hit comedy act 'Gallagher and Shean'), who was 37 years her senior. He taught her 'all the little tricks of the business.' She said, 'I wanted to learn everything about show business and he taught me - believe me!' She and Gallagher put together a vaudeville act and worked together for two years. When they parted ways, she was teamed with Herman Berrans by noted vaudeville sketch writer Herman Timberg. They put together an act that featured Fifi as a saucy music student and Berrans as her teacher, and it soon became a hit on the Orpheum circuit. Hollywood beckoned and on the strength of a favorable screen test, she dumped her fiancé (Berrans' brother Freddie) and took off for Hollywood. By this time she had adopted the last name 'D'Orsay,' after her favorite perfume. She continued her career in movies, alternating them with highly paid appearances in vaudeville. In 1950 the Palace Theatre revived vaudeville and Fifi returned to sparkling acclaim. She was one of the first major stars to appear on television in its early days, and later acted in such series as Bewitched (1964), Adventures in Paradise (1959) and Perry Mason (1957), among other shows. In 1971-72, at the age of 67, she appeared on Broadway in the Stephen Sondheim musical 'Follies.' She played 'Solange LaFitte,' a former Follies headliner (a character more than just a little reminiscent of her own life and career). Her song 'Ah, Paris' was strong and sexy and helped make the cast album a success. 'Follies' opened April 4, 1971, at New York's Winter Garden Theatre and ran for 522 performances. It won seven Tony Awards and the New York Drama Critics' Award for Best Musical. Fifi died on December 2, 1983..."
1524 Dietrich, Marlene (Film actress): Six 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photographs and two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of film star Marlene Dietrich (entertaining at the Stage Door Canteen in Paris and at the Hollywood Canteen with a soldier in 1943) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Marlene" Dietrich was a German-American actress and singer. Dietrich maintained popularity throughout her unusually long show business career by continually re-inventing herself, professionally and characteristically. In the 1920s, in Berlin, she acted on the stage and in silent films. Her performance as Lola-Lola in The Blue Angel (1930), directed by Josef von Sternberg, brought her international fame and resulted in a contract with Paramount Pictures. Dietrich starred in Hollywood films such as Morocco (1930), Shanghai Express (1932) and Desire (1936). She successfully traded on her glamorous persona and 'exotic' looks, cementing her super-stardom and becoming one of the highest-paid actresses of the era. Dietrich became a U.S. citizen in 1939, and throughout World War II she was a high-profile frontline entertainer. Although she still made occasional films after World War II, Dietrich spent most of the 1950s to the 1970s touring the world as a marquee live-show performer. Dietrich was noted for her humanitarian efforts during the War, housing German and French exiles, providing financial support, and even advocating for their US citizenship. For her work improving morale on the front lines in WWII, she received honors from the US, France, Belgium, and Israel. In 1999, the American Film Institute named Dietrich the ninth-greatest female star of classic Hollywood cinema..."
1525 Drake, Alfred (Stage Actor): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of stage actor Alfred Drake (rehearsing for the play LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS in NYC - 1960) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Born as Alfred Capurro in New York City, the son of parents emigrated from Recco, Genoa, Drake began his Broadway career while still a student at Brooklyn College. He is best known for his leading roles in the original Broadway productions of Oklahoma!; Kiss Me, Kate; Kismet; and for playing Marshall Blackstone in the original production of Babes in Arms, (in which he sang the title song) and Hajj in Kismet, for which he received the Tony Award. He was also a prolific Shakespearean, notably starring as Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing opposite Katharine Hepburn. Drake was mostly a stage and television star; he starred in only one film, Tars and Spars, but played several roles on television. However, one notable film appearance came in 1982 at the conclusion of "Trading Places," where Drake, with evident relish as president of the stock exchange, informs the movie's antagonists that they are broke. His first musical television appearance was as Captain Dick Warrington in the January 15, 1955, live telecast of the operetta Naughty Marietta. His 1964 stage performance as Claudius in the Richard Burton Hamlet was filmed live on the stage of the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, using a 'quickie' process called Electronovision, and shown in movie theatres in a very limited engagement. It was also recorded on LP. He played the President of the Stock Exchange in the 1983 Eddie Murphy-Dan Aykroyd film Trading Places. His final stage appearance in a musical was in 1973 as Honore LaChaisse in Lerner and Loewe's Gigi. Two years later he starred in a revival of The Skin of Our Teeth. As a director he staged the 1974 premiere of The Royal Rape of Ruari Macasmunde at the Virginia Museum Theater. He was inducted into the American Theatre Hall of Fame in 1981. He was also a published author - writing at least a few plays: Dr. Willy Nilly, an adaptation of Molière's The Doctor in Spite of Himself, an adaptation of Goldoni's The Liar, and even at least one book on cards (specifically Gin Rummy)..."
1526 Durante, Jimmy (Stage/film/TV/nightclub performer): Four (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of performer Jimmy Durante (at home, with fans and with Ethel Merman and Bob Hope rehearsing RED, HOT AND BLUE for Broadway) by Martin Harris (a photo assignment for THE LITERARY DIGEST - "The Mantles of Ziegfeld and Barnum" - November 30, 1935). According to Wikipedia: "James Francis 'Jimmy' Durante (February 10, 1893 - January 29, 1980) was an American singer, pianist, comedian, and actor. His distinctive clipped gravelly speech, New York accent, comic language butchery, jazz-influenced songs, and prominent nose helped make him one of America's most familiar and popular personalities of the 1920s through the 1970s. He often referred to his nose as the Schnozzola (from the Yiddish schnoz [nose]), and the word became his nickname..."
1527 Fadiman, Clifton (Writer/Radio and TV personality): Two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of writer and broadcasting personality Clifton Fadiman (photographed in uniform on July 12, 1945) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to the IMDb web site: "Clifton Fadiman was born on May 15, 1904 in Brooklyn, New York, USA. He is known for his work on Information Please: Series 1, No. 1 (1939), Information Please: Series 1, No. 9 (1940) and Information Please: Series 1, No. 11 (1940). He was married to Annalee Whitmore. He died on June 20, 1999 in Sanibel Island, Florida, USA..."
1528 Fairbanks, Jr., Douglas (Film actor): One 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of film star Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. (in a U.S. Navy uniform/costume - circa 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to his biography (by Guy Bellinger) on the IMDb web site: "Although he appeared in approximately 100 movies or TV shows, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. never really intended to take up acting as a career. However, the environment he was born into and the circumstances naturally led him to be a thespian. Noblesse oblige. He was born Douglas Elton Fairbanks, Jr. in New York City, New York, to Anna Beth (Sully), daughter of a very wealthy cotton mogul, and actor Douglas Fairbanks (born Douglas Elton Thomas Ullman), then not yet established as the swashbuckling idol he would become. Fairbanks, Jr. had German Jewish (from his paternal grandfather), English, and Scottish ancestry. He proved a gifted boy early in life. To the end of his life he remained a multi-talented, hyperactive man, not content to appear in the 100 films mentioned above. Handsome, distinguished and extremely bright, he excelled at sports (much like his father), notably during his stay at the Military Academy in 1919 (his role in Claude Autant-Lara's 'L'athlète incomplete' illustrated these abilities). He also excelled academically, and attended the Lycéee Janson de Sailly in Paris, where he had followed his divorced mother. Very early in his life he developed a taste for the arts as well and became a painter and sculptor. Not content to limiting himself to just one field, he became involved in business, in fields as varied as mining, hotel management, owning a chain of bowling alleys and a firm that manufactured popcorn. During World War II he headed London's Douglas Voluntary Hospital (an establishment taking care of war refugees), was President Franklin D. Roosevelt's special envoy for the Special Mission to South America in 1940 before becoming a lieutenant in the Navy (he was promoted to the rank of captain in 1954) and taking part in the Allies' landing in Sicily and Elba in 1943. A fervent Anglophile, was knighted in 1949 and often entertained Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip in his London mansion, 'The Boltons.' His film career began at the age of 13 when he was signed by Paramount Pictures. He debuted in Stephen Steps Out (1923) but the film flopped and his career stagnated despite a critically acclaimed role in Stella Dallas (1925). Things really picked up when he married Lucille Le Sueur, a young starlet who was soon to become better known as Joan Crawford. The young couple became the toast of the town (one 'Screen Snapshot' episode echoes this sudden glory) and good parts and success followed, such as the hapless partner of Edward G. Robinson in Little Caesar (1931) a favorably reviewed turn as the villain in The Prisoner of Zenda (1937) or more debonair characters in slapstick comedies or adventure yarns. The 1930s were a fruitful period for Fairbanks, his most memorable role probably being that of the British soldier in Gunga Din (1939); although it was somewhat of a 'swashbuckling' role, Fairbanks made a point of never imitating his father. After the World War II, his star waned and, despite a moving part in Ghost Story (1981), he did not appear in a major movie. Now a legend himself, Douglas Fairbanks Jr. left this world with the satisfaction of having lived up to the Fairbanks name at the end of a life nobody could call 'wasted.' "
1529 Ferrer, Mel (Stage and film actor): One 1. 5 x 5.5 inch (black and white) proof sheet of stage and film actor Mel Ferrer (in a theatre audience - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Mel Ferrer began acting in summer stock as a teenager and in 1937 won the Theatre Intime award for best new play by a Princeton undergraduate; the play was called Awhile to Work and co-starred another college student, Frances Pilchard, who would become Ferrer's first wife that same year. At age twenty-one, he was appearing on the Broadway stage as a chorus dancer, making his debut there as an actor two years later. After a bout with polio, Ferrer worked as a disc jockey in Texas and Arkansas and moved to Mexico to work on a novel. He then was contracted to Columbia Pictures as a director along with several other 'potentials' who began as dialogue directors: Fred Sears, William Castle, Henry Levin and Robert Gordon. Eventually, he returned to Broadway, where he directed the 1946 stage production of Cyrano de Bergerac, in which Jose Ferrer (no relation) first appeared in the role, then became involved in motion pictures, directing more than ten feature films and acting in more than eighty. As a producer, he had notable success with the well-regarded film Wait Until Dark (1967), starring Audrey Hepburn. In 1945, Ferrer made a modest directing debut with The Girl of the Limberlost, a low-budget black-and-white film for Columbia. He returned to Broadway to star in Strange Fruit, based on the novel by Lillian Smith. He made his screen acting debut in Lost Boundaries (1949), and as a film actor is best remembered for his roles as the injured puppeteer in the musical Lili (1953, starring Leslie Caron), as the villainous Marquis de Maynes in Scaramouche (1952) and as Prince Andrei in War and Peace (1956, co-starring with his then-wife, Audrey Hepburn). Ferrer never achieved major stardom and later turned towards television, doing some directing for the series The Farmer's Daughter (1963-1966) starring Inger Stevens, but is best remembered in television work for his role opposite Jane Wyman as Angela Channing's attorney and briefly, her husband, Phillip Erikson, in Falcon Crest, as well as directing a few of the series episodes. He also played a blackmailing paparazzo reporter in the Columbo episode "Requiem for a Fallen Star" (starring Anne Baxter) and a few years later in 1979 Dr. Brogli in an episode of Return of the Saint. For his contributions to the motion picture industry, Mel Ferrer has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6268 Hollywood Blvd..."
161 Gable, Clark (Film actor): Eleven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes), eleven 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs and seven 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs of film star Clark Gable (in Arnhem, Holland while filming BETRAYED for MGM) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE article "Who, Gable?" - 1954). According to Wikipedia: "Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 - November 16, 1960) was an American film actor, often referred to as 'The King of Hollywood' or just simply as 'The King.' Gable began his career as a stage actor and appeared as an extra in silent films between 1924 and 1926, and progressed to supporting roles with a few films for MGM in 1931. The next year, he landed his first leading Hollywood role and became a leading man in more than 60 motion pictures over the next three decades. Gable won an Academy Award for Best Actor for It Happened One Night (1934),and was nominated for leading roles in Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) and for his arguably best-known role as Rhett Butler in the epic Gone with the Wind (1939)..."
162 Gardiner, Reginald (Film actor): Three 8 x 8 inch (black and white) photographs of film actor Reginald Gardner (on a USO tour - circa 1943) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment. According to his biography (by I.S. Mowis) on the IMDb web site: "English-born Reginald Gardiner graduated from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts and, by the early 1930's, had become an established revue and musical star on the London stage. His first foray into films was in the Alfred Hitchcock-directed The Lodger (1927) in 1926, but it was in Hollywood where his career really took off. At the prompting of Beatrice Lillie, he left for America in 1935. After appearing in two of her shows, he delighted Broadway audiences in 'An Evening with Beatrice Lillie and Reginald Gardiner,' performing a series of witty impersonations of various inanimate items, such as lighthouses and wallpaper. In 1936, he appeared in his first Hollywood film, Born to Dance (1936), with Eleanor Powell and James Stewart, as a traffic cop with symphonic delusions. His instant popularity resulted in other film offers, and Gardiner was soon in demand as butlers and 'silly ass' upper-crust English twits. With his suave attire, thin moustache and obtuse mannerisms, he took to playing those caricatures with obvious glee. He enlivened many a film with his comic presence, notably A Damsel in Distress (1937), The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942-his character 'Beverly Carlton' brilliantly lampooning Noël Coward) - and Cluny Brown (1946). In later years, Gardiner was seen on television as co-star of The Phyllis Diller Show (1966), opposite Phyllis Diller. In 1964, he returned to the stage to play Alfred P. Doolittle, the role made famous by Stanley Holloway, in 'My Fair Lady' at the New York City Centre. John Canaday, reviewing for the New York Times, described his character as a 'wonderful, boozy, abominable, bug-ridden and altogether reprehensible charmer, a kind of defrocked Boy Scout, whose love for everybody is exceeded only by his propensity for chicanery and self-indulgence.' Reginald Gardiner was also celebrated for his classic monologue, simply called 'Trains', which so impressed King George VI that he summoned the actor to Buckingham Palace for a special performance. 'Trains' was recorded by Decca and has since become a collector's item."
163 Gaxton, William (Broadway musical-comedy star): One 9 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph of Broadway star William Gaxton (at The Lambs Club in NYC in 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia "William Gaxton (December 2, 1893 - February 2, 1963) was a star of vaudeville, film, and theatre. Gaxton was president of The Lambs Club from 1936 to 1939, 1952 to 1953, and 1957 to 1961. He and Victor Moore became a popular theatre team in the 1930s and 1940s; they also appeared in several films and shorts together. Although a fine vocalist, Gaxton's strength was his comic timing and he often requested songs of his be removed from shows in favor of giving him more time for comedic scenes. An example of this was the removal of 'Easy to Love' from Cole Porter's Anything Goes . The song reappeared in the show 53 years later, sung by Howard McGillin in the 1987 Broadway revival. Gaxton was born as Arturo Antonio Gaxiola in San Francisco to Cecilia and John Gaxiola. Gaxton served in the U.S. Navy during World War I. He was of Spanish ancestry and a cousin of actor Leo Carrillo. Gaxton appeared on film and onstage. He debuted on Broadway in the Music Box Revue on October 23, 1922. On radio, Gaxton starred in Broadway Showtime, a 30-minute musical drama that ran on CBS December 27, 1943 to June 26, 1944. In 1961 and 1962, he and Arthur Treacher starred in Guy Lombardo's production of the musical Paradise Island at Jones Beach Marine Theater. He died from cancer on February 2, 1963 in Manhattan, New York City..."
164 Gleason, Jackie (Comedian): Twelve (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of Jackie Gleason (and film director, Gene Kelly on the Paris set of GIGOT - 1962) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the Biography.com web site: "Jackie Gleason was a pioneer of television comedy. 'The Honeymooners' and 'The Jackie Gleason Show' have been audience favorites for more than half a century..."
165 Gobel, George (Nightclub/Television Comedian): Five (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and five 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of comedian George Gobel (with his wife and family at home) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - 1955). According to his biography (by Gary Brumburgh) on the IMDb web site: "Squat, easygoing, brushcut-blonde George Gobel first won Midwest attention singing as 'Little Georgie Gobel' on radio. He also toured with country music bands while billed as 'The Littlest Cowboy.' His career was interrupted by WWII, in which he served as a pilot instructor. He also began doing standup for his fellow servicemen and took to the nightclub, hotel and county fair circuit in subsequent years. Gobel's mild-mannered comic delivery coupled with a warm, cracker-barrel styled feel caught fire when he hit the TV waves in 1952 and he subsequently starred on his own The George Gobel Show (1954), winning an Emmy award for his efforts. His alter-ego was this hapless, unassuming, hen-pecked husband who tried to breeze through life the best he could. Gobel's folksy, non-threatening 'little man' appeal did not extend into film, however, finding little success in the two lightweight comedy showcases offered him -- The Birds and the Bees (1956) and I Married a Woman (1958). After his TV series, Gobel lost severe momentum, occasionally appearing in guest spots or as a talk show guest. In 1974, he regained a bit of notice after replacing the late Charley Weaver as the bottom left square on the popular game show Hollywood Squares and went on to win a role on the short-lived series Harper Valley P.T.A. (1981) as a tipsy mayor. The comedian died at age 71 in 1991 following bypass surgery."
166 Goldwyn, Samuel (Film Mogul): Five (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of film mogul and producer Samuel Godwyn (in his Goldwyn Studios office in Hollywood - 1955) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Samuel Goldwyn (August 17, 1879 - January 31, 1974), also known as Samuel Goldfish, was a Jewish Polish American film producer. He was most well known for being the founding contributor and executive of several motion picture studios in Hollywood. His awards include the 1973 Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1947, and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1958..."
167 Hardwicke, Sir Cedric (Stage and film actor): One 11 x 13.5 inch (black and white) photograph of actor Sir Cedric Hardwicke (the balding man with glasses, on the left, at the home of Richard Aldrich and Gertrude Lawrence - 1950) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - April 5, 1950). According to his biography (by Guy Lazarus) on the IMDb web site: "Sir Cedric Hardwicke, one of the great character actors in the first decades of the talking picture, was born in Lye, England on February 19, 1893. Hardwicke attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and made his stage debut in 1912. His career was interrupted by military service in World War I, but he returned to the stage in 1922 with the Birmingham Repertory Theatre, distinguishing himself as Caesar in George Bernard Shaw's Caesar and Cleopatra, which was his ticket to the London stage. For his distinguished work on the stage and in films, he was knighted by King George V in 1934, a time when very few actors received such an honor. Hardwicke first performed on the American stage in 1936 and emigrated to the United States permanently after spending the 1948 season with the Old Vic. Hardwicke's success on stage and in films and television was abetted by his resonant voice and aristocratic bearing. Among the major films he appeared in were Les Misérables (1935), Stanley and Livingstone (1939), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939), Suspicion (1941), A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1949), and The Ten Commandments (1956). His last film was The Pumpkin Eater (1964) in 1964. Cedric Hardwicke died on August 6, 1964 in New York City, New York."
168 Hargrove, Marion (Writer): One 11 x 11 inch (black and white) photograph of writer Marion Hargrove (at a picnic in Rockland County, New York - sitting on the ground - center with Helen Eustis - author of THE HORIZONTAL MAN, Mrs. Hargrove and Mrs. Alan Anderson - daughter of playwright Maxwell Anderson - circa 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Marion Hargrove (October 13, 1919 - August 23, 2003) was an American writer noted for the World War II bestselling book See Here, Private Hargrove, a collection of humorous newspaper columns written mostly before the United States entered the war. (The book was made into a 1944 movie with Robert Walker as Hargrove and Donna Reed as his love interest.) During the war, he served on the staff of Yank, the Army Weekly. After the war he wrote two novels: Something's Got to Give (1948) and The Girl He Left Behind (1956). He also wrote for various popular magazines, and served as feature editor of Argosy..."
169 Heifetz, Jascha (Violinist): One 9.5 x 10.5 inch (black and white) photograph of violinist Jascha Heifetz (on a USO tour in Naples, Italy - c. WWII) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Jascha Heifetz...was a violinist, considered by many to be the greatest violinist of all time. Born in Wilno, Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania), he moved as a teenager to the United States, where his Carnegie Hall debut was rapturously received. He was a virtuoso since childhood—Fritz Kreisler, another leading violinist of the twentieth century, said on hearing Heifetz's debut, 'We might as well take our fiddles and break them across our knees.' He had a long and successful performing and recording career; after an injury to his right (bowing) arm, he focused on teaching..."
1610 Hepburn, Katherine (Film actress): One 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photograph of actress Katherine Hepburn (in conversation with an unidentified man - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Katharine Hepburn (May 12, 1907 - June 29, 2003) was an American actress. Known for her fierce independence and spirited personality, Hepburn was a leading lady in Hollywood for more than 60 years. She appeared in a range of genres, from screwball comedy to literary drama, and she received four Academy Awards for Best Actress—a record for any performer. In 1999, Hepburn was named by the American Film Institute as the greatest female star of Classic Hollywood Cinema..."
1611 Hiett, Helen (NBC News Correspondent): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of NBC Radio News correspondent Helen Hiett (arriving in NYC aboard the S.S. Exeter - circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for an NBC photo assignment). According to the Smith College (Northampton, Ma) web site: "Helen Hiett was born in Chenoa, Illinois, 1913. After graduating from the University of Chicago in 1934, she lived in Europe where she studied at the League of Nations in Geneva and edited a monthly review for the Graduate Institute of International Affairs. In 1937 she lived in a girls' labor camp in Germany, studying Nazi indoctrination methods. She was a foreign correspondent for NBC during World War II in France, Spain and Gibraltar, the first outsider to broadcast from the Spanish Civil War. She continued her career as a foreign correspondent for NBC after returning to the U.S., from 1941 to 1944; and was a war correspondent from 1944 to 1945 in Italy, Germany and Austria. After the war she was director of the New York Herald Tribune Forum, from 1945 to 1961. She published No Matter Where (1944) based on her experiences in Europe. She married Theodore Waller in 1948; they had 3 children. Helen Hiett Waller died in 1961."
1612 Ives, Burl (Folksinger/actor): Four (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of actor and folksinger Burl Ives (entertaining at his NYC apartment with George Kleinsinger, Charles Driscoll, Jane Malver, Mrs. Joseph Darion, Marge Samuel, Joseph Darion, Eddie Albert, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. And Mrs. Burl Ives" - October 1949). According to Wikipedia: "Burl Ives (June 14, 1909 - April 14, 1995) was an American folk singer and actor of stage, screen, radio and television. He began as an itinerant singer and banjoist, and launched his own radio show, The Wayfaring Stranger, which popularized traditional folk songs. In 1942, he appeared in Irving Berlin's This Is the Army, and then became a major star of CBS radio. In the 1960s, he successfully crossed over into country music, recording hits such as 'A Little Bitty Tear' and 'Funny Way of Laughing.' A popular film actor through the late 1940s and 1950s, Ives's best-known roles in that medium included parts in So Dear to My Heart and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, as well as Rufus Hannassey in The Big Country, for which he won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor..."
1613 Janney, Leon (Actor): Seven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and two 10 x 11 inch (black and white) photographs of radio actor Leon Janney (at work, with radio announcer, John Griggs and golfing) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Junior in a Hurry" - circa 1949). According to the IMBd web site: "Leon Janney was born on April 1, 1917 in Ogden, Utah, USA as Leon Ramon. He was an actor, known for Another World (1964), Charly (1968) and The Wind (1928). He was married to Dorothy and Jessica Pepper. He died on October 28, 1980 in Guadalajara, Mexico."
1614 Karloff, Boris (Film/stage actor): One 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of film and stage star Boris Karloff (sipping a soda backstage at a theatre in Baltimore, MD during a tour of ARSENIC AND OLD LACE - December 28, 1940) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Boris Karloff...was widely known for his roles in horror films, particularly for his portrayal of Frankenstein's monster in Frankenstein (1931), Bride of Frankenstein (1935), and Son of Frankenstein (1939), which resulted in his immense popularity. His best-known non-horror role is as the Grinch, as well as the narrator, in the animated television special of Dr. Seuss's How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1966). He also had a memorable role in the original Scarface (1932). For his contribution to film and television, Boris Karloff was awarded two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame..."
1615 Kazan,Elia (Stage and film director): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet of director Elia Kazan (with actress Jessica Tandy and others - circa 1948-49) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Elia Kazan (September 7, 1909 - September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American director, producer, writer and actor, described by The New York Times as 'one of the most honored and influential directors in Broadway and Hollywood history."
1616 Kibbee, Guy (Stage and film actor): One 9 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph of character actor Guy Kibbee (bald man with flowered tie - playing cards with "Smith and Dale," and others, at The Lambs Club in NYC - 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Guy Kibbee was born in El Paso, Texas and began his entertainment career on Mississippi riverboats. He eventually became a successful Broadway actor. In the 1930s, Kibbee moved to California and became part of 'Warner Bros.' stock company,' contracted actors who cycled through different productions in supporting roles. Kibbee's specialty was daft and jovial characters, and he is perhaps best remembered for the films 42nd Street (1933), Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933), Captain Blood (1935), and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), though he also played the expat inn owner in Joan Crawford's Rain (1932). He is also remembered for his performance as Mr. Webb, editor of the Grover's Corners, New Hampshire newspaper, and father of Emily Webb, played by Martha Scott, in the film version of the classic Thornton Wilder play Our Town. Kibbee died from complications arising from Parkinson's disease in Long Island, New York in 1956. His younger brother was actor Milton Kibbee..."
1617 Kyser, Kay (Big Band leader): Four (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of band leader Kay Kyser (with comedy musician "Ish Kabibble" and soldiers on the "Kollege of Musical Knowledge" during World War II) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to the All Music web site: "Kay Kyser couldn't read a note of music, and spent nearly as much time doing comedy as music on radio. But for over 15 years, from 1933 until the end of the 1940s, he was one of the most popular bandleaders and music personalities in America, and delighted tens of millions of listeners. Born into a family of academics, Kyser was supposed to pursue a career in law, but abandoned this after he took over the campus band at his college from its leader, Hal Kemp. He became so popular as a personality that he was on the road by the time he graduated. In order to compensate for his lack of musical training, he hired arranger/composer George Duning (later the author of film scores for movies such as Picnic), a graduate of the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music. Kyser and his band became nationally known following a series of radio broadcasts from the Miramar Hotel in Santa Monica -- a group of gimmicks, such as having the vocalist sing the titles of the songs to be performed, interrupting a chorus for the band's theme, "Thinking of You," and announcing the singer's name, made his group stand out on the radio, and an engagement at the Blackhawk Restaurant in Chicago made Kyser a star. His radio show, Kay Kyser's Kollege of Musical Knowledge, ran for 11 years, mixing comic quiz questions with swing music, ballads, and novelty tunes; Kyser presided over it all dressed in an academic gown complete with mortarboard, presenting an easygoing Southern personality and comic manner. He was so popular that RKO signed him up for a series of films, starting with That's Right, You're Wrong, playing himself. He made one movie for MGM in 1944, Swing Fever, which was an unsuccessful attempt to cast Kyser in a Harold Lloyd mold. Kyser's featured vocalist during much of the late '30s and early '40s was Ginny Simms, who was succeeded by Gloria Wood, Julie Conway, Trudy Erwin, and Georgia Carroll ('There Goes That Song Again'), the latter a singer and former John Robert Powers model whom Kyser married. The other featured personality was Merwyn Bogue, who was known on the air as Ish Kabibble, who handled the novelty numbers. Kyser's hits, for Brunswick during most of the 1930s and Columbia after 1939, included 'You, You Darlin',' 'Playmates,' 'With the Wind and the Rain in Your Hair,' 'Friendship,' 'Tennessee Fish Fry,' 'The White Cliffs of Dover,' and 'Old Buttermilk Sky.' During World War II, Kyser and his band endeared themselves to millions of listeners and servicemen by appearing at over 1,800 military installations in USO shows, in addition to their regular appearances on radio. Although the emphasis was on comedy, the band was recognized as a capable swing jazz outfit. The radio show was canceled in 1949, and Kyser retired the following year. He declined to participate with his former bandmembers in the making of the 1962 Capitol album Kyser Hits in Hi-Fi, which featured comedian Stan Freberg imitating Kyser's spoken song introductions. During the rest of his life, he spent time as a traveling lecturer on Christian Science, an area in which he was a true scholar." .
1618 Lahr, Bert (Stage and film comedian): One 9 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph of comedian Bert Lahr (dining at The Lambs Club in NYC - 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo shoot). According to Wikipedia: "Bert Lahr, born Irving Lahrheim (August 13, 1895 - December 4, 1967), was an American iconic actor, particularly of stage and film and comedian. Lahr is principally known for his role as the Cowardly Lion, as well as his counterpart Kansas farmworker Zeke, in The Wizard of Oz (1939). He was well known for his explosive humor, but also adapted well to dramatic roles and his work in burlesque, vaudeville, and on Broadway..."
1619 Lastfogal, Abe (Show business agent): Two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of show business agent (talking with a soldier on a USO tour - 1945) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Abraham Isaac "Abe" Lastfogel (May 17, 1898 - August 27, 1984) was one of the first employees and a long-time President of the William Morris Agency, a large diversified talent agency...During World War II, Lastfogel served as President of the USO-Camp Shows, which produced wartime entertainment events featuring more than 7,000 performers—including Humphrey Bogart, James Cagney, Gary Cooper, Bing Crosby, Dinah Shore and James Stewart—seen by audiences of soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines around the world estimated to total two hundred million..."
1620 Lawrence, Gertrude (Stage Actress/Singer): Six 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheets and one 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of actress Gertrude Lawrence (with her producer -husband Richard Aldrich and guests Joan Bennett, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, et cetera at her NYC apartment - 1950) by Martin Harris (for A CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Richard Aldrich" - April 5, 1950). According to Encyclopedia Britannica: "Gertrude Lawrence, original name Gertrud Alexandra Dagma Lawrence Klasen (born July 4, 1898, London, Eng.—died Sept. 6, 1952, New York, N.Y., U.S.) English actress noted for her performances in Noël Coward's sophisticated comedies and in musicals. Lawrence was the daughter of music hall performers, and from an early age she was trained to follow their career. She made her stage debut in December 1908 in a pantomime Dick Whittington in Brixton. Subsequently she appeared in Babes in the Wood (1910) and other musicals and plays, and for a time she toured in minor revues. In 1916 she began appearing in André Charlot's intimate revues in London, and two years later she stepped into the lead when Beatrice Lillie fell ill. She appeared with Coward, whom she had known for 10 years, in his London Calling (1923) and in January 1924 made her New York debut as one of the stars of Charlot's Revue, with Lillie and Jack Buchanan. In 1926 she starred in George and Ira Gershwin's Oh Kay!, which moved to London the next year, and in 1928 in their Treasure Girl. In the latter year she played her first straight dramatic role in Icebound in London. Lawrence's greatest role was in Coward's Private Lives, written with her in mind, in which she opened opposite the author at the Phoenix Theatre, London, in September 1930. Both the play and the stars set the tone that would characterize comedies of manners for a decade or more: sophistication, brittle wit, and chic. Perhaps Lawrence's greatest triumph was as Liza Elliot in the Moss Hart-Kurt Weill musical Lady in the Dark (1941). Throughout her career, her singing and dancing, both accomplished but not exceptional, merely supported her compelling stage presence, what Coward called her 'star quality.' On the strength of it she remained for a quarter-century one of the most popular stars on the American and British stages. She spent the years following her 1940 marriage to Richard Aldrich, an American producer, in the United States. In 1945 she published an autobiography, A Star Danced. In March 1951 she opened on Broadway in Rodgers and Hammerstein's The King and I, during the run of which she died."
1621 Le Gallienne, Eva (Stage Actress): One 10 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph of actress Eva Le Gallienne (painting in her library - circa 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to her biography (by Gary Brumburgh) on the IMDb web site: "Legendary stage actress Eva Le Gallienne's life began just as grandly as the daughter of poet Richard Le Gallienne. Sarah Bernhardt was her idol growing up and, at age 18, was brought to New York by her mother. Making her London debut with 'Monna Vanna' in 1914, she proved a star in every sense of the word. She appeared on Broadway first in 'Liliom' in 1921 and lastly at the Biltmore Theatre in 1981 with 'To Grandmother's House We Go,' which won her a Tony nomination at age 82. Noted for her extreme boldness and idealism, she became a director and muse for theatre's top playwrights, a foremost translator of Henrik Ibsen, and a founder of the civic repertory movement in America. A respected stage coach, director, producer and manager over her six decades, Ms. Le Gallienne consciously devoted herself to the Art of the Theatre as opposed to the Show Business of Broadway and dedicated herself to upgrading the quality of the stage. She ran the Civic Repertory Theatre Company for 10 years (1926-1936), producing 37 plays during that time. She managed Broadway's 1100-seat Civic Repertory Theatre (more popularly known as The 14th Street Theatre) at 107 14th Street from 1926-32, which was home to her company whose actors included herself, J. Edward Bromberg, Paul Leyssac, Florida Friebus, and Leona Roberts. Her gallery of theatre portrayals would include everything from Peter Pan to Hamlet. Sadly, she almost completely avoided film and TV during her lengthy career. However, toward the end of her life, she did appear in a marvelous 1977 stage version of 'The Royal Family' on TV and rendered a quietly touching performance as Ellen Burstyn's grandmother in Resurrection (1980), for which she received an Oscar nomination."
1622 Lee, Gypsy Rose (Burlesque entertainer): Five (black and white) proof sheets and one 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of burlesque legend Gypsy Rose Lee (at work and promoting the "March of Dimes" - May 1940) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Gypsy Rose Lee (January 8, 1911 - April 26, 1970) was an American burlesque entertainer famous for her striptease act. She was also an actress, author, and playwright whose 1957 memoir was made into the stage musical and film Gypsy..."
1623 Loren, Sophia (Film actress): Four (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and six (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of actress Sophia Loren (with film director Vittorio De Sica, in Italy, filming SCANDAL IN SORRENTO aka BREAD, LOVE AND LADY SOPHIA - 1955) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Sophia in Sorrento" - September 16, 1955). According to Wikipedia: "Sophia Loren...is an Italian film actress. Encouraged to enroll in acting lessons after entering a beauty pageant, Loren began her film career in 1950 at age 15. She appeared in several bit parts and minor roles in the early part of the decade, until her five-picture contract with Paramount in 1956 launched her international career. Notable film appearances around this time include The Pride and the Passion, Houseboat, and It Started in Naples. Her talents as an actress were not recognized until her performance as Cesira in Vittorio De Sica's Two Women; Loren's performance earned her the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1962 and made her the first artist to win an Oscar for a foreign-language performance. She holds the record for having earned six David di Donatello Awards for Best Actress, the most ever received: Two Women; Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow; Marriage Italian Style (for which she was nominated for a second Oscar); Sunflower; The Voyage; and A Special Day. After starting her family in the early 1970s, Loren spent less time on her acting career and chose to make only occasional film appearances. In later years, she has appeared in American films such as Grumpier Old Men and Nine. Aside from the Academy Award, she has won a Grammy Award, five special Golden Globes, a BAFTA Award, a Laurel Award, the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival, and the Honorary Academy Award in 1991. In 1995, she received the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievements, one of many such awards. In 1999, Loren was acknowledged as one of the top 25 female American Screen Legends in the American Film Institute's survey, AFI's 100 Years...100 Stars..."
1624 Lowe, Edmund (Film actor): One 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photograph of film actor Edmund Lowe (in apron, with actress Fifi D'Orsay and a soldier at the Hollywood Canteen - October 1942) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Edmund Dantes Lowe (March 3, 1890 - April 21, 1971) was an American actor. His formative experience began in vaudeville and silent film. He was born in San Jose, California. His father was a local judge. His childhood home was at 314 North 1st Street, San Jose. He attended Santa Clara College and entertained the idea of becoming a priest before starting his acting career. He died in Woodland Hills, California of lung cancer...Edmund Lowe's career included over 100 films in which he starred as the leading man. He is best remembered for his role as Sergeant Quirt in the 1926 movie, What Price Glory. (Lowe reprised his role from the movie in the radio program Captain Flagg and Sergeant Quirt, broadcast on the Blue Network September 28, 1941 - January 25, 1942, and on NBC February 13, 1942 - April 3, 1942. Making a smooth transition to talking pictures he remained popular but by the mid 1930s he was no longer a major star although he occasionally played leading man to the likes of Jean Harlow, Mae West, and Claudette Colbert. He remained a valuable supporting actor at the major studios while continuing in leads for such 'Poverty Row' studios as Columbia Pictures where his skills could bolster low budget productions. He also starred in 35 episodes of the 1950s television show, Front Page Detective and appeared as the elderly lead villain in the first episode of Maverick opposite James Garner in 1957..."
1625 Lunt, Alfred (Stage Actor): Three 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs of stage actor Alfred Lunt (addressing his acting class - 1946) by Martin Harris (for a PM- NEW YORK photo assignment - "Alfred Lunt Teaches Acting to Ex-GI'S" - October 3, 1946). According to Wikipedia: "Alfred Lunt (August 12, 1892 - August 3, 1977) was an American stage director and actor, often identified for a long-time professional partnership with his wife, actress Lynn Fontanne. Broadway's Lunt-Fontanne Theatre was named for them. Lunt was one of 20th century Broadway's leading male stars..."
1626 McKenna, Siobhan (Stage actress): Six (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of stage actress Siobham McKenna (in the RCA studios in NYC recording the play ST.JOAN - 1956) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Siobhán McKenna...was an Irish stage and screen actress...She is remembered for her English language performances at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin where she would eventually star in what many consider her finest role in the George Bernard Shaw play, Saint Joan. While performing at the Abbey Theatre in the 1940s, she met actor Denis O'Dea, whom she married in 1946. Until 1970 they lived in Richmond Street South, Dublin. They had one child, a son: Donnacha O'Dea, who swam for Ireland at the 1968 Summer Olympics and later won a World Series of Poker bracelet in 1998. In 1947, she made her debut on the London stage and on Broadway in 1955 in The Chalk Garden for which she would receive a Tony Award nomination for 'Best Actress in a Leading Role, Drama.' In 1956, she appeared in the Cambridge Drama Festival production of Saint Joan at the Off-Broadway Phoenix Theatre. Theatre critic Elliot Norton called her performance the finest portrayal of Joan in memory. Siobhán McKenna's popularity earned her the cover of Life magazine. She received a second Tony Best Actress nomination for her role in the 1958 play, The Rope Dancers in which she starred with Art Carney and Joan Blondell. Although primarily a stage actress, McKenna appeared in a number of made-for-television films and dramas. She also acted in several motion pictures including 1961's King of Kings, starring in the role of the Virgin Mary. In 1964, she performed in Of Human Bondage and the following year in Doctor Zhivago. McKenna was awarded the Gold Medal of the Éire Society of Boston, for having 'significantly fulfilled the ideals of the Éire Society, in particular, spreading awareness of the cultural achievements of the Irish people.'.
1627 McMahon, Horace (Stage and film actor): One 10 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph of actor Horace McMahon (closest on left, with others at The Lambs Club in NYC - 1950) by Martin Harris (for a SATURDAY EVENING POST photo assignment - "All-Star Hangout" with text by Maurice Zolotov - April 22, 1950) according to the Find-a-Grave web site: "Actor. Bull-necked, gravel-voiced character actor who was one of Hollywood's favorite heavies. After several years as a bit player and a starring role on Broadway, he went west to further his career. He was soon typecast as a mobster; a bread-and-butter persona that he relished in many of his 135 films. 'I was a jailbird,' he said, 'behind bars so often that Western Costume Company had a Horace McMahon tag sewn into a convict's striped suit.' In 1949 he exchanged his film prison number for a badge number, returning to the stage as Lieutenant Monoghan in 'Detective Story.' Finding his new image as the hard-boiled cop equally remunerative, he later became the grumbling police lieutenant who ran New York's 65th precinct detective squad on the long-lived ABC series 'Naked City.' "
1628 Meredith, Burgess (Stage and film actor): Three (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of actor Burgess Meredith (arriving at a function in the 1930s and in uniform during World War II) by Martin Harris (for various publications including STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Oliver Burgess Meredith (November 16, 1907 - September 9, 1997), known professionally as Burgess Meredith, was an American actor, director, producer, and writer in theater, film, and television. Active for more than six decades, Meredith has been called 'a virtuosic actor' and 'one of the most accomplished actors of the century.' A life member of the Actors Studio by invitation, he won several Emmys, was the first male actor to win the Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actor twice, and was nominated for two Academy Awards. Meredith was known later in his career for his appearances on The Twilight Zone, portraying arch-villain The Penguin on the 1960s TV series Batman, and boxing trainer Mickey Goldmill in the Rocky film series. 'Although those performances renewed his popularity,' observed Mel Gussow in The New York Times, 'they represented only a small part of a richly varied career in which he played many of the more demanding roles in classical and contemporary theater—in plays by Shakespeare, O'Neill, Beckett and others...'.
1629 Miller, Arthur (Playwright): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and eight (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of playwright Arthur Miller (with his wife and family, actor Lee J. Cobb, director Elia Kazan, et cetera - circa 1949) by Martin Harris for various publications photo assignments - CUE MAGAZINE and COLLIER'S MAGAZINE). According to Wikipedia: "Arthur Asher Miller (October 17, 1915 - February 10, 2005) was an American playwright, essayist, and prominent figure in twentieth-century American theatre. Among his most popular plays are All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953) and A View from the Bridge (1955, revised 1956). He also wrote several screenplays and was most noted for his work on The Misfits (1961). The drama Death of a Salesman is often numbered on the short list of finest American plays in the 20th century alongside Long Day's Journey into Night and A Streetcar Named Desire. Miller was often in the public eye, particularly during the late 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s. During this time, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama; testified before the House Un-American Activities Committee; and was married to Marilyn Monroe. In 1980, Miller received the St. Louis Literary Award from the Saint Louis University Library Associates. He received the Prince of Asturias Award and the Praemium Imperiale prize in 2002 and the Jerusalem Prize in 2003, as well as the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Lifetime Achievement Award..."
171 Miller, Mitch (Record producer/TV performer: Eighteen (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes), twenty-one 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs and five (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of record producer and television personality Mitch Miller (with his Columbia Records staff and singer Johnnie Ray, et cetera - 1952) by Martin Harris (for two BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE photo assignments - "Miller Nurses the Talent" and "Mitch Miller Listening for Columbia" - October 18, 1952). According to Wikipedia" "Mitchell William 'Mitch' Miller (July 4, 1911 - July 31, 2010) was an American oboist, conductor, recording producer and recording industry executive. He was involved in almost all aspects of the industry, particularly as a conductor, and AandR (artist and repertoire) man. Miller was one of the most influential people in American popular music during the 1950s and early 1960s, both as the head of AandR at Columbia Records and as a best-selling recording artist with an NBC television series, Sing Along with Mitch. A graduate of the Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester in the early 1930s, Miller began his musical career as an accomplished player of the oboe and English horn, making numerous highly regarded classical and popular recordings, but he is best remembered as a choral conductor on television and as a recordings executive..."
172 Monroe, Marilyn (Film actress): One 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of film star Marilyn Monroe (with actor Tom Ewell at the famous NYC photo shoot for THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH - 1955) by Martin Harris (one of the multitude of photographers present at this nighttime publicity photo shoot - for an unidentified publication). According to Wikipedia: "Marilyn Monroe...was an American actress and model. Famous for playing 'dumb blonde' characters, she became one of the most popular sex symbols of the 1950s, emblematic of the era's attitudes towards sexuality. Although she was a top-billed actress for only a decade, her films grossed $200 million by the time of her unexpected death in 1962. She continues to be considered a major popular culture icon..."
173 Morgan, Ralph (Film actor): One 10 x 13.5 inch (black and white) photograph of film actor Ralph Morgan (with actor Edward Arnold, actress Tallulah Bankhead and others at an American Federation of Labor meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey - 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Ralph Morgan was a Hollywood stage and film character actor, and an older brother of Frank Morgan (who played the title role in The Wizard of Oz, 1939)...His first role on the stage came in The Bachelor in 1909 and later played John Marvin in the 1918 hit play, Lightnin' . Ralph Morgan made his film debut in silent films in 1915, appearing in several production made on the East Coast. In the early talkie era, he played such leading roles in such productions as Strange Interlude in 1932 and Rasputin and the Empress also in 1932.He later settled into secondary character parts. His quiet, dignified demeanor on screen was often employed for murder mysteries in which, more often than not, he would play what is known as a 'heavy,' being exposed in the last reel as the killer. One of his memorable roles was in the 1942 serial Gang Busters, in which he played a brilliant surgeon turned master criminal. Morgan later worked in both radio and television, frequently in religious dramas filmed for Family Theater. Among his off-camera activities, he, alongside Grant Mitchell, Berton Churchill, Charles Miller, Alden Gay, and Kenneth Thomson, formed the Screen Actors Guild to resolve and stop most of the injustice that actors faced within the industry (among which, were prolonged work hours enforced by the studios and the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences' membership policy, which was exclusively by invitation). He was also a founder, charter member, and the first president of SAG in 1933, and he was elected to two additional one-year terms in 1938 and 1939, serving until 1940..."
174 Morris, Wayne (Film actor): One 10 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph of actor Wayne Morris (blonde man in striped suit, standing against the wall, at left - with Edward Arnold - in white pants - and Mischa Auer - leaning over in center of photo - at an American Federation of Labor meeting in Atlantic City, NJ - 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the Find -A - Grave web site: "After a short stint as a forest ranger this blond haired boyish looking Californian returned to his native Los Angeles where he studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse. It was there that he was discovered by a talent scout that led to him becoming one of America's most famous cowboy actors. In 1937 he played the title role in the boxing movie 'Kid Galahad' and had the second lead in his first western 'Beyond the Law.' In 1940 he learned to fly in preparation for his role in 'Flight Angels.' With the threat of World War II looming, his new interest in flying led him to seek military pilot training in the US Naval Reserves. In 1942 he was sent to the Pacific where he gained a reputation as a courageous and tenacious F6F Hellcat pilot. He flew on fifty-seven missions, shot down seven enemy planes and aided in the sinking of five ships. He was awarded four Distinguished Flying Crosses and two Air Medals. After the war he returned to Hollywood where he struggled to reach the level of stardom he once held. He settled into playing roles in mostly low budget Westerns. In 1957 he played the role of the cowardly Lieutenant Roget in 'Paths of Glory.' Critics believed this role would give his career a big boost, but unfortunately he died of a heart attack shortly thereafter."
175 Mostel, Zero (Stage and film actor): Eighteen (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes), four 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs and two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of nightclub, stage and film star Zero Mostel (at Downtown Café Society in NYC, in Central Park, in a recording studio, painting in his studio and, with Gene Wilder, filming THE PRODUCERS) by Martin Harris (for various unidentified publications from 1942 to 67). According to Wikipedia: "Samuel Joel 'Zero' Mostel (February 28, 1915 - September 8, 1977) was an American actor and comedian of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of comic characters such as Tevye on stage in Fiddler on the Roof, Pseudolus on stage and on screen in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, and Max Bialystock in the original film version of The Producers. Mostel was a student of Don Richardson, using an acting technique based on muscle memory. He was blacklisted during the 1950s, and his testimony before the House Committee on Un-American Activities was well-publicized. He was an Obie Award and three-time Tony Award winner..."
176 Muni, Paul (Stage and film actor): One 10 .5 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph of actor Paul Muni (speaking at an unidentified Madison Square Garden political rally in NYC - c. WWII) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Paul Muni (September 22, 1895 - August 25, 1967) was an American stage and film actor who was born in Lemberg (Galicia, Austro-Hungarian Empire) and grew up in Chicago. He started his acting career in the Yiddish theatre. During the 1930s, he was considered one of the most prestigious actors at Warner Brothers studios, and was given the rare privilege of choosing which parts he wanted. His acting quality, usually playing a powerful character, such as the lead in Scarface (1932), was partly a result of his intense preparation for his parts, often immersing himself in study of the real character's traits and mannerisms. He was also highly skilled in using makeup techniques, a talent he learned from his parents, who were also actors, and from his early years on stage with the Yiddish Theater in Chicago. At the age of 12, he played the stage role of an 80-year-old man; in one of his films, Seven Faces, he played seven different characters. He made 25 films and won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his role in the 1936 film The Story of Louis Pasteur. He also starred in numerous Broadway plays and won the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play for his role in the 1955 production of Inherit the Wind..."
177 Murray, Arthur (Dance instructor/TV personality): Nine (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and three 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs of dance instructor Arthur Murray (in his NYC apartment, with his wife and dance partner, Kathryn Murray entertaining guests - Bert Parks, Dan Seymour, Henry Sell, Mary Dillon, et cetera - 1950) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Murray - January 7, 1950). According to Wikipedia: "Arthur Murray (April 4, 1895 - March 3, 1991) was an American dance instructor and businessman, whose name is most often associated with the dance studio chain that bears his name. His pupils included Eleanor Roosevelt, the Duke of Windsor, John D. Rockefeller Jr., Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney, Barbara Hutton, Elizabeth Arden, Manuel L. Quezon, and Jack Dempsey. Television evangelist D. James Kennedy and Little House on the Prairie actress Katherine MacGregor were instructors of Murray's technique. Arthur Murray was inducted into the National Museum of Dance's Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney Hall of Fame in 2007..."
178 Presley, Elvis (Singer/Musician): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet of the "King of Rock and Roll" Elvis Presley (rehearsing for THE STEVE ALLEN SHOW - NBC -TV - with Steve Allen, Andy Griffith, Imogene Coca, Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme - January 29, 1956) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). The proof sheet includes the infamous images of Elvis, in white tie and tails, singing "Hound Dog" to a hound dog. According to Wikipedia: "Elvis Aaron Presley (January 8, 1935 - August 16, 1977) was an American musician and actor. Regarded as one of the most significant cultural icons of the 20th century, he is often referred to as 'the King of Rock and Roll,' or simply, 'the King,' "
179 Murrow, Edward R. (CBS News Reporter/Commentator): Twenty -six (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of CBS News correspondent Edward R. Murrow (at home with his wife and family and at work with colleagues William S. Paley, Richard Hottelet, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Murrow Sticks to the News" - 1949). According to Wikipedia: "Edward R. Murrow (April 25, 1908 - April 27, 1965) was an American broadcast journalist. He was generally referred to as Ed Murrow. He first came to prominence with a series of radio broadcasts for the news division of the Columbia Broadcasting System during World War II, which were followed by millions of listeners in the United States. During the war he assembled a team of foreign correspondents who came to be known as the Murrow Boys. A pioneer of television news broadcasting, Murrow produced a series of reports that helped lead to the censure of Senator Joseph McCarthy. Fellow journalists Eric Sevareid, Ed Bliss, Bill Downs, Dan Rather, and Alexander Kendrick consider Murrow one of journalism's greatest figures, noting his honesty and integrity in delivering the news..."
1710 Peck, Gregory (Film actor): One 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of film star Gregory Peck (sitting in an office - c. late 1950s/early 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication phot assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Eldred Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 - June 12, 2003) was an American actor who was one of the most popular film stars from the 1940s to the 1960s. Peck continued to play major film roles until the late 1980s. His performance as Atticus Finch in the 1962 film To Kill a Mockingbird earned him the Academy Award for Best Actor. He had also been nominated for an Oscar for the same category for The Keys of the Kingdom (1944), The Yearling (1946), Gentleman's Agreement (1947) and Twelve O'Clock High (1949). Other notable films he appeared in include Spellbound (1945), The Paradine Case (1947), The World in His Arms (1952), Roman Holiday (1953), Moby Dick (1956, and its 1998 miniseries), The Guns of Navarone (1961), Cape Fear (1962, and its 1991 remake), How the West Was Won (1962), The Omen (1976) and The Boys from Brazil (1978)..."
1711 Perelman, S. J. (Screenwriter): One 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of screenwriter S. J. Perelman (with an unidentified woman - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment).to Wikipedia: "Sidney Joseph Perelman (February 1, 1904 - October 17, 1979), known as S. J. Perelman, was an American humorist, author, and screenwriter. He is best known for his humorous short pieces written over many years for The New Yorker. He also wrote for several other magazines, including Judge, as well as books, scripts, and screenplays. Perelman received an Academy Award for screenwriting for AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS in 1956..."
1712 Perkins, Anthony (Film actor): Three 3.5 x 4.5 inch (black and white) Polaroid snapshots of actor Anthony Perkins (with actress Tuesday Weld and others on the set of PRETTY POISON - 1968) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo project). According to Wikipedia "Anthony Perkins (April 4, 1932 - September 12, 1992) was an American actor and singer. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his second film, Friendly Persuasion, but is best known for playing Norman Bates in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho and its three sequels. His other films include The Trial, Phaedra, Fear Strikes Out, Tall Story, The Matchmaker, Pretty Poison, North Sea Hijack, Five Miles to Midnight, The Black Hole, Murder on the Orient Express, Mahogany, and Crimes of Passion..."
1713 Ray, Johnnie (Singer/recording artist): Five (black and white) proof sheets and eleven (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of singing sensation Johnnie Ray (with record producer Mitch Miller and others in the Columbia recording studios - 1952) by Martin Harris (for a BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Miller Nurses the Talent" - October 18, 1952). According to Wikipedia: "John Alvin 'Johnnie' Ray (January 10, 1927 - February 24, 1990) was an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. Extremely popular for most of the 1950s, Ray has been cited by critics as a major precursor of what would become rock and roll, for his jazz and blues-influenced music and his animated stage personality. Tony Bennett credits Ray as being the true father of rock and roll. British Hit Singles and Albums noted that Ray was 'a sensation in the 1950s, the heart-wrenching vocal delivery of 'Cry' ... influenced many acts including Elvis and was the prime target for teen hysteria in the pre-Presley days.' In 1952, Ray rose very quickly from obscurity to stardom in the United States. He became a major star in the United Kingdom by performing and releasing recordings there in 1953 and shared billing there with many acts including Frank Holder. He matched these achievements in Australia the following year. His career in his native United States began to decline in the late 1950s, and his American record label dropped him in 1960. He never regained a strong following there and very rarely appeared on American television after 1973. His fan base in other countries, however, remained strong until his last year of performing, which was 1989. His recordings never stopped selling outside the United States..."
181 Robeson, Paul (Singer/actor): Two 6 x 9 inch (black and white) proof sheets of singer and actor Paul Robeson (in uniform - entertaining at the Hollywood Canteen - circa 1942) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Paul Leroy Robeson (April 9, 1898 - January 23, 1976) was an American bass singer and actor who became involved with the Civil Rights Movement. At Rutgers College, he was an outstanding American football player, and then had an international career in singing, with a distinctive, powerful, deep bass voice, as well as acting in theater and movies. He became politically involved in response to the Spanish Civil War, fascism, and social injustices. His advocacy of anti-imperialism, affiliation with communism, and criticism of the United States government caused him to be blacklisted during the McCarthy era. Ill health forced him into retirement from his career..."
182 Robinson, Bill (Dancer/actor) : Two (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of dance legend Bill "Bojangles" Robinson (with NYC Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia and city planner Robert Moses at Colonial Park in NYC - circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Bill "Bojangles" Robinson (May 25, 1878 - November 25, 1949) was an American tap dancer and actor, the best known and most highly paid African American entertainer in the first half of the twentieth century. His long career mirrored changes in American entertainment tastes and technology, starting in the age of minstrel shows, moving to vaudeville, Broadway, the recording industry, Hollywood radio, and television. According to dance critic Marshall Stearns, 'Robinson's contribution to tap dance is exact and specific. He brought it up on its toes, dancing upright and swinging, giving tap a ...hitherto-unknown lightness and presence.' His signature routine was the stair dance, in which Robinson would tap up and down a set of stairs in a rhythmically complex sequence of steps, a routine that he unsuccessfully attempted to patent. Robinson is also credited with having introduced a new word, copacetic, into popular culture, via his repeated use of it in vaudeville and radio appearances..."
183 Rodgers, Richard (Composer): Five (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and one 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of composer Richard Rodgers (at work in his office and with his wife, Dorothy, at home - 1950) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rodgers" - May 6, 1950). According to Wikipedia: "Richard Charles Rodgers (June 28, 1902 - December 30, 1979) was an American composer of music for more than 900 songs and for 43 Broadway musicals. He also composed music for films and television. He is best known for his songwriting partnerships with the lyricists Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. His compositions have had a significant impact on popular music up to the present day, and have an enduring broad appeal. Rodgers was the first person to win what are considered the top show business awards in television, recording, movies and Broadway—an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar, and a Tony—now known collectively as an EGOT. He has also won a Pulitzer Prize, making him one of two people (Marvin Hamlisch is the other) to receive each award..."
184 Savo, Jimmy (Vaudeville/nightclub comedian): Three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of nightclub and vaudeville performer Jimmy Savo (at "Café Society Uptown" nightclub - May 9, 1943) by Martin Harris (for PM-NEW YORK - July 22, 1943). According to the American Vaudeville Museum web site: "Savo was one of the top comics of vaudeville and the Broadway stage. Charlie Chaplin called him the 'best pantomimist in the world.' Like W.C. Fields, who inspired him, and Fred Allen, Savo began as a juggler and later added comedy, singing and magic to his act. Two of his most remembered songs were 'River Stay 'Way from My Door' and '(You Get No Bread with) One Meat Ball.' "
185 Skinner, Cornelia Otis (Actress/author): Fifteen (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and three 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs of actress Cornelia Otis Skinner (with her husband, son and her son's friend at home in her NYC apartment circa 1949) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Alden S. Blodget"). According to Wikipedia: "Cornelia Otis Skinner...was the daughter of the actor Otis Skinner and his wife, Maud Durbin. After attending the all-girls' Baldwin School and Bryn Mawr College (1918-1919) and studying theatre at the Sorbonne in Paris, she began her career on the stage in 1921. She appeared in several plays before embarking on a tour of the United States from 1926 to 1929 in a one-woman performance of short character sketches she herself wrote. She wrote numerous short humorous pieces for publications like The New Yorker. These pieces were eventually compiled into a series of books, including Nuts in May, Dithers and Jitters, Excuse It Please!, and The Ape in Me, among others. In a 'comprehensive study' of Skinner's work, G. Bruce Loganbill (1961) refers to Skinner's scripts as 'monologue-dramas,' which were extensions of the 'linked monologues' developed by Ruth Draper. Skinner's work differed in structure and content however, creating and performing full-length monologue-dramas that were based on the lives of historical figures. Such work was a 'unique' and important contribution to the one-person show in America. With Emily Kimbrough, she wrote Our Hearts Were Young and Gay, a light-hearted description of their European tour after college. Kimbrough and Skinner went to Hollywood to act as consultants on the film version of the book, which resulted in the film of the same name and starred Gail Russell playing Skinner. Skinner was portrayed by Bethel Leslie replaced by Gloria Stroock in the short-lived 1950 television series The Girls, based upon Our Hearts Were Young and Gay. In 1952, her one-woman show Paris '90 (music and lyrics by Kay Swift) premiered on Broadway. An original cast recording was produced by Goddard Lieberson for Columbia Records, now available on compact disc. In later years Skinner wrote Madame Sarah (a biography of Sarah Bernhardt) and Elegant Wits and Grand Horizontals about the Belle Epoque. She appeared with Orson Welles on The Campbell Playhouse radio play of The Things We Have on May 26, 1939. In a 1944 conversation with Victor Borge, Skinner reportedly told the Danish comedian that she decided to drop the term 'diseuse' from her act after reading in a Scottish newspaper: 'Cornelia Otis Skinner, the American disease, gave a program last night.' "
186 Stapleton, Maureen (Stage/film actress): Four (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and nineteen (color and black and white) photographs (various sizes) of actress Maureen Stapleton (with co-star Martin Balsam, director Frank Perry and other co-stars on the NYC set of the TV movie AMONG THE PATHS TO EDEN - 1967) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Maureen Stapleton (June 21, 1925 - March 13, 2006) was an American actress in film, theater and television. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for Lonelyhearts (1958), Airport (1970) and Interiors (1978), before winning for her performance as Emma Goldman in Reds (1981). She was inducted into the American Theatre Hall of Fame in 1981. Stapleton made her Broadway debut in 1946 in The Playboy of the Western World, and went on to win the 1951 Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Play for The Rose Tattoo and the 1971 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play for The Gingerbread Lady. She also won an Emmy Award for the television film Among the Paths to Eden (1967) and the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Reds. Her other film roles included Bye Bye Birdie (1963), Plaza Suite (1971), The Fan (1981), Cocoon (1985) and The Money Pit (1986)..."
187 Stewart, Paul (Actor/director/producer): One 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of actor/director Paul Stewart (at a rehearsal of SING ME NO LULLABY at the Phoenix Theatre in London - 1954) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Paul Stewart (born Paul Sternberg; March 13, 1908 - February 17, 1986) was an American character actor, director and producer who worked in theatre, radio, films and television. He frequently portrayed cynical and sinister characters throughout his lengthy career. A friend and associate of Orson Welles for many years, he helped Welles get his first job in radio and was associate producer of the celebrated radio program 'The War of the Worlds,' in which he also performed. One of the Mercury Theatre players who made their film debut in Welles's landmark film Citizen Kane, Stewart portrayed Kane's butler and valet, Raymond. He appeared in 50 films, and performed in or directed some 5,000 radio and television shows..."
188 Swanson, Gloria (Film actress) - Part 1: Three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and twenty (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of film legend Gloria Swanson (promoting her classic comeback film SUNSET BOULEVARD - 1950) by Martin Harris (for various publication photo assignments). According to Wikipedia: "Gloria May Josephine Swanson (March 27, 1899 - April 4, 1983) was an American actress and producer best known for her role as Norma Desmond, a reclusive silent film star, in the critically acclaimed 1950 film Sunset Boulevard. Swanson was also a star in the silent film era as both an actress and a fashion icon, especially under the direction of Cecil B. DeMille. She starred in dozens of silent films and was nominated for the first Academy Award in the Best Actress category. She also produced her own films, including Sadie Thompson and The Love of Sunya. In 1929, Swanson transitioned to talkies with The Trespasser. Personal problems and changing tastes saw her popularity wane during the 1930s when she moved into theater and television..."
189 Swanson, Gloria (Film actress) - Part 2: Four (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes), eight 9 x 10 inch (black and white) mounted (on cardboard) photographs and five (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of film legend Gloria Swanson (promoting her classic comeback film SUNSET BOULEVARD - 1950) by Martin Harris (for various publication photo assignments). According to Wikipedia: "Gloria May Josephine Swanson (March 27, 1899 - April 4, 1983) was an American actress and producer best known for her role as Norma Desmond, a reclusive silent film star, in the critically acclaimed 1950 film Sunset Boulevard. Swanson was also a star in the silent film era as both an actress and a fashion icon, especially under the direction of Cecil B. DeMille. She starred in dozens of silent films and was nominated for the first Academy Award in the Best Actress category. She also produced her own films, including Sadie Thompson and The Love of Sunya. In 1929, Swanson transitioned to talkies with The Trespasser. Personal problems and changing tastes saw her popularity wane during the 1930s when she moved into theater and television..."
191 Thomas, Lowell (Broadcaster/writer/adventurer): One 10 x 12 inch (black and white) photograph of broadcaster Lowell Thomas (circa 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Lowell Jackson Thomas (April 6, 1892 - August 29, 1981) was an American writer, broadcaster, and traveler, best known as the man who made Lawrence of Arabia famous...During the 1920s, Thomas was a magazine editor, but he never lost his fascination with the movies. He narrated Twentieth Century Fox's Movietone newsreels until 1952. That year, he went into business with Mike Todd and Merian C. Cooper to exploit Cinerama, a movie format that used three projectors and an enormous curved screen with 7-channel surround sound. (He produced the first movie/documentary in Cinerama: This is Cinerama, the third: Seven Wonders of the World, and the fourth: Search for Paradise) in this format in 1956, with a 1957 release date. Cinerama features were well-received, but the company discontinued the three-projector system by 1963, with the enormous costs and technical difficulties in film production and presentation, in favor of a single-camera 70mm system which lacked the visual impact of true Cinerama. A quarter-century later, Thomas was still raving about Cinerama in his memoirs and wondering why someone wasn't trying to revive it..."
192 Thompson, Virgil (Composer/critic): Two 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of composer Virgil Thompson (sitting on a wall talking with a soldier - World War II) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Virgil Thomson (November 25, 1896 - September 30, 1989) was an American composer and critic. He was instrumental in the development of the 'American Sound' in classical music. He has been described as a modernist, a neoromantic, a neoclassicist and a composer of 'an Olympian blend of humanity and detachment' whose 'expressive voice was always carefully muted' until his late opera Lord Byron which, in contrast to all his previous work, exhibited an emotional content that rises to 'moments of real passion.' "
193 Traubel, Helen (Metropolitan Opera/concert singer): Eighteen (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and nine 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs of opera singer Helen Traubel (at home, rehearsing, with opera singer Lawrence Tibbett, with major league pitcher Bucky Walters at a baseball game, at a circus, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for a SATURDAY EVENING POST photo assignment - circa 1950). According to Wikipedia: "Helen Francesca Traubel (June 16, 1899 - July 28, 1972) was an American opera and concert singer. A dramatic soprano, she was best known for her Wagnerian roles, especially those of Brünnhilde and Isolde. Born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, she began her career as a concert singer and went on to sing at the Metropolitan Opera from 1937-53. Starting in the 1950s, she also developed a career as a nightclub and cabaret singer as well as appearing in television, films and musical theatre. Traubel spent her later years in Santa Monica, California, where she died at the age of 73..."
194 Von Stroheim, Erich (Film director/producer/actor): Three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of film legend Erich von Stroheim (aboard the Queen Elizabeth ocean liner - circa 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Erich von Stroheim (September 22, 1885 - May 12, 1957) was an Austrian-American director, actor and producer, most notable as being a film star of the silent era, subsequently noted as an auteur for his directorial work..."
195 Whiteman, Paul (Bandleader): Two (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of 'The King of Jazz" Paul Whiteman (backstage at the NYC Hippodrome Theatre during the run of the Broadway production JUMBO - 1935) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication phot assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Paul Samuel Whiteman (March 28, 1890 - December 29, 1967) was an American bandleader, composer, orchestral director and violinist. Leader of one of the most popular dance bands in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s, Whiteman produced recordings that were immensely successful, and press notices often referred to him as the 'King of Jazz.' Using a large ensemble and exploring many styles of music, Whiteman is perhaps best known for his blending of symphonic music and jazz, as typified by his 1924 commissioning and debut of George Gershwin's jazz-influenced 'Rhapsody in Blue.' Later, Whiteman's work on Symphonic Jazz influenced many jazz musicians - directly or indirectly - as diverse as Miles Davis, Gil Evans, the Modern Jazz Quartet, Wynton Marsalis and other modern artists..."
196 Welles, Orson (Director/producer/writer/actor): Two (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and one 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of film, radio and stage legend Orson Welles (shaving and directing an unidentified stage production circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 - October 10, 1985) was an American actor, director, writer, and producer who worked in theatre, radio, and film. He is remembered for his innovative work in all three: in theatre, most notably Caesar (1937), a Broadway adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar; in radio, the 1938 broadcast 'The War of the Worlds,' one of the most famous in the history of radio; and in film, Citizen Kane (1941), consistently ranked as one of the all-time greatest films. Welles directed a number of high-profile stage productions for the Federal Theatre Project in his early twenties, including an innovative adaptation of Macbeth with an entirely African American cast, and the political musical The Cradle Will Rock. In 1937 he and John Houseman founded the Mercury Theatre, an independent repertory theatre company that presented an acclaimed series of productions on Broadway through 1941. Welles found national and international fame as the director and narrator of a 1938 radio adaptation of H. G. Wells' novel The War of the Worlds performed for his radio anthology series The Mercury Theatre on the Air. It reportedly caused widespread panic when listeners thought that an invasion by extraterrestrial beings was occurring. Although some contemporary sources claim these reports of panic were mostly false and overstated, they rocketed Welles to notoriety. His first film was Citizen Kane (1941), which he co-wrote, produced, directed, and starred in as Charles Foster Kane. Welles was an outsider to the studio system and directed only 13 full-length films in his career. He struggled for creative control on his projects early on with the major film studios and later in life with a variety of independent financiers, and his films were either heavily edited or remained unreleased. His distinctive directorial style featured layered and nonlinear narrative forms, innovative uses of lighting such as chiaroscuro, unusual camera angles, sound techniques borrowed from radio, deep focus shots, and long takes. He has been praised as a major creative force and as 'the ultimate auteur.' "
197 Wilder, Alec (Composer): One 9 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph of composer Alec Wilder (addressing a letter at a Post Office circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication phot assignment). According to the Alec Wilder Music and Life web site: "Alec Wilder's music is a unique blend of American musical traditions - among them jazz and the American popular song - and basic 'classical' European forms and techniques. As such, it fiercely resists all labeling. Although it often pained Alec that his music was not more widely accepted by either jazz or classical performers, undeterred, he wrote a great deal of music of remarkable originality in many forms: sonatas, suites, concertos, operas, ballets, art songs, woodwind quintets, brass quintets, jazz suites - and hundreds of popular songs..."
198 Wilder, Thornton (Playwright/novelist): One 2.25 x 2.25 inch (black and white) photograph of playwright and novelist Thornton Wilder by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo project - c. WWII). According to Wikipedia: "Thornton Niven Wilder (April 17, 1897 - December 7, 1975) was an American playwright and novelist. He won three Pulitzer Prizes—for the novel The Bridge of San Luis Rey and for the two plays Our Town and The Skin of Our Teeth — and a U.S. National Book Award for the novel The Eighth Day..."
199 Winchell, Walter (Columnist/broadcaster/actor): One 7.5 x 9.5 inch (black and white) photograph of columnist Walter Winchell (in a Navy Uniform, pictured with his daughter Walda at "The President's - FDR - Birthday Ball" - circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for a PM - NEW YORK - photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Walter Winchell (April 7, 1897 - February 20, 1972) was an American newspaper and radio gossip commentator. Winchell was born in New York City, the son of Jennie (Bakst) and Jacob Winchell, a salesman. His parents were Russian Jewish immigrants. He left school in the sixth grade and started performing in Gus Edwards's vaudeville troupe known as 'Newsboys Sextet.' He began his career in journalism by posting notes about his acting troupe on backstage bulletin boards. He joined the Vaudeville News in 1920, then left the paper for the Evening Graphic in 1924, where his column was named Mainly About Mainstreeters. He was hired on June 10, 1929 by the New York Daily Mirror where he finally became the author of the first syndicated gossip column, entitled On-Broadway. He used connections in the entertainment, social, and governmental realms to expose exciting or embarrassing information about celebrities in those industries. This caused him to become very feared as a journalist, because he would routinely affect the lives of famous or powerful people, exposing alleged information and rumors about them, using this as ammunition to attack his enemies and to blackmail influential people. He used this power, trading positive mention in his column (and later, his radio show) for more rumors and secrets. He made his radio debut over WABC in New York, a CBS affiliate, on May 12, 1930. The show entitled Saks on Broadway was a 15-minute feature that provided business news about Broadway..."
1910 Wright, Teresa (Film/stage actress): Twenty-one (black and white) proof sheets and two 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of stage and film actress Teresa Wright (at home, shopping and at dance class - 1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Teresa Wright (October 27, 1918 - March 6, 2005) was an American actress. Her first Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress nomination came in 1941 for her debut work in The Little Foxes. She received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in 1942 for her performance in Mrs. Miniver. That same year, she received an Academy Award for Best Actress nomination for her performance in Pride of the Yankees opposite Gary Cooper. She is also known for her performances in Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt (1943) and William Wyler's The Best Years of Our Lives (1946). Wright received three Emmy Award nominations for her performances in the Playhouse 90 original television version of The Miracle Worker (1957), in the Breck Sunday Showcase feature The Margaret Bourke-White Story, and in the CBS drama series Dolphin Cove (1989). She earned the acclaim of top film directors, including William Wyler, who called her the most promising actress he had directed, and Alfred Hitchcock, who admired her thorough preparation and quiet professionalism..."



PHOTOGRAPHS - PERFORMING ARTS SUBJECTS and THEATRICAL/CINEMA PRODUCTIONS

Photographs by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by subject or production title.



Box Folder
201 Amahl and the Night Visitors (NBC -TV): Five 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheets of the rehearsal for the NBC - TV production of AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS (April 15, 1952 starring Chet Allen, Rosemary Kuhlman, Andrew McKinley, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "There Were Three Kings" - December 27, 1952). According to Wikipedia: "Amahl and the Night Visitors is an opera in one act by Gian Carlo Menotti with an original English libretto by the composer. It was commissioned by NBC and first performed by the NBC Opera Theatre on December 24, 1951, in New York City at NBC studio 8H in Rockefeller Center, where it was broadcast live on television from that venue as the debut production of the Hallmark Hall of Fame. It was the first opera specifically composed for television in America. Menotti wrote Amahl with the stage in mind, even though it was intended for broadcast. 'On television you're lucky if they ever repeat anything. Writing an opera is a big effort and to give it away for one performance is stupid.' The composer appeared on-screen in the premiere to introduce the opera and give the background of the events leading up to its composition. He also brought out director Kirk Browning and conductor Thomas Schippers to thank them on-screen. Amahl was seen on 35 NBC affiliates coast to coast, the largest network hookup for an opera broadcast to that date. An estimated five million people saw the live broadcast, the largest audience ever to see a televised opera..."
202 American Federation of Labor (AFL): Six 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheets and eight (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of various performers (including Frederic March, Edward Arnold, Wayne Morris, Ralph Morgan, Henry Hull, Binnie Barnes, Mischa Auer, Lucille Gleason, Tallulah Bankhead, Katherine Hepburn, Harry Richman, et cetera) arriving and taking part in a n American Federation of Labor (AFL) meeting in Atlantic City (1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was a national federation of labor unions in the United States. It was founded in Columbus, Ohio, in May 1886 by an alliance of craft unions disaffected from the Knights of Labor, a national labor association. Samuel Gompers of the Cigar Makers' International Union was elected president of the Federation at its founding convention and was reelected every year except one until his death in 1924. The AFL was the largest union grouping in the United States for the first half of the 20th century, even after the creation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) by unions that were expelled by the AFL in 1935 over its opposition to industrial unionism. While the Federation was founded and dominated by craft unions throughout the first fifty years of its existence, many of its craft union affiliates turned to organizing on an industrial union basis to meet the challenge from the CIO in the 1940s. In 1955, the AFL merged with its longtime rival, the Congress of Industrial Organizations, to form the AFL-CIO, a federation which remains in place to this day. Together with the new union, the AFL has comprised the longest lasting and most influential labor federation in the United States..."
203 Anti- Nazi Rally (Madison Square Garden - NYC): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and two 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of a New York City anti-Nazi rally in Madison Square Garden (November 21, 1938 - featuring performer Paul Robeson, radio broadcaster and journalist Dorothy Thompson, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Harry Hopkins and others as speakers) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
204 Ballet (School of American Ballet - NYC): Twenty-three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and four (black and white) photographs of the New York City School of American Ballet and director George Balanchine (in rehearsal and performance - 1949) by Martin Harris (for a PM-NEW YORK photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The School of American Ballet (SAB) is one of the most famous classical ballet schools in the world and is the associate school of the New York City Ballet, a leading international ballet company based at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City. The school trains students from the age of six, with professional vocational ballet training for students aged 11-18. Graduates of the school achieve employment with leading ballet companies worldwide, most notably in the United States with New York City Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, Boston Ballet, and San Francisco Ballet. The school was founded by the renowned Russo-Georgian-born choreographer George Balanchine, and philanthropists Lincoln Kirstein and Edward Warburg in 1934. Balanchine's self- prescribed edict, 'But first, a school,' is indicative of his adherence to the ideals of the training that was fostered by the Imperial Ballet School where he received his training. He realized that most great dance companies were fed by an academy closely associated with it. This practice afforded scores of dancers, well versed in the specifics of his technique and choreographic style. Among the teachers there were many Russian emigres who fled the Russian Revolution: Pierre Vladimiroff, Felia Doubrovska, Anatole Oboukhoff, Hélène Dudin, Ludmilla Schollar, Antonina Tumkovsky, and Alexandra Danilova. Their intention was to establish a major classical ballet company in America, which would lead to the formation of today's New York City Ballet. The school was formed to train and feed dancers into the company. It opened at 637 Madison Avenue with 32 students on January 2, 1934, and the students first performed that June. Seventy-five years later, the School was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President Barack Obama..."
205 Café Society Downtown (NYC nightclub): Two (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of Café Society Downtown owner Barney Josephson and others at nightclub tables (May 9, 1943) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the Night Lights web site: "Cafe Society was New York City's first integrated nightclub and a cultural flashpoint for artists, jazz musicians, intellectuals, and activists of the 1940s." According to Wikipedia: "Barney Josephson (1902-1988) was the founder of Café Society in Greenwich Village, New York's first integrated nightclub. It was opened in 1938 by, among others, Billie Holiday and it was here that the singer first publicly performed the song Strange Fruit in 1939..."
206 Cheesecake Photographs (Miscellaneous): Eighteen (black and white) proof sheets and three (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of unidentified nude and semi-nude women ("cheesecake" or pin-up images) by Martin Harris (circa 1930s/40s). According to the definition on the Free Dictionary by Farlex web site: " Cheesecake: Images, especially photographs, of sexually attractive, scantily attired women..." According to Wikipedia: "A pin-up model (known as a pin-up girl for a female and less commonly male pin-up for a male) is a model whose mass-produced pictures see wide appeal as popular culture. Pin-ups are intended for informal display, i.e. meant to be 'pinned-up' on a wall. Pin-up models may be glamour models, fashion models, or actors. These pictures are also sometimes known as cheesecake photos. The term pin-up may refer to drawings, paintings, and other illustrations as well as photographs (see the list of pin-up artists). The term was first attested to in English in 1941; however, the practice is documented back at least to the 1890s. The pin-up images could be cut out of magazines or newspapers, or on a postcard or lithograph. Such pictures often appear on wall or desk calendars. Posters of pin-ups were mass-produced and became popular from the mid 20th century. Male pin-ups were less common than their female counterparts throughout the 20th century, although a market for homoerotica has always existed as well as pictures of popular male celebrities targeted at women or girls. Examples include James Dean and Jim Morrison..."
207 Earrings of Madame de..., The (French film): Seventeen (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and five (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the 1953 French film THE EARRINGS OF MADAME DE...directed by Max Ophuls and starring Charles Boyer, Danielle Darrieux and Vittorio De Sica (production and rehearsal photos) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The Earrings of Madame de... is a 1953 drama film directed by Max Ophüls, adapted from Louise Leveque de Vilmorin's period novel by Ophüls, Marcel Archard and Annette Wadement. The film is considered a masterpiece of the 1950s French cinema. Andrew Sarris called it 'the most perfect film ever made.' Ophüls said the story's construction attracted him, stating 'there is always the same axis around which the action continually turns like a carousel. A tiny, scarcely visible axis: a pair of earrings." The film's different titles reflect on the fact that the surname of the Madame in question - the same as that of her husband's - is never heard nor seen onscreen. The few times in the film when it might be revealed, it is elided by noise or a camera trick...The film received mixed reviews when first released, but its reputation has grown over the years. It was revived in England in 1979, where it was rediscovered as a masterpiece. Derek Malcolm called it 'a supreme piece of film-making which hardly puts a foot wrong for 2 hours...a magnificent and utterly timeless dissection of passion and affection, the game of life and love itself.' Lindsay Anderson criticized the film, stating 'the camera is never still; every shot has the tension of a conjuring trick. The sleight of hand is dazzling, but fatally distracting...With a supple, ingenious, glittering flow of images that is aesthetically the diametric opposite of Mme. de Vilmorin's chaste prose, he has made the film an excuse for a succession of rich, decorative displays...In all this visual frou-frou it is not surprising that the characters become lost and the interior development of the drama is almost completely unobserved." François Truffaut wrote that the film was very similar to Ophüls' earlier film Liebelei, stating that 'the last half hour, the duel and the finale, is a remake pure and simple.' Jacques Rivette praised the film, calling it 'a difficult work, in the fullest sense of the word, even in its writing, one in which everything aims to disconcert, distract the viewer from what is essential through the accumulation of secondary actions, wrong turns, repetitions and delays; a work in which the picturesque tries hard to conceal the pathetic." Molly Haskell has called the film a masterpiece with a cult following that grows every year. Haskell has asserted that the film is usually not as revered as other, more male-oriented films because it is a female-oriented film. Richard Roud has stated that Ophüls made film about 'women. More specifically, women in love. Most often, women who are unhappily in love, or whom love brings misfortune of one kind or another...' "
211 First Time, The (Film) - Part 1: Two 3 x4 inch (color) snapshots and 43 (black and white) proof sheets of the cast and crew of the 1969 Mirisch Company/United Artists production of THE FIRST TIME directed by James Neilson and starring Jacqueline Bisset, Wes Stern, Ricky Kelman, Wink Roberts, et cetera (production and publicity photos) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "The First Time (1969) is a coming of age film directed by James Neilson and starring Jacqueline Bisset."
212 First Time, The (Film) - Part 2: Thirty Eight (black and white) proof sheets of the cast and crew of the 1969 Mirisch Company/United Artists production of THE FIRST TIME directed by James Neilson and starring Jacqueline Bisset, Wes Stern, Ricky Kelman, Wink Roberts, et cetera (production and publicity photos) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "The First Time (1969) is a coming of age film directed by James Neilson and starring Jacqueline Bisset."
213 Folk Music (1941): Six (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and one 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of various folk stars appearing at Café Society Downtown (NYC Nightclub) including Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter, Libby Holman (Broadway and jazz singer), Woody Guthrie, Josh White, Pete Seeger, et cetera (1941) by Martin Harris (for a PM- NEW YORK photo assignment - October 21, 1941). According to Wikipedia: "HUDDIE WILLIAM LEDBETTER (January 20, 1889 - December 6, 1949) was an American folk and blues musician notable for his strong vocals, virtuosity on the twelve-string guitar, and the folk standards he introduced. He is best known as Lead Belly. Though many releases list him as 'Leadbelly,' he himself wrote it as "Lead Belly", which is also the spelling on his tombstone and the spelling used by the Lead Belly Foundation. Lead Belly usually played a twelve-string guitar, but he also played the piano, mandolin, harmonica, violin, and 'windjammer' (diatonic accordion). In some of his recordings he sang while clapping his hands or stomping his foot. Lead Belly's songs covered a wide range, including gospel music; blues about women, liquor, prison life, and racism; and folk songs about cowboys, prison, work, sailors, cattle herding, and dancing. He also wrote songs about people in the news, such as Franklin D. Roosevelt, Adolf Hitler, Jean Harlow, the Scottsboro Boys and Howard Hughes. Lead Belly was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988 and the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame in 2008..." According to Wikipedia: "LIBBY HOLMAN (May 23, 1904 - June 18, 1971) was an American torch singer and stage actress who also achieved notoriety for her complex and unconventional personal life..." According to Wikipedia: "WOODY GUTHRIE (July 14, 1912 - October 3, 1967) was an American singer-songwriter and musician whose musical legacy includes hundreds of political, traditional, and children's songs, along with ballads and improvised works. He frequently performed with the slogan This machine kills fascists displayed on his guitar. His best-known song is 'This Land Is Your Land.' Many of his recorded songs are archived in the Library of Congress. Songwriters such as Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Johnny Cash, Bruce Springsteen, Robert Hunter, Harry Chapin, John Mellencamp, Pete Seeger, Andy Irvine, Joe Strummer, Billy Bragg, Jerry Garcia, Jay Farrar, Bob Weir, Jeff Tweedy, Bob Childers, Sammy Walker and Tom Paxton have acknowledged Guthrie as a major influence..." According to Wikipedia: JOSH WHITE (February 11, 1914 - September 5, 1969) was an American singer, guitarist, songwriter, actor, and civil rights activist. He also recorded under the names Pinewood Tom and Tippy Barton in the 1930s..." According to Wikipedia: "PETE SEEGER (May 3, 1919 - January 27, 2014) was an American folk singer and social activist. A fixture on nationwide radio in the 1940s, he also had a string of hit records during the early 1950s as a member of the Weavers, most notably their recording of Lead Belly's 'Goodnight, Irene,' which topped the charts for 13 weeks in 1950. Members of the Weavers were blacklisted during the McCarthy Era. In the 1960s, he re-emerged on the public scene as a prominent singer of protest music in support of international disarmament, civil rights, counterculture and environmental causes..."
214 House of Mystery (Radio Program): Five (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of the radio show HOUSE OF MYSTERY (circa 1949) with behind the scenes images of the unidentified female producer (and others in a radio studio) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
215 Lust for Life (Film): Three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of film director Vincente Minnelli, star Kirk Douglas and the cast and crew on the set of the 1956 MGM production of LUST FOR LIFE (the biopic of artist Vincent van Gogh) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Lust for Life (1956) is a MGM (Metrocolor) biographical film about the life of the Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh, based on the 1934 novel of the same name by Irving Stone and adapted by Norman Corwin. It was directed by Vincente Minnelli and produced by John Houseman. The film stars Kirk Douglas as Van Gogh, James Donald as his brother Theo, Pamela Brown, Everett Sloane and Anthony Quinn, who won an Oscar for his performance as Van Gogh's fast friend and rival Paul Gauguin..."
216 Miracle Worker, The (Play): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet for the 1959 Broadway production of THE MIRACLE WORKER (cast on stage) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The Miracle Worker is a three-act play by William Gibson adapted from his 1957 Playhouse 90 teleplay of the same name. It is based on Helen Keller's autobiography The Story of My Life...The play premiered on Broadway at the Playhouse Theatre on October 19, 1959, and closed on July 1, 1961, after 719 performances. The production was directed by Arthur Penn with scenic and lighting design by George Jenkins and costumes by Ruth Morley. The cast starred Anne Bancroft as Anne Sullivan and Patty Duke as Helen Keller. Featured in the cast were Torin Thatcher as Captain Keller, Patricia Neal as Kate Keller, Michael Constantine as Anagnos and Beah Richards as Viney. Patty Duke remained with the play for its entire run. Suzanne Pleshette eventually replaced Anne Bancroft..."
217 New Theatre (Magazine): Four (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of various NYC/Broadway celebrities (including Ethel Waters - others unidentified) reading NEW THEATRE MAGAZINE (circa 1935) BY Martin Harris (for a NEW THEATRE MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "New Theatre (magazine), a communist magazine dedicated to the dramatic arts..."
218 Odd Couple, (Film): Seven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau filming NYC street and rooftop scenes (for the 1968 Paramount Pictures production THE ODD COUPLE) by Martin Harris (with typed photo captions by the photographer). According to Wikipedia: "The Odd Couple is a 1968 American comedy Technicolor film in Panavision, written by Neil Simon, based on his play The Odd Couple, directed by Gene Saks, and starring Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau. It is the story of two divorced men—neurotic neat-freak Felix Ungar and fun-loving slob Oscar Madison—who decide to live together, even though their personalities clash. The film was successful with critics and audiences, grossing over $44.5 million,[2] making it the fourth highest-grossing picture of 1968. The success of the film was the basis for the ABC television sitcom of the same name, starring Tony Randall as Felix and Jack Klugman as Oscar..."
221 President's Analyst, The (Film): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet of James Coburn and Godfrey Cambridge (with the production crew) filming NYC street scenes (for the 1967 Paramount Pictures production of THE PRESIDENT'S ANALYST) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "The President's Analyst is an American satirical comedy film written and directed by Ted Flicker, starring James Coburn. The cinematography was by William A. Fraker, and Lalo Schifrin provided the film's musical score. The film has elements of political satire and science fiction. The film's themes include modern ethics and privacy concerns, specifically regarding the intrusion of the Telecom system, working with the U.S. Government, into the private lives of the country's citizens. it was released theatrically on December 21, 1967..."
222 Symphony Orchestra (NY Philharmonic): Nine (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and seventeen 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of the conductor and musicians of the NY Philharmonic (behind the scenes and in performance- 1958) by Martin Harris (for an unpublished book proposal). According to Wikipedia: "The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc., globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the 'Big Five.' The Philharmonic's home is David Geffen Hall, known as Avery Fisher Hall until September 2015, located in New York's Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the "Big Five" orchestras. Its record-setting 14,000th concert was given in December 2004. The orchestra's current music director is Alan Gilbert, since 2009. Matthew VanBesien is the orchestra's current President..."
223 Red, Hot and Blue (Play): Three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of Bob Hope, Ethel Merman and Jimmy Durante rehearsing for the Broadway production of RED, HOT AND BLUE (1936) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Red, Hot and Blue is a stage musical with music and lyrics by Cole Porter and a book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse. It premiered on Broadway in 1936 and introduced the popular song 'It's De-Lovely,' sung by Ethel Merman and Bob Hope. The musical has no connection to the 1949 film musical of the same name with songs by Frank Loesser...During the out-of-town tryouts, according to Cole Porter's biography, Cole Porter: A Biography by Charles Schwartz, the book was too long and did not blend with the music. Further the producer Vinton Freedley made 'numerous suggestions for overhauling the show,' which were accepted by all except Porter. Porter initially told Freedley to communicate through his agent, but finally relented. Additional conflict had arisen before the show's tryouts, when Freedley had assembled the cast and creative team behind the musical Anything Goes, hoping to repeat that show's success. William Gaxton was part of that cast, but withdrew because Ethel Merman's part was so large and Bob Hope was cast. The next conflict came over billing for Jimmy Durante and Merman, which was resolved by having their names crisscrossed above the title. The musical was first titled But Millions! and then Wait for Baby!. Porter had written the song 'It's De-Lovely' for the film Born to Dance but it was not used. He turned it into a romantic duet for Merman and Bob Hope, in which they trace their romance from first kiss to marriage to a baby..."
224 Rob Roy: The Highland Rogue (Film): Fifteen (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of Richard Todd and Glynis Johns (with production crew filming and promoting the 1953 Walt Disney production of ROB ROY: THE HIGHLAND ROGUE) by Martin Harris. According to: "Rob Roy, the Highland Rogue is a 1953 British-American action film, made by Walt Disney Productions. This film is about Rob Roy MacGregor, and it is also the final Disney film released through RKO Radio Pictures...Disney had enjoyed success with its first live action movie, Treasure Island, shot in England. He followed it up with two more costume adventure tales, The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (starring Richard Todd) and The Sword and the Rose both directed by Ken Annakin. When the Rank Organization refused to loan Annakin out to Disney again, Disney chose Harold French who had worked with Annakin on some Somerset Maugham portmanteau films to direct the film which was filmed just as Sword and the Rose was released. Rob Roy was shot on location in Scotland. Richard Todd related in his autobiography that the extras were soldiers of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders who had just returned from the Korean War. Todd said as well as providing thrilling battle scenes for the viewers, the soldiers used the opportunity to enthusiastically get back at their non-commissioned officers. Todd also sheepishly admitted that his first scene leading a charge led to an injury when he stepped in a rabbit hole..."
225 Sandhog (Play): Three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and one 10 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of rehearsals (in the design shop) for the 1954 off-Broadway musical production of SANDHOG starring Jack Cassidy, Leon Bibb, David Brooks, Eliot Field, Alice Ghostly, et cetera (directed by Howard Da Silva and produced at the Phoenix Theatre in NYC) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
226 Sing Me No Lullaby (Play): Seven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of the rehearsals for the 1954 off- Broadway production of SING ME NO LULLABY starring Beatrice Straight, Richard Kiley, Jack Warden, Michael Lipton, Marian Winters, Jessie Royce Landis, John Fiedler and John Marley (Directed by Paul Stewart and produced at the Phoenix Theatre in NYC). According to Wikipedia: "Sing Me No Lullaby is a 1954 play by Robert Ardrey. It is about the treatment of accused communists in post-Cold War America. It was originally presented at the off-Broadway Phoenix Theatre in New York City...Sing Me No Lullaby received praise for its political content. The New York Times asserted that 'The third act of Sing Me No Lullaby constitutes the most forceful statement anyone has made in the theatre for ages.' Richard Watts wrote that Ardrey was 'striving with the most obvious sincerity to probe the unhealthy and hysterical political climate of America in the wake of the cold war...Mr. Ardrey doesn't solve the problem. But the contribution he has made in the last act is a clear and perceptive statement of this nameless, formless situation and an estimation of what it is doing to America. ... Mr. Ardrey ... is a man of principle and taste. In Sing Me No Lullaby he has performed the function of a writer. He has found the words to describe something that is vague and elusive but ominous. And he has got far enough away from political recriminations to state it in terms of character and the life of the spirit.' In a later New York Times review, Atkinson wrote that 'After the triviality of a theatre that normally aims low and is satisfied with technical competence, it is heartening to see a play that is as adult, if not more adult, than the world outside the theatre.' "
227 Stage Door Canteen (Paris): Thirty-three 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photographs of various unidentified performers (with soldiers) at the Stage Door Canteen ("Cabaret Des Troupes Alliees") in Paris (circa 1942) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). No additional information available.
228 Tony Awards (NYC): Two 10.25 x 11 inch (black and white) photographs of a gathering of award-winning stars following the 1949 Antoinette Perry ("Tony") Awards ceremony at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in NYC (including Ray Bolger, Arthur Miller, Shirley Booth, Arthur Kennedy, Rex Harrison, Nanette Fabray, Martita Hunt, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The 3rd Annual Tony Awards were held on April 24, 1949 at the Waldorf-Astoria Grand Ballroom in New York City, and broadcast on radio station WOR and the Mutual Network. The Masters of Ceremonies were Brock Pemberton and James Sauter. The silver Tony medallion, designed by Herman Rosse, was awarded for the first time. The face of the medallion portrayed an adaptation of the comedy and tragedy masks and the reverse side had a relief profile of Antoinette Perry. Performers: Yvonne Adair, Anne Renee Anderson, Carol Channing, Alfred Drake, Bill Eythe, Nanette Fabray, Jane Froman, Lisa Kirk, Mary McCarty, Lucy Monroe, Gene Nelson, Lanny Ross, Lee Stacy, Lawrence Tibbett, Betty Jane Watson, and Paul Winchell..."
229 United Service Organization (USO): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and twenty-four (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of unidentified performers (with soldiers) on a USO tour of Europe (circa 1942) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The United Service Organizations Inc. (USO Show) is a nonprofit organization that provides programs, services and live entertainment to United States service members and their families. Since 1941, it has worked in partnership with the Department of Defense (DoD), relying heavily on private contributions and on funds, goods, and services from various corporate and individual donors. Although congressionally chartered, it is not a government agency. The USO operates 160 centers worldwide. During World War II, the USO became the G.I.'s 'home away from home' and began a tradition of entertaining the troops that continues today. Involvement in the USO was one of the many ways in which the nation had come together to support the war effort, with nearly 1.5 million Americans having volunteered their services in some way. After it was disbanded in 1947, it was revived in 1950 for the Korean War, after which it also provided peacetime services. During the Vietnam War, USOs were sometimes located in combat zones. The organization became particularly famous for its live performances called Camp Shows, through which the entertainment industry helped boost the morale of its servicemen and women. Hollywood in general was eager to show its patriotism, and many famous celebrities joined the ranks of USO entertainers. They entertained in military bases at home and overseas, sometimes placing their own lives in danger, by traveling or performing under hazardous conditions. The USO has over 160 locations around the world in 14 countries (including the U.S.) and 27 states. During a gala marking the USO's 75th anniversary in 2016, retired Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr., the current chairman of the USO Board of Governors, estimated that the USO has served more than 35 million Americans over its history. Its motto is 'Until everyone comes home.' "
2210 What's So Bad About Feeling Good?(Film): Seven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of NYC street filming (1967) of scenes for the 1968 Universal Pictures production of WHAT'S SO BAD ABOUT FEELING GOOD? (starring Mary Tyler Moore and George Peppard) by Martin Harris (with proof /contact sheet noted by the photographer). According to Wikipedia: "What's So Bad About Feeling Good? is the title of a 1968 comedy film, starring George Peppard, Mary Tyler Moore, Jeanne Arnold, Dom DeLuise and Gillian Spencer. A box-office disappointment, it was directed by George Seaton, whose next film, Airport, would become the second highest-grossing film of 1970...The film was the first in a three-picture deal between Seaton and Universal. The script was written by Seaton and Robert Pirosh who had last worked together on A Day at the Races (1937). Filming was meant to start in 1966 but was pushed back until the following year. 'For those of us who've been in analysis, it'll be a lot of fun,' said George Peppard, who signed to play the male lead. His so-star was Mary Tyler Moore, then under long term contract to Universal. 'This picture is now comedy, influenced by the new wave,' said Seaton. 'There's not so much emphasis on the story and everything tying in anymore. Sometimes there's a scene almost extraneous but if it is entertaining or extraneous audiences accept this. Today's comedy writing mirrors the times. It's much harder to make people laugh today because of the world conditions. The young certainly don't have much to laugh about. So humor in film has to be so wild, so outlandish, that you can't help but laugh. The sophisticated humor of 20 years ago, the Noel Coward type of thing is not today. Not now.' The film was shot entirely on location in New York. The co operation of Mayor John Lindsay meant it was the first film to be shot in New York City Hall..."
2211 World of Sholem Aleichem, The (Play): Nine (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of rehearsals for the 1956 Broadway production of THE WORLD OF SHOLEM ALEICHEM starring Jack Gilford, Sally-Jane Heit, Mitchell Jason, Morris Carnovsky and Renee Lippin (Written by Arnold Perl, conceived by Howard Da Silva, directed by Milton Moss and produced at the Rialto Theatre in NYC) by Martin Harris for an unidentified publication photo assignment. According to Wikipedia: "Solomon Naumovich Rabinovich, better known under his pen name Sholem Aleichem during the Soviet era was a leading Yiddish author and playwright. The musical Fiddler on the Roof, based on his stories about Tevye the Dairyman, was the first commercially successful English-language stage production about Jewish life in Eastern Europe. The Hebrew phrase Shalom Aleichem literally means 'Peace be upon you' and is a greeting in traditional Hebrew and Yiddish..."
2212 Yokel Boy (Play): Three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of rehearsals and opening night of the 1939 Broadway musical production of YOKEL BOY starring Phil Silvers, Buddy Ebsen, Judy Canova, Dixie Dunbar, et cetera (directed by Lew Brown and produced at the Majestic Theatre in NYC) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Phil Silvers... made his Broadway début in the short-lived show Yokel Boy in 1939. Critics raved about Silvers, who was hailed as the bright spot in the mediocre play..."



PHOTO-SLIDES: PERFORMING ARTS SUBJECTS and THEATRICAL/CINEMA PRODUCTIONS.



Box Folder
231 Amahl and the Night Visitors (NBC-TV) - Part 1: One Hundred and Eighty (color) photo slides of the rehearsal for the NBC - TV production of AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS (April 15, 1952 starring Chet Allen, Rosemary Kuhlman, Andrew McKinley, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "There Were Three Kings" - December 27, 1952). According to Wikipedia: "Amahl and the Night Visitors is an opera in one act by Gian Carlo Menotti with an original English libretto by the composer. It was commissioned by NBC and first performed by the NBC Opera Theatre on December 24, 1951, in New York City at NBC studio 8H in Rockefeller Center, where it was broadcast live on television from that venue as the debut production of the Hallmark Hall of Fame. It was the first opera specifically composed for television in America. Menotti wrote Amahl with the stage in mind, even though it was intended for broadcast. 'On television you're lucky if they ever repeat anything. Writing an opera is a big effort and to give it away for one performance is stupid.' The composer appeared on-screen in the premiere to introduce the opera and give the background of the events leading up to its composition. He also brought out director Kirk Browning and conductor Thomas Schippers to thank them on-screen. Amahl was seen on 35 NBC affiliates coast to coast, the largest network hookup for an opera broadcast to that date. An estimated five million people saw the live broadcast, the largest audience ever to see a televised opera..."
232 Amahl and the Night Visitors (NBC-TV) - Part 2: One Hundred and Eighty (color) photo slides of the rehearsal for the NBC - TV production of AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS (April 15, 1952 starring Chet Allen, Rosemary Kuhlman, Andrew McKinley, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "There Were Three Kings" - December 27, 1952). According to Wikipedia: "Amahl and the Night Visitors is an opera in one act by Gian Carlo Menotti with an original English libretto by the composer. It was commissioned by NBC and first performed by the NBC Opera Theatre on December 24, 1951, in New York City at NBC studio 8H in Rockefeller Center, where it was broadcast live on television from that venue as the debut production of the Hallmark Hall of Fame. It was the first opera specifically composed for television in America. Menotti wrote Amahl with the stage in mind, even though it was intended for broadcast. 'On television you're lucky if they ever repeat anything. Writing an opera is a big effort and to give it away for one performance is stupid.' The composer appeared on-screen in the premiere to introduce the opera and give the background of the events leading up to its composition. He also brought out director Kirk Browning and conductor Thomas Schippers to thank them on-screen. Amahl was seen on 35 NBC affiliates coast to coast, the largest network hookup for an opera broadcast to that date. An estimated five million people saw the live broadcast, the largest audience ever to see a televised opera..."
233 Baker, Carroll (Film actress): Seven (color) publicity photo slides of film star Carroll Baker (during the filming of THE BIG COUNTRY - 1958) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to her biography by Ed Stephn on the IMDb web site: "Carroll Baker was born Karolina Piekarski on May 28, 1931 in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, the daughter of a traveling salesman. She attended community college for a year and then worked as a dancer and magician's assistant. After a brief marriage, she had a small part in Easy to Love (1953), did TV commercials, and had a bit part on Broadway. She studied at the Actors Studio and was married to director Jack Garfein (one daughter, Blanche Baker). Warner Brothers, sensing a future Marilyn Monroe, cast her in Giant (1956), Baby Doll (1956) (Oscar nomination for her thumb-sucking role), The Carpetbaggers (1964) and Harlow (1965) (title role). Moving to Italy, she made films there and in England, Germany, Mexico and Spain . After returning to American films, she married Donald Burton in 1982 and resided in Hampstead, London in the 1980s. They remained together until Burton's death from emphysema in their home in Cathedral City, California in 2007."
234 Balsam, Martin (Stage and film actor): Five (color) production photo slides of film actor Martin Balsam (on the NYC set of the 1967 television film AMONG THE PATHS TO EDEN) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Martin Henry Balsam (November 4, 1919 - February 13, 1996) was an American actor. He is best known for a number of renowned film roles, including Milton Arbogast in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho, Arnold Burns in A Thousand Clowns (for which he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor), Juror #1 in 12 Angry Men, and Mr. Green in The Taking of Pelham One Two Three, as well as for his role as Murray Klein in the television sitcom Archie Bunker's Place..."
235 Bergman, Ingrid (Film actress): Thirty-one (color) publicity photo slides of actress Ingrid Bergman (1953) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Ingrid's New Role" - September 18, 1953). According to Wikipedia: "Ingrid Bergman...was a Swedish actress who starred in a variety of European and American films. She won three Academy Awards, two Emmy Awards, four Golden Globe Awards, a BAFTA Award, and the Tony Award for Best Actress. She is best remembered for her roles as Ilsa Lund in Casablanca (1942) and as Alicia Huberman in Notorious (1946), an Alfred Hitchcock thriller starring Cary Grant and Claude Rains..."
236 Casals, Pablo (Cellist/conductor): Seventeen (color) photo slides of classical cellist Pablo Casals (conducting an orchestra in Marlboro, Vermont - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Pau Casals i Defilló (December 29, 1876 - October 22, 1973), better known in some countries as Pablo Casals, was a Spanish cellist and conductor from Catalonia. He is generally regarded as the pre-eminent cellist of the first half of the 20th century, and one of the greatest cellists of all time. He made many recordings throughout his career, of solo, chamber, and orchestral music, also as conductor, but he is perhaps best remembered for the recordings of the Bach Cello Suites he made from 1936 to 1939..."
237 Cooper, Gary (Film actor): Forty-three (color) photo slides of film star Gary Cooper (with his wife and daughter touring Europe) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Gary Cooper: An American Tourist - 1953). According to Wikipedia: "Gary Cooper was an American film actor known for his natural, authentic, and understated acting style and screen performances. His career spanned thirty-five years, from 1925 to 1960, and included leading roles in eighty-four feature films. He was a major movie star from the end of the silent film era through the end of the golden age of Classical Hollywood. His screen persona appealed strongly to both men and women, and his range of performances included roles in most major movie genres. Cooper's ability to project his own personality onto the characters he played contributed to his appearing natural and authentic on screen. The screen persona he sustained throughout his career represented the ideal American hero. Cooper began his career as a film extra and stunt rider and soon landed acting roles. After establishing himself as a Western hero in his early silent films, Cooper became a movie star in 1929 with his first sound picture, The Virginian. In the early 1930s, he expanded his heroic image to include more cautious characters in adventure films and dramas such as A Farewell to Arms (1932) and The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935). During the height of his career, Cooper portrayed a new type of hero—a champion of the common man—in films such as Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Meet John Doe (1941), Sergeant York (1941), The Pride of the Yankees (1942), and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943). In the post-war years, he portrayed more mature characters at odds with the world in films such as The Fountainhead (1949) and High Noon (1952). In his final films, Cooper played non-violent characters searching for redemption in films such as Friendly Persuasion (1956) and Man of the West (1958). He married New York debutante Veronica Balfe in 1933, and the couple had one daughter. Their marriage was interrupted by a three-year separation precipitated by Cooper's love affair with Patricia Neal. Cooper received the Academy Award for Best Actor for his roles in Sergeant York and High Noon. He also received an Academy Honorary Award for his career achievements in 1961. He was one of the top ten film personalities for twenty-three consecutive years, and was one of the top money-making stars for eighteen years. The American Film Institute (AFI) ranked Cooper eleventh on its list of the twenty five greatest male stars of classic Hollywood cinema..."
238 Copacabana (NYC nightclub): Twelve (color) photo slides of the Copacabana nightclub showgirls (in their dressing rooms - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The Copacabana is a New York City nightclub. Many entertainers, among them Danny Thomas, Pat Cooper and the comedy team of Martin and Lewis, made their New York debuts at the Copacabana. The Barry Manilow song "Copacabana" (1978) is named after the club. Part of the 2003 Yerba Buena song "Guajira" is set there. The Copa was used as a setting in the films Goodfellas, Raging Bull, Tootsie, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Carlito's Way, The French Connection, Martin and Lewis, and Beyond the Sea, as well as several plays, including Barry Manilow's Copacabana. In addition the musical film Copacabana (1947), starring Groucho Marx and Carmen Miranda, takes place in the nightclub..."
239 Earrings of Madame de..., The (French film): Sixteen (color) photo slides of scenes from the 1953 French film THE EARRINGS OF MADAME DE...directed by Max Ophuls and starring Charles Boyer, Danielle Darrieux and Vittorio De Sica (production and rehearsal photos) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The Earrings of Madame de... is a 1953 drama film directed by Max Ophüls, adapted from Louise Leveque de Vilmorin's period novel by Ophüls, Marcel Archard and Annette Wadement. The film is considered a masterpiece of the 1950s French cinema. Andrew Sarris called it 'the most perfect film ever made.' Ophüls said the story's construction attracted him, stating 'there is always the same axis around which the action continually turns like a carousel. A tiny, scarcely visible axis: a pair of earrings." The film's different titles reflect on the fact that the surname of the Madame in question - the same as that of her husband's - is never heard nor seen onscreen. The few times in the film when it might be revealed, it is elided by noise or a camera trick...The film received mixed reviews when first released, but its reputation has grown over the years. It was revived in England in 1979, where it was rediscovered as a masterpiece. Derek Malcolm called it 'a supreme piece of film-making which hardly puts a foot wrong for 2 hours...a magnificent and utterly timeless dissection of passion and affection, the game of life and love itself.' Lindsay Anderson criticized the film, stating 'the camera is never still; every shot has the tension of a conjuring trick. The sleight of hand is dazzling, but fatally distracting...With a supple, ingenious, glittering flow of images that is aesthetically the diametric opposite of Mme. de Vilmorin's chaste prose, he has made the film an excuse for a succession of rich, decorative displays...In all this visual frou-frou it is not surprising that the characters become lost and the interior development of the drama is almost completely unobserved." François Truffaut wrote that the film was very similar to Ophüls' earlier film Liebelei, stating that 'the last half hour, the duel and the finale, is a remake pure and simple.' Jacques Rivette praised the film, calling it 'a difficult work, in the fullest sense of the word, even in its writing, one in which everything aims to disconcert, distract the viewer from what is essential through the accumulation of secondary actions, wrong turns, repetitions and delays; a work in which the picturesque tries hard to conceal the pathetic." Molly Haskell has called the film a masterpiece with a cult following that grows every year. Haskell has asserted that the film is usually not as revered as other, more male-oriented films because it is a female-oriented film. Richard Roud has stated that Ophüls made film about 'women. More specifically, women in love. Most often, women who are unhappily in love, or whom love brings misfortune of one kind or another...' "
2310 Gable, Clark (Film actress): Sixty (color) photo slides of film star Clark Gable (in Arnhem, Holland while filming BETRAYED for MGM) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE article "Who, Gable?" - 1954). According to Wikipedia: "Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 - November 16, 1960) was an American film actor, often referred to as 'The King of Hollywood' or just simply as 'The King.' Gable began his career as a stage actor and appeared as an extra in silent films between 1924 and 1926, and progressed to supporting roles with a few films for MGM in 1931. The next year, he landed his first leading Hollywood role and became a leading man in more than 60 motion pictures over the next three decades. Gable won an Academy Award for Best Actor for It Happened One Night (1934),and was nominated for leading roles in Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) and for his arguably best-known role as Rhett Butler in the epic Gone with the Wind (1939)..."
2311 Garroway, Dave (TV host): Twenty-Five (color) photo slides of television host and anchor Dave Garroway (in his office with his dog - c. mid 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "David Cunningham 'Dave' Garroway (July 13, 1913 - July 21, 1982) was an American television personality. He was the founding host and anchor of NBC's Today from 1952 to 1961. His easygoing and relaxing style belied a lifelong battle with depression. Garroway has been honored for his contributions to radio and television with a star for each on the Hollywood Walk of Fame as well as the St. Louis Walk of Fame, the city where he spent part of his teenage years and early adulthood..."
2312 Gleason, Jackie (TV Comedian): Nineteen (color) photo slides of television legend Jackie Gleason rehearsing with the cast for the HONEYMOONERS; CHRISTMAS PARTY (December 1952 starring Audrey Meadows, Art Carney and Jane Kean) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the IMDb web site: "Frances Langford sings 'Great Day' and 'I Love Paris.' Eddie Hodges sings 'Walkin' My Baby Back Home.' On this program, several of Jackie Gleason's characters visit the Kramden apartment for a Christmas party. The Honeymooners sketch ran 39:23 in length..."
2313 J.T. (CBS- TV): Three (color) photo slides of the cast (Kevin Hooks and Theresa Merritt) of the CBS - TV production filming on the streets of NYC (1969 - written by Jane Wagner and directed by Robert M. Young) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the Christmas TV History web site: "Few who have seen it will ever forget this emotional story of the young Harlem kid, J.T. Gamble, based on a book written by Jane Wagner. It was originally produced for the CBS Saturday morning Children's Hour program but was also re-broadcast in primetime and has won the prestigious Peabody Award. A troubled little boy living in the ghetto finds his connection to the world through a sickly cat he cares for in an abandoned building. As Christmas approaches, J.T.'s transistor radio is stolen and he's chased by two bullies from the condemned building, only to witness his cat run over in the street by a car. A despondent J.T. is consoled by his visiting grandmother. Later at Christmas, the boy's life is transformed when the neighborhood grocer gives J.T. a kitten and a chance at a new start. This story will warm the coldest of hearts. Lingering images include J.T. fixing a bed for the cat inside a broken down oven inside the abandoned building. I can't forget the compassion of the grocer's gift, offering the young boy a second chance for a special, nurturing relationship to endure a world that often seems cruel and unforgiving. It stars actor Kevin Hooks as the young lead. Hooks is recognizable from his later role as Morris Thorpe, on the TV series The White Shadow and he currently works as a director for dramatic TV series including Lost, 24, Monk and Prison Break. The role of J.T.'s mother is played by actress Ja'net DuBois who also appeared as the upstairs neighbor, Willona on the ground breaking, 1970s sitcom, Good Times and more recently working as a voice actor on The PJs."
2314 Jones, Jack (Nightclub and recording artist): Seven (color) publicity photo slides of nightclub and recording star Jack Jones (with an unidentified female co-star/performer) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "John Allan 'Jack' Jones (born January 14, 1938) is an American actor and jazz and pop singer, popular during the 1960s. He is the son of actor Allan Jones. Jones was primarily a straight-pop singer (even when he recorded contemporary material) whose ventures in the direction of jazz were mostly of the big band/swing variety. Jones has won two Grammy Awards. He continues to perform concerts around the world and remains popular in Las Vegas. Jones is widely known for his recordings of 'Wives and Lovers' (1964 Grammy Award, Best Pop Male Performance), 'The Race Is On,' 'Lollipops and Roses' (1962, Grammy Award, Best Pop Male Performance), 'The Impossible Dream,' 'Call Me Irresponsible,' 'Lady' and 'The Love Boat Theme.' He was also the voice of Greg's frog in the 2014 animated television miniseries Over the Garden Wall..."
2315 Loren, Sophia (Film actress): One hundred and twenty-six (color) photo slides of actress Sophia Loren (with film director Vittorio De Sica, in Italy, filming SCANDAL IN SORRENTO aka BREAD, LOVE AND LADY SOPHIA - 1955) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Sophia in Sorrento" - September 16, 1955). According to Wikipedia: "Sophia Loren...is an Italian film actress. Encouraged to enroll in acting lessons after entering a beauty pageant, Loren began her film career in 1950 at age 15. She appeared in several bit parts and minor roles in the early part of the decade, until her five-picture contract with Paramount in 1956 launched her international career. Notable film appearances around this time include The Pride and the Passion, Houseboat, and It Started in Naples. Her talents as an actress were not recognized until her performance as Cesira in Vittorio De Sica's Two Women; Loren's performance earned her the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1962 and made her the first artist to win an Oscar for a foreign-language performance. She holds the record for having earned six David di Donatello Awards for Best Actress, the most ever received: Two Women; Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow; Marriage Italian Style (for which she was nominated for a second Oscar); Sunflower; The Voyage; and A Special Day. After starting her family in the early 1970s, Loren spent less time on her acting career and chose to make only occasional film appearances. In later years, she has appeared in American films such as Grumpier Old Men and Nine. Aside from the Academy Award, she has won a Grammy Award, five special Golden Globes, a BAFTA Award, a Laurel Award, the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival, and the Honorary Academy Award in 1991. In 1995, she received the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievements, one of many such awards. In 1999, Loren was acknowledged as one of the top 25 female American Screen Legends in the American Film Institute's survey, AFI's 100 Years...100 Stars..."
2316 Lust for Life (Film): Eleven (color) photo slides of behind the scenes filming of the 1956 MGM film biography of Vincent van Goh starring Kirk Douglas and Anthony Quinn (directed by Vincente Minnelli) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Lust for Life (1956) is a MGM (Metrocolor) biographical film about the life of the Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh, based on the 1934 novel of the same name by Irving Stone and adapted by Norman Corwin. It was directed by Vincente Minnelli and produced by John Houseman. The film stars Kirk Douglas as Van Gogh, James Donald as his brother Theo, Pamela Brown, Everett Sloane and Anthony Quinn, who won an Oscar for his performance as Van Gogh's fast friend and rival Paul Gauguin..."
2317 McMahon, Ed (Television announcer/personality): Two (color) photo slides of television announcer Ed McMahon (filming a television commercial - circa 1965) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Edward Leo Peter 'Ed' McMahon, Jr. (March 6, 1923 - June 23, 2009) was an American comedian, actor, singer, game show host and announcer. He is most famous for his work on television as Johnny Carson's sidekick, announcer, and second banana on The Tonight Show from 1962 through 1992. He also hosted the original version of the talent show Star Search from 1983 to 1995. He co-hosted TV's Bloopers and Practical Jokes with Dick Clark from 1982 to 1998. He also presented sweepstakes for the direct marketing company American Family Publishers (not, as is commonly believed, its main rival Publishers Clearing House). McMahon annually co-hosted the Jerry Lewis Labor Day Telethon. In the 1970s and 1980s, he anchored the team of NBC personalities conducting the network's coverage of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. McMahon appeared in several films, including The Incident, Fun With Dick and Jane, Full Moon High, and Butterfly, as well as briefly in the film version of Bewitched. He also performed in numerous television commercials. According to Entertainment Weekly, McMahon is considered one of the greatest 'sidekicks.' "
2318 Perkins, Anthony (Film actor): One (color) photo slide of actor Anthony Perkins (with Tuesday Weld on the set of the 1972 Universal Pictures production of PLAY IT AS IT LAYS) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Play It as It Lays is a 1972 American drama film directed by Frank Perry. The screenplay by married couple Joan Didion and John Gregory Dunne is based on Didion's 1970 novel of the same name. The film stars Tuesday Weld and Anthony Perkins, who previously starred together in the 1968 film Pretty Poison..."
2319 Rob Roy: The Highland Rogue (Film) - Part -1: One hundred (color) photo slides of Richard Todd and Glynis Johns (with production crew filming and promoting the 1953 Walt Disney production of ROB ROY: THE HIGHLAND ROGUE) by Martin Harris. According to: "Rob Roy, the Highland Rogue is a 1953 British-American action film, made by Walt Disney Productions. This film is about Rob Roy MacGregor, and it is also the final Disney film released through RKO Radio Pictures...Disney had enjoyed success with its first live action movie, Treasure Island, shot in England. He followed it up with two more costume adventure tales, The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (starring Richard Todd) and The Sword and the Rose both directed by Ken Annakin. When the Rank Organization refused to loan Annakin out to Disney again, Disney chose Harold French who had worked with Annakin on some Somerset Maugham portmanteau films to direct the film which was filmed just as Sword and the Rose was released. Rob Roy was shot on location in Scotland. Richard Todd related in his autobiography that the extras were soldiers of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders who had just returned from the Korean War. Todd said as well as providing thrilling battle scenes for the viewers, the soldiers used the opportunity to enthusiastically get back at their non-commissioned officers. Todd also sheepishly admitted that his first scene leading a charge led to an injury when he stepped in a rabbit hole..."
2320 Rob Roy: The Highland Rogue (Film) - Part - 2: One hundred (color) photo slides of Richard Todd and Glynis Johns (with production crew filming and promoting the 1953 Walt Disney production of ROB ROY: THE HIGHLAND ROGUE) by Martin Harris. According to: "Rob Roy, the Highland Rogue is a 1953 British-American action film, made by Walt Disney Productions. This film is about Rob Roy MacGregor, and it is also the final Disney film released through RKO Radio Pictures...Disney had enjoyed success with its first live action movie, Treasure Island, shot in England. He followed it up with two more costume adventure tales, The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (starring Richard Todd) and The Sword and the Rose both directed by Ken Annakin. When the Rank Organization refused to loan Annakin out to Disney again, Disney chose Harold French who had worked with Annakin on some Somerset Maugham portmanteau films to direct the film which was filmed just as Sword and the Rose was released. Rob Roy was shot on location in Scotland. Richard Todd related in his autobiography that the extras were soldiers of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders who had just returned from the Korean War. Todd said as well as providing thrilling battle scenes for the viewers, the soldiers used the opportunity to enthusiastically get back at their non-commissioned officers. Todd also sheepishly admitted that his first scene leading a charge led to an injury when he stepped in a rabbit hole..."
2321 Sarnoff, David (RCA/NBC executive): Twenty (color) photo slides of RCA President David Sarnoff and other RCA executives (circa 1960) by Martin Harris (for a FORTUNE MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "David Sarnoff (February 27, 1891 - December 12, 1971) was an American businessman and pioneer of American radio and television. Throughout most of his career he led the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) in various capacities from shortly after its founding in 1919 until his retirement in 1970. He ruled over an ever-growing telecommunications and consumer electronics empire that included both RCA and NBC, and became one of the largest companies in the world. Named a Reserve Brigadier General of the Signal Corps in 1945, Sarnoff thereafter was widely known as 'The General.' Sarnoff is credited with Sarnoff's law, which states that the value of a broadcast network is proportional to the number of viewers..."
2322 Wright, Teresa (Stage/film actress): Twenty-five (color) photo slides of stage and film actress Teresa Wright (at home and sightseeing with family - 1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Teresa Wright (October 27, 1918 - March 6, 2005) was an American actress. Her first Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress nomination came in 1941 for her debut work in The Little Foxes. She received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in 1942 for her performance in Mrs. Miniver. That same year, she received an Academy Award for Best Actress nomination for her performance in Pride of the Yankees opposite Gary Cooper. She is also known for her performances in Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt (1943) and William Wyler's The Best Years of Our Lives (1946). Wright received three Emmy Award nominations for her performances in the Playhouse 90 original television version of The Miracle Worker (1957), in the Breck Sunday Showcase feature The Margaret Bourke-White Story, and in the CBS drama series Dolphin Cove (1989). She earned the acclaim of top film directors, including William Wyler, who called her the most promising actress he had directed, and Alfred Hitchcock, who admired her thorough preparation and quiet professionalism..."



PHOTOGRAPHS: SECOND WORLD WAR

Photographs by Martin Harris for THE STARS AND STRIPES. Filed alphabetically by subject.



Box Folder
241 African-American Soldiers (8th Infantry Division): Six (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of African-American pilots and African-American 8th Infantry Division soldiers ("8th Infantry Negroes") in Europe (c.1942) by Martin Harris for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The 8th Infantry Division, ('Pathfinder') was an infantry division of the United States Army during the 20th century. The division served in World War I, World War II, and Operation Desert Storm. Initially activated in January 1918, the unit did not see combat during World War I and returned to the United States. Activated again on July 1, 1940 as part of the build-up of military forces prior to the United States' entry into World War II, the division saw extensive action in the European Theatre of Operations. Following World War II, the division was moved to West Germany, where it remained stationed at the Rose Barracks in Bad Kreuznach until it was inactivated on January 17, 1992..."
242 Air Force (15th Air Force): Ten 6.5 x 9.5 inch (black and white) photographs of Major General Charles F. Born, and other officers of the 15th Air Force, in a bombing target selection meeting in a war room (in an unidentified European location - circa 1943) by Martin Harris for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to the U.S. Air Force web site: "...In July 1940, General Born became commanding officer of the Fifth Bombardment Squadron at Mitchel Field, N.Y., and in August 1941, was named commanding officer of the Ninth Bombardment Group at Rio Hato, Panama. He later was assigned to the Sixth Fighter Command at San Juan, Puerto Rico, and in May 1942, resumed his duties as commanding officer of the Ninth Bombardment Group, which had moved to the British West Indies. The following year General Born assumed command of the Army Air Forces in the Antilles Command and soon thereafter was appointed assistant chief of staff for operations and training of the Northwest African Strategic Air Force. When the 12th Bomber Command of that Air Force became the 15th Air Force, he became its assistant chief of staff for operations and training and directed its operations against Germany. In October 1944, he was named deputy commander of the 15th Air Force, then stationed in Bari, Italy. In March, 1945, General Born was assigned to Air Force headquarters at Washington and later that month became chief of operations and training of the Continental Air Forces at Bolling Field, D.C. In October, 1945, he was named director of separations at Air Force headquarters, and the following January was appointed chief of staff of the Continental Air Forces..." According to the Army Air Corpsweb site: "Constituted as the 15th Air Force on October 30, 1943 and activated on November 1, 1943. The 15th AF primary function was Strategic Bombardment of Italy, France, Germany,Romania,Hungary,Poland, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Yugoslavia and Greece."
243 Alexander, Harold (British Field Marshall): One 6.5 x 9 inch (black and white) photograph of British Filed Marshall Harold Alexander speaking at a presentation ceremonies in Rome, Italy (circa 1943) by Martin Harris for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Field Marshal Harold Rupert Leofric George Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Tunis, (December 10, 1891 - June 16, 1969), was a senior officer of the British Army who served with distinction in both the First and Second World Wars and, afterwards, as Governor General of Canada, the 17th since Canadian Confederation. Alexander was born in London, England, to aristocratic parents and was educated at Harrow before moving on to the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, for training as an army officer of the Irish Guards. He rose to prominence through his service in the First World War, receiving numerous honors and decorations, and continued his military career through various British campaigns across Europe and Asia. In the Second World War, Alexander oversaw the final stages of the Allied evacuation from Dunkirk and subsequently held high-ranking field commands in Burma, North Africa and Italy, including serving as Commander-in-Chief Middle East and commanding the 18th Army Group in Tunisia. He then commanded the 15th Army Group for the capture of Sicily and again in Italy before receiving his field marshal's baton and being made Supreme Allied Commander Mediterranean..."
244 Alsace -Lorraine (France/Germany border): Sixty-four (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of battle scenes (1944-45) involving Allied and Axis military (specifically the U.S. 7th Army in the "Battle of Colmar," the Nazi devastation of the town of Oradour Sur Glane, fighting in Strasbourg, France and the Molsheim area of France, the 12th Armored Division in Osthoffen, France, the battle at the Moder River near Haguenau, France, et cetera) by Martin Harris fro STARS AND STRIPES).According to the Encyclopedia Britannica: "Alsace-Lorraine, German Elsass-Lothringen, area comprising the present French departments of Haut-Rhin, Bas-Rhin, and Moselle. Alsace-Lorraine was the name given to the 5,067 square miles (13,123 square km) of territory that was ceded by France to Germany in 1871 after the Franco-German War. This territory was retroceded to France in 1919 after World War I, was ceded again to Germany in 1940 during World War II, and was again retroceded to France in 1945...Early in World War II, the collapse of France in 1940 was followed by the second German annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, which was again returned to France in 1945. Since then many of the French prewar governmental policies that had clashed with the region's particularism have been modified, and the autonomist movement has largely disappeared. Linguistically, the German dialect known as Alsatian remains the lingua franca of the region, and both French and German are taught in the schools..."
245 Anders, Wladyslaw (Polish General): Three (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of Polish Army General Wladyslaw Anders (inspecting the troops in Italy - 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "W?adys?aw Albert Anders (August 11, 1892 - May 12, 1970) was a General in the Polish Army and later in life a politician and prominent member of the Polish government-in-exile in London...Anders commanded the Nowogródzka Cavalry Brigade during the German Army's invasion of Poland in September 1939 and was immediately called into action, taking part in the Battle of M?awa. After the collapse of the Polish Northern Front the brigade withdrew towards Warsaw, and also fought heavy battles against the Germans around Minsk Mazowiecki and in the second phase of the Battle of Tomaszów Lubelski. After learning about the Soviet invasion of Poland, Anders retreated south in the direction of Lviv (then Lwów), hoping to reach the Hungarian or Romanian border, but was intercepted by Soviet forces and captured on September 29, after being wounded twice. He was initially jailed in Lwów and subsequently transferred to the Lubyanka prison in Moscow on February 29, 1940. During his imprisonment Anders was interrogated, tortured and unsuccessfully urged to join the Russian Army. after the launch of Operation Barbarossa and the signing of the Sikorski-Maisky agreement, Anders was released by the Soviets with the aim of forming a Polish Army to fight against the Germans alongside the Red Army. Continued friction with the Soviets over political issues as well as shortages of weapons, food and clothing, led to the eventual exodus of Anders' men - known as Anders Army - together with a sizeable contingent of Polish civilians who had been deported to the USSR from Soviet-occupied Poland, via the Persian Corridor into Iran, Iraq and Palestine. Here, Anders formed and led the Polish 2nd Corps, while continuing to agitate for the release of Polish nationals still in the Soviet Union. The Polish 2nd Corps became a major tactical and operational unit of the Polish Armed Forces in the West. Anders commanded the Corps throughout the Italian Campaign, capturing Monte Cassino on May 18,1944, later fighting on the Gothic Line and in the final spring offensive..."
246 Anzio (Italy): Seventeen (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of Allied forces and civilians following the Anzio (Italy) beach landing and battles (January 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "The Battle of Anzio was an important battle of the Italian Campaign of World War II that took place on January 22, 1944, with the Allied amphibious landing known as Operation Shingle against the German forces in the area of Anzio and Nettuno. The operation was commanded by Major General John P. Lucas, of the U.S. Army, commanding U.S. VI Corps, and was intended to outflank German forces at the Winter Line and enable an attack on Rome. The success of an amphibious landing at that location, in a basin consisting substantially of reclaimed marshland and surrounded by mountains, depended on the element of surprise and the swiftness with which the invaders could move relative to the reaction time of the defenders. Any delay could result in the occupation of the mountains by the defenders and the consequent entrapment of the invaders. Lieutenant General Mark W. Clark, commander of the U.S. Fifth Army, understood that risk, but Clark did not pass on his appreciation of the situation to his subordinate, Lucas, who preferred to take time to entrench against an expected counterattack. The initial landing achieved complete surprise with no opposition and a jeep patrol even made it as far as the outskirts of Rome. Despite that report, Lucas, who had little confidence in the operation as planned, failed to capitalize on the element of surprise by delaying his advance until he judged his position was sufficiently consolidated and his troops ready..."
247 Badaglio, Pietro (Prime Minister of Italy): One 5 x 9 inch (black and white) proof sheet of Italian Prime Minister Pietro Badaglio (in uniform, in his office headquarters - June 23, 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Marshal Pietro Badoglio, 1st Duke of Addis Abeba, 1st Marquess of Sabotino ( September 28, 1871 - November 1, 1956), was an Italian general during both World Wars and a Prime Minister of Italy, as well as the first viceroy of Italian East Africa...Badoglio was Chief of Staff from 1925 to 1940, an enormous length of time, and it was he who had the final say on the entire structure of the Armed Forces, including doctrine, selection of officers, armaments, for all that time, impregnating the whole military environment. Badoglio was not in favor of the Italian-German Pact of Steel and was pessimistic about the chances of Italian success in any European war but he did not oppose the decision of Mussolini and the King to declare war on France and Great Britain. Following the Italian army's poor performance in the invasion of Greece in December 1940, he resigned from the General Staff. Badoglio was replaced by Ugo Cavallero. On July 24, 1943, as Italy had suffered several setbacks following the Allied invasion of Sicily in World War II, Mussolini summoned the Fascist Grand Council, which voted no confidence in Mussolini. The following day Il Duce was removed from government by King Victor Emmanuel III and arrested. On September 3, 1943, General Giuseppe Castellano signed the Italian armistice with the Allies in Cassibile on behalf of Badoglio, who was named Prime Minister of Italy. Wary of the potentially hostile German response to the Armistice, Badoglio hesitated to formally announce the treaty. On September 8, 1943, the armistice document was published by the Allies in the Badoglio Proclamation, before Badoglio could communicate news of the switch to the Italian armed forces. The units of the Italian Royal Army, Royal Navy, and Royal Air Force were generally surprised by the switch and unprepared for German actions to disarm them. In the early hours of the following day, September 9, 1943, Badoglio, King Victor Emmanuel, some military ministers, and the Chief of the General Staff escaped to Pescara and Brindisi seeking Allied protection. On September 23, 1943, the longer version of the armistice was signed in Malta. On October 13, Badoglio and the Kingdom of Italy officially declared war on Nazi Germany. Badoglio continued to head the government for another nine months. On June 9, 1944, following the German rescue of Mussolini, the capture of Rome by the allies, and increasingly strong opposition to his government, Badoglio was replaced by Ivanoe Bonomi of the Labor Democratic Party..."
248 Belgium: Seven (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the aftermath of Nazi bombing and invasion of Belgian cities in the Sart and Leige areas (occupied by the U.S. 83rd Infantry Division and Fifth Army - c. late 1944/early 1945) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Despite being neutral at the start of World War II, Belgium and its colonial possessions found themselves at war after the country was invaded by German forces on May 10, 1940. After 18 days of fighting in which Belgian forces were pushed back into a small pocket in the north-east of the country, the Belgian military surrendered to the Germans, beginning an occupation that would endure until 1944. The surrender of May 28 was ordered by King Leopold III without the consultation of his government and sparked a political crisis after the war. Despite the capitulation, many Belgians managed to escape to the United Kingdom where they formed a government and army-in-exile on the Allied side. The Belgian Congo remained loyal to the Belgian government in London and contributed significant material and human resources to the Allied cause. Many Belgians were involved in both armed and passive resistance to German forces, although some chose to collaborate with the German forces. Support from right-wing political factions and sections of the Belgian population allowed the German army to recruit two divisions of the Waffen-SS from Belgium and also facilitated the Nazi persecution of Belgian Jews in which nearly 25,000 were killed. Most of the country was liberated by the Allies between September and October 1944, though areas to the far east of the country remained occupied until early 1945. In total, approximately 88,000 Belgians died during the conflict, a figure representing 1.05 percent of the country's pre-war population, and around 8 percent of the country's GDP was destroyed..."
249 Bradley, Omar (U.S. Army General): One 7.5 x 9.5 inch (black and white) "Official British photograph" (by Martin Harris?) of Lt. General Omar Bradley, British General Bernard Montgomery and British Lt. General M.C. Dempsey in conference on a liberated France battlefield - circa 1944). According to Wikipedia: "General of the Army Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 - April 8, 1981), nicknamed Brad, was a highly distinguished senior officer of the United States Army who saw distinguished service in North Africa and Western Europe during World War II, and later became General of the Army. From the Normandy landings of June 6, 1944 through to the end of the war in Europe, Bradley had command of all U.S. ground forces invading Germany from the west; he ultimately commanded forty-three divisions and 1.3 million men, the largest body of American soldiers ever to serve under a single U.S. field commander. After the war, Bradley headed the Veterans Administration and became Army Chief of Staff. In 1949, Bradley was appointed the first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the following year oversaw the policy-making for the Korean War, before retiring from active service in 1953. Bradley was the last of only nine people to hold a five-star rank in the United States Armed Forces..."
2410 Caruso, Pietro (Italian Chief of Police): Four 7 x 9.5 inch (black and white) photographs of the execution of the Italian Fascist Chief of Police Pietro Caruso (in the courtyard of Fort Bravetta in Rome - September 22, 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Pietro Caruso (born November 10, 1899 in Maddaloni - died September 22, 1944 in Rome) was an Italian Fascist and head of the Italian police during the final part of World War II. Together with Herbert Kappler, the German Gestapo chief in Rome, Caruso organized the massacre in Fosse Ardeatine on March 24, 1944 as revenge for an attack the day before by Italian partisans on a column of German soldiers in Rome. 335 people, many of them belonging to a Communist military resistance group, were shot during the massacre. After Italy's liberation from the German occupation, Caruso was tried for his numerous crimes, sentenced to death and executed by firing squad by the Carabinieri in the courtyard of the Fort Bravetta in Rome..."
2411 Civilians (Europe): Twenty-four (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of European civilians interacting with Allied GI's in various cities and towns (circa 1944-45) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). No additional information available.
2412 Clark, Mark (U.S. Army General): Nine (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of U.S. Army General Mark Clark (with General Lucien Truscott. General Geoffrey Keyes, General Charles G. Fredericks and soldiers -outside Rome - June 1946) by y Martin Harris (For STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "General Mark Wayne Clark (May 1, 1896 - April 17, 1984) was a senior United States Army officer who saw service during World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. He was the youngest lieutenant general (three-star general) in the United States Army during World War II. During World War I, he was a company commander in the 11th Infantry Regiment, part of the 5th Division, and served in France in 1918, as a 22-year old captain, where he was seriously wounded by shrapnel. After the war, the future U.S. Army Chief of Staff, George Marshall, noticed Clark's abilities. During World War II, he commanded the United States Fifth Army, and later the 15th Army Group, in the Italian campaign. He is known for leading the Fifth Army in its capture of Rome in June 1944. Clark has been heavily criticized for ignoring the orders of his superior officer, British General Sir Harold Alexander, and allowing the German 10th Army to slip away, in his drive to take Rome, the capital of Italy, a strategically unimportant city. The German 10th Army then joined with the rest of the German army group at the Trasimene Line. In March 1945, Clark, at the age of 48, became the youngest American officer to be promoted to the rank of general. General Dwight D. Eisenhower, a close friend of Clark's, considered him a brilliant staff officer and trainer. Clark was awarded many medals, including the Distinguished Service Cross, the U.S. Army's second highest award. A legacy of the 'Clark task force' that he led in 1953-55, which reviewed and made recommendations on all federal intelligence activities, is the coined term Intelligence Community..."
2413 Collins, Joseph L. (U.S. Army General): One 7 x 9 inch (black and white) photograph of U.S. Army Major General Joseph L. Collins (Commander of the 7th U.S. Corps, with his nephew Lieutenant Colonel James L. Collins, Jr. - on the battlefield near Duron, Germany - December 1944). According to Wikipedia: "Joseph 'Lightning Joe' Lawton Collins (May 1, 1896 - September 12, 1987) was Army Chief of Staff during the Korean War. During World War II, he was an Army general, serving in both the Pacific and European Theaters of Operations. His elder brother, James Lawton Collins, was also in the Army as a major general. His nephew, Michael Collins, was the command module pilot on the Apollo 11 mission in 1969 that put the first two men on the Moon and would retire as a major general from the Air Force. His sister Gertrude was married to General Arthur Edmund Easterbrook...Collins was promoted to the temporary ranks of colonel, January 1941, brigadier general, February 1942, and major general, May 1942. He was chief of staff of the Hawaiian Department, 1941-1942, and commanding general of the 25th Infantry Division—the 'Tropic Lightning' Division—on Oahu and in operations against the Japanese on Guadalcanal, 1942-1943 and on New Georgia in from July to October 1943.Transferred to Europe, he commanded VII Corps in the Normandy invasion and in Western European campaigns to the German surrender, 1944-1945. VII Corps is best known for the leading role it played in Operation Cobra; less well known is Collins' contribution to that plan. One of the few generals to fight in both Europe and the Pacific, Collins contrasted the nature of the enemy in the two theaters: The German was far more skilled than the Japanese. Most of the Japanese that we fought were not skilled men. Not skilled leaders. The German had a professional army.... The Japanese... didn't know how to handle combined arms - the artillery and the support of the infantry - to the same extent we did. They were gallant soldiers, though.... They fought very, very hard, but they were not nearly as skillful as the Germans. But the German didn't have the tenacity of the Japanese. Collins was promoted to temporary lieutenant general (April) and permanent brigadier general (June), 1945..."
2414 Combat Medics (Miscellaneous) : Ten (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of U.S. combat medics (in European operating rooms and on battlefields - circa 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Combat medics (also known as medics) are military personnel who have been trained to at least an EMT-Basic level (18 week course in the U.S. Army), and are responsible for providing first aid and frontline trauma care on the battlefield. They are also responsible for providing continuing medical care in the absence of a readily available physician, including care for disease and battle injuries. Combat medics are normally co-located with the combat troops they serve in order to easily move with the troops and monitor ongoing health..."
2415 Coulter, John B. (U.S. Army General): Two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of U.S. Army Major General John B. Coulter of the 85th Division (interviewed after the May 11, 1944 Rome/Arno breakthrough in Italy - May 11, 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "John Breitling Coulter (1891-1983) was a Lieutenant General in the United States Army. Coulter served during World Wars I and II and the Korean War...In 1941 Coulter was assigned as commander of the 3rd Cavalry Brigade in Phoenix, Arizona, receiving promotion to Brigadier General. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, his soldiers patrolled the Mexican border, and Coulter received an additional assignment as the Western Defense Command's commander of the Southern Land Frontier Sector. In early 1942 Coulter was assigned to command 2nd Cavalry Division. Coulter assumed command of the 85th Infantry Division in 1943, receiving promotion to Major General. After stateside training, he led his division in North Africa and Italy. The 85th Division fought through the Gustav and Gothic Lines during the Rome-Arno, North Apennines and Po Valley campaigns, and Coulter earned a reputation as an expert in military mountaineering and alpine warfare. After World War II, Coulter returned to the U.S. as commander of the Infantry Replacement Center at Fort McClellan, Alabama, and then was assigned as deputy commander of Fourth Army at Fort Sam Houston, Texas..."
2416 Ditterman, Kurt (German General): Four 5 x 7 inch (black and white) photographs of Lt. General Kurt Dittmar, under Allied guard, at home visiting with his family (with 9th Army permission after his surrender - May 1945) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Kurt Dittmar (January 5, 1891 in Magdeburg - April 26, 1959 in Stadtoldendorf) was a German general in World War II, who served as the Official Military Commentator of the German Armed Forces. Dittmar entered the German Imperial army as Officer candidate in March 1909. He was assigned to the 4th Engineer Battalion (Magdeburgisches Pionier-Bataillon Nr.4.) and commissioned a Second lieutenant one year later. During the World War I, Dittmar served with the rank of Captain as a Company commander and also as a Temporary Battalion Commander. After the War, Dittmar entered the Reichswehr and continued to serve with engineers units, where he reached the rank of Colonel (Oberst) to the date of April 1, 1936. With the outbreak of the World War II, Dittmar served as a commander of the engineer school in Berlin-Karlshorst. He became a divisional commander in February 1941 and led the 169th Infantry Division, which was later stationed in Finland. In the summer of 1941, he participated in Operation Polarfuchs but was evacuated from Finland a few months later due to illness. He was awarded for his leadership with the German Cross in Gold and also received Order of the Cross of Liberty, 1st Class with Swords by the Finnish government. He was posted to the Army High Command Leader Reserve in October 1941, and became General for Special Employment in April 1942. In that post, which he held over the remainder of his war service, he was the Official Military Commentator of the German Armed Forces. A rumor that he committed suicide in April 1945 was dispelled on the 23rd when he surrendered to soldiers of the 30th U.S. Infantry Division at Magdeburg. He later told his captors that the National Redoubt did not exist. Dittmar was held in U.S and later in British captivity until May 1948..."
2417 Dolittle, James (U.S. Army Air Corps General): One 4 x 6 inch (black and white) photograph of Lt. General James "Jimmy" Dolittle with reporters and photographers (including Martin Harris -on the far right, smoking a cigarette ) following the Tokyo raids. According to Wikipedia: "James Harold "Jimmy" Doolittle (December 14, 1896 - September 27, 1993) was an American aviation pioneer. A Reserve officer in the United States Army Air Corps, Doolittle was recalled to active duty during World War II and awarded the Medal of Honor for his valor and leadership as commander of the Doolittle Raid, a bold long-range retaliatory air raid on the Japanese main islands weeks after the Attack on Pearl Harbor. He was eventually promoted to lieutenant general and commanded the Twelfth Air Force over North Africa, the Fifteenth Air Force over the Mediterranean, and the Eighth Air Force over Europe..."
251 Germany (Miscellaneous) - Part 1: Thirty-six (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of Allied occupied Germany (1945 - including images of the surrender of German soldiers, civilians, Allied soldiers with German POWS, German destruction and ruins, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES with typed photo notes by the photographer). According to Wikipedia: "Upon the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II, the victorious Allied powers asserted their authority over all territory of the German Reich which lay west of the Oder-Neisse line, having formally abolished the government of Adolf Hitler (see 1945 Berlin Declaration). The four powers divided Germany into four occupation zones for administrative purposes, into what is collectively known now as Allied-occupied Germany (German: Alliierten-besetztes Deutschland). This division was ratified at the Potsdam Conference (17 July to 2 August 1945). In Autumn 1944, the United States, United Kingdom, and Soviet Union had agreed on the zones by the London Protocol. The powers approved the eventual detachment of much of the German eastern territories, lying east of the Oder-Neisse line, from Germany; the contemplated Final German Peace Treaty would determine the Polish-German and USSR-Polish border lines for the former German territories. The Final German Peace Treaty would result in the 'shifting westward' of Poland's borders back to approximately as they were before 1722. In the closing weeks of fighting in Europe, United States forces had pushed beyond the agreed boundaries for the future zones of occupation, in some places by as much as 320 kilometres (200 mi). The so-called line of contact between Soviet and American forces at the end of hostilities, mostly lying eastward of the July 1945-established inner German border was temporary. After two months in which they had held areas that had been assigned to the Soviet zone, U.S. forces withdrew in the first days of July 1945. Some have concluded that this was a crucial move that persuaded the Soviet Union to allow American, British, and French forces into their designated sectors in Berlin, which occurred at roughly the same time (July 1945), although the need for intelligence gathering (see Operation Paperclip) may also have been a factor..."
252 Germany (Miscellaneous) - Part 2: Thirty-two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of Allied attacks and Allied occupied Germany (1944/1945 - including images of an Allied B-26 bombing run , German civilians, Allied soldiers with German POWS, an Allied tank assault, the Battle of Sportsplate, Julich, Geilenkirchen, Koslav and Saarlautern, Germany, the 7th Army in Germany, Cologne Cathedral, Serbst, Germany surrender, an Allied infantry on an unidentified German city, German destruction and ruins, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES with typed photo notes by the photographer). According to Wikipedia: "Upon the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II, the victorious Allied powers asserted their authority over all territory of the German Reich which lay west of the Oder-Neisse line, having formally abolished the government of Adolf Hitler (see 1945 Berlin Declaration). The four powers divided Germany into four occupation zones for administrative purposes, into what is collectively known now as Allied-occupied Germany (German: Alliierten-besetztes Deutschland). This division was ratified at the Potsdam Conference (17 July to 2 August 1945). In Autumn 1944, the United States, United Kingdom, and Soviet Union had agreed on the zones by the London Protocol. The powers approved the eventual detachment of much of the German eastern territories, lying east of the Oder-Neisse line, from Germany; the contemplated Final German Peace Treaty would determine the Polish-German and USSR-Polish border lines for the former German territories. The Final German Peace Treaty would result in the 'shifting westward' of Poland's borders back to approximately as they were before 1722. In the closing weeks of fighting in Europe, United States forces had pushed beyond the agreed boundaries for the future zones of occupation, in some places by as much as 320 kilometres (200 mi). The so-called line of contact between Soviet and American forces at the end of hostilities, mostly lying eastward of the July 1945-established inner German border was temporary. After two months in which they had held areas that had been assigned to the Soviet zone, U.S. forces withdrew in the first days of July 1945. Some have concluded that this was a crucial move that persuaded the Soviet Union to allow American, British, and French forces into their designated sectors in Berlin, which occurred at roughly the same time (July 1945), although the need for intelligence gathering (see Operation Paperclip) may also have been a factor..."
253 Goering, Hermann (Commander-in-Chief/Luftwaffe): Nineteen (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the Vice Chancellor of Germany, Hermann Goering (interviewed, by Allied correspondents, after his surrender to the 7th U.S. Army - May 14, 1945) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES - with typed photo captions by the photographer). According to Wikipedia: "Hermann Wilhelm Goering (12 January 1893 - 15 October 1946) was a German politician, military leader, and leading member of the Nazi Party (NSDAP). A veteran World War I fighter pilot ace, he was a recipient of the coveted Pour le Mérite, also known as the 'Blue Max.' He was the last commander of Jagdgeschwader 1, the fighter wing once led by Manfred von Richthofen. A member of the NSDAP from its earliest days, Göering was wounded in 1923 during the failed coup known as the Beer Hall Putsch. He became addicted to morphine after being treated with the drug for his injuries. After helping Adolf Hitler take power in 1933, he became the second-most powerful man in Germany. He founded the Gestapo in 1933, and later gave command of it to Heinrich Himmler. Göering was appointed commander-in-chief of the Luftwaffe (air force) in 1935, a position he held until the final days of World War II. By 1940, he was at the peak of his power and influence; as minister in charge of the Four Year Plan, he was responsible for much of the functioning of the German economy in the build-up to World War II. Hitler promoted him to the rank of Reichsmarschall, a rank senior to all other Wehrmacht commanders, and in 1941 Hitler designated him as his successor and deputy in all his offices. Göering's standing with Hitler was reduced by the beginning of 1943, when the Luftwaffe failed to stop the Allied bombing of German cities and was unable to resupply German forces trapped in the Battle of Stalingrad. Göering largely withdrew from the military and political scene and focused on the acquisition of property and artwork, much of which was taken from Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Informed on 22 April 1945 that Hitler intended to commit suicide, Göering sent a telegram to Hitler requesting permission to assume control of the Reich. Considering it an act of treason, Hitler removed Göering from all his positions, expelled him from the party, and ordered his arrest. After World War II, Göering was convicted of war crimes and crimes against humanity at the Nuremberg trials. He was sentenced to death by hanging, but committed suicide by ingesting cyanide the night before the sentence was to be carried out..."
254 Halifax, Lord (British Ambassador to USA): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet of British Ambassador to the United States, Lord Halifax (Edward Wood - First Earl of Halifax) speaking at a Russian War Relief Rally in Madison Square Garden (NYC - October 27, 1941) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax (16 April 1881 - 23 December 1959), styled Lord Irwin from 1925 until 1934 and Viscount Halifax from 1934 until 1944, was one of the most senior British Conservative politicians of the 1930s. He held several senior ministerial posts during this time, most notably those of Viceroy of India from 1925 to 1931 and of Foreign Secretary between 1938 and 1940. He is regarded as one of the architects of the policy of appeasement prior to the Second World War, although after Hitler's occupation of the rump of Czechoslovakia in March 1939 he was also one of those who pushed for a new policy of attempting to deter further German aggression by promising to go to war to defend Poland. On Neville Chamberlain's resignation early in May 1940, Halifax effectively declined the position of Prime Minister despite widespread support across the political spectrum, as he felt that Churchill would be a more suitable war leader (his membership of the House of Lords was given as the official reason). A few weeks later, with the Allies facing apparently catastrophic defeat and British forces falling back on Dunkirk, Halifax favored approaching Italy to see if acceptable peace terms could be negotiated, but was overruled by Churchill after a series of stormy meetings of the War Cabinet. From 1941 to 1946, he served as British Ambassador in Washington..."
255 Holland (Liberated): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of Dutch civilians with a U.S. G.I. (Mar 1945 - in liberated Holland) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "The direct involvement of the Netherlands in World War II began with its invasion by Nazi Germany on 10 May 1940. The Netherlands had proclaimed neutrality when war broke out in September 1939, just as it had in World War I, but Adolf Hitler ordered it to be invaded anyway. On 15 May 1940, one day after the bombing of Rotterdam, the Dutch forces surrendered. The Dutch government and the royal family escaped and went into exile in London. Following the defeat, the Netherlands was placed under German occupation, which endured in some areas until the German surrender in May 1945. Active resistance was carried out by a small minority, which grew in the course of the occupation. The occupiers deported the majority of the country's Jews to Nazi concentration camps, with the cooperation of much of the Dutch police and civil service. In fact, the Netherlands saw one of the highest levels of collaboration during the Holocaust of any occupied country. The city of Amsterdam organized the only industrial action in protest to the prosecution of their Jewish fellow citizens ever in all of the Nazi occupied areas. Nonetheless, and also due to the well organized population registers comparing to other countries, about 75% of the country's Jewish population were killed during the conflict; a much higher percentage than comparable countries, like Belgium and France. Most of the south of the country was liberated in the second half of 1944. The rest, especially the west and north of the country still under occupation, suffered from a famine at the end of 1944, known as the "Hunger Winter". On 5 May 1945, the whole country was finally liberated by the total surrender of all German forces..."
256 Italy (Miscellaneous): Fifty-seven (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of Italian civilians, U.S. soldiers and the destruction in Italy ( 1944 - including the Pignataro region, the Nettuno region, Castel Del Rio, San Pancrazio, Foggia, Cassino, Salerno, Viarano, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "...On April 19, 1945, the CLN called for an insurrection (the April 25 uprising). Bologna was attacked by partisans on April 19 and was liberated on April 21 by the Italian Co-Belligerent Army and the Polish II Corps under Allied command; Parma and Reggio Emilia were freed on April 24. Turin and Milan were liberated on April 25 through an insurrection following a general strike that commenced two days earlier; over 14,000 German and Fascist troops were captured in Genoa on April 26-27, when General Reinhart Meinhold surrendered to the CLN.Many of the defeated German troops attempted to escape from Italy and some partisans units allowed the German columns to pass through if they turned over any Italians who were travelling with them. The forces of German occupation in Italy officially capitulated on May 2. Some die-hard Fascists attempted to continue fighting, but were quickly suppressed by the partisans and the Allied forces. The April insurrection brought to the fore issues between the resistance and the Allies. Given the revolutionary dimension of the insurrection in the industrial centers of Turin, Milan, and Genoa, where concerted factory occupations by armed workers had occurred, the Allied commanders sought to impose control as soon as they took the place of the retreating Germans. While the Kingdom of Italy was the de facto ruler of the South, the National Liberation Committee, still embedded in German territory, existed as a populist organization which posed a threat to the monarchy and property owners in a post-war Italy. However the PCI, under directives from Moscow, enabled the Allies to carry out their program of disarming the partisans and discouraged any revolutionary attempt at changing the social system. Instead, the PCI emphasized national unity and 'progressive democracy' in order to stake their claim in the post-war political situation. Despite the pressing need to resolve social issues which persisted after the fall of fascism, the resistance movement was subordinated to the interests of Allied leaders in order to maintain the status quo..."
257 Keyes, Geoffrey (U.S. Army General): One 6 x 9 inch (black and white) photograph of U.S. Army General Geoffrey Keyes (with French General Alphonse Juin in Rome - circa 1945) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes (October 30, 1888 - September 17, 1967) was a highly decorated senior officer of the United States Army who commanded II Corps during the Italian Campaign of World War II...In 1940, during World War II, he was Chief of Staff of the 2nd Armored Division. Keyes became Commanding General of the 3d Armored Division in 1942. From June to September 1942, he commanded the 9th Armored Division before going to North Africa as Deputy Commanding General of the I Armored Corps. From 1943 to 1945, he was Commanding General of II Corps. He commanded the Seventh Army from 1945 to 1946 and the Third Army from 1946 to 1947. In 1947, Keyes was appointed U.S. High Commissioner on the Allied Council for Austria. He served as Director, Weapons Systems Evaluation Group (WSEG) from 1951 to 1954. Keyes retired in 1954 and died on September 17, 1967 at Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. He is interred at West Point..."
258 McAuliffe, Anthony C. (U.S. Army General): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of U.S. Army General Anthony C. McAuliffe (with his aide, Lt. Ted Starrett - "somewhere in the European Theater" - December 22, 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Anthony Clement 'Nuts' McAuliffe (July 2, 1898 - August 11, 1975) was a United States Army brigadier general, who earned fame as the acting division commander of the 101st Airborne Division troops defending Bastogne, Belgium, during World War II's Battle of the Bulge. After the Battle of the Bulge, McAuliffe was promoted to Major General, and given command of his own division, the 103rd Infantry, which he led from January 1945 to July 1945. In the post-war era, he was commander of US forces in the American sector of Germany...On December 22, 1944, von Lüttwitz dispatched a party, consisting of a major, a lieutenant, and two enlisted men under a flag of truce to deliver an ultimatum. Entering the American lines southeast of Bastogne (occupied by Company F, 2nd Battalion, 327th Glider Infantry), the German party delivered the following to Gen. McAuliffe: 'To the U.S.A. Commander of the encircled town of Bastogne.' The fortune of war is changing. This time the U.S.A. forces in and near Bastogne have been encircled by strong German armored units. More German armored units have crossed the river Our near Ortheuville, have taken Marche and reached St. Hubert by passing through Hompre-Sibret-Tillet. Libramont is in German hands. There is only one possibility to save the encircled U.S.A. troops from total annihilation: that is the honorable surrender of the encircled town. In order to think it over a term of two hours will be granted beginning with the presentation of this note. If this proposal should be rejected one German Artillery Corps and six heavy A. A. Battalions are ready to annihilate the U.S.A. troops in and near Bastogne. The order for firing will be given immediately after this two hours term. All the serious civilian losses caused by this artillery fire would not correspond with the well-known American humanity. The German Commander.' According to those present when McAuliffe received the German message, he read it, crumpled it into a ball, threw it in a wastepaper basket, and muttered, 'Aw, nuts.'The officers in McAuliffe's command post were trying to find suitable language for an official reply when Lt. Col. Harry Kinnard suggested that McAuliffe's first response summed up the situation pretty well, and the others agreed. The official reply was typed and delivered by Colonel Joseph Harper, commanding the 327th Glider Infantry, to the German delegation. It was as follows: 'To the German Commander. NUTS! The American Commander' The German major appeared confused and asked Harper what the message meant. Harper said, 'In plain English? Go to hell.' The choice of 'Nuts!' rather than something earthier was typical for McAuliffe. Vincent Vicari, his personal aide at the time, recalled that 'General Mac was the only general I ever knew who did not use profane language. 'NUTS was part of his normal vocabulary.' "
259 Marseilles (France): Six (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the liberated city of Marseilles, France (1944-45 - including images of civilians, G.I.s, local blood banks, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "...During the Second World War, Marseille was bombed by German and Italian forces in 1940. The city was occupied by the Germans from November 1942 to August 1944. On 22 January 1943, over 4,000 Jews were seized in Marseille as part of 'Action Tiger.' They were held in detention camps before being deported to Poland occupied by Nazi Germany to be murdered. The Old Port was destroyed in January 1943 by the Germans. The city was liberated by the Allies on 29 August 1944. As a part of Operation Dragoon, General Joseph de Goislard de Monsabert lead roughly 130,000 French troops to liberate the city. Similar to the liberation of other major French cities, (Such as Paris and Strasbourg.) The local German garrison was defeated by mainly French forces, with limited American support...After the war, much of the city was rebuilt during the 1950s. The governments of East Germany, West Germany and Italy paid massive reparations, plus compound interest, to compensate civilians killed, injured, left homeless or destitute as a result of the war. From the 1950s onward, the city served as an entrance port for over a million immigrants to France. In 1962, there was a large influx from the newly independent Algeria, including around 150,000 returned Algerian settlers (pieds-noirs). Many immigrants have stayed and given the city a French-African quarter with a large market..."
2510 Marshall, George (U.S. Army Chief of Staff): Two 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of U.S. Army Chief of Staff George C. Marshall (with Major General Joseph L. Collins - in an armored car - inspecting the front lines and the Siegfried Line sector - 1944/Signing autographs in Baltimore, MD at the Army-Navy Game - 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "George Catlett Marshall, Jr. (December 31, 1880 - October 16, 1959) was an American statesman and soldier, famous for his leadership roles during World War II and the Cold War. He was Chief of Staff of the United States Army under presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, and served as Secretary of State and Secretary of Defense under Truman. He was hailed as the 'organizer of victory' by Winston Churchill for his leadership of the Allied victory in World War II..."
2511 Mountain Patrol Troops (U.S. Army - Miscellaneous): Sixteen (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the U.S. Army 10th Mountain Division (aka "10th Light Division" or "10th Infantry Division") training in The Italian Alps (1943) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "The 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) is a light infantry division in the United States Army based at Fort Drum, New York. Originally constituted as a mountain warfare unit, the division was the only one of its size to receive intense specialized training for fighting in mountainous and arctic conditions. Today, the 10th honors that legacy by retaining the 'Mountain' designation. Originally activated as the 10th Light Division (Alpine) in 1943, the division was redesignated the 10th Mountain Division in 1944 and fought in the mountains of Italy in some of the roughest terrain in the country. On 5 May 1945 the Division reached Nauders, Austria, beyond the Resia Pass, where it made contact with German forces being pushed south by the U.S. Seventh Army. A status quo was maintained until the enemy headquarters involved had completed their surrender to the Seventh. On the 6th, 10th Mountain troops met the 44th Infantry Division of Seventh Army..."
261 Naples (Italy): Seventeen (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of Naples, Italy in 1944-45 (including the ruins of Galleria Umberto, GI's embarking, evacuation of the wounded, civilians, Italian soldiers, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Naples was the most-bombed Italian city during World War II. Though Neapolitans did not rebel under Italian Fascism, Naples was the first Italian city to rise up against German military occupation; the city was completely freed by 1 October 1943, when British and American forces entered the city. Departing Germans burned the library of the university, as well as the Italian Royal Society. They also destroyed the city archives. Time bombs planted throughout the city continued to explode into November. The symbol of the rebirth of Naples was the rebuilding of the church of Santa Chiara, which had been destroyed in a United States Army Air Corps bombing raid..."
262 North Africa: Three (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the North Africa campaign (Casablanca, various battlefield images, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES - circa 1942). According to Wikipedia: "The North African Campaign of the Second World War took place in North Africa from June 1940 to May 1943. It included campaigns fought in the Libyan and Egyptian deserts (Western Desert Campaign, also known as the Desert War) and in Morocco and Algeria (Operation Torch) and Tunisia (Tunisia Campaign). The campaign was fought between the Allies and Axis powers, many of whom had colonial interests in Africa dating from the late 19th century. The Allied war effort was dominated by the British Commonwealth and exiles from German-occupied Europe. The United States entered the war in December 1941 and began direct military assistance in North Africa on May 11, 1942..."
263 Pacific Theatre: Three (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the aftermath of a "bloody tank battles" at Peleliu and Leyte and a posed photograph of Captain Herman Bottcher ("Hero of Buna") by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES - circa 1944). According to Wikipedia: "The Pacific War, sometimes called the Asia-Pacific War, was the theatre of World War II that was fought in the Pacific and East Asia. It was fought over a vast area that included the Pacific Ocean and islands, the South West Pacific, South-East Asia, and in China (including the 1945 Soviet-Japanese conflict)..."
264 Paris (France): Four (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes and four 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of the 1945 Bastille Day celebrations (the first in 5 years) in liberated Paris, France (1945) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "...The Liberation of Paris (also known as the Battle for Paris) was a military action that took place during World War II from 19 August 1944 until the German garrison surrendered the French capital on 25 August 1944. Paris had been ruled by Nazi Germany since the signing of the Second Compiègne Armistice on 22 June 1940, after which the Wehrmacht occupied northern and western France..."
265 Patton, George S. (U.S. Army General): Five 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of General George C. Patton (with Generals James Van Fleet, James Egan, Robert W. Grow and Dwight D. Eisenhower, visiting wounded soldiers at the estate of German Chancellor Franz Von Papen in Wallerfangen, Germany, addressing the 26th Infantry Division in France, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES - 1944). According to Wikipedia: "General George Smith Patton Jr. (November 11, 1885 - December 21, 1945) was a senior officer of the United States Army, who commanded the United States Seventh Army in the Mediterranean and European theaters of World War II, but is best known for his leadership of the United States Third Army in France and Germany following the Allied invasion of Normandy in June 1944..."
266 Peace (Themed photo assignment): Eight (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of soldiers and civilians holding THE STARS AND STRIPES newspaper following the Allied victory in Europe (with a "PEACE" headline) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES - 1945). According to Wikipedia: "Victory in Europe Day, generally known as V-E Day, VE Day or simply V Day was the public holiday celebrated on 8 May 1945 to mark the formal acceptance by the Allies of World War II of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces. It thus marked the end of World War II in Europe. The term VE Day existed as early as September 1944, in anticipation of victory. On 30 April 1945, Adolf Hitler, the Nazi leader, committed suicide during the Battle of Berlin. Germany's surrender, therefore, was authorized by his successor, Reichspräsident Karl Dönitz. The administration headed by Dönitz was known as the Flensburg Government. The act of military surrender was signed on 7 May in Reims, France and on 8 May in Berlin, Germany. The former Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc countries have historically celebrated the end of World War II on 9 May. However, the Baltic countries now commemorate VE day on 8 May. In Ukraine from 2015, 8 May was designated as a day of Remembrance and Reconciliation, but it is not a public holiday..."
267 Polish Army (Photo assignment): Eight (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of Polish Army activities in No Man's Land" (unidentified location - circa 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "The European theatre of World War II opened with the German invasion of Poland on Friday September 1, 1939 and the Soviet invasion of Poland on September 17, 1939. The Polish Army was defeated after more than a month of fighting. After Poland had been overrun, a government-in-exile (headquartered in Britain), armed forces, and an intelligence service were established outside of Poland. These organizations contributed to the Allied effort throughout the war. The Polish Army was recreated in the West, as well as in the East (after the German invasion of the Soviet Union). Poles provided crucial help to the Allies throughout the war, fighting on land, sea and air. Notable was the service of the Polish Air Force, not only in the Allied victory in the Battle of Britain but also the subsequent air war. Polish ground troops were present in the North Africa Campaign (siege of Tobruk); the Italian campaign (including the capture of the monastery hill at the Battle of Monte Cassino); and in battles following the invasion of France (the battle of the Falaise pocket; an airborne brigade parachute drop during Operation Market Garden and one division in the Western Allied invasion of Germany). Polish forces in the east, fighting alongside the Red army and under Soviet command, took part in the Soviet offensives across Belarus and Ukraine into Poland, across the Vistula and towards the Oder and then into Berlin. Some Polish contributions were less visible, and some even overlooked, most notably the prewar and wartime deciphering of German Enigma machine codes by cryptologists Marian Rejewski and his colleagues. The Polish intelligence network also proved to be of much value to the Allied intelligence..."
268 Rodeo (Foggia, Italy): Twenty-Nine (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of a GI - "R and R" - rodeo (rest and recuperation entertainment for the troops) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES - 1944). No additional information available.
269 Rome (Italy): Eleven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and sixteen (black and white) photographs of the liberation of Rome (June 1944 ) and the aftermath (civilians, soldiers, buildings, examination of prostitutes for sexually transmitted diseases, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "It took four major offensives between January and May 1944 before the line was eventually broken by a combined assault of the Fifth and Eighth Armies (including British, American, French, Polish and Canadian Corps) concentrated along a twenty-mile front between Monte Cassino and the western seaboard. In a concurrent action, American General Mark Clark was ordered to break out of the stagnant position at Anzio and cash-in on the opportunity to cut off and destroy a large part of the German 10th Army retreating from the Gustav Line between them and the Canadians. But this opportunity was lost on the brink of success, when General Clark disobeyed his orders and sent his U.S. Forces to enter the vacant Rome instead. Rome had been declared an open city by the German Army so no resistance was encountered. The American forces took possession of Rome on 4 June 1944. The German Tenth Army were allowed to get away and, in the next few weeks, were responsible for doubling the Allied casualties in the next few months. General Clark was hailed as a hero in the United States. The Canadians were sent through the city without stopping at 3:00AM the next morning..."
2610 Roosevelt, Jr. Theodore (U.S. Army General): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of Brigadier General Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ("Smiling at death" in France on the day before he died - July 11, 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Theodore 'Ted' Roosevelt III (September 13, 1887 - July 12, 1944), known as Theodore Jr., was an American government, business and military leader. He was the eldest son of President Theodore Roosevelt and First Lady Edith Roosevelt. Roosevelt was instrumental in the forming of the American Legion in 1919 following his valiant service in the United States Army during World War I. He later served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Governor of Puerto Rico (1929-32), Governor-General of the Philippines (1932-33), Chairman of the Board of American Express Company, Vice-President at Doubleday Books. Returning to the Army in 1940, he led the first wave of troops at Utah Beach during the Normandy landings in 1944, earning the Medal of Honor for his command. He died in France 36 days later, holding the rank of Brigadier General..."
2611 Russian Army (Photo assignment): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and seven (black and white) photographs of Russian army activities (including the awarding of Russian medals to British airmen, Russian airmen waiting for Lend-lease planes, Marshal Gregor Zukhov with General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery in Berlin, American GI's with Russian soldiers, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES 1944-45). According to the UKessays web site: "The history of the Russian army in the period of the Second World War is an important topic, which has still not been fully explored by historians today. For a long time the documents regarding the Soviet Armed Forces has been kept classified and the Russian authorities only published propagandistic data...The Russian Army in the period of World War II was known as the Workers' and Peasants' Red Army (RKKA or Red Army). The Red Army came about as the Soviet Government's revolutionary militia in the Russian Civil War of 1918-1922. Eventually it grew into the national army of the USSR and since 1946 was called the Soviet Army..."
2612 Second World War (Miscellaneous): Miscellaneous and unidentified (black and white) photographs (various sizes) taken during the Second World War by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). No additional information available.
271 Signage (European Theatre): Twenty-four (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of military and battlefield signs (and aircraft art images) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES - 1944). No additional information available.
272 Sloan, John E. (U.S. Army General): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and four (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of Major General John Emmet Sloan (Commander of the 88th Infantry Division from 1942-44) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES - 1944). No additional information available.
273 Soldiers and Mules (U.S.Army): Eleven (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of U.S. Army soldiers and service mules (Italy - 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Mules were used by the U.S. Army during World War II to carry supplies and equipment over difficult terrain. Pack animals that are innately patient, cautious, and hardy, mules could carry heavy loads of supplies where Jeeps and even pack horses could not travel. Mules were used in North Africa, Burma, and in Italy. They are also used for transporting supplies in mountainous regions."
274 Stars and Stripes (Personnel): Eleven (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of STARS AND STRIPES reporters, columnists, writers, photographers, editors, cartoonists et cetera (including Bill Mauldin, Howard Taubman, Bill Brinkley, Ed Hill, Harry Shershow, Ralph Martin, Ralph Stein, Jack Ruge, Arthur Weithas, et cetera at work and at social functions) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES - circa 1944). According to Wikipedia: "Stars and Stripes is a U.S. newspaper that reports on matters affecting the members of the United States Armed Forces. It operates from inside the Department of Defense, but is editorially separate from it, and its First Amendment protection is safeguarded by the United States Congress, to whom an independent ombudsman, who serves the readers' interests, regularly reports. As well as a website, Stars and Stripes publishes four daily print editions for the military service members serving overseas; these European, Middle Eastern, Japanese, and South Korean editions are also available as free downloads in electronic format, and there are also seven digital editions. The newspaper has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. During World War II, the newspaper was printed in dozens of editions in several operating theaters. Again, both newspapermen in uniform and young soldiers, some of whom would later become important journalists, filled the staffs and showed zeal and talent in publishing and delivering the paper on time. Some of the editions were assembled and printed very close to the front in order to get the latest information to the most troops. Also, during the war, the newspaper published the 53-book series G.I. Stories. After Bill Mauldin did his popular 'Up Front' cartoons for the WWII Stars and Stripes, he returned home to a successful career as an editorial cartoonist and two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize..."
275 Taylor, Maxwell D. (U.S. Army General): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of Major General Maxwell D. Taylor in Bastogne, France (December 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). The photo caption reads: "HE FLEW ATLANTIC TO JOIN MEN IN BASTOGNE, FRANCE...Major General Maxwell D. Taylor, Commander of the 101st Airborne Division is shown above in a jeep at an advanced command post in France some time ago, Major General Taylor, who was in Washington when his division was trapped inside Bastogne during the German counter-offensive in Belgium, flew the Atlantic Ocean and slipped through enemy lines in a jeep to be with his men in the final phase of the battle it was revealed tonight. General Taylor left Washington Christmas Eve and arrived inside the pocket at Bastogne, two days ago." According to Wikipedia: "Maxwell Davenport 'Max' Taylor (August 26, 1901 - April 19, 1987) was a senior United States Army officer and U.S. diplomat of the mid-20th century, who served as the fifth Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff after having been appointed by President John F. Kennedy. He is the father of military historian and author Thomas Happer Taylor...He served on the War Plans Division staff in 1940 and took part in a defense cooperation mission to Latin American countries. He commanded the 12th Field Artillery Battalion from 1940 to 1941, and then served in the Office of the Secretary of the General Staff until 1942. He received temporary promotions to Lieutenant Colonel in December 1941, Colonel in February 1942, and Brigadier General in December 1942..."
276 Taylor, Myron (Personal Envoy to Pope Pius VII): One 2 x 3 inch (black and white) photograph of Myron Taylor (Personal Envoy to Pope Pius VII - in Rome) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES - August 1944). According to Wikipedia: "Myron Charles Taylor (January 18, 1874 - May 5, 1959) was an American industrialist, and later a diplomatic figure involved in many of the most important geopolitical events during and after World War II. In addition he was a philanthropist, giving to his alma mater, Cornell University, and a number of other causes..."
277 Women in Wartime (Miscellaneous): Nineteen (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of various (unidentified) women (Military and civilian during the Second World War) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: " Women in World War II took on a variety of roles from country to country. World War II involved global conflict on an unprecedented scale; the absolute urgency of mobilizing the entire population made the expansion of the role of women inevitable. The domestic roles of women are covered in Home front during World War II..."
278 Yugoslavian Soldiers and Children (Miscellaneous): Two (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and seventeen (black and white) photographs of unidentified Yugoslavian soldiers (at work and at play) and Yugoslavian children in a hospital (1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Military operations in World War II on the territory of Yugoslavia started on April 6, 1941, when the kingdom was swiftly conquered by Axis forces and partitioned between Germany, Italy, Hungary, Bulgaria and client regimes. Subsequently, a guerrilla liberation war was fought against the Axis occupying forces and their locally established puppet regimes, including the Independent State of Croatia and the Government of National Salvation in Serbia, by the Communist-led republican Yugoslav Partisans. Simultaneously, a multi-side civil war was waged between the Partisans, the Serbian royalist Chetniks, Croatian nationalist Ustaše and Home Guard, as well as Slovene Home Guard troops..."



PHOTOGRAPHS/PHOTO SLIDES: TRANSPORTATION.

Photographs, slides and proof sheets by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by subject.



Box Folder
281 Autogyro (Aircraft): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet of an autogyro test at an unidentified (New York-area) airport (circa 1930s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "An autogyro (from Greek - self-turning), also known as gyroplane, gyrocopter, or rotaplane, is a type of rotorcraft that uses an unpowered rotor in autorotation to develop lift, and an engine-powered propeller, similar to that of a fixed-wing aircraft, to provide thrust. While similar to a helicopter rotor in appearance, the autogyro's rotor must have air flowing through the rotor disc to generate rotation. Invented by the Spanish engineer Juan de la Cierva to create an aircraft that could fly safely at slow speeds, the autogyro was first flown on January 9, 1923, at Cuatro Vientos Airfield in Madrid. De la Cierva's aircraft resembled the fixed-wing aircraft of the day, with a front-mounted engine and propeller in a tractor configuration to pull the aircraft through the air. Under license from Cierva in the 1920s and 1930s, the Pitcairn and Kellett companies made further innovations. Late-model autogyros patterned after Etienne Dormoy's Buhl A-1 Autogyro and Igor Bensen's designs feature a rear-mounted engine and propeller in a pusher configuration. The term Autogiro was a trademark of the Cierva Autogiro Company, and the term Gyrocopter was used by E. Burke Wilford who developed the Reiseler Kreiser feathering rotor equipped gyroplane in the first half of the twentieth century. The latter term was later adopted as a trademark by Bensen Aircraft..."
282 Bus Terminal (Boarding): Four 3.5 x 4.5 inch (black and white) photographs of activities at an unidentified bus terminal (with passengers boarding for Los Angeles) by Martin Harris (for A COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Here is America" with text by Thomas H. Wolf - October 11, 1947). No additional information is available.
283 Flying Newsboys/Flying Clubs: One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and three (black and white) photographs of "Flying Newsboys" and other flying clubs in the New York area (c.1930s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
284 Nassau (Bahamas) Cruise: Three 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of "4 survivors of a group of 5 passengers" aboard the Waco (airplane) forced down (due to mechanical problems) on "one of the Cays" between Miami and Nassau (including the rescue party) by Martin Harris (circa 1940). No additional information available.
285 Nautilus Nuclear Submarine (Launching): Eleven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and twenty-three (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the launching of the first nuclear powered submarine Nautilus in Groton Connecticut (with the executives and shipyard workers of General Dynamics, the international press, U.S. military and First Lady Mamie Eisenhower - 1954) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "USS Nautilus (SSN-571) was the world's first operational nuclear-powered submarine. The vessel was the first submarine to complete a submerged transit of the North Pole on August 3, 1958. Sharing names with Captain Nemo's fictional submarine in Jules Verne's Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, and named after another USS Nautilus (SS-168) that served with distinction in World War II, Nautilus was authorized in 1951 and launched in 1954. Because her nuclear propulsion allowed her to remain submerged far longer than diesel-electric submarines, she broke many records in her first years of operation, and traveled to locations previously beyond the limits of submarines. In operation, she revealed a number of limitations in her design and construction. This information was used to improve subsequent submarines. Nautilus was decommissioned in 1980 and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1982. The submarine has been preserved as a submarine museum in Groton, Connecticut, where the vessel receives some 250,000 visitors a year..."
286 Pan American Story, The (Book) - Part 1: Six (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the Pan American pilots and crew (1968) by Martin Harris and Esther Bubbley (for a children's book THE PAN AMERICAN STORY published in 1968). According to Wikipedia: "Pan American World Airways, known from its founding until 1950 as Pan American Airways and commonly known as Pan Am, was the principal and largest international air carrier in the United States from 1927 until its collapse on December 4, 1991. Founded in 1927 as a scheduled air mail and passenger service operating between Key West, Florida, and Havana, Cuba, the airline became a major company credited with many innovations that shaped the international airline industry, including the widespread use of jet aircraft, jumbo jets, and computerized reservation systems. It was also a founding member of the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the global airline industry association. Identified by its blue globe logo ('The Blue Meatball'), the use of the word 'Clipper' in aircraft names and call signs, and the white pilot uniform caps, the airline was a cultural icon of the 20th century. In an era dominated by flag carriers that were wholly or majority government-owned, it was also the unofficial overseas flag carrier of the United States. During most of the jet era, Pan Am's flagship terminal was the Worldport located at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City..."
287 Pan American Story, The (Book) - Part 2: Twenty 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of Pan American stewardess training (1968) by Martin Harris and Esther Bubbley (for a children's book THE PAN AMERICAN STORY published in 1968). According to Wikipedia: "Pan American World Airways, known from its founding until 1950 as Pan American Airways and commonly known as Pan Am, was the principal and largest international air carrier in the United States from 1927 until its collapse on December 4, 1991. Founded in 1927 as a scheduled air mail and passenger service operating between Key West, Florida, and Havana, Cuba, the airline became a major company credited with many innovations that shaped the international airline industry, including the widespread use of jet aircraft, jumbo jets, and computerized reservation systems. It was also a founding member of the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the global airline industry association. Identified by its blue globe logo ('The Blue Meatball'), the use of the word 'Clipper' in aircraft names and call signs, and the white pilot uniform caps, the airline was a cultural icon of the 20th century. In an era dominated by flag carriers that were wholly or majority government-owned, it was also the unofficial overseas flag carrier of the United States. During most of the jet era, Pan Am's flagship terminal was the Worldport located at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City..."
288 Pan American Story, The (Book) - Part 3: Twenty one (black and white) proof sheets of miscellaneous Pan American workplace activities (1968) by Martin Harris and Esther Bubbley (for a children's book THE PAN AMERICAN STORY published in 1968). According to Wikipedia: "Pan American World Airways, known from its founding until 1950 as Pan American Airways and commonly known as Pan Am, was the principal and largest international air carrier in the United States from 1927 until its collapse on December 4, 1991. Founded in 1927 as a scheduled air mail and passenger service operating between Key West, Florida, and Havana, Cuba, the airline became a major company credited with many innovations that shaped the international airline industry, including the widespread use of jet aircraft, jumbo jets, and computerized reservation systems. It was also a founding member of the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the global airline industry association. Identified by its blue globe logo ('The Blue Meatball'), the use of the word 'Clipper' in aircraft names and call signs, and the white pilot uniform caps, the airline was a cultural icon of the 20th century. In an era dominated by flag carriers that were wholly or majority government-owned, it was also the unofficial overseas flag carrier of the United States. During most of the jet era, Pan Am's flagship terminal was the Worldport located at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City..."
289 Pan American Story, The (Book) - Part 4: Forty - eight (color) photo slides of the Pan American pilots and crew (1968) by Martin Harris and Esther Bubbley (for a children's book THE PAN AMERICAN STORY published in 1968). According to Wikipedia: "Pan American World Airways, known from its founding until 1950 as Pan American Airways and commonly known as Pan Am, was the principal and largest international air carrier in the United States from 1927 until its collapse on December 4, 1991. Founded in 1927 as a scheduled air mail and passenger service operating between Key West, Florida, and Havana, Cuba, the airline became a major company credited with many innovations that shaped the international airline industry, including the widespread use of jet aircraft, jumbo jets, and computerized reservation systems. It was also a founding member of the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the global airline industry association. Identified by its blue globe logo ('The Blue Meatball'), the use of the word 'Clipper' in aircraft names and call signs, and the white pilot uniform caps, the airline was a cultural icon of the 20th century. In an era dominated by flag carriers that were wholly or majority government-owned, it was also the unofficial overseas flag carrier of the United States. During most of the jet era, Pan Am's flagship terminal was the Worldport located at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City..."
2810 Piper, William T. (Airplane manufacturer): Two 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of airplane manufacturer William T. Piper ("Maker of the largest selling ship - the cub" - 1940 ) by Martin Harris (for a FORBE'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - May 1940). According to Wikipedia: "William Thomas Piper Sr. (January 8, 1881, Knapps Creek, New York U.S. - January 15, 1970, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania) was an American airplane manufacturer, aviation businessman, oil industry businessman, and engineer. He was the founding president of the Piper Aircraft Corporation and led the company from 1929 until his death in 1970. He graduated from Harvard University in 1903 and later became known as 'the Henry Ford of Aviation.' The William T. Piper Memorial Airport in Lock Haven is named in his honor. Piper served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, in the latter as a captain in the Corps of Engineers. In 1980, he was posthumously inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame."



PHOTOGRAPHS/PHOTO SLIDES: TRAVEL

Photographs, slides and proof sheets by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by subject.



Box Folder
291 Brussels World's Fair (Belgium) - Part 1: Two (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and thirty-one 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of various attractions at the Brussels (Belgium) World's Fair (Edward Stone, Fair architect - 1958) by Martin Harris (for a BUSINESS WEEK photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Expo 58, also known as the Brussels World's Fair, was held from April 17 to October 19, 1958. It was the first major World's Fair after World War II...The site is best known for the Atomium, a giant model of a unit cell of an iron crystal (each sphere representing an atom). More than 41 million visitors visited the site, which was opened with a call for world peace and social and economic progress, issued by King Baudouin I. Notable exhibitions include the Philips Pavilion, where 'Poème électronique,' commissioned specifically for the location, was played back from 425 loudspeakers, placed at specific points as designed by Iannis Xenakis, and Le Corbusier. Another exhibition at the Belgian pavilion was the Congolese village that some have branded a human zoo..."
292 Brussels World's Fair (Belgium) - Part 2: Twenty-seven 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of various attractions at the Brussels (Belgium) World's Fair (Edward Stone, Fair architect - 1958) by Martin Harris (for a BUSINESS WEEK photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Expo 58, also known as the Brussels World's Fair, was held from April 17 to October 19, 1958. It was the first major World's Fair after World War II...The site is best known for the Atomium, a giant model of a unit cell of an iron crystal (each sphere representing an atom). More than 41 million visitors visited the site, which was opened with a call for world peace and social and economic progress, issued by King Baudouin I. Notable exhibitions include the Philips Pavilion, where 'Poème électronique,' commissioned specifically for the location, was played back from 425 loudspeakers, placed at specific points as designed by Iannis Xenakis, and Le Corbusier. Another exhibition at the Belgian pavilion was the Congolese village that some have branded a human zoo..."
293 Brussels World's Fair (Belgium) - Part 3: Twenty-seven 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of various attractions at the Brussels (Belgium) World's Fair (Edward Stone, Fair architect - 1958) by Martin Harris (for a BUSINESS WEEK photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Expo 58, also known as the Brussels World's Fair, was held from April 17 to October 19, 1958. It was the first major World's Fair after World War II...The site is best known for the Atomium, a giant model of a unit cell of an iron crystal (each sphere representing an atom). More than 41 million visitors visited the site, which was opened with a call for world peace and social and economic progress, issued by King Baudouin I. Notable exhibitions include the Philips Pavilion, where 'Poème électronique,' commissioned specifically for the location, was played back from 425 loudspeakers, placed at specific points as designed by Iannis Xenakis, and Le Corbusier. Another exhibition at the Belgian pavilion was the Congolese village that some have branded a human zoo..."
294 Brussels World's Fair (Belgium) - Part 4: One hundred and fifty-five (color) photo slides of various attractions at the Brussels (Belgium) World's Fair (Edward Stone, Fair architect - 1958) by Martin Harris (for a BUSINESS WEEK photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Expo 58, also known as the Brussels World's Fair, was held from April 17 to October 19, 1958. It was the first major World's Fair after World War II...The site is best known for the Atomium, a giant model of a unit cell of an iron crystal (each sphere representing an atom). More than 41 million visitors visited the site, which was opened with a call for world peace and social and economic progress, issued by King Baudouin I. Notable exhibitions include the Philips Pavilion, where 'Poème électronique,' commissioned specifically for the location, was played back from 425 loudspeakers, placed at specific points as designed by Iannis Xenakis, and Le Corbusier. Another exhibition at the Belgian pavilion was the Congolese village that some have branded a human zoo..."
295 England - Part 1: Seventeen (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of political speech making at "Speakers' Corner" in London's Hyde Park (1953) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Hyde Park was created in 1536 by Henry Vlll for hunting. He acquired the manor of Hyde from the canons of Westminster Abbey, who had held it since before the Norman Conquest; it was enclosed as a deer park and remained a private hunting ground until James I permitted limited access to gentlefolk, appointing a ranger to take charge. Charles I created the Ring (north of the present Serpentine boathouses), and in 1637 he opened the park to the general public...Sites of interest in the park include Speakers' Corner (located in the northeast corner near Marble Arch), close to the former site of the Tyburn gallows, and Rotten Row, which is the northern boundary of the site of the Crystal Palace. South of the Serpentine is the Diana, Princess of Wales memorial, an oval stone ring fountain opened on 6 July 2004. To the east of the Serpentine, just beyond the dam, is London's Holocaust Memorial. The July 7 Memorial in the park commemorates the victims of 7 July 2005 London bombings...."
296 England - Part 2: One 6.75 x 9.75 inch (black and white) proof sheet and thirteen 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of activities in the London Underground (mass - transit subway system - 1953) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo shoot). According to Wikipedia: "The London Underground (also known simply as the Underground, or by its nickname the Tube) is a public rapid transit system serving Greater London and some adjacent parts of the counties of Buckinghamshire, Essex and Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom. The world's first underground railway, the Metropolitan Railway, which opened in 1863, is now part of the Circle, Hammersmith and City and Metropolitan lines; the first line to operate underground electric traction trains, the City and South London Railway in 1890, is now part of the Northern line. The network has expanded to 11 lines, and in 2015-16 carried 1.34 billion passengers, making it the world's 11th busiest metro system..."
297 England - Part 3: Thirteen (color) photo slides of political speech making at "Speakers' Corner" in London's Hyde Park (1953) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Hyde Park was created in 1536 by Henry Vlll for hunting. He acquired the manor of Hyde from the canons of Westminster Abbey, who had held it since before the Norman Conquest; it was enclosed as a deer park and remained a private hunting ground until James I permitted limited access to gentlefolk, appointing a ranger to take charge. Charles I created the Ring (north of the present Serpentine boathouses), and in 1637 he opened the park to the general public...Sites of interest in the park include Speakers' Corner (located in the northeast corner near Marble Arch), close to the former site of the Tyburn gallows, and Rotten Row, which is the northern boundary of the site of the Crystal Palace. South of the Serpentine is the Diana, Princess of Wales memorial, an oval stone ring fountain opened on 6 July 2004. To the east of the Serpentine, just beyond the dam, is London's Holocaust Memorial. The July 7 Memorial in the park commemorates the victims of 7 July 2005 London bombings...."
301 France (Post - Second World War) - Part 1: Two (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of street scenes in Paris, France following the Allied victory in Europe (circa 1945-46) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "...France emerged from World War II to face a series of new problems. After a short period of provisional government initially led by General Charles de Gaulle, a new constitution (October 13, 1946) established the Fourth Republic under a parliamentary form of government controlled by a series of coalitions. The mixed nature of the coalitions and a consequent lack of agreement on measures for dealing with colonial wars in Indochina and Algeria caused successive cabinet crises and changes of government. The war in Indochina ended with French defeat and withdrawal in 1954. Algeria was no mere colony. With over a million European residents in Algeria (the Pied-Noir), France refused to grant independence until a bloody colonial war (the Algerian War of Independence) had turned into a French political and civil crisis; Algeria was given its independence in 1962, unleashing a massive wave of immigration from the former colony back to France..."
302 France (Post - Second World War) - Part 2: Sixteen (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of street scenes in Paris (1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "...The population of Paris did not return to its 1936 level until 1946, and had grown to 2,850,000 by 1954, including 135,000 immigrants, mostly from Algeria, Morocco, Italy and Spain. The exodus of middle-class Parisians to the suburbs continued. The population of the city declined during the 1960s and 1970s (2,753,000 in 1962, 2.3 million in 1972) before finally stabilizing in the 1980s (2,168.000 in 1982, 2,152,000 in 1992)..."
303 France (Post - Second World War) - Part 3: Thirty-five (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of street scenes in Paris (1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "...The population of Paris did not return to its 1936 level until 1946, and had grown to 2,850,000 by 1954, including 135,000 immigrants, mostly from Algeria, Morocco, Italy and Spain. The exodus of middle-class Parisians to the suburbs continued. The population of the city declined during the 1960s and 1970s (2,753,000 in 1962, 2.3 million in 1972) before finally stabilizing in the 1980s (2,168.000 in 1982, 2,152,000 in 1992)..."
304 France (Post - Second World War) - Part 4: Fifty-two (color) photo slides of street scenes in Paris (1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "...The population of Paris did not return to its 1936 level until 1946, and had grown to 2,850,000 by 1954, including 135,000 immigrants, mostly from Algeria, Morocco, Italy and Spain. The exodus of middle-class Parisians to the suburbs continued. The population of the city declined during the 1960s and 1970s (2,753,000 in 1962, 2.3 million in 1972) before finally stabilizing in the 1980s (2,168.000 in 1982, 2,152,000 in 1992)..."
305 Germany (NATO) - Part 1: Twenty-three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and twenty-three (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) diplomatic (featuring Karl Gumbel - Department Chief for Personnel, Dr. Wolfgang Holz - Head of Economy and Technique Department, Hans Hopf - Finance and Budget Department Head, et cetera) and military (featuring Major General Joseph von Radowitz - Recruitment Officer, Chairman General Adolf Hesinger, Colonel Ernst Kusserov, General Hellmuth Laegeler - Chief of Ministry, et cetera) images (circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for NATO, a AKTUELL MAGAZINE photo assignment - 1956 and a U.S. NEWS AND WOPRLD REPORT MAGAZINE photo assignment - 1959). According to Wikipedia: "The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, is an intergovernmental military alliance based on the North Atlantic Treaty which was signed on April 4, 1949. The organization constitutes a system of collective defense whereby its member states agree to mutual defense in response to an attack by any external party. NATO's headquarters are located in Haren, Brussels, Belgium, where the Supreme Allied Commander also resides. Belgium is one of the 28 member states across North America and Europe, the newest of which, Albania and Croatia, joined in April 2009. An additional 22 countries participate in NATO's Partnership for Peace program, with 15 other countries involved in institutionalized dialogue programs. The combined military spending of all NATO members constitutes over 70 percent of the global total. Members' defense spending is supposed to amount to 2 percent of GDP..."
306 Germany (NATO) - Part 2: Forty -two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) diplomatic (featuring Karl Gumbel - Department Chief for Personnel, Dr. Wolfgang Holz - Head of Economy and Technique Department, Hans Hopf - Finance and Budget Department Head, State Secretary Dr. Joseph Rust, et cetera) and military (featuring Major General Joseph von Radowitz - Recruitment Officer, Chairman General Adolf Hesinger, Colonel Ernst Kusserov,, General Haus Speidel - Armed Forces Chief, Colonel Werner Panitzki- Air Forces Chief, Vice -Admiral Friedrich Oskar Ruge - Chief of Naval Forces, General Hellmuth Laegeler - Chief of Ministry, enlisted soldiers at work and play, et cetera) images (circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for NATO, a AKTUELL MAGAZINE photo assignment - 1956 and a U.S. NEWS AND WOPRLD REPORT MAGAZINE photo assignment - 1959). According to Wikipedia: "The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, is an intergovernmental military alliance based on the North Atlantic Treaty which was signed on April 4, 1949. The organization constitutes a system of collective defense whereby its member states agree to mutual defense in response to an attack by any external party. NATO's headquarters are located in Haren, Brussels, Belgium, where the Supreme Allied Commander also resides. Belgium is one of the 28 member states across North America and Europe, the newest of which, Albania and Croatia, joined in April 2009. An additional 22 countries participate in NATO's Partnership for Peace program, with 15 other countries involved in institutionalized dialogue programs. The combined military spending of all NATO members constitutes over 70 percent of the global total. Members' defense spending is supposed to amount to 2 percent of GDP..."
311 Indonesia (High school): Five (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and six 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of the daily activities at an unidentified high school in Indonesia (April 1960) by Martin Harris (for a SCOPE ASSOCIATES photo assignment). No additional information available.
312 Ireland (Tour) - Part 1: Seventeen (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and twenty-one 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of, what is described as, the "O'Sullivan Irish Tour" - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo project). No additional information provided or available.
313 Ireland (Tour) - Part 2: Twenty- five 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of, what is described as, the "O'Sullivan Irish Tour" (circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo project). No additional information provided or available.
314 Israel (Miscellaneous) - Part 1: Four (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of "young archeologists" in Israel (with typed photo captions by the photographer - circa 1949) and three unidentified (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of life in Israel (street scenes, a diplomatic gathering and military scenes - circa 1949 - 1950s) by Martin Harris ('Young archeologists" for a New York Times photo assignment). No additional information available.
315 Israel (Miscellaneous) - Part 2: Eighty-two (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of life in Israel (markets, beaches, military, buildings, et cetera - circa 1949) by Martin Harris (for a SCOPE ASSOCIATES photo assignment). No additional information available.
316 New York City (Miscellaneous) - Part 1: One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet and twelve (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of New York City in the 1940s and 1950s (nightclubs, the United Nations, aerial views of Coney Island, rooftop scenes, Hudson River Esplanade, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for various publication photo assignments and projects). No additional information available.
317 New York City (Miscellaneous) - Part 2: Thirty - three (color) photo slides of New York City skyline images (circa 1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo project). No additional information available.
318 Puerto Rico (Miscellaneous) : Twenty - one (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of life in Puerto Rico (U.S Army bombers in flight over Puerto Rico, labor negotiations with David Dubrisky, San Juan Mayor Fernando J. Geigel, aerial views of Puerto Rico, street and café scenes, painter Jose Vela Zanetti, Dr. Tomas Blanco - Health Education Director, Pan Am Yankee Clipper, William D. Leahy - Governor of Puerto Rico, et cetera - 1940.) by Martin Harris (for unidentified publication photo assignments). According to Wikipedia: "...In 1940, when Germany attacked Great Britain, the United States feared that if Germany controlled Great Britain, Mexico and the U.S. would be next. In the same year, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt ordered the construction of a naval base in the Atlantic similar to Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. The site was meant to provide anchorage, docking, repair facilities, fuel, and supplies for 60% of the Atlantic Fleet. The naval base, which was named U.S. Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, became the largest naval installation in the world in landmass and was meant to be the Pearl Harbor of the Atlantic. However, with the defeat of Germany in 1945, the United States concentrated all of their efforts to the war in the Pacific. In May 2003, after six decades of existence, the base was officially shut down by the U.S. Navy..."
319 Spain (The Prado Museum): Three 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs of The Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain (circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for a Scope Associates photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The Museo del Prado is the main Spanish national art museum, located in central Madrid. It features one of the world's finest collections of European art, dating from the 12th century to the early 20th century, based on the former Spanish Royal Collection, and unquestionably the best single collection of Spanish art. Founded as a museum of paintings and sculpture in 1819, it also contains important collections of other types of works. El Prado is one of the most visited sites in the world, and is considered one the greatest museums of art in the world. The numerous works by Francisco de Goya, the single most extensively represented artist, as well as by Diego Velázquez, El Greco, Titian, Peter Paul Rubens and Hieronymus Bosch are some of the highlights of the collection..."
3110 West Point Military Academy (New York): Seven (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and one 11 x 11 inch (black and white) photograph of daily activities at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York (1948) by Martin Harris (for a THIS WEEK MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Revolution at West Point" - April 4, 1948 with text by Bob Deindorfer). According to Wikipedia: "The United States Military Academy (USMA), also known as West Point, Army, The Academy, or simply The Point, is a four-year coeducational federal service academy located in West Point, New York in Orange County. It sits on scenic high ground overlooking the Hudson River, 50 miles (80 km) north of New York City. The Academy traces its roots to 1801, when President Thomas Jefferson directed, shortly after his inauguration, that plans be set in motion to establish the United States Military Academy at West Point. The entire central campus is a national landmark and home to scores of historic sites, buildings, and monuments. The majority of the campus's Norman-style buildings are constructed from gray and black granite. The campus is a popular tourist destination complete with a large visitor center and the oldest museum in the United States Army..."



PHOTOGRAPHS/PHOTO SLIDES: WORLD LEADERS and POLITICIANS

Photographs, slides and proof sheets by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by name of subject.



Box Folder
321 Benes, Edvard (President of Czechoslovakia): One 8 x 9.5 inch (black and white) photograph of the 2nd (1935-38) and 4th (1939-48) President of Czechoslovakia Edvard Benes (circa 1948) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Edvard Beneš (May 17, 1884 - September 3, 1948) was a Czech politician who served as the President of Czechoslovakia twice, from 1935-1938 and 1939-1948. He was also Minister of Foreign Affairs (1918-1935), Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia (1921-1922) and the President of Czechoslovakia in exile (1939-1945). A member of the Czechoslovak National Social Party, he was known as a skilled diplomat..."
322 Broz, Jovanka (First Lady of Yugoslavia): One 7 x 9 inch (black and white) proof sheet, ten (color) photo slides and four 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs of Jovanka Broz (wife of Yugoslav leader Josip Bros Tito at an August 1953 diplomatic reception with her husband and others) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Jovanka Budisavljevi? Broz (December 7, 1924 - October 20, 2013) was First Lady of Yugoslavia as the wife of Yugoslav leader Josip Broz Tito. She was a lieutenant colonel in the Yugoslav People's Army. She was married to Tito from 1952 until his death in 1980. Following her husband's death, all of her property was seized and she moved to a state-owned villa, where she reportedly lived under virtual house arrest..."
323 Castro, Fidel (President of Cuba) : One 3 x 3 inch (black and white) photograph of Cuban President Fidel Castro (in a railroad dining car at an unidentified location - possibly during his NYC visit - early 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born August 13, 1926), commonly known as Fidel Castro, is a Cuban politician and revolutionary who governed the Republic of Cuba as Prime Minister from 1959 to 1976 and then as President from 1976 to 2008. Politically a Marxist-Leninist and Cuban nationalist, he also served as the First Secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba from 1961 until 2011. Under his administration Cuba became a one-party communist state; industry and business were nationalized, and state socialist reforms implemented throughout society..."
324 Churchill, Winston (Prime Minister of England): One 3 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheet of Winston Churchill, his wife Clementine and others aboard the Queen Elizabeth luxury liner (circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill (November 30, 1874 - January 24, 1965) was a British statesman who was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a non-academic historian, a writer (as Winston S. Churchill), and an artist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953 for his overall, lifetime body of work. In 1963, he was the first of only eight people to be made an honorary citizen of the United States..."
325 Dulles, Allen (CIA Director): Six 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photographs of CIA Director Allen Dulles (at home with his wife - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Allen Welsh Dulles (April 7, 1893 - January 29, 1969) was an American diplomat and lawyer who became the first civilian Director of Central Intelligence and its longest-serving director to date. As head of the Central Intelligence Agency during the early Cold War, he oversaw the 1954 Guatemalan coup d'état, Operation Ajax (the overthrow of Iran's elected government), the Lockheed U-2 aircraft program and the Bay of Pigs Invasion. Following the assassination of John F. Kennedy, Dulles was one of the members of the Warren Commission. Between his stints of government service, Dulles was a corporate lawyer and partner at Sullivan and Cromwell. His older brother, John Foster Dulles, was the Secretary of State during the Eisenhower Administration...."
326 Eisenhower, Dwight D. (President of the U.S./Army General): Twenty-one (black and white) photos (various sizes), 16 (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and 30 (color) photo slides of General Dwight David Eisenhower (Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces) at the 1944 Bastille Day celebration in Paris (with General Charles De Gaulle), in Paris, saying farewell to the press in 1945, at his first Inaugural Parade as President in 1953 and at the White House (with staff) in the mid 1950s. All photos by Martin Harris (for various unidentified publications). According to Wikipedia: "Dwight David 'Ike' Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 - March 28, 1969) was an American politician and general who served as the 34th President of the United States from 1953 until 1961. He was a five-star general in the United States Army during World War II and served as Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe. He was responsible for planning and supervising the invasion of North Africa in Operation Torch in 1942-43 and the successful invasion of France and Germany in 1944-45 from the Western Front. In 1951, he became the first Supreme Commander of NATO. Eisenhower was of Pennsylvania Dutch and a lesser amount of Irish ancestry, and was raised in a large family in Kansas by parents with a strong religious background. He graduated from West Point in 1915 and later married Mamie Doud and had two sons. After World War II, Eisenhower served as Army Chief of Staff under President Harry S. Truman and then accepted the post of President at Columbia University. Eisenhower entered the 1952 presidential race as a Republican to counter the non-interventionism of Senator Robert A. Taft, campaigning against 'communism, Korea and corruption.' He won in a landslide, defeating Democratic candidate Adlai Stevenson and temporarily upending the New Deal Coalition. Eisenhower was the first U.S. president to be constitutionally term-limited under the 22nd Amendment..."
327 Fish, Jr., Hamilton (Congressman - NY): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of Republican U.S. Congressman (NY) Hamilton Fish, Jr. (shaving) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Hamilton Fish III (born Hamilton Stuyvesant Fish and also known as Hamilton Fish, Jr.; December 7, 1888 - January 18, 1991) was a soldier and Republican politician from New York State. Born into a family long active in the state, he served in the United States House of Representatives from 1920 to 1945 and during that time was a prominent opponent of United States intervention in foreign affairs and was a critic of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. When Fish celebrated his 102nd birthday in 1990, he was the oldest living American who had served in Congress..."
328 Gromyko, Andrei (Soviet Ambassador to the U.S.): One 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of the Soviet Ambassador to the United States Adrei Gromyko (1943) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Andrei Andreyevich Gromyko (1909 - 1989) was a Soviet statesman during the Cold War. He served as Minister of Foreign Affairs (1957-1985) and as Chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet (1985-1988). Gromyko was responsible for many top decisions on Soviet foreign policy until he retired in 1988. In the 1940s Western pundits called him Mr. Nyet ('Mr. No') or 'Grim Grom,' because of his frequent use of the Soviet veto in the UN Security Council. Gromyko's political career started in 1939 with his employment at the People's Commissariat for Foreign Affairs (renamed Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1946). In 1943 Gromyko became the Soviet ambassador to the United States, leaving in 1946 to become the Soviet Permanent Representative to the United Nations. Upon his return to the Soviet Union he became a Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs and later the First Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs. He went on to become the Soviet ambassador to the United Kingdom in 1952. Gromyko played a direct role in the Cuban Missile Crisis in his role as the Soviet Foreign Minister. Gromyko helped negotiate arms limitations treaties such as the ABM Treaty, the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and SALT I and II among others. Under Leonid Brezhnev's leadership Gromyko helped build the policy of détente between the US and the USSR. He supported Mikhail Gorbachev's candidacy for General Secretary in 1985. Gromyko lost his office as foreign minister when Gorbachev became General Secretary, and was instead appointed to the largely ceremonial office of head of state. Gromyko retired from political life in 1988 and died the following year in Moscow..."
329 Hammarskjold, Dag (Secretary General of the U.N.): Two 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of the 2nd Secretary-General of the United Nations Dag Hammarskjold (in his office - circa 1960) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Dag Hjalmar Agne Carl Hammarskjöld (1905 - 1961) was a Swedish diplomat, economist, and author. The second secretary-general of the United Nations, he served from April 1953 until his death in a plane crash in September 1961. At the age of 56 years and 255 days, Hammarskjöld was the youngest to have held the post. He is one of only four people to be awarded a posthumous Nobel Prize. Hammarskjöld is the only UN secretary-general to die in office; he was killed in a Douglas DC-6 airplane crash en route to cease-fire negotiations. Hammarskjöld has been referred to as the 'best secretary general so far' and his appointment has been mentioned as the most notable success for the UN. US president John F. Kennedy called Hammarskjöld 'the greatest statesman of our century.'.
3210 Krishna Menon, V.K. (Defense Minister of India): Four 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs of the Defense Minister of India V.K. Krishna Menon (at the United Nations in NYC - circa 1960) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Vengalil Krishnan Krishna Menon (1896 - 1974) was an Indian nationalist, diplomat and statesman, described as the second most powerful man in India by Time magazine and others, after his ally and intimate friend, Jawaharlal Nehru..."
3211 Khrushchev, Nikita (Soviet Union First Secretary/Communist Party): Two 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheets of the First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Nikita Khrushchev (arriving at the United Nations in NYC - circa 1960) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev[a] (1894 - 1971) was a politician who led the Soviet Union during part of the Cold War. He served as First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1953 to 1964, and as Chairman of the Council of Ministers, or Premier, from 1958 to 1964. Khrushchev was responsible for the de-Stalinization of the Soviet Union, for backing the progress of the early Soviet space program, and for several relatively liberal reforms in areas of domestic policy. Khrushchev's party colleagues removed him from power in 1964, replacing him with Leonid Brezhnev as First Secretary and Alexei Kosygin as Premier..."
3212 La Guardia, Fiorello H. (NYC Mayor): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia (with First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt at a political banquet- circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for a PM NEW YORK photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Fiorello Henry La Guardia (December 11, 1882 - September 20, 1947) was an American politician. He is best known for being the 99th Mayor of New York City for three terms from 1934 to 1945 as a Republican. Previously he had been elected to Congress in 1916 and 1918, and again from 1922 through 1930. Irascible, energetic, and charismatic, he craved publicity and is acclaimed as one of the greatest mayors in American history. Only five feet, two inches tall, he was called 'the Little Flower' (Fiorello is Italian for 'little flower')..."
3213 Leahy, William D. (Governor of Puerto Rico): Three 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of the Governor of Puerto Rico William D. Leahy (with other unidentified associates in Puerto Rico - 1940) by Martin Harris (for a FORTUNE MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Fleet Admiral William Daniel Leahy (May 6, 1875 - July 20, 1959) was an American naval officer who served as the senior-most United States military officer on active duty during World War II. He held multiple titles and was at the center of all the major military decisions the United States made in World War II...From September 1939 to November 1940, Leahy served as Governor of Puerto Rico. He oversaw the development of military bases and stations across the island while serving as governor. He took an open stance of not intervening directly in local politics, attempted to understand and respect local customs, and initiated various major public works projects in the island. While given the unflattering sobriquet Almirante Lija ("Admiral Sandpaper") by locals, based on his family name, he was regarded as one of the most lenient American governors of the several that served Puerto Rico in the first half of the 20th century...."
3214 Lindsay, John (NYC Mayor): Three 8 x 10 inch (black and white) proof sheets and 135 (color) photo slides of New York City Mayor John Lindsay (with his staff during his 1970 Mayoral reelection campaign) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "John Vliet Lindsay (November 24, 1921 - December 19, 2000) was an American politician, lawyer, and broadcaster who was a U.S. congressman, mayor of New York City, candidate for U.S. president, and regular guest host of Good Morning America. During his political career, he served as a member of the United States House of Representatives from January 1959 to December 1965 and as mayor of New York City from January 1966 to December 1973. He switched from the Republican to the Democratic Party in 1971, and launched a brief and unsuccessful bid for the 1972 Democratic presidential nomination as well as the 1980 Democratic nomination for Senator from New York. He died from Parkinson's disease and pneumonia in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina on December 19, 2000..."
3215 Marin, Luis (Governor of Puerto Rico): Three (black and white) photographs (various sizes) of the 1st Governor of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Luis Munoz Marin (With the 2nd Governor William D. Leahy - 1940) by Martin Harris (for a FORTUNE MAGAZINE photo Assignment). According to Wikipedia: "José Luis Alberto Muñoz Marín (February 18, 1898 - April 30, 1980), known as Luis Muñoz Marín, was a Puerto Rican poet, journalist, politician and statesman, regarded as the 'Father of Modern Puerto Rico,' and the 'Architect of the Commonwealth.' In 1948 he was the first democratically elected Governor of Puerto Rico, spearheading an administration that engineered profound economic, political and social reforms; accomplishments that were internationally lauded by many politicians, statesmen, political scientists and economists of the period. Marin was instrumental in the destruction of the Nationalist party and its efforts to gain independence..."
3216 Mendes France, Pierre (Prime Minister of France): One 6 x 9 inch (black and white) proof sheet and two 9 x 13 inch (black and white) photographs of the Prime Minister of France Pierre Mendes France (with other unidentified associates - circa 1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Pierre Mendès France (1907 - 1982) was a French politician who served as President of the Council of Ministers for eight months from 1954 to 1955. He represented the Radical Party, and his government had the support of the Communist party. His main priority was ending the war in Indochina, which had already cost 92,000 dead, 114,000 wounded and 28,000 captured. Public opinion polls showed that in February 1954, only 7% of the French people wanted to continue the fight to keep Indochina out of the hands of the Communists, led by Ho Chi Minh and his Viet Minh movement. At the Geneva Conference of 1954 he negotiated a deal that gave the Viet Minh control of Vietnam north of the seventeenth parallel, and allowed him to pull out all French forces. However, the United States subsequently provided large-scale financial, military and economic support to South Vietnam..."
3217 Meyner, Robert B. (NJ Governor): Two (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of New Jersey Governor Robert B. Meyner (on a local news interview show SEARCHLIGHT - November 15, 1959) by Martin Harris (for a SCOPE ASSOCIATES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Robert Baumle Meyner (July 3, 1908 - May 27, 1990) was an American Democratic Party politician, who served as the 44th Governor of New Jersey, from 1954 to 1962. Before being elected governor, Meyner represented Warren County in the New Jersey Senate from 1948 to 1951...The ailing New Jersey Democratic Party chose him as its gubernatorial candidate in 1953, and he achieved a surprise victory, boosted by a minor scandal surrounding his opponent, Paul L. Troast. Meyner's first term was marked by strong support for state education and a general restructuring of the government. While in his first term as governor, Meyner uncovered Employment Security Division Director (and former governor) Harold G. Hoffman's massive corruption scam, and suspended Hoffman on March 18, 1954. Meyner defeated Malcolm Forbes handily in 1957 in his bid for re-election. In 1958, Time Magazine recognized Meyner as a potential candidate for the 1960 Democratic presidential nomination, and featured him on the cover of their November 24 edition of that year (along with five other noteworthy Democrats, including John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson). At the 1960 Democratic National Convention Meyner received 43 votes for president, finishing fifth behind John F. Kennedy (806 votes), Lyndon Johnson (409 votes), Stuart Symington (86 votes) and Adlai Stevenson (79.5 votes) and just ahead of Hubert Humphrey who received 41 votes. At the time, New Jersey's constitution prohibited governors from serving more than two consecutive terms, but did not place a limit on the total number of terms. After his Democratic successor, Richard J. Hughes had served two terms and was unable to run for a third, the Democratic Party turned back to Meyner as their gubernatorial candidate in 1969. But after 16 years of Democratic administrations, Republican William T. Cahill won election over Meyner..."
3218 Michael I (King of Romania): One 7 x 9 inch (black and white) proof sheet of King Michael I of Romania (arriving in NYC with the Queen Mother of Romania - March 11, 1948) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Michael I (born 25 October 1921) reigned as King of Romania from July 20, 1927 to June 8, 1930 and again from September 6, 1940 to December 30, 1947. In 1925, Michael's father Prince Carol had renounced his rights to the throne and moved to Paris in exile. In 1927, Michael ascended the throne following the death of his grandfather, Ferdinand I. In 1930, his father returned to Romania from exile and replaced his son as king, the regency ruling on behalf of his son dissolved. Carol II was deposed in 1940, and Michael once again became king. In 1944, Michael participated in a coup against the military dictator Ion Antonescu and subsequently declared an alliance with the Allies. He was forced to abdicate in 1947 by the government controlled by the Communist Party of Romania, forced into exile, and was stripped of his citizenship a year later. He married Princess Anne of Bourbon-Parma in 1948 with whom he had five daughters: Margareta, Elena, Irina, Sophie, and Maria. His citizenship was restored in 1997 and he currently resides in Romania. He is the last surviving monarch or other head of state from the Interwar period, and the oldest of only three surviving heads of state from the Second World War, the others being the former King Simeon II of Bulgaria and Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet..."
3219 Molotov, Vyacheslav (Chairman - Council of Soviet Ministers): One 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of the First Deputy Chairman of the Council of Ministers of the Soviet Union Vyacheslav Molotov (in NYC - c. late 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov (1890 - 1986) was a Soviet politician and diplomat, an Old Bolshevik, and a leading figure in the Soviet government from the 1920s, when he rose to power as a protégé of Joseph Stalin. Molotov served as Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars (Premier) from 1930 to 1941, and as Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1939 to 1949 and from 1953 to 1956. He served as First Deputy Premier from 1942 to 1957, when he was dismissed from the Presidium of the Central Committee by Nikita Khrushchev. Molotov retired in 1961 after several years of obscurity..."
331 Pius XII (Pope of the Catholic Church): One 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photograph of Pope Pius XII greeting guests during a Papal audience (circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Pope Pius XII, born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (1876 - 1958), reigned as Pope from March 2, 1939 to his death in 1958. Before his election to the papacy, Pacelli served as secretary of the Department of Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs, papal nuncio to Germany (1917-1929), and Cardinal Secretary of State, in which capacity he worked to conclude treaties with European and Latin American nations, most notably the Reichskonkordat with Nazi Germany, with which most historians believe the Vatican sought to protect the Church in Germany while Adolf Hitler sought the destruction of 'political Catholicism.' A pre-war critic of Nazism, Pius XII lobbied world leaders to avoid war and, as Pope at the outbreak of war, issued Summi Pontificatus, expressing dismay at the invasion of Poland, reiterating Church teaching against racial persecution and calling for love, compassion and charity to prevail over war..."
332 Reynolds, Robert Rice (U.S. Senator - North Carolina): Two 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of Democratic U.S. Senator (North Carolina) Robert Rice Reynolds ( wearing a fedora with a feather in the hatband - circa 1938-39) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Robert Rice Reynolds (June 18, 1884 - February 13, 1963) was a Democratic U.S. senator from North Carolina between 1932 and 1945. Almost from the outset of his Senate career, 'Our Bob,' as he was known among supporters back home, acquired distinction as a passionate isolationist and increasingly as an apologist for Nazi aggression in Europe. Even after America's entry into World War II, according to a contemporary study of subversive elements in America, he 'publicly endorsed the propaganda efforts of Gerald L. K. Smith,' whose scurrilous publication The Cross and the Flag 'violently assailed the United States war effort and America's allies.' Reynolds and Smith, one of the nation's most influential fascists, likewise collaborated on The Defender, an anti-Semitic newspaper partly owned by Reynolds. Reynolds on occasion turned over his Senate office facilities to subversive propagandists and allowed them to use his franking privilege to mail their literature postage-free..."
333 Snyder, A. Cecil (Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Puerto Rico): Three 8 x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Puerto Rico (circa 1941) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Aaron Cecil Snyder (September 14, 1907 - June 29, 1959, aged 51) was an American lawyer who served as a prosecutor and judge in Puerto Rico. Snyder was born in Baltimore, Maryland. After attending Baltimore City College and Johns Hopkins University as an undergraduate, he graduated from Harvard Law School in 1930. Snyder practiced law briefly in New York City and Baltimore. In 1933, Maryland Senator Millard Tydings, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Territories, arranged for Snyder's appointment as United States Attorney for the District of Puerto Rico. As U.S. Attorney, he prosecuted Puerto Rican independence activist Pedro Albizu Campos and defended then-Senate President Luis Muñoz Marín at U.S. Senate hearings on Muñoz' allegedly communist leanings. In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Snyder as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Puerto Rico. Snyder became the last non-Puerto Rican appointed to that court. As Associate Justice, he appeared before the United States House of Representatives' Committee on Public Lands in 1950 in support of a bill allowing Puerto Rico to draft a local constitution. The bill was passed, and Snyder contributed to the drafting and translation of the Constitution of Puerto Rico. In 1953, Governor Luis Muñoz Marín, following a long-standing tradition of appointing the most senior Associate Justice as Chief Justice when a vacancy arose, appointed him Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Puerto Rico, the first appointment that a Puerto Rican governor made to the court, addressing the nomination to 'A. Cecilio Snyder.' Snyder actually used the name 'Cecilio' when sworn in as Chief Justice. Four years later, in July 1957, after most of Puerto Rico's legal establishment had lost confidence in Snyder's leadership as Chief Justice, he resigned from the court effective September 15, 1957. He was succeeded as Chief Justice by Associate Justice Jaime Sifre Dávila. After his departure from the court, Snyder practiced law in San Juan until his death in 1959."
334 Stevenson, Adlai (Governor of Illinois/UN Ambassador): Three (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of Illinois Governor and Democratic presidential nominee Adlai Stevenson (at a Democratic fundraising dinner with John F. Kennedy, Eleanor Roosevelt, emcee Bud Collyer, cartoonist Al Capp, Margaret Truman, W. Averell Harriman, et cetera - 1956) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (1900 - 1965) was an American politician and diplomat, noted for his intellectual demeanor, eloquent public speaking, and promotion of progressive causes in the Democratic Party. He served as the 31st Governor of Illinois, and received the Democratic Party's nomination for president in 1952 even though he had not campaigned in the primaries. John Frederick Martin says party leaders selected him because he was "more moderate on civil rights than Estes Kefauver, yet nonetheless acceptable to labor and urban machines—so a coalition of southern, urban, and labor leaders fell in behind his candidacy in Chicago...' "
335 Tito, Josip Bros (President of Yugoslavia): Two (black and white) proof sheets and one 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of the President of Yugoslavia Josip Broz Tito (at a diplomatic reception in Bled Yugoslavia - August 1953) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Josip Broz Tito (1892 - 1980) was a Yugoslav revolutionary and statesman, serving in various roles from 1943 until his death in 1980. During World War II he was the leader of the Partisans, often regarded as the most effective resistance movement in occupied Europe. While his presidency has been criticized as authoritarian, and concerns about the repression of political opponents have been raised, Tito was 'seen by most as a benevolent dictator' due to his economic and diplomatic policies. He was a popular public figure both in Yugoslavia and abroad. Viewed as a unifying symbol, his internal policies maintained the peaceful coexistence of the nations of the Yugoslav federation. He gained further international attention as the chief leader of the Non-Aligned Movement, working with Jawaharlal Nehru of India, Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt and Sukarno of Indonesia..."
336 Truman, Harry (President of the United States): Six (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) of President Harry S. Truman (at his birthday celebration with wife Bess and daughter Margaret in Washington, DC - circa 1946) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 - December 26, 1972) was an American politician who served as the 33rd President of the United States (1945-53). He served as a United States Senator from Missouri (1935-45) and briefly as Vice President (1945) before he succeeded to the presidency on April 12, 1945 upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. He was president during the final months of World War II, making the decision to drop atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Truman was elected in his own right in 1948. He presided over an uncertain domestic scene as America sought its path after the war and tensions with the Soviet Union increased, marking the start of the Cold War..."
337 Wagner, Robert F. (U.S. Senator - New York): One 10 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph of New Jersey Senator Robert F. Wagner (interviewed by Seward Brisbane at the Lido Country Club - Long Beach, Long Island (NY). Topic "The Hatch Bill" - August 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Robert Ferdinand Wagner I (June 8, 1877 - May 4, 1953) was an American politician. He was a Democratic U.S. Senator from New York from 1927 to 1949. Working closely in the state legislature with fellow New York City Democrat Al Smith, Wagner embraced reform in the 1910s and 1920s, especially to the benefit of their core constituency, the working class. They built a coalition for these reforms that embraced unions, social workers, some businessmen, and numerous middle-class activists and civic reform organizations across the state.[3] As Senator, Wagner was a leader of the New Deal Coalition putting special emphasis on supporting the labor movement. He sponsored three major laws: the National Labor Relations Act of 1935, the Social Security Act of 1935, and the Public Housing Act of 1937. His son, Robert F. Wagner, Jr. was mayor of New York from 1954 through 1965..."
338 Wagner, Jr., Robert F. (Mayor of New York City) - Part 1: Seventeen (black and white) proof sheets (various sizes) and one 11 x 13 inch (black and white) photograph of NYC Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. (with various "administrative figures" - circa 1956) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Robert Ferdinand Wagner II (April 20, 1910 - February 12, 1991), usually known as Robert F. Wagner Jr. served three terms as the mayor of New York City, from 1954 through 1965. When running for his third term, he broke with the Tammany Hall leadership, ending the reign of clubhouse bosses in city politics..."
339 Wagner, Jr., Robert F. (Mayor of New York City) - Part 2: Fifty (black and white) proof sheets and thirteen 8x 10 inch (black and white) photographs of NYC Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. travelling in Europe (England - with the Lord Mayor of London Sir Seymour, Ireland - with the Lord Mayor of Dublin Alfie Byrne, John Huston and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Germany - at the birthplace of his father, France, Israel, Greece and Italy - c. early 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an Unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Robert Ferdinand Wagner II (April 20, 1910 - February 12, 1991), usually known as Robert F. Wagner Jr. served three terms as the mayor of New York City, from 1954 through 1965. When running for his third term, he broke with the Tammany Hall leadership, ending the reign of clubhouse bosses in city politics..."
3310 Winant, John (U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain): One 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photograph of the U.S> Envoy to Great Britain John Winant (1941) by Martin Harris (for a PARADE MAGAZINE photo assignment - January 25, 1942). According to Wikipedia: "John Gilbert Winant OM (February 23, 1889 - November 3, 1947) was an American politician with the Republican party after a brief career as a teacher in Concord, New Hampshire. Winant was born on East Side, New York City, the son of Frederick and Jeanette Winant, his father a prosperous partner in a real estate company. John Winant held positions in New Hampshire, national, and international politics. He was the first man to serve more than a single two-year term as Governor of New Hampshire, winning election three times. Winant also served as US Ambassador to the United Kingdom during most of World War II. Depressed by career disappointments, a failed marriage, and heavy debts, he committed suicide in 1947..."
3311 Wood, Edward F. L. (Ist Earl of Halifax, England): Two 11 x 14 inch (black and white) photographs of Edward Frederick Lindley Wood - the 1st Earl of Halifax (speaking at an unidentified (isolationist?) Madison Square Garden Rally in NYC - circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax (1881 - 1959), styled Lord Irwin from 1925 until 1934 and Viscount Halifax from 1934 until 1944, was one of the most senior British Conservative politicians of the 1930s. He held several senior ministerial posts during this time, most notably those of Viceroy of India from 1925 to 1931 and of Foreign Secretary between 1938 and 1940. He is regarded as one of the architects of the policy of appeasement prior to the Second World War, although after Hitler's occupation of the rump of Czechoslovakia in March 1939 he was also one of those who pushed for a new policy of attempting to deter further German aggression by promising to go to war to defend Poland. On Neville Chamberlain's resignation early in May 1940, Halifax effectively declined the position of Prime Minister despite widespread support across the political spectrum, as he felt that Churchill would be a more suitable war leader (his membership of the House of Lords was given as the official reason). A few weeks later, with the Allies facing apparently catastrophic defeat and British forces falling back on Dunkirk, Halifax favored approaching Italy to see if acceptable peace terms could be negotiated, but was overruled by Churchill after a series of stormy meetings of the War Cabinet. From 1941 to 1946, he served as British Ambassador in Washington..."



PHOTO NEGATIVES: ARTISTS and WRITERS

Photo Negatives by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by name of subject.



Box Folder
341 Bourke-White, Margaret (Photographer): One 3 x 4.5 inch (black and white) passport photo negative of LIFE MAGAZINE photographer Margaret Bourke-White (circa 1940s) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Margaret Bourke-White (June 14, 1904 - August 27, 1971) was an American photographer and documentary photographer. She is best known as the first foreign photographer permitted to take pictures of Soviet industry, the firsthand American female war photojournalist, and the first female photographer for Henry Luce's Life magazine, where her photograph appeared on the first cover. She died of Parkinson's disease about eighteen years after she developed her first symptoms..."
342 Broun, Heywood(Journalist): One 1.5 x 6 inch (black and white) photo negative strip (4 images) of journalist Heywood Broun (with Art Young - cartoonist for NEW MASSES MAGAZINE - at the "Artists Congress" - 1936) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Heywood Campbell Broun, Jr. (December 7, 1888 - December 18, 1939) was an American journalist. He worked as a sportswriter, newspaper columnist, and editor in New York City. He founded the American Newspaper Guild, now known as The Newspaper Guild. Born in Brooklyn, New York, he is best remembered for his writing on social issues and his championing of the underdog. He believed that journalists could help right wrongs, especially social ills..." According to Wikipedia: Arthur Henry 'Art' Young (1866-1943) was an American cartoonist and writer. He is most famous for his socialist cartoons, especially those drawn for the left wing political magazine The Masses between 1911 and 1917...Young started out as a generally apolitical Republican, but gradually became interested in left wing ideas, and by 1906 or so considered himself a socialist. Young would begin increasingly to associate with such political leftist as John Sloan and Piet Vlag, both of whom he would work with at the radical socialist monthly, The Masses. He became firmly ensconced in the radical environment of Greenwich Village after moving there in 1910. He became politically active, and by 1910, racial and sexual discrimination and the injustices of the capitalist system became prevalent themes in his work. Young would explain these sentiments in his autobiography, Art Young: His Life and Times (1939)..."
343 Caesar, Doris (Sculptor): Nine 2.5 x 9.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (4 images on each) of sculptor Doris Caesar (in her studio - 1950) by Martin Harris (for a NEW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Doris Porter Caesar (November 8, 1892 - 1971) was an American sculptor best known for her portrayals of the nude female body...Caesar experimented with sculpting the female body in clay, bronze, and brass, often elongating the figures to be taller than human height. In 1927, she cast her first bronze, the primary material she would work with throughout her career. She took this bronze to E. Weyhe, a dealer on Lexington Avenue in New York City, who gave her access to his collection of German Expressionist artists. There, she was inspired by Ernst Barlach, Wilhelm Lehmbruck, and Käthe Kollwitz, whose work led her to turn away from classical forms and begin distorting the figures she sculpted until they were 'stick-like.' Unfortunately, most of her work in the 1920s and 1930s was destroyed; the bulk of her major work was created in the following two decades after she moved to North Salem, New York and then to Litchfield, Connecticut, where she died in 1971. In an article published in Hill News (March 11, 1975), Caesar says that she chose sculpture 'because it's big and fights against you all the time.' "
344 Caniff, Milton (Cartoonist): Eleven (black and white) photo negatives and photo negative strips (various sizes) of cartoonist Milton Caniff (with beauty and fashion expert Miriam Cordwell - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Milton Arthur Paul 'Milt' Caniff (February 28, 1907 - April 3, 1988) was an American cartoonist famous for the Terry and the Pirates and Steve Canyon comic strips...Caniff was one of the founders of the National Cartoonists Society and served two terms as its President, 1948 and 1949. He also received the Society's first Cartoonist of the Year Award in 1947 for work published during 1946, which included both Steve Canyon and Terry and the Pirates as well. Caniff would be named Cartoonist of the Year again, receiving the accompanying trophy, the Reuben, in 1972 for 1971, again for Steve Canyon. He was inducted into the comic book industry's Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1988. He received the National Cartoonists Society Elzie Segar Award in 1971, the Award for Story Comic Strip in 1979 for Steve Canyon, the Gold Key Award (the Society's Hall of Fame) in 1981, and the NCS has since named the Milton Caniff Lifetime Achievement Award in his honor. In 1977, the Milton Caniff Collection of papers and original art became the foundation for what is known presently as the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum. Covering 696 cubic feet, the collection fills 526 boxes, plus 12,153 art originals and 59 oversized items. In addition to the original artwork, the collection includes Caniff's personal and business papers, correspondence, research files, photographs, memorabilia, merchandise, realia, awards, audio/visual material and scrapbooks..." MIRIAM CORDWELL is the author of HAIR DESIGN AND FASHION: PRINCIPLES AND RELATIONSHIPS and THE COMPLETE BOOK OF MEN'S HAIRSTYLES AND HAIR CARE.
345 Chagall, Marc (Modernist painter): Ten 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives and twelve 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (2 images) of artist Marc Chagall (at work in his studio and with his daughter - December 10, 1946) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Marc Zakharovich Chagall (1887 - 1985) was a Russian-French artist. An early modernist, he was associated with several major artistic styles and created works in virtually every artistic medium, including painting, book illustrations, stained glass, stage sets, ceramic, tapestries and fine art prints. Art critic Robert Hughes referred to Chagall as 'the quintessential Jewish artist of the twentieth century' (though Chagall saw his work as 'not the dream of one people but of all humanity'). According to art historian Michael J. Lewis, Chagall was considered to be 'the last survivor of the first generation of European modernists.' For decades, he 'had also been respected as the world's preeminent Jewish artist.' Using the medium of stained glass, he produced windows for the cathedrals of Reims and Metz, windows for the UN, and the Jerusalem Windows in Israel. He also did large-scale paintings, including part of the ceiling of the Paris Opéra..."
346 de Chirico, Giorgio (Surrealist painter): Fifteen (black and white) photo negatives and photo negative strips (various sizes) of artist Giorgio de Chirico (at work in the Rome studio of Assen Piekov - October 1944) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Giorgio de Chirico (1888 - 1978) was an Italian artist. In the years before World War I, he founded the scuola metafisica art movement, which profoundly influenced the surrealists. After 1919, he became interested in traditional painting techniques, and worked in a neoclassical or neo-Baroque style, while frequently revisiting the metaphysical themes of his earlier work..." Assen Peikov (1908 - 73)was a Bulgarian born sculptor.
347 Eisenstaedt, Alfred (Photographer): Four (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt (at work in his office/studio - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Alfred Eisenstaedt (December 6, 1898 - August 23, 1995) was a German-born American photographer and photojournalist. One of the most prolific photographers of the twentieth century, he began his career in pre-World War II Germany, and after moving to the U.S., achieved prominence as a staff photographer for Life Magazine which featured more than 90 of his pictures on its covers with over 2,500 photo stories published. Among his most famous cover photographs was V-J Day in Times Square, taken during the V-J Day celebration in New York City, showing "an exuberant American sailor kissing a nurse in a dancelike dip [that] summed up the euphoria many Americans felt as the war came to a close." Eisenstaedt was 'renowned for his ability to capture memorable images of important people in the news, including statesmen, movie stars and artists' and for his candid photographs, taken with a small 35mm Leica camera and typically with only natural lighting..."
348 Fisher, Alan (Photographer): Two 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of photographer Alan Fisher (in fedora with camera - May 1940) by Martin Harris. No additional information available.
349 Hill, Gladwin (Journalist): Ten 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (2 images) of journalist Gladwin Hill (publicity photographs with cactus - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Gladwin Hill (June 16, 1914, Boston - September 19, 1992, Los Angeles) was an American journalist who was a member of the famed Writing 69th, a group of reporters who trained and flew on bombing missions with the Eighth Air Force...As a member of the group of reporters who were alternatively known as either the Writing 69th, the Legion of the Doomed or The Flying Typewriters, Hill trained with The United States Eighth Air Force. The training covered important topics such as high altitude adjustment, weapons and parachuting. Hill worked for the Associated Press from 1936-1944 and was the AP correspondent assigned to the bomber missions. Hill flew his first and last mission on Feb. 26, 1943. On that day one of the planes carrying a reporter, Robert Post, was shot down and Post and eight Air Force personnel were killed. He described the mission in his article the next day: "It was thrilling. Yet at the same time it was strangely prosaic in the business-like efficiency with which it was executed.' After WWII ended Hill went to work for the New York Times in their Los Angeles bureau. Hill worked their from 1946-1968. On Nov. 22, 1963 Hill was dispatched by the Times to Dallas to cover the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. He eventually voluntarily offered the FBI an interview about what he knew in relation to Jack Ruby shooting Lee Harvey Oswald. The interview basically determined when Hill heard the shot and 'immediately realizing what was happening he ran out of the police building through another exit to take up a position by the van.' In addition, Hill also wrote books on environmental issues and politics..."
3410 Hopper, Edward (American realist painter/printmaker): Six (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of painter Edward Hopper (with his wife in their Washington Square -NYC - apartment - 1950) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Edward Hopper (July 22, 1882 - May 15, 1967) was a prominent American realist painter and printmaker. While he was most popularly known for his oil paintings, he was equally proficient as a watercolorist and printmaker in etching. Both in his urban and rural scenes, his spare and finely calculated renderings reflected his personal vision of modern American life..."
3411 Joyce, James (Novelist/poet): Twenty-two 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of the celebrity gathering for the FINNEGANS WAKE (By James Joyce) publication party at the Gotham Book Mart (NYC - May 4, 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (1882 - 1941) was an Irish novelist and poet. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde, and is regarded as one of the most influential and important authors of the twentieth century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey are paralleled in an array of contrasting literary styles, perhaps most prominent among these the stream of consciousness technique he utilized. Other well-known works are the short-story collection Dubliners (1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939). His other writings include three books of poetry, a play, occasional journalism, and his published letters..."
3412 Kiernan, John F. (Sportswriter/broadcaster): Seventeen 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of sportswriter John F. Kiernan (at home and in his NYC office - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "John Francis Kieran (August 2, 1892 - December 9, 1981) was an American author, journalist, amateur naturalist and radio and television personality...Kieran began his newspaper career in 1915 as a sportswriter for The New York Times. He continued on the sports beat during his entire career, working for a number of New York City newspapers and becoming one of the country's best known sports columnists. During his 1927-1943 tenure as The Times' senior sports columnist, he was profiled in the January 9, 1939 issue of Time magazine, which described him as 'short, wiry, grey, bristly and brilliant.' Although Kieran is widely credited with first applying the term 'grand slam' to tennis, to describe the winning of all four major tennis tournaments in a calendar year, sports columnist Alan Gould had used the term in that connection almost two months before Kieran. A noted 'intellectual,' he gained extensive personal popularity with his 10-year stint as a panelist on NBC's most widely heard radio quiz program Information, Please! (May 17, 1938 - June 25, 1948). His seemingly encyclopedic erudition and quick wit, combined with an aura of gentle modesty, endeared him to the listening audience and assured his place on the show. Along with fellow 'intellectuals' Franklin P. Adams and host Clifton Fadiman, Kieran entertained and educated radio audiences through the Great Depression, World War II and the Cold War. Within eight months of Information, Please! leaving the air, Kieran entered the new medium of television with TV's first widely syndicated show John Kieran's Kaleidoscope. A 15-minute program produced from February 1949 to April 1952, John Kieran's Kaleidoscope presented its writer and host in his well-acquainted role as the learned and witty guide to the complexities of human knowledge. The 104 episodes touched on any and every subject from the mating habits of insects to the properties of magnetic attraction to the theories surrounding the creation of the solar system. Kieran became a familiar face on 1950s television, guesting on numerous panel and quiz shows, including CBS' 13-week revival of Information, Please! as a 1952 summer replacement show, the only time it would be seen on TV..."
3413 Kronenberger, Louis (Author/critic): One 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strip (2 images) of author Louis Kronenberger (at his desk - 1946) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Louis Kronenberger (December 9, 1904 - April 30, 1980) was an American critic and author. He was a novelist and biographer, and wrote extensively on drama and the 18th century. He studied at the University of Cincinnati from 1921. In 1924, he went to New York, working at The New York Times, then in publishing and at Fortune magazine. He was a drama critic for Time magazine from 1938 to 1961, mentioned by Whittaker Chambers in his 1952 memoir. Then he was theater arts professor at Brandeis University."
3414 Lewis, Sinclair (Novelist/playwright): One 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative of writer Sinclair Lewis (with an unidentified woman - circa 1930s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Harry Sinclair Lewis (February 7, 1885 - January 10, 1951) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and playwright. In 1930, he became the first writer from the United States to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature, which was awarded 'for his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create, with wit and humor, new types of characters.' His works are known for their insightful and critical views of American capitalism and materialism between the wars. He is also respected for his strong characterizations of modern working women. H. L. Mencken wrote of him, '[If] there was ever a novelist among us with an authentic call to the trade ... it is this red-haired tornado from the Minnesota wilds.' He has been honored by the U.S. Postal Service with a postage stamp in the Great Americans series..."
3415 Lewyt, Alex (Art patron): Four (color) photo negative strips (various sizes) of inventor and art patron Alexander M. Lewyt (at home and at work - January 1950) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to his March 21, 1988 New York Times obituary: "Mr. Lewyt...held patents for scores of inventions and once said he had chronic insomnia from thinking them up, was best known for the Lewyt vacuum cleaner, a compact machine with no dust bag that was designed to operate without distorting television and radio reception...Mr. Lewyt, a compulsive worker, was praised for the sales techniques used to promote his vacuum cleaners, which his company, the Lewyt Corporation, sold door to door after World War II. He visited 100 homes to see, he said, what housewives were looking for in vacuums. Award for Vacuum Cleaner In the first eight years after his vacuum cleaner was introduced, the company sold two million, and Mr. Lewyt received an award from the American Society of Industrial Engineers for ''leadership in the vacuum-cleaner field.' He was born in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan in 1908, the son of an Austrian immigrant who ran a shop near Gramercy Park in Manhattan that made metallic gadgets like coat hangers. By the time he was in high school, he was working for his father, fashioning such things as metal holders for harmonicas. When he heard an undertakers' supplier complain that it was hard to fasten neckties around corpses, Alex, who was not yet 16, devised a new kind of bow tie that would clip on. He sold 50,000 of them, but it is unclear whether he ever patented the concept. After his father died, Mr. Lewyt took over the family shop and turned it into the Lewyt Corporation. During World War II the company did a multimillion-dollar business, manufacturing such items as radar antennas and popcorn poppers. Mr. Lewyt was made a member of the French Legion of Honor for his company's work in making equipment for the Allies during World War II...Mr. Lewyt was also a philanthropist and served on the board of directors of a number of enterprises, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He and his wife collected French oil paintings by such artists as Cezanne, Degas, Gauguin, Bonnard and Renoir..."
3416 Livingston, Syd (Reporter/writer): Fourteen 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of crime reporter and writer Syd Livingston (at work in NYC - March 22/23, 1946) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
3417 Noguchi, Isamu (Sculptor/architect): Thirty-one 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photographs of sculptor and architect Isamu Noguchi (at work on the "AP Mural" for the Associated Press Building in NYC - 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Isamu Noguchi (November 17, 1904 - December 30, 1988) was an American artist and landscape architect whose artistic career spanned six decades, from the 1920s onward. Known for his sculpture and public works, Noguchi also designed stage sets for various Martha Graham productions, and several mass-produced lamps and furniture pieces, some of which are still manufactured and sold. In 1947, Noguchi began a collaboration with the Herman Miller company, when he joined with George Nelson, Paul László and Charles Eames to produce a catalog containing what is often considered to be the most influential body of modern furniture ever produced, including the iconic Noguchi table which remains in production today. His work lives on around the world and at the Noguchi Museum in New York City...Noguchi returned to New York in 1937. He again began to turn out portrait busts, and after various proposals was selected for two sculptures. The first of these, a fountain built of automobile parts for the Ford Motor Company's exhibit at the 1939 New York World's Fair, was thought of poorly by critics and Noguchi alike, but nevertheless introduced him to fountain-construction and magnesite. Conversely, his second sculpture, a nine-ton stainless steel bas-relief entitled News, was unveiled over the entrance to the Associated Press building at the Rockefeller Center in April 1940 to much praise. Following further rejections of his playground designs, Noguchi left on a cross-country road trip with Arshile Gorky and Gorky's fiancée in July 1941, eventually separating from them to go to Hollywood..."
3418 Pfriem, Bernard (Abstract painter): Three (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of artist Bernard Pfriem (with some of his artwork - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the ASKART.com website: "Bernard Pfriem (1926 - 1996) was active/lived in New York, Ohio. Bernard Pfriem is known for abstraction, surreal view, portrait."
3419 Pollock, Channing (Playwright/critic): Eleven 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of playwright Channing Pollock ("with Lesto and Mort Lewis" - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Channing Pollock (March 4, 1880 - August 17, 1946) was an American playwright, critic and writer of film scenarios, including The Evil Thereof (1916). He was married to cat breeder and Manhattan Opera House press agent Anna Marble Pollock, daughter of actor and songwriter Edward Marble. Pollock died at his summer home in Shoreham, New York in August 1946, a few months after his wife."
3420 Robinson, Boardman (Illustrator/cartoonist): Thirteen 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of cartoonist and illustrator Boardman Robinson (at home - March 22, 1942) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Boardman Robinson (1876-1952) was a Canadian-American artist, illustrator and cartoonist...He freelanced for a wide range of...popular publications, including Pearson's Magazine, Scribner's Magazine, Collier's, Harper's Weekly, and others. In 1910, Robinson took a job on the staff of the New York Tribune drawing editorial cartoons, a position which he retained for four years. With the eruption of World War I in 1914, Robinson's increasingly radical anti-militarist political views brought him into conflict with his employer and he quit the publication. In 1915, Robinson travelled to Eastern Europe on behalf of Metropolitan Magazine along with journalist John Reed. The pair saw first hand the effects of the European war in Russia, Serbia, Macedonia and Greece. In 1916 Reed's account of the journey was collected in a book called The War in Eastern Europe, to which Robinson contributed illustrations. On his return from Europe, Robinson worked at the socialist monthly The Masses. His highly political cartoons as well as the general anti-war stance of The Masses was deemed to have violated the recently passed Espionage Act of 1917, and The Masses had to cease publication. Robinson, along with the other defendants were acquitted on October 5, 1918. Following The Masses, Robinson became a contributing editor to The Liberator and The New Masses, working with former Masses editor Max Eastman. Robinson would later go on to teach art at the Art Students League in New York City (1919-30) and head the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center (1936-47). Some of his students include Bill Tytla, Edmund Duffy, Jacob Burck, Russel Wright, Eric Bransby, Rifka Angel, Mary Anne Bransby, Gerhard Bakker, and Esther Shemitz (who soon after married Whittaker Chambers: both Burck and Shemitz contributed illustrations to The New Masses as their mentor did.) Robinson is also known as a muralist. Some of his mural commissions include Rockefeller Center, the Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. and a nine-panel mural on the History of Trade for Kaufmann's flagship department store in Pittsburgh completed in 1929. Robinson also illustrated several books, among these are editions of Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass (1921), Dostoyevsky's The Brothers Karamazov (1933), Edgar Lee Masters' Spoon River Anthology (1941), and Herman Melville's Moby Dick (1942)..."
3421 Rorimer, James (Art museum curator): Seven (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of Metropolitan Museum of Art Curator James Rorimer (at work and at home with his family - 1950) by Martin Harris for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. James Rorimer"). According to Wikipedia: "James Joseph Rorimer (September 7, 1905 - May 11, 1966), was an American museum curator and former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where he was a primary force behind the creation of the Cloisters, a branch of the museum dedicated to the art and architecture of Medieval Europe. During World War II, Rorimer served in the U.S. Army's Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives Section, a.k.a. the "Monuments Men,' protecting cultural sites and recovering stolen art work...Rorimer was an inspiration for the character of James Granger, portrayed by Matt Damon in the George Clooney-directed film The Monuments Men, released in February 2014."
3422 Ruark, Robert (Writer/columnist): Eleven 1.5 x 7.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (5 images on each) of author and columnist Robert Ruark (at home - June 25, 1949) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ruark" Text by Philip Minoff). According to Wikipedia: "Robert Ruark (December 29, 1915 in Wilmington, North Carolina - July 1, 1965 in London, England) was an American author, syndicated columnist, and big game hunter...In the 1930s, Ruark was fired from an accounting job in the Works Progress Administration, and did a hitch in the United States Merchant Marine. He worked for two small town newspapers in North Carolina: the Hamlet News Messenger and, later, the Sanford Herald. In 1936, Ruark moved to Washington, D.C., and was hired as a copy boy for The Washington Daily News, a Scripps-Howard newspaper. In just a few months he was the paper's top sports reporter. During World War II, Ruark was commissioned an ensign in the United States Navy, and served ten months as a gunnery officer on Atlantic and Mediterranean convoys...Upon his return to Washington, Ruark joined the Scripps-Howard Newspaper Alliance. As his obituary in The New York Times stated, Ruark was 'sometimes glad, sometimes sad, and often mad - but almost always provocative.' Some of his columns were eventually collected into two books, I Didn't Know It Was Loaded (1948) and One for the Road (1949). As he became recognized, Ruark began to write fiction, first for literary magazines, and then his first novel, Grenadine Etching, in 1947. The novel parodied the popular historical romances of the time and set the stage for his many humorous novels and articles published in the Saturday Evening Post, Esquire, and other popular publications..."
3423 Spender, Stephen (Poet/novelist): Ten (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of poet and novelist Stephen Spender (teaching at Sarah Lawrence and at home in Bronxville, NY - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Sir Stephen Harold Spender CBE (1909 - 1995) was an English poet, novelist and essayist who concentrated on themes of social injustice and the class struggle in his work. He was appointed the seventeenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the United States Library of Congress in 1965..."
3424 Van Dine, S.S.(Novelist/art critic): Five 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of novelist and art critic S. S. Van Dine (1938) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "S. S. Van Dine is the pseudonym used by American art critic Willard Huntington Wright (October 15, 1888 - April 11, 1939) when he wrote detective novels. Wright was an important figure in avant-garde cultural circles in pre-WWI New York, and under the pseudonym (which he originally used to conceal his identity) he created the once immensely popular fictional detective Philo Vance, a sleuth and aesthete who first appeared in books in the 1920s, then in movies and on the radio..."
3425 Van Dyke, Willard (Photographer/filmmaker): Four (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) and three 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of photographer and filmmaker Willard Van Dyke (circa 1930s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Willard Van Dyke (December 5, 1906 - January 23, 1986) was an American filmmaker, photographer, arts administrator, teacher, and former director of the film department at the Museum of Modern Art. Van Dyke went to the University of California, dropping out for a time to avoid taking an ROTC course. Van Dyke died in January 23, 1986 of a heart attack on his way to Cambridge, Mass., where he was named Laureate Artist in Residence at Harvard..."



PHOTO NEGATIVES: BUSINESS and INDUSTRY

Photo Negatives by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by name or subject.



Box Folder
351 Armstrong, Edwin Howard (Inventor): Seventeen 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of inventor Edwin Howard Armstrong (shown with his FM antenna - the first static-less radio antenna - July 1939) by Martin Harris (for a LIFE MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Edwin Howard Armstrong (December 18, 1890 - January 31, 1954) was an American electrical engineer and inventor, best known for developing FM (frequency modulation) radio. He held 42 patents and received numerous awards, including the first Medal of Honor awarded by the Institute of Radio Engineers (now IEEE), the French Legion of Honor, the 1941 Franklin Medal and the 1942 Edison Medal. He was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame and included in the International Telecommunication Union's roster of great inventors..."
352 Bethlehem Steel (PA): Twenty-one (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the Bethlehem steel plant and strike - circa 1950s and 1960s) by Martin Harris for various BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE photo assignments. According to Wikipedia: "Bethlehem Steel Corporation was America's second-largest steel producer and largest shipbuilder. Bethlehem Steel and a subsidiary company, Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, were two of the most powerful symbols of American industrial manufacturing leadership. Their demise is often cited as one of the most prominent examples of the U.S. economy's shift away from industrial manufacturing, its failure to compete with cheap foreign labor, and management's penchant for short-term profits. After a decline in the American steel industry and other problems leading to the company's bankruptcy in 2001, the company was dissolved and the remaining assets sold to International Steel Group in 2003. In 2005, ISG merged with Mittal Steel, ending American ownership of the assets of Bethlehem Steel..."
353 General Electric (GE): Seven (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of Ralph J. Cordiner, President and CEO of General Electric Corporation 1959-63) by Martin Harris for a BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE photo assignment - circa 1950s). According to Wikipedia: "Ralph J. Cordiner was an American businessman. He served as president of General Electric from 1950 to 1958, and as its chairman and chief executive officer from 1958 to 1963. He was born in 1900 on a 1280-acre wheat farm in Walla Walla, Washington. He attended Whitman College, working odd jobs and selling washing machines, and graduated in 1922 with a Bachelor of Science in Economics. He joined the Edison General Electric Appliance Company, a GE affiliate, in 1923. Later, he became manager of its Northwest and Ocean Pacific divisions. From 1932 to 1938, he worked in its Bridgeport, Connecticut office. In 1939, he left GE and served as president of Schick until 1942. He returned to GE and worked as Charles E. Wilson's assistant. In 1950, he became president of GE, up until 1958. From 1958 to 1963, he served as chairman and CEO. During his tenure, he decentralized GE into 120 units. He served as chairman of the Defense Advisory Committee on Professional and Technical Compensation in the Armed Forces. He also served as chairman of The Business Council from 1960 to 1961. He was on the cover of Time Magazine on January 12, 1959. He was the recipient of the first Gold Medal Award of the Economic Club of New York."
354 Gottlieb, Duttweiler (Founder of Migros Grocery Stores): Seven (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of Duttweiler Gottlieb, founder of the Migros grocery chain (at work - January 1956) by Martin Harris for a FORTUNE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Who's Who in Foreign Business - Gottlieb Duttweiler"). According to Wikipedia: "Gottlieb Duttweiler (1888 - 1962) was a Swiss businessman and politician, founder of both the Migros chain of grocery stores and the Alliance of Independents party. Duttweiler was born in Zürich. Starting with five vehicles in 1925, his Migros eventually opened stores and is today one of the main grocery chains in Switzerland. The original secret to his success was bringing daily necessities to the consumer by excluding the middlemen. As a result, many producers initially chose to boycott Migros, and Duttweiler's Migros would itself manufacture or package those missing products. In 1941, Gottlieb and his wife Adele Duttweiler transferred ownership of Migros to their customers, as a cooperative. Duttweiler also required that Migros contribute a percentage of profits (actual from the total revenue) to cultural, athletic, and hobby-related activities. This led to the Migros-club-schools and several hobby courses..."
355 International Business Machine (IBM): Eleven (black and white) photo negatives strips and nine 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photographs of an International Business Machine (IBM) motivational meeting (circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for a FORTUNE MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "International Business Machines Corporation (commonly referred to as IBM) is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Armonk, New York, United States, with operations in over 170 countries. The company originated in 1911 as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company (CTR) and was renamed 'International Business Machines' in 1924..."
356 Lewyt Vacuum Cleaners (Sales office): Three (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of activities in the Lewyt Vacuum Cleaner Corporation (1950) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment). See "Box 34/Folder 15."
357 PM New York (Daily NYC newspaper): One 2.5 x 9.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strip (4 images) and twelve 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of activities in the PM NEW YORK newspaper (including images of newspapermen Ray Smith, Tommy Smith, Martin Harris and others - January 1947) by Martin Harris (and other staff photographers for the newspaper). According to Wikipedia: "PM was a liberal leaning daily newspaper published in New York City by Ralph Ingersoll from June 1940 to June 1948 and financed by Chicago millionaire Marshall Field III. The origin of the name is unknown, although Ingersoll recalled that it probably referred to the fact that the paper appeared in the afternoon; The New Yorker reported that the name had been suggested by Lillian Hellman. (There is no historical evidence for the suggestion that the name was an abbreviation of Picture Magazine.) The paper borrowed many elements from weekly news magazines, such as many large photos and at first was bound with staples. In an attempt to be free of pressure from business interests, it did not accept advertising. These departures from the norms of newspaper publishing created excitement in the industry. Some 11,000 people applied for the 150 jobs available when the publication first hired staff. There were accusations that the paper was Communist-dominated, but a thesis by Anya Schiffrin concluded that the paper frequently opposed the policies of the Communist Party and got into editorial fights with the CP's paper, the Daily Worker..."
358 Radio Corporation of America (RCA): Fourteen 1.5 x 7.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips of executives and activities in the offices of RCA - January 25, 1957) by Martin Harris (for a BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE assignment). According to Wikipedia: "RCA Corporation, founded as the Radio Corporation of America, was an American electronics company in existence from 1919 to 1986. General Electric took over the company in 1985 and split it up the following year. The RCA trademark is used by Sony Music Entertainment and Technicolor, which licenses the name to other companies such as Voxx International and TCL Corporation for products descended from that common ancestor..."
359 Rutgers Business Conference (New Brunswick, NJ): Fourteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of activities at the Rutgers University (Business School) Business Conference (c. late 1950s) by Martin Harris (for a BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE photo assignment). No additional information available.
3510 Summer Banking School: Fourteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of activities at an unidentified "Summer Banking School" (July 19, 1956) by Martin Harris (for a BUSINESS WEEK photo assignment). No additional information available.
3511 Skil-Saw (Power tools): Seven (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of activities at the Skil Power Tools Corporation (Chicago - c. late 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "...In the early 1920s, Edmond Michel, a French immigrant in New Orleans with a penchant for tinkering and inventing, watched a group of farmers hack away at sugar cane with large machetes. After observing the painstaking labor the workers went through, Michel began experimenting with how to mechanize the Machete. In 1923, Michel created a motorized machete, which had a 6 in. saw-blade mounted on carved wooden frame and powered with a motor taken from malted milk mixer - the first electric handsaw. After reading about Michel's new invention, Joseph Sullivan, a Minneapolis land developer, set out to find the New Orleans inventor. After deciding to go into business together, Michel and Sullivan moved to Chicago and opened the Michel Electric Handsaw Co. in 1924. After forming the company, six production models were made at $1000 each. Michel went to the new Atlantic City's Million Dollar Boardwalk to demonstrate the new tools, where the first portable electric 'Skilsaw' was purchased for $160 by the Piers' developer. In 1926, the Skil brand name was born after Michel left the company to pursue other ventures, and Sullivan changed the company name to Skilsaw, Inc. After surviving the Great Depression, Skil continued making improvements to its saw. During the 1930s, Skil released the Model E Skilsaw, the first generation saw with a worm drive. In 1937, Edward Sterba perfected the Model E and built the first Model 77 with a 7 ¼" blade, considered the 'workhorse on building sites.' The model 77 celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2012..."



PHOTO NEGATIVES: MISCELLANEOUS SUBJECTS

Photo Negatives by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by subject.



Box Folder
361 Allen, Walser H. (Pastor - Central Moravian Church): Twelve (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the Pastor of the Central Moravian Church (Bethlehem, PA) Dr. Walser H. Allen (formal portraits - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to the Central Moravian Church web site: "Central Moravian Church is Bethlehem's first congregation and the oldest Moravian Church in North America. Coming from a variety of backgrounds and traditions, our congregation today comes together to experience God's love in a caring, respectful and inclusive atmosphere. Central Moravian Church emphasizes Christian faith, hope and love. Central Moravian Church is listed in Ideas' Travel Guide on Historic Places of Worship in the United States, joining other places of worship such as the National Cathedral and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. USA Today, in 1998, named Central Moravian Church as one of the nation's Ten Greatest Places to Reflect on Christmas Eve. Several places of worship were utilized by the early Moravians in their mission to bring the good news to the early colonists and American Indians in Bethlehem. The Saal was the central place of worship in 1742 for the early inhabitants of the Bethlehem community. It is located on the second floor of the Gemeinhaus or community house (today it is part of the Moravian Museum). In 1751, the Saal could not hold the number of worshippers and the Old Chapel became the new place of worship. Near the corner of Heckewelder Place and Church Street, the Old Chapel served as the place of worship for the community for the next 55 years until the community was concerned that they needed a larger church to meet their future needs. On April 16, 1803 the cornerstone was placed for a new Sanctuary. The Sanctuary was the largest church building in PA at the time, although the final cost of $52,000 exceeded the $11,000 estimate. It was completed in 1806, and seats about 1,200."
362 Americans in a Chinese Restaurant (NYC): Two (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of average Americans in a NYC Chinese restaurant (unidentified location - c. early 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
363 Animal Talent Scouts (NYC): Nineteen 1.5 x 7.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (5 images on each strip) of an organized animal talent show (NYC - 1957) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information is available.
364 Baroness of Capri (Aviatirix): Twenty-eight (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) of the aviatrix, the Baroness of Capri (at home and at Roosevelt Field in Mineola (Long Island), New York) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - June 1941). No additional biographical information available. See, "Box 12, Folder 5."
365 Bellevue Nurses (NYC): Twenty-one (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of nursing training and activities at Bellevue Hospital (NYC - 1956) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment. According to Wikipedia: "...Bellevue Hospital Center, was founded on March 31, 1736 and is the oldest public hospital in the United States..."
366 Billy Taub Clothing : Thirty (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) of models wearing clothing from the "Billy Taub" line (October 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment. According to the Huggins and Scott Auctions web site: "As the 'clothier to champions,' New York outfitter Billy Taub spared no expense in making his clients look their very best..."
367 Boy Scouts of America: Twenty-two (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) of various activities of an unidentified Boy Scouts of America troop (July 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
368 Boy with an American Flag: Five 4 x 5 inch (color) photo negatives of an unidentified boy raising the American flag from a second story window (unidentified location - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris. No additional information available.
369 Central Moravian Church (Bethlehem, PA): Thirty-two (color) photo slides of Christmas at the Central Moravian Church (Bethlehem, PA - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the Central Moravian Church web site: "Central Moravian Church is Bethlehem's first congregation and the oldest Moravian Church in North America. Coming from a variety of backgrounds and traditions, our congregation today comes together to experience God's love in a caring, respectful and inclusive atmosphere. Central Moravian Church emphasizes Christian faith, hope and love. Central Moravian Church is listed in Ideas' Travel Guide on Historic Places of Worship in the United States, joining other places of worship such as the National Cathedral and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. USA Today, in 1998, named Central Moravian Church as one of the nation's Ten Greatest Places to Reflect on Christmas Eve. Several places of worship were utilized by the early Moravians in their mission to bring the good news to the early colonists and American Indians in Bethlehem. The Saal was the central place of worship in 1742 for the early inhabitants of the Bethlehem community. It is located on the second floor of the Gemeinhaus or community house (today it is part of the Moravian Museum). In 1751, the Saal could not hold the number of worshippers and the Old Chapel became the new place of worship. Near the corner of Heckewelder Place and Church Street, the Old Chapel served as the place of worship for the community for the next 55 years until the community was concerned that they needed a larger church to meet their future needs. On April 16, 1803 the cornerstone was placed for a new Sanctuary. The Sanctuary was the largest church building in PA at the time, although the final cost of $52,000 exceeded the $11,000 estimate. It was completed in 1806, and seats about 1,200."
3610 Cerebral Palsy (Children): Twenty-one 2 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips of children with Cerebral Palsy (with families and medical professionals - May 1949) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - "Our Child Has Cerebral Palsy" with text by Genevieve R. Langston). According to Wikipedia: "Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Signs and symptoms vary among people. Often, symptoms include poor coordination, stiff muscles, weak muscles, and tremors. There may be problems with sensation, vision, hearing, swallowing, and speaking. Often babies with cerebral palsy do not roll over, sit, crawl, or walk as early as other children their age. Difficulty with the ability to think or reason and seizures each occurs in about one third of people with CP. While the symptoms may get more noticeable over the first few years of life, the underlying problems do not worsen over time..."
3611 "Cheesecake" Pin-Ups (PM - New York): Nine 2 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of unidentified "cheesecake" pin-up models (NYC - September 22, 1943) by Martin Harris (for a PM-NEW YORK photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "A pin-up model (known as a pin-up girl for a female and less commonly male pin-up for a male) is a model whose mass-produced pictures see wide appeal as popular culture. Pin-ups are intended for informal display, i.e. meant to be 'pinned-up' on a wall. Pin-up models may be glamour models, fashion models, or actors. These pictures are also sometimes known as cheesecake photos. The term pin-up may refer to drawings, paintings, and other illustrations as well as photographs (see the list of pin-up artists). The term was first attested to in English in 1941; however, the practice is documented back at least to the 1890s. The pin-up images could be cut out of magazines or newspapers, or on a postcard or lithograph. Such pictures often appear on wall or desk calendars. Posters of pin-ups were mass-produced and became popular from the mid 20th century. Male pin-ups were less common than their female counterparts throughout the 20th century, although a market for homoerotica has always existed as well as pictures of popular male celebrities targeted at women or girls. Examples include James Dean and Jim Morrison..."
3612 "Defend Spain" Street Demonstration (NYC): Ten 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of a "Defend Spain" street demonstration (On Broadway in NYC - circa 1937) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The Spanish Civil War took place from 1936 to 1939 and was fought between the Republicans, who were loyal to the democratic, left-leaning Second Spanish Republic, and the Nationalists, a falangist group led by General Francisco Franco. Although often portrayed as a struggle between democracy and fascism, some historians consider it more accurately described as a struggle between leftist revolution and rightist counterrevolution. Ultimately, the Nationalists won, and Franco then ruled Spain for the next 36 years, from April 1939 until his death in November 1975..."
3613 Dime-Store Clerk (5 and 10 cent store): Twelve (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) of the daily activities of a counter clerk in an unidentified dime (or a "5 and 10 cent") store (circa 1950-51) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The F. W. Woolworth Company (often referred to as Woolworth's, or Woolworth) was a retail company and one of the original pioneers of the five-and-dime store. It was arguably the most successful American and international five-and-dime, setting trends and creating the modern retail model which stores follow worldwide today..."
3614 Donohue, Stephen (NYC Roman Catholic Bishop): One 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative of Roman Catholic Bishop Stephen Donohue (St. Patrick's Cathedral, NYC - circa 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Stephen Donahue was born in New York City, the fifth of ten children of Thomas P. and Dorothy (née Rentz) Donahue. His father was born in England to Irish parents, and his mother was born in Germany. He received his early education at the parochial school of Holy Name Church, run by the Christian Brothers. He was encouraged by one of his teachers to enter the priesthood. After graduating from Holy Name School in 1906, he attended Cathedral College. He received the Cardinal's Medal for general excellence upon his graduation; the award was presented to him by the college's president, Father Patrick Joseph Hayes (who later became Archbishop of New York in 1919)...On March 5, 1934, Donahue was appointed Auxiliary Bishop of New York and Titular Bishop of Medea by Pope Pius XI. He received his episcopal consecration on the following May 1 from Cardinal Hayes, with Bishop Edward Mooney and Archbishop John Joseph Mitty serving as co-consecrators, at St. Patrick's Cathedral. He selected as his episcopal motto: Monstra te esse matrem (Latin: "Show thyself a mother"). After his consecration, he was made pastor of his childhood parish of Holy Name Church, and frequently represented Cardinal Hayes at religious conventions and other events. When Cardinal Eugenio Pacelli, then-Vatican Secretary of State and future Pope Pius XII, visited New York in 1936, Donahue took a leading role in greeting him. He also took a special interest in the Legion of Decency, and served as a member of the motion picture committee of the National Catholic Welfare Council..."
3615 Fashion (Miscellaneous): Thirty-six (color) photo negatives (various sizes) of unidentified professional fashion models (circa 1940s - 60s) by Martin Harris (for various photo assignments and projects). No additional information available.
3616 Hearing Impaired Children: Forty-nine (black and white) photo negatives of the daily activities of unidentified hearing-impaired children (unidentified location - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information is available.
3617 Herndon, Angelo (Labor Organizer): Four (black and white) photo negatives of African- American labor organizer Angelo Herndon (and others - 1934) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Angelo Braxton Herndon (May 6, 1913, Wyoming, Ohio - December 9, 1997, Sweet Home, Arkansas) was an African-American labor organizer arrested and convicted for insurrection after attempting to organize black and white industrial workers alike in 1932 in Atlanta, Georgia. (The prosecution case rested heavily on Herndon's possession of 'communist literature')..."
3618 Hobbies (Miscellaneous): Four 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of unidentified men working on various hobbies (model-ship building, short-wave radio, et cetera - December 1938) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
3619 Holman, Nat (Collee Basketball Coach): Twelve (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of City College New York (CCNY) basketball coach Not Holman (on the court and performing his everyday work duties - January 1949) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Nat Holman (October 19, 1896 - February 12, 1995) was one of the early pro basketball players and one of the game's most important innovators...Known for his exceptional ball-handling and his accurate shooting, Holman was a star player at New York University. He was also an important part of the Original Celtics, who were no relation to the Boston Celtics. Also a gifted passer and excellent floor leader, Holman was a prototype of later playmakers. Although he played pro basketball until 1930, he took over the head coaching position at the City College of New York in 1920. Known as Mr. Basketball, Holman guided CCNY to the so-called grand slam of college basketball, winning both the NCAA and NIT titles in 1950, a feat that has never been achieved since (and is no longer possible as both tournaments are now done concurrently). In 1951, Holman's CCNY team became involved in a national point shaving scandal involving seven different schools. While several CCNY players, including Ed Warner and Ed Roman were arrested, the investigation cleared Holman of any wrongdoing. The scandal eventually led CCNY to de-emphasize athletics (CCNY currently competes in NCAA Division III) and suspend Holman after the 1951-52 season. He returned for brief stints in 1954-56 and 1958-59, retiring for good in 1959. Holman compiled a 421-190 record in 37 seasons at CCNY, retiring in 1959..."
3620 Hyldoft, Joan (Professional ice skater): Twenty-three 4 x 5 inch (color) photo negatives of professional ice skater Joan Hyldoft (publicity photographs - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). Joan Hyldoft is most famous as an "ice ballerina" in the HOLIDAY ON ICE touring shows.
3621 Ice Skaters (Professional): Twenty 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of unidentified professional ice skaters (circa 1941) by Martin Harris (using strobe lights for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
3622 Louis, Joe (Heavyweight Boxing Champion) Part 1: Eight 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of heavyweight boxing champion Joe Louis (sparring and visiting military hospitals during World War II) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "Joseph Louis Barrow (May 13, 1914 - April 12, 1981), best known as Joe Louis, was an American professional boxer. He held the world heavyweight championship from 1937 to 1949, and is considered to be one of the greatest heavyweights of all time. Nicknamed the 'Brown Bomber.' Louis' championship reign lasted 140 consecutive months, during which he participated in 26 championship fights; a 27th fight, against Ezzard Charles, was a challenge to Charles' heavyweight title and so is not included in Louis' reign. Louis was victorious in 25 title defenses, a world record second only to Julio César Chávez with 27. In 2005, Louis was ranked as the #1 heavyweight of all-time by the International Boxing Research Organization and was ranked #1 on The Ring magazine's list of the 100 Greatest Punchers of All-Time..."
3623 Louis, Joe (Heavyweight Boxing Champion) Part 2: Six 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives heavyweight boxing champion Joe Louis filming a television commercial for VICK'S INHALER with former middleweight boxing champ Rocky Graziano and former heavyweight boxing champ Jersey Joe Walcott (circa 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo assignment). According to a biography on the IMDb website (by "Angels unchained"): "Joe Louis is considered by many fistic experts and fans as the greatest Heavyweight Boxing Champion in the sport's history. Born into a poor family, Joe Louis's mother felt the only way her son could escape poverty was through music. She bought him a violin and sent him off daily to lessons. On his way there, young Joe would pass by a boxing gym. In no time, he was working out at the gym, training for a boxing career. His amateur career started off disastrously, as he was knocked-out down 16 times in losing the fight. However, he was determined to continue and posted an outstanding amateur career with only 5 defeats in 60 fights. He turned professional and quickly racked up one of the most impressive winning streaks in boxing history. He was nicknamed, The Brown Bomber, and became the first boxer to defeat six heavyweight champions (Primo Carnera, Max Baer, Jack Sharkey, Jimmy Braddock, Max Schmeling, and Jersey Joe Walcott). After winning the championship, he held it almost 12 years to set a record, plus set another record with 25 successful title defenses. He retired with a 60-1 record, only to make an unsuccessful and very sad comeback at the age of 37. While champion, Joe Louis volunteered to join the U.S. Army at the height of his career. He made two title defenses in which he donated his entire purses to relief funds to help both the Army and the Navy. He spent almost five years in the service and boxed hundreds of exhibitions. However, after the war, he was hounded by the Internal Revenue Service to pay back taxes on the purses he had donated. He suffered terribly through this ordeal. and soon found himself broke. He launched a "controversial" pro-wrestling career and was undefeated in some 20 matches before retiring with a heart problem. He was helped by his good friend Frank Sinatra and acted in a few films, worked as a host in Las Vegas, and made numerous appearances for boxing. He died a few years after suffering a massive stroke. Joe Louis was buried with full-military honors, and it was said that he was 'most' proud of his European-African-Middle Eastern Medal and his Victory Medal World War II. In or out of the ring, Joe Louis was a Champion." According to the Encyclopedia Britannica: "Rocky Graziano, original name Thomas Rocco Barbella (born January 1, 1919, New York, New York, U.S.—died May 22, 1990, New York) American boxer and world middleweight champion (1947-48). In his youth Graziano was close friends with future fighter Jake La Motta, and both troubled youths attended the same juvenile reform school. Graziano was drafted during World War II, but he later deserted from the U.S. Army after punching an officer. During his brief time with the military, Graziano became a professional boxer and adopted his new name to evade the army. He was found nonetheless, sentenced to nine months in the federal penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kansas, and dishonorably discharged from military service. He began fighting again soon after his release from Leavenworth in 1943 and became known for his powerful right-hand punches and for his relentless animal-like fury. Graziano defeated fighters Al Davis, Marty Servo, and Harold Green to get his first shot at a title against Tony Zale. Graziano battled Zale for the title three times in less than two years; these epic battles were his best-known fights. Zale knocked Graziano out in six rounds in the first fight, in 1946; Graziano won the second fight by knocking out Zale in the sixth, thereby becoming middleweight champion; Zale won the third fight by a knockout in the third to regain the championship. Graziano lost his last middleweight title challenge to Sugar Ray Robinson in 1952 and retired from boxing the next year. He subsequently became a comic actor and wrote, with Rowland Barber, his autobiography, Somebody Up There Likes Me, which was made into a popular film starring Paul Newman in 1956. Graziano's career record was 67 wins (52 by knockout), 10 losses, and 6 draws. He was inducted into The Ring magazine's Boxing Hall of Fame in 1971" According to Wikipedia: "Jersey Joe Walcott, was an American world heavyweight boxing champion. He broke the world's record for the oldest man to win the world's heavyweight title when he earned it at the age of 37 years, 168 days. That record would eventually be broken on November 5, 1994, by 45-year-old George Foreman, who defeated the 26-year-old heavyweight champion of the world Michael Moorer, to win the WBA and IBF heavyweight titles. After retiring from boxing, Walcott did some acting, playing small parts in a few movies and television shows. He also refereed several boxing matches, but after the controversial ending to the second fight between Muhammad Ali and Sonny Liston, Walcott was not asked to referee again. From 1971 to 1974, Walcott held the elected position of Camden County, New Jersey, sheriff, the first African-American to do so. From 1975 to 1984, he was the chairman of the New Jersey State Athletic Commission..."
3624 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT): One 2.5 x 2.5 inch (color) photo negative of unidentified Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) administration and faculty members in a meeting room (December 1949) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1861 in response to the increasing industrialization of the United States, MIT adopted a European polytechnic university model and stressed laboratory instruction in applied science and engineering. Researchers worked on computers, radar, and inertial guidance during World War II and the Cold War. Post-war defense research contributed to the rapid expansion of the faculty and campus under James Killian. The current 168-acre campus opened in 1916 and extends over 1 mile along the northern bank of the Charles River basin..."
3625 Mays, Willie (Professional Baseball Player): Seventy (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes of Baseball Hall of Famer Willie mays (playing 'Winter Ball" with the "Santurce" team in Puerto Rico - 1954) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The Cangrejeros de Santurce is a professional baseball team based in Santurce, the largest barrio of San Juan, Puerto Rico. The franchise joined the Puerto Rico Baseball League when it was the semi-professional Liga de Béisbol Semi-Professional de Puerto Rico. Having played for over 70 years, the Santurce Cangrejeros ('Crabbers') have won twelve national titles and five Caribbean Series. With over 2000 victories, the Cangrejeros have won the most games in the history of Puerto Rican professional baseball. The 1954-55 Cangrejeros, nicknamed Escuadrón del Pánico (lit. 'Panic Squad'), was the team's most notable roster, with a lineup that included hall of famers Roberto Clemente and Willie Mays. This version of the Santurce won the National and Caribbean championships by sweeping their respective series..."
3626 Military Physician (USAF Hospital): Twelve (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of "Dr. Wills" the military physician at an unidentified USAF hospital (1959) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
3627 Rickover, Hyman (U.S. Navy Admiral): Three 1.5 x 8.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (6 images on each strip) of U.S. Navy Admiral ("Father of the Nuclear Navy") Hyman Rickover (with NYC Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. and others - c. early 1960s). According to Wikipedia: "Hyman George Rickover (January 27, 1900 - July 8, 1986) was a United States Navy admiral who directed the original development of naval nuclear propulsion and controlled its operations for three decades as director of Naval Reactors. In addition, he oversaw the development of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, the world's first commercial pressurized water reactor used for generating electricity. As of July 2007, the Naval Sea Systems Command programs which he oversaw the creation and operation of had produced 200 nuclear-powered submarines, and 23 nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and cruisers, though many of these U.S. vessels are now decommissioned and others are under construction..."
3628 Narcotics (NYC): Twelve 1.5 x 7.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips of the daily activities of the NYC Police Department Narcotics Squad (1954) by Martin Harris for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Kitty Barry - Woman Detective"). No additional information available. See "Box 13, Folder 7."
3629 New York City Police Department (Miscellaneous): Forty-seven (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) for the New York City Police Department (pertaining to the daily activates of law enforcement in NYC - circa 1940 - 1960s) by Martin Harris (for various publication photo assignments). No additional information available.
3630 North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO): Twenty-one (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the West Point Military Academy (NY) offices of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO - circa 1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
3631 Political Demonstrations (c.1930s): Fifteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) and fifteen 2.5 x 3.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of various political street demonstrations of the 1930s (including an unidentified "left-wing demonstration at Coney Island," the Macaulay Publishing strike in NYC, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
3632 Stillman's Gym (NYC): Twenty-one 3.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of the daily activities at Stillman's Gym in NYC (February 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Louis Ingber (1887-1969), better known as Lou Stillman, was a legendary boxing trainer who had a gym in New York City, but whose fame transcended beyond New York and into boxing circles virtually everywhere else. He was also a private detective prior to working as a boxing trainer. In 1919, Ingber was invited by millionaires Alpheus Geer and Hiram Mallison to manage Stillman's Gym. When Ingber came along, the gym was actually named the Marshall Stillman Athletic Club. In the late 1920s, the gym changed its name. Patrons used to think Ingber's last name was Stillman; because of this, they greeted him as Mr. Stillman. Stillman, described as moody and acid, among other things, by boxing historians and writers, disliked having to correct everyone who called him Mr. Stillman, so eventually he changed his name legally from Louis Ingber to Lou Stillman. Stillman was famous for keeping his gym as unsanitary as possible: He allowed the public to smoke in a closed-windows atmosphere, and he absolutely required the gym floors to go uncleaned, sometimes for years. He said: 'The golden age of prizefighting was the age of bad food, bad air, bad sanitation, and no sunlight. I keep the place like this for the fighters' own good. If I clean it up they'll catch a cold from the cleanliness'..."
3633 Students (College class of 1966): Forty-two (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of unidentified college students (on campus and in class - February 1966) by Martin Harris (for a FORTUNE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "University Opinions - The Private World of the Class of '66" with text by Duncan Norton-Taylor). No additional information available.
3634 Teenagers (1956): Fifty-six (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the daily activities of teenagers (at home and with friends - Summer 1956) by Martin Harris (for a PAGEANT MAGAZINE photo assignment). No additional information available.
3635 United Jewish Appeal (UJA): Forty-eight (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the NYC United Jewish Appeal (UJA) pro-Israel delegation (departing Grand Central Station c. late 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The United Jewish Appeal (UJA) was a Jewish philanthropic umbrella organization that existed from its creation in 1939 until it was folded into the United Jewish Communities, which was formed from the 1999 merger of United Jewish Appeal (UJA), Council of Jewish Federations and United Israel Appeal, Inc. In January 1939, the United Jewish Appeal for Refugees and Overseas Needs was established, combining the efforts of American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, led by Rabbi Jonah Wise; the United Palestine Appeal, led by Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver; and the National Coordinating Committee Fund led by William Rosenwald. The three founders emphasized that the funds needed to support Jews in Europe and Palestine would be triple to quadruple the amount raised in the previous year. While the organizations would raise funds together, the Joint Distribution Committee would assist Jews in Europe, the United Palestine Appeal would aid the Jewish community in Palestine, including refugees from Europe arriving there and the National Coordinating Committee Fund would assist refugees arriving in the United States..."
3636 Vietnam War Protests (NYC): Four (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of an anti-Vietnam War street demonstration in NYC (circa 1967) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.



PHOTO NEGATIVES: PERFORMERS and SHOW BUSINESS PERSONALITIES

Photo Negatives by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by name of subject.



Box Folder
371 Adams, Franklin Pierce (Columnist/Radio Personality): Three 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of newspaper columnist and radio personality Franklin Pierce Adams (shaving - 1938) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 10, Folder 1." According to Wikipedia: "Franklin Pierce Adams (November 15, 1881 - March 23, 1960) was an American columnist, well known by his initials F.P.A., and wit, best known for his newspaper column, "The Conning Tower.' and his appearances as a regular panelist on radio's Information Please. A prolific writer of light verse, he was a member of the Algonquin Round Table of the 1920s and 1930s..."
372 Allen, Steve (Television Personality): One-hundred and twenty-one (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the original TONIGHT SHOW host Steve Allen (with his family at his NYC apartment and at the NBC television studio with his TONIGHT SHOW guests, cast and crew including Jack Palance, Buddy Hackett, comedian Milt Kamen, Julie Wilson, Agnes Moorehead, Hal March, Louis Nye, Skitch Henderson, Gene Rayburn, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for a PAGEANT MAGAZINE photo assignment - 1956). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 3." According to Wikipedia: "Steve Allen (December 26, 1921 - October 30, 2000) was an American television personality, musician, composer, actor, comedian, and writer. Though he got his start in radio, Allen is best known for his television career. He first gained national attention as a guest host on Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts. He graduated to become the first host of The Tonight Show, where he was instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. Thereafter, he hosted numerous game and variety shows, including The Steve Allen Show, I've Got a Secret, and The New Steve Allen Show, and was a regular panel member on CBS' What's My Line? Allen was a creditable pianist and a prolific composer, having written (by his own estimate) over 8,500 songs, some of which were recorded by Perry Como, Margaret Whiting, Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme, Les Brown, and Gloria Lynne. Allen won the 1964 Grammy Award for Best Original Jazz Composition, with his song written with Ray Brown, 'The Gravy Waltz.' Allen wrote more than 50 books, has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and a Hollywood theater named in his honor..." ) by Martin Harris.
373 Anderson, Marian (Concert Artist): Sixteen 3 x 4.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of contralto singer and activist Marian Anderson (with others at an Essex House reception in her honor - NYC - April 17, 1939) by Martin Harris for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Marian Anderson (February 27, 1897 - April 8, 1993) was an American contralto and one of the most celebrated singers of the twentieth century. Music critic Alan Blyth said: 'Her voice was a rich, vibrant contralto of intrinsic beauty.' Most of her singing career was spent performing in concert and recital in major music venues and with famous orchestras throughout the United States and Europe between 1925 and 1965. Although offered roles with many important European opera companies, Anderson declined, as she had no training in acting. She preferred to perform in concert and recital only. She did, however, perform opera arias within her concerts and recitals. She made many recordings that reflected her broad performance repertoire of everything from concert literature to lieder to opera to traditional American songs and spirituals. Between 1940 and 1965 the German-American pianist Franz Rupp was her permanent accompanist. Anderson became an important figure in the struggle for black artists to overcome racial prejudice in the United States during the mid-twentieth century. In 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) refused permission for Anderson to sing to an integrated audience in Constitution Hall. The incident placed Anderson into the spotlight of the international community on a level unusual for a classical musician. With the aid of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and her husband Franklin D. Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. She sang before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. Anderson continued to break barriers for black artists in the United States, becoming the first black person, American or otherwise, to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City on January 7, 1955. Her performance as Ulrica in Giuseppe Verdi's Un ballo in maschera at the Met was the only time she sang an opera role on stage. Anderson worked for several years as a delegate to the United Nations Human Rights Committee and as a 'goodwill ambassadress' for the United States Department of State, giving concerts all over the world. She participated in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, singing at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963. The recipient of numerous awards and honors, Anderson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963, the Kennedy Center Honors in 1978, the National Medal of Arts in 1986, and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1991..."
374 Anderson, Maxwell (Playwright): Two 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of playwright and author Maxwell Anderson (with others (at an unidentified play rehearsal - circa 1040s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "James Maxwell Anderson (December 15, 1888 - February 28, 1959) was an American playwright, author, poet, journalist and lyricist...His plays are in widely varying styles, and Anderson was one of the few modern playwrights to make extensive use of blank verse. Some of these were adapted as movies, and Anderson wrote the screenplays of other authors' plays and novels - Death Takes a Holiday, All Quiet on the Western Front - in addition to books of poetry and essays. His first Broadway hit was the gritty 1924 World War I comedy-drama, What Price Glory, written with Laurence Stallings. The play was notable for its use of profanity, which caused censors to protest. But when the chief censor (Rear Admiral Charles Peshall Plunkett) was found to have written far more obscene letters to General Chamberlaine, he was discredited: soldiers really did speak that way..."
375 Bankhead, Tallulah (Stage and film actress): Two 1.5 x 7 inch (black and white) photo negatives of stage and screen actress Tallulah Bankhead (in the backyard of her home - July 1952) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 5." According to "Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 - December 12, 1968) was an American actress of the stage and screen, and a reputed libertine. Bankhead was known for her husky voice, outrageous personality, and devastating wit. Originating some of the 20th-century theater's preeminent roles in comedy and melodrama, she gained acclaim as an actress on both sides of the Atlantic. Bankhead became an icon of the tempestuous, flamboyant actress, and her unique voice and mannerisms are often subject to imitation and parody..." According to his biography (by Hal Erickson) on the Fandango web site: "Henry Hull, the son of a Louisville drama critic, made his Broadway acting debut in either 1909 or 1911, depending on which 'official' biography one reads. After leaving the stage to try his luck as a gold prospector and mining engineer, Hull was back on the boards in 1916, the same year that he made his first film at New Jersey's World Studios. While his place of honor in the American Theater is incontestable (among his many Broadway appearances was Tobacco Road, in which he created the role of Jeeter Lester), Hull's reputation as film actor varies from observer to observer. An incredibly mannered movie performer, Hull was a bit too precious for his leading roles in One Exciting Night (1922) and The Werewolf of London (1935); he also came off as shamelessly hammy in such character parts as the crusading newspaper editor in The Return of Frank James (1940). Conversely, his calculated mannerisms and gratuitous vocal tricks served him quite well in roles like the obnoxious millionaire in Hitchcock's Lifeboat (1944) and the Ernie Pyle-like war correspondent in Objective Burma (1945). A playwright as well as an actor, Hull worked on such plays as Congratulations and Manhattan. One of Henry Hull's last film appearances was the typically irritating role of a small-town buttinsky in The Chase (1966)."
376 Basehart, Richard (Actor): One 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strip (2 images) of actor Richard Basehart (in his library - c. late 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 2." According to his biography by pusquets@lander.es on the IMDb website: "Richard Basehart came to Hollywood in 1947, after beginning an acting career on Broadway. He made his mark in the gritty film-noir classic He Walked by Night (1948), among others, and proved his versatility in several international productions, most notably in Federico Fellini's poignant masterpiece La Strada (1954)."
377 Bergman, Ingrid (Film Actress): Four (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of film actress Ingrid Bergman (with Swedish starlets Mai Britt and Marta Toren - 1953) by Martin Harris (for a 2-page article published in COLLIER'S MAGAZINE: "Ingrid's New Role" - September 18, 1953). See, also, "Box 4, Folder 10" and "Box 15, Folder 6." Text (by an unidentified author): "The beautiful Swede who went to Rome via Hollywood now helps Swedish starlets (Mai Britt and Marta Toren) grapple with their own careers. As wife, mother, actress and benefactress, she has her capable hands full. And Bergman, as you can see, never looked lovelier..."
378 Bernstein, Leonard (Composer and Conductor): Nine 1.5 x 4.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (3 images on each) of composer Leonard Bernstein (with an unidentified record producer - c. late 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 7." According to his biography on the IMDb web site: "Renowned composer ('West Side Story,' 'Candide,' 'On The Town'), conductor, arranger, pianist, educator, author, TV/radio host, educated at the Boston Latin School and Harvard University (BA) with Walter Piston. Edward Burlingame Hill and A. Tillman Merritt. He studied piano with Helen Coates, Heinrich Gebhard and Isabelle Vengerova, at the Curtis Institute with Fritz Reiner, and at the Berkshire Music Center with Serge Koussevitzky (and became an assistant to Koussevitzky). He was assistant conductor of the New York Philharmonic in 1943-1944, and conductor of the New York Symphony, 1945-1948. He was music advisor to the Israel Philharmonic from 1948-1949, and a member of the faculty at the Berkshire Music Center from 1948 (though he did take leaves of absence), and head of the conducting department there in 1951. He was Professor of Music at Brandeis University, 1951-1956; and co-conductor of the New York Philharmonic, 1957-1958, and music director there after 1958. He won an Emmy award for his televised Young People's Concerts. He was guest conductor of symphony orchestras in the USA and Europe, and conducted the Israel Philharmonic seven times between 1947 and 1957. He toured the US with Koussevitzky in 1951, and was the first American to conduct at the La Scala Opera House in Milan, in 1953. He was awarded the Sonning Prize in Denmark, and was a member of the National Institute of Arts and Letters. He joined ASCAP in 1944, and his chief musical collaborators included Betty Comden, Adolph Green, John Latouche, and Stephen Sondheim..."
379 Blue, Ben (Nightclub and film comedian): Three (3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of comedian Ben Blue (clowning with photographers) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment - circa 1940s). See, also, Box 15, Folder 8." According to his biography on the Find a Grave web site: "Vaudeville comedian...Ben Blue immigrated to the United States where he became a dance instructor, dance school owner, and a successful nightclub owner. He began his movie career in short films for Warner Brothers in 1926 and later worked at Hal Roach Studios, Paramount and later at MGM. Some of his notable film appearances were in The Big Broadcast of 1938 (1938), For Me and My Gal (1942) which starred Judy Garland, One Sunday Afternoon (1948) which was a remake of the 1933 film of the same name and It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963) in which he had a cameo as a biplane pilot. He was also on television and frequently appeared on Ed Sullivan's 'Toast of the Town' variety series and on the popular, long-running variety show 'The Hollywood Palace.' "
3710 Bolger, Ray (Stage and film dancer): One 3.5 x 5inch (black and white) photo negative of dancer and actor Ray Bolger (rehearsing, in bed, with an unidentified woman, for an unidentified show - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 9." According to Wikipedia: "Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 - January 15, 1987)[3] was an American entertainer of vaudeville, stage (particularly musical theatre) and actor, singer and dancer best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz...His entertainment aspirations evolved from the vaudeville shows of his youth. He changed his surname to Bolger and began his career in a vaudeville tap show, creating the act 'Sanford and Bolger' with his dance partner. In 1926, he danced at New York City's legendary Palace Theatre, the premier vaudeville theatre in the U.S. His limber body and improvisational dance movement won him many leading roles on Broadway in the 1930s. Eventually, his career would also encompass film, television and nightclub work..."
3711 Brando, Marlon (Film and stage actor): One 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative of actor Marlon Brando (speaking on the telephone while sitting on an overturned waste basket - April 1950). "See, also, "Box 15, Folder 10." According to the IMDb web site: "Marlon Brando is widely considered the greatest movie actor of all time, rivaled only by the more theatrically oriented Laurence Olivier in terms of esteem. Unlike Olivier, who preferred the stage to the screen, Brando concentrated his talents on movies after bidding the Broadway stage adieu in 1949, a decision for which he was severely criticized when his star began to dim in the 1960s and he was excoriated for squandering his talents. No actor ever exerted such a profound influence on succeeding generations of actors as did Brando. More than 50 years after he first scorched the screen as Stanley Kowalski in the movie version of Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and a quarter-century after his last great performance as Col. Kurtz in Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now (1979), all American actors are still being measured by the yardstick that was Brando. It was if the shadow of John Barrymore, the great American actor closest to Brando in terms of talent and stardom, dominated the acting field up until the 1970s. He did not, nor did any other actor so dominate the public's consciousness of what WAS an actor before or since Brando's 1951 on-screen portrayal of Stanley made him a cultural icon. Brando eclipsed the reputation of other great actors circa 1950, such as Paul Muni and Fredric March. Only the luster of Spencer Tracy's reputation hasn't dimmed when seen in the starlight thrown off by Brando. However, neither Tracy nor Olivier created an entire school of acting just by the force of his personality. Brando did..."
3712 Yul Brynner (Stage and film actor): Thirteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of stage and film actor Yul Brynner (with hair and his wife -actress Virginia Gilmore - seated at a table - 1949) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 12." According to Wikipedia: "Yul Brynner (July 11, 1920 - October 10, 1985) was a Russian-born, United States-based film and stage actor. Brynner was best known for his portrayals of Rameses II in the 1956 Cecil B. DeMille blockbuster The Ten Commandments, and of King Mongkut of Siam in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I, for which he won two Tony Awards and an Academy Award for the film version. He played the role 4625 times on stage. He portrayed General Bounine in the 1956 film Anastasia and the gunman Chris Adams in The Magnificent Seven. Brynner was noted for his distinctive voice and for his shaved head, which he maintained as a personal trademark long after adopting it in 1951 for his role in The King and I. Earlier, he was a model and television director, and later a photographer and the author of two books..." According to Wikipedia: "Virginia Gilmore was born as Sherman Virginia Poole in El Monte, California. Her father was a retired officer of the British Army. She began her stage career in San Francisco at the age of 15, but moved to Los Angeles in 1939 to pursue work in films. When her movie career was not progressing, Gilmore mustered the nerve to approach Samuel Goldwyn at his home. As a result of their meeting, he promised her a screen test. She did soon land some small movie roles. Her better known film appearances both occurred in 1941: Western Union, directed by Fritz Lang, and Swamp Water directed by Jean Renoir..."
3713 Brown, Joe E. (Film comedian): Ten (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of film comedian Joe E. Brown (with other unidentified performers backstage - circa 1936. Also included - black and white images of a theatre marquee advertising Charlie Chaplin in MODERN TIMES) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Joseph Evans Brown (July 28, 1891 - July 6, 1973) was an American actor and comedian, remembered for his amiable screen persona, comic timing, and enormous elastic-mouth smile. He was one of the most popular American comedians in the 1930s and 1940s, with successful films like A Midsummer Night's Dream, Earthworm Tractors, and Alibi Ike. In his later career Brown starred in Some Like It Hot (1959), as Osgood Fielding III, in which he utters the famous punchline, 'Well, nobody's perfect.' "
3714 Casals, Pablo (Cellist) : Eleven (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of cellist Pablo Casals (with crowds and musicians - c. late 1950s /early 1960s) by Martin Harris (for Scope Associates). See, also, "Box 10, Folder 14." According to the Encyclopedia of World Biography web site: "Pablo Casals was regarded as one of the greatest cello players and composers (writers of music) of the twentieth century. He was also an active protester against oppressive governments (those that misuse their power and mistreat citizens), including that of the Spanish tyrant Francisco Franco (1892-1975). Pablo Casals was born on December 29, 1876, in Vendrell, in the Catalonian region of Spain. He was the second of eleven children of Carlos Casals and Pilar Defillo de Casals. Casals's father, the local church organist, would play the piano while the infant Casals rested his head against it and sang along. By the age of four Casals was playing the piano, and at five he joined the church choir. At six he was composing songs with his father, and by the age of nine he could play the violin and organ. From the age of ten Casals began each day with a walk, taking inspiration from nature. He would then play two Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) pieces on the piano when he returned home. Casals became interested in the cello after seeing the instrument in a music recital at age eleven; soon, his father built him one. His parents argued about his future; his father wanted him to study carpentry, but his mother would not hear of it and enrolled him in the Municipal School of Music in Barcelona, Spain. Casals clashed with his strict instructors, preferring to play the cello in his own, more expressive, manner. His progress was extraordinary, and Casals's new way of playing made the cello a more popular instrument. Among those impressed by Casals was the Spanish composer Isaac Albéniz (1860-1909). After hearing Casals play, Albéniz gave him a letter of introduction to Count Guillermo de Morphy, secretary to the Queen Regent of Spain, Maria Cristine. In 1894 Casals traveled to Madrid, Spain, and gave concerts for the queen and her court. Over the next few years his reputation spread as he played with various orchestras in Madrid. With his formal debut as a concert soloist in Paris, France, in 1899, Casals's career was assured..."
3715 Castle, Irene (Modern dance pioneer): Twenty-eight 3 x 4.5 inch (black and white) photographs of dance pioneer Irene Castle (rehearsing and dancing with others - August 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Vernon and Irene Castle were a husband-and-wife team of ballroom dancers and dance teachers who appeared on Broadway and in silent films early in the early 20th century. They are credited with reviving the popularity of modern dancing. Castle was a stage name: Vernon (1887 - 1918) was born William Vernon Blyth in Norwich, Norfolk, England. Irene (1893 - 1969) was born Irene Foote in New Rochelle, New York. The couple reached the peak of their popularity in Irving Berlin's first Broadway show, Watch Your Step (1914), in which they refined and popularized the Foxtrot. They also helped to promote ragtime, jazz rhythms and African-American music for dance. Irene became a fashion icon through her appearances on stage and in early movies, and both Castles were in demand as teachers and writers on dance. After serving with distinction as a pilot in the British Royal Flying Corps during World War I, Vernon died in a plane crash on a flight training base in Texas in 1918. Irene continued to perform solo in Broadway, vaudeville and motion picture productions over the next decade. She remarried three times, had children and became an animal-rights activist. In 1939, her life with Vernon was dramatized in The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle..."
3716 Chevalier, Maurice: Eight 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of Maurice Chevalier (greeting Allied soldiers during World War II) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to his biography (by Volker Boehm) on the IMDb web site: "His heavy French accent, melodic voice and Gallic charm made Maurice Chevalier the prototype of the gallant French monsieur in the American cinema of the 1930s. Before he went to Hollywood he worked as a farmer, circus acrobat, cabaret singer and, starting in 1908, a comical actor in French films, a few times even with the celebrated Max Linder. Chevalier fought as an infantryman in the French army during World War I and was taken prisoner by the Germans in 1914, spending two years in a POW camp. After the war he returned to the entertainment field, and eventually tried his luck in Hollywood. He made his first American movie in 1929, The Love Parade (1929). The film was a success, and Chevalier made more successful films with directors like Ernst Lubitsch (The Merry Widow 1934). He retired from films in 1967, his last few roles being mainly friendly patriarchs."
3717 Clair, Rene (Film director/writer): Two 1.5 x 4.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (3 images on each) of French filmmaker and writer Rene Clair (circa 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication phot assignment). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 16." According to Wikipedia: "René Clair was a French filmmaker and writer. He first established his reputation in the 1920s as a director of silent films in which comedy was often mingled with fantasy. He went on to make some of the most innovative early sound films in France, before going abroad to work in the UK and USA for more than a decade. Returning to France after World War II, he continued to make films that were characterized by their elegance and wit, often presenting a nostalgic view of French life in earlier years. He was elected to the Académie française in 1960. Clair's best known films include The Italian Straw Hat (1928), Under the Roofs of Paris (1930), Le Million (1931), À nous la liberté (1931), I Married a Witch (1942), and And Then There Were None (1945)..."
3718 Collingwood, Charles (Television journalist): One 2.5 x 2.5 inch (color) photo negative of television journalist Charles Collingwood (in the CBS newsroom - circa 1962) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Charles Collingwood (June 4, 1917 - October 3, 1985) was an American journalist and war correspondent. He was an early member of Edward R. Murrow's group of reporters known as 'Murrow's Boys.' He was also among the early ranks of television journalists that included Walter Cronkite, Eric Sevareid, and Murrow himself..."
3719 Condon, Eddie (Jazz Musician): Seven (black and white) photo negatives of jazz musician and bandleader Eddie Condon (with his family and with his band and images of "Nick and Eddie Condon's" nightclub patrons and other jazz musicians including Joe Sullivan) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE series of articles - "Brother Jazz - The Story of Eddie Condon" - August 23, August 30 and September 6, 1947). See, also, Box 4, folder 31, Box 4, Folder 40 and Box 15, Folder 17." According to the Red Hot Jazz web site: " Eddie Condon was one of the gang of young white Chicago jazz musicians in the 1920s. He started out playing banjo with Hollis Peavey's Jazz Bandits when he was 17. He worked with several members of the famed Austin High School Gang in the 1920s. In 1927 he co-led with Red McKenzie the McKenzie-Condon Chicagoans record that was popular among white Chicago jazz musicians. After organizing some other record sessions, Condon switched to guitar and moved to New York in 1929, where he worked with Red Nichols' Five Pennies and Red McKenzie's Mound City Blue Blowers. He participated in several recording sessions including one with Louis Armstrong and his Savoy Ballroom 5 in 1929. In 1938 he led some sessions for the Commodore label and he became a star. He had a nightly gig at Nick's in New York City from 1937 to 1944. From 1944 to 1945 he led a series of recordings at Town Hall that were broadcast weekly on the radio. Condon opened his own club in 1945, and recorded for Columbia in the 1950s."
3720 Connelly, Marc (Playwright/screenwriter): Two 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of playwright and screenwriter Marc Connelly (Meeting with unidentified men - circa 1940s). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 18." According to Wikipedia: "Marcus Cook Connelly was an American playwright, director, producer, performer, and lyricist. He was a key member of the Algonquin Round Table, and received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1930. Connelly was born to actor and hotelier Patrick Joseph Connelly and actress Mabel Louise Cook in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. He began writing plays at the age of five, and would later become a journalist for the Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph until he moved to New York City. In 1919 he joined the Algonquin Round Table. Connelly had contributed to several Broadway musicals before teaming up with his most important collaborator, George S. Kaufman, in 1921. During their four-year partnership, they wrote five comedies - Dulcy (1921), To the Ladies (1922), Merton of the Movies (1922), The Deep Tangled Wildwood (1923) and Beggar on Horseback (1924) - and also co-directed and contributed sketches to the 1922 revue The '49ers, collaborated on the book to the musical comedy Helen of Troy, New York (1923), and wrote both the book and lyrics for another musical comedy, Be Yourself (1924). Connelly received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for The Green Pastures in 1930. The play, a re-telling of the Old Testament, was a landmark in American drama; boasting the first all-black Broadway cast. He contributed verse and articles to Life, Everybody's, and other magazines. Connelly was one of the wittiest members of the Algonquin Round Table. He said, 'I always knew children were anti-social. But the children of the West Side - they're savage.' In 1968, Connelly published his memoirs, Voices Offstage. Over the years, Connolly appeared as an actor in 21 movies, including The Spirit of St. Louis (1957) with James Stewart. A film about the Round Table members, The Ten-Year Lunch (1987), won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature and featured Connelly, who was the last survivor. The 1994 film Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle, a fictional account of the group, featured actor Matt Malloy as Connelly..."
3721 Cooper, Gary (Film actor): Forty-nine (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of film star Gary Cooper (with his wife and daughter touring Europe) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Gary Cooper: An American Tourist - 1953). See, also, "Box 4, Folder 34" and "Box 15, Folder 19." According to Wikipedia: "Gary Cooper was an American film actor known for his natural, authentic, and understated acting style and screen performances. His career spanned thirty-five years, from 1925 to 1960, and included leading roles in eighty-four feature films. He was a major movie star from the end of the silent film era through the end of the golden age of Classical Hollywood. His screen persona appealed strongly to both men and women, and his range of performances included roles in most major movie genres. Cooper's ability to project his own personality onto the characters he played contributed to his appearing natural and authentic on screen. The screen persona he sustained throughout his career represented the ideal American hero. Cooper began his career as a film extra and stunt rider and soon landed acting roles. After establishing himself as a Western hero in his early silent films, Cooper became a movie star in 1929 with his first sound picture, The Virginian. In the early 1930s, he expanded his heroic image to include more cautious characters in adventure films and dramas such as A Farewell to Arms (1932) and The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935). During the height of his career, Cooper portrayed a new type of hero—a champion of the common man—in films such as Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Meet John Doe (1941), Sergeant York (1941), The Pride of the Yankees (1942), and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943). In the post-war years, he portrayed more mature characters at odds with the world in films such as The Fountainhead (1949) and High Noon (1952). In his final films, Cooper played non-violent characters searching for redemption in films such as Friendly Persuasion (1956) and Man of the West (1958). He married New York debutante Veronica Balfe in 1933, and the couple had one daughter. Their marriage was interrupted by a three-year separation precipitated by Cooper's love affair with Patricia Neal. Cooper received the Academy Award for Best Actor for his roles in Sergeant York and High Noon. He also received an Academy Honorary Award for his career achievements in 1961. He was one of the top ten film personalities for twenty-three consecutive years, and was one of the top money-making stars for eighteen years. The American Film Institute (AFI) ranked Cooper eleventh on its list of the twenty five greatest male stars of classic Hollywood cinema..."
3722 Cronkite, Walter (CBS News journalist): Two 2.5 x 2.5 inch (color) photo negatives of television journalist Walter Cronkite (in the CBS newsroom - circa 1962) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Walter Leland Cronkite, Jr. (November 4, 1916 - July 17, 2009) was an American broadcast journalist, best known as anchorman for the CBS Evening News for 19 years (1962-81). During the heyday of CBS News in the 1960s and 1970s, he was often cited as 'the most trusted man in America' after being so named in an opinion poll. He reported many events from 1937 to 1981, including bombings in World War II; the Nuremberg trials; combat in the Vietnam War; the Dawson's Field hijackings; Watergate; the Iran Hostage Crisis; and the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy, civil rights pioneer Martin Luther King, Jr., and Beatles musician John Lennon. He was also known for his extensive coverage of the U.S. space program, from Project Mercury to the Moon landings to the Space Shuttle. He was the only non-NASA recipient of a Moon-rock award. Cronkite is well known for his departing catchphrase 'And that's the way it is,' followed by the broadcast's date..."
3723 D'Arcy, Alexander (Film character actor): One 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative of actor Alexander D'Arcy (in a nightclub with actor Mart Moss and an unidentified woman - October 2, 1941) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Alexander D'Arcy (August 10, 1908 - April 20, 1996) was an Egyptian actor with an international film repertoire...His first film appearance was in 1927 in The Garden of Allah, before appearing in Alfred Hitchcock's Champagne (1928). He then went to Hollywood where he started by playing supporting roles in several films in the late 1930s including The Prisoner of Zenda (1937) Stolen Holiday (1937), The Awful Truth (1937). In 1953, he was one of Marilyn Monroe's suitors in How to Marry a Millionaire and featured in Abdulla the Great and Soldier of Fortune in 1955. His roles diminished in importance and by the 1960s he was acting mostly on television before resurfacing in horror films, notably It's Hot in Paradise (1962) and as Dracula in Blood of Dracula's Castle (1969). Evidently a favorite of such cult directors as Roger Corman, Russ Meyer and Sam Fuller, D'Arcy was seen in Corman's The St. Valentine's Day Massacre (1967), Meyer's The Seven Minutes (1971) and Fuller's Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street (1972). In 1966, he appeared in Episode 3 of the Batman television series. He was married in the 1940s to Arleen Whelan and had a number of other relationships with single and married women, including Princess Grace of Monaco..."
3724 Drake, Alfred (Stage actor): Seven (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of stage actor Alfred Drake (rehearsing for the play LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS in NYC - 1960) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 25 and Box 22, Folder 8." According to Wikipedia: "Born as Alfred Capurro in New York City, the son of parents emigrated from Recco, Genoa, Drake began his Broadway career while still a student at Brooklyn College. He is best known for his leading roles in the original Broadway productions of Oklahoma!; Kiss Me, Kate; Kismet; and for playing Marshall Blackstone in the original production of Babes in Arms, (in which he sang the title song) and Hajj in Kismet, for which he received the Tony Award. He was also a prolific Shakespearean, notably starring as Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing opposite Katharine Hepburn. Drake was mostly a stage and television star; he starred in only one film, Tars and Spars, but played several roles on television. However, one notable film appearance came in 1982 at the conclusion of "Trading Places," where Drake, with evident relish as president of the stock exchange, informs the movie's antagonists that they are broke. His first musical television appearance was as Captain Dick Warrington in the January 15, 1955, live telecast of the operetta Naughty Marietta. His 1964 stage performance as Claudius in the Richard Burton Hamlet was filmed live on the stage of the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, using a 'quickie' process called Electronovision, and shown in movie theatres in a very limited engagement. It was also recorded on LP. He played the President of the Stock Exchange in the 1983 Eddie Murphy-Dan Aykroyd film Trading Places. His final stage appearance in a musical was in 1973 as Honore LaChaisse in Lerner and Loewe's Gigi. Two years later he starred in a revival of The Skin of Our Teeth. As a director he staged the 1974 premiere of The Royal Rape of Ruari Macasmunde at the Virginia Museum Theater. He was inducted into the American Theatre Hall of Fame in 1981. He was also a published author - writing at least a few plays: Dr. Willy Nilly, an adaptation of Molière's The Doctor in Spite of Himself, an adaptation of Goldoni's The Liar, and even at least one book on cards (specifically Gin Rummy)..."
3725 Drake, Allen (Comedian): Sixty-nine (black and white) photo negative strips of comedian Allen Drake (rehearsing for an unidentified film - c. late 1960s/early 1970s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to the IMDb web site: "Allan Drake was born on October 15, 1921 in Massachusetts, USA as Allan Margulies. He was an actor, known for Norman... Is That You? (1976), Sex Kittens Go to College (1960) and Sanford and Son (1972). He was married to Janice Hansen. He died on March 8, 1986 in Los Angeles County, California, USA."
3726 Durante, Jimmy (Stage/film/TV/nightclub performer): Eighteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of performer Jimmy Durante (rehearsing for the Broadway production of JUMBO) by Martin Harris (a photo assignment for THE LITERARY DIGEST - "The Mantles of Ziegfeld and Barnum" - November 30, 1935). See, also, "Box 4, Folder 21," 'Box 15, Folder 26" and Box 22, Folder 3." According to Wikipedia: "James Francis 'Jimmy' Durante (February 10, 1893 - January 29, 1980) was an American singer, pianist, comedian, and actor. His distinctive clipped gravelly speech, New York accent, comic language butchery, jazz-influenced songs, and prominent nose helped make him one of America's most familiar and popular personalities of the 1920s through the 1970s. He often referred to his nose as the Schnozzola (from the Yiddish schnoz [nose]), and the word became his nickname..."
3727 Ekberg, Anita (Film actress): Five (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of film actress Anita Ekberg (with author and screenwriter Irwin Shaw - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Kerstin Anita Marianne Ekberg (1931 - 2015) was a Swedish-Italian actress, model, and sex symbol. She is best known for her role as Sylvia in the Federico Fellini film La Dolce Vita (1960). Ekberg worked primarily in Italy, of which she became a permanent resident in 1964..." According to Wikipedia: "Irwin Shaw (February 27, 1913 - May 16, 1984) was an American playwright, screenwriter, novelist, and short-story author whose written works have sold more than 14 million copies. He is best known for two of his novels: The Young Lions (1948), about the fate of three soldiers during World War II, made into a film of the same name starring Marlon Brando and Montgomery Clift, and Rich Man, Poor Man (1970), about the fate of three siblings after World War II, that was made into a popular miniseries starring Nick Nolte. Though Shaw's work received widespread critical acclaim, the success of his commercial fiction ultimately diminished his literary reputation..."
3728 Engel, Morris (Filmmaker): Four 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of flimmaker Morris Engel ("test shots" - May 21, 1946) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "Morris Engel (April 8, 1918 - March 5, 2005) was an influential American photographer, cinematographer and filmmaker best known for directing the 1953 film Little Fugitive in collaboration with his wife, photographer Ruth Orkin, and their friend, writer Raymond Abrashkin. Engel completed two more features during the 1950s, Lovers and Lollipops (1956) and Weddings and Babies (1960). Engel was a pioneer in the use of hand-held cameras and nonprofessional actors in his films, using cameras that he helped design, and his naturalistic films influenced future prominent independent and French New Wave filmmakers.."
3729 Gable, Clark (Film actor): Four 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) and thirty-five (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of film star Clark Gable (in Arnhem, Holland while filming BETRAYED for MGM) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE article "Who, Gable?" - 1954). See, also, "Box 5, Folder 8" and "Box 16, Folder 1." According to Wikipedia: "Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 - November 16, 1960) was an American film actor, often referred to as 'The King of Hollywood' or just simply as 'The King.' Gable began his career as a stage actor and appeared as an extra in silent films between 1924 and 1926, and progressed to supporting roles with a few films for MGM in 1931. The next year, he landed his first leading Hollywood role and became a leading man in more than 60 motion pictures over the next three decades. Gable won an Academy Award for Best Actor for It Happened One Night (1934),and was nominated for leading roles in Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) and for his arguably best-known role as Rhett Butler in the epic Gone with the Wind (1939)..."
3730 Gleason, Jackie (Television comedian): Forty-two (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of comedian Jackie Gleason (with film director Gene Kelly on the Paris film set of GIGOT - 1962) by Martin Harris. See, also, "Box 16, Folder 4" and "Box 23, Folder 12." According to Wikipedia: "Gigot is an American motion picture; it was released in 1962 by 20th Century Fox. The film stars Jackie Gleason (in a non-speaking role) and was directed by Gene Kelly...Gleason had conceived the story himself years earlier and had long dreamed of making the film. He wanted Orson Welles as director, and Paddy Chayefsky as screenwriter. Though Welles was an old friend, the board at Fox rejected him as being an overspender. Gene Kelly was selected as a compromise. Chayefsky was not interested and John Patrick, writer of Teahouse of the August Moon, was signed instead. The film was shot on location in Paris. Most of the production crew and cast were French; some spoke no English. Gleason bore with this in two ways: Kelly spoke French, and Gleason's character had no lines, being mute. Gleason was extremely proud of the film, which earned one Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Score. Gleason received a story credit and a music credit. On the other hand, according to the book, The Films of Gene Kelly, by Tony Thomas, Kelly himself said that the movie 'had been so drastically cut and reedited that it had little to do with my version.' "
3731 Gobel, George (Nighclub and television comedian): Seventeen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of comedian George Gobel (at home with his family - 1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 16, Folder 5." According to his biography (by Gary Brumburgh) on the IMDb web site: "Squat, easygoing, brushcut-blonde George Gobel first won Midwest attention singing as 'Little Georgie Gobel' on radio. He also toured with country music bands while billed as 'The Littlest Cowboy.' His career was interrupted by WWII, in which he served as a pilot instructor. He also began doing standup for his fellow servicemen and took to the nightclub, hotel and county fair circuit in subsequent years. Gobel's mild-mannered comic delivery coupled with a warm, cracker-barrel styled feel caught fire when he hit the TV waves in 1952 and he subsequently starred on his own The George Gobel Show (1954), winning an Emmy award for his efforts. His alter-ego was this hapless, unassuming, hen-pecked husband who tried to breeze through life the best he could. Gobel's folksy, non-threatening 'little man' appeal did not extend into film, however, finding little success in the two lightweight comedy showcases offered him -- The Birds and the Bees (1956) and I Married a Woman (1958). After his TV series, Gobel lost severe momentum, occasionally appearing in guest spots or as a talk show guest. In 1974, he regained a bit of notice after replacing the late Charley Weaver as the bottom left square on the popular game show Hollywood Squares and went on to win a role on the short-lived series Harper Valley P.T.A. (1981) as a tipsy mayor. The comedian died at age 71 in 1991 following bypass surgery."
3732 Hargrove, Marion (Screenwriter): One 2.35 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strip (2 images) of screenwriter Marion Hargrove (with his children - circa 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 16, Folder 8." According to Wikipedia: "Marion Hargrove (October 13, 1919 - August 23, 2003) was an American writer noted for the World War II bestselling book See Here, Private Hargrove, a collection of humorous newspaper columns written mostly before the United States entered the war. (The book was made into a 1944 movie with Robert Walker as Hargrove and Donna Reed as his love interest.) During the war, he served on the staff of Yank, the Army Weekly. After the war he wrote two novels: Something's Got to Give (1948) and The Girl He Left Behind (1956). He also wrote for various popular magazines, and served as feature editor of Argosy..."
3733 Hayworth, Rita (Film actress): Six (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of film actress Rita Hayworth (sailing from NYC on the R.M.S. Mauretania - May 26, 1948) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Rita Hayworth (born Margarita Carmen Cansino; October 17, 1918 - May 14, 1987) was an American actress and dancer. She achieved fame during the 1940s as one of the era's top stars, appearing in a total of 61 films over 37 years. The press coined the term 'love goddess' to describe Hayworth after she had become the most glamorous screen idol of the 1940s. She was the top pin-up girl for GIs during World War II..."
3734 Heifetz, Jascha (Violinist) : Five 4 x 5inch (black and white) photo negatives of violinist Jascha Heifetz (on a USO tour at the Little Theater at the 2ist General Hospital in Naples, Italy - c. WWII) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). See, also, "Box 16, Folder 9." According to Wikipedia: "Jascha Heifetz...was a violinist, considered by many to be the greatest violinist of all time. Born in Wilno, Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania), he moved as a teenager to the United States, where his Carnegie Hall debut was rapturously received. He was a virtuoso since childhood—Fritz Kreisler, another leading violinist of the twentieth century, said on hearing Heifetz's debut, 'We might as well take our fiddles and break them across our knees.' He had a long and successful performing and recording career; after an injury to his right (bowing) arm, he focused on teaching..."
3735 Hellman, Daphne (Harpist): Three (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of harpist Daphne Hellman (with her children - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to her biography on the ALLMUSIC web site: "Unconventional jazz harpist Daphne Hellman was born Daphne Van Buren Bayne; the granddaughter of the founder of the Seaboard National Bank, she began playing the harp at age 12 before pursuing a career as an actress, studying in New York and London and even appearing in a walk-on capacity in a Broadway production of Hamlet. Often compared physically to Hollywood legend Katharine Hepburn, she also modeled for photographer Man Ray and Harper's Bazaar magazine before marrying Town and Country editor Harry Bull, with whom she had two children, the noted guitarist Sandy Bull and musician Daisy Paradis. An affair with New Yorker writer Geoffrey T. Hellman was grist for local gossip columnists, and in 1941, just hours after her divorce from Bull was finalized, she wed Hellman in Reno, NV. Taking her new husband's name, Hellman then began playing her harp professionally, making her debut at New York City's Town Hall -- because of her wealth, beauty, and social status, the performance was the subject of much media interest, and even Time magazine covered the event, calling her "as curvesome as a treble clef." In time, Hellman moved away from classical performance to jazz, beginning with an appearance at Le Ruban Bleu; in the years to follow she was a fixture of the Big Apple cabaret circuit, appearing at the Hotel New Yorker with Ving Merlin and His All-Girl Band and at Upstairs at the Downstairs with Blossom Dearie and Imogene Coca. In 1961, after her marriage to Geoffrey dissolved, Hellman married the writer and architect Hsio-Wen Shih, who mysteriously disappeared four years later -- Hellman often toured his native China, but never saw him again. Over the decades her repertoire expanded to included contemporary pop and country songs, and in 1964 she and her trio, Hellman's Angels -- touted as the world's only jazz combo fronted by a harp player -- made their first appearance at the Village Gate, where they played virtually every Tuesday night until the club shut down three decades later, making it one of the longest nightclub runs in New York City history. Hellman also appeared at unconventional venues like the pioneering punk club CBGB's; beginning in the '80s, she regularly played on subway platforms and on city street corners, even collecting spare change from passers-by in spite of her considerable wealth. Hellman maintained an active performing schedule into her eighties, and was appearing at New York's Firebird Café in the summer of 2002 when she was critically injured in a fall at her home; she died weeks later on August 4 in a Manhattan nursing home at the age of 86."
3736 Henrich, Tommy (CBS News Journalist): One 2.5 x 2.5 inch (color) photo negative of television journalist Tommy Henrich (in the CBS newsroom - circa 1962) by Martin Harris. No additional information available.
3737 Ingram, Rex (Stage and film actor): Three (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of actor Rex Ingram (rehearsing for the stage play "Marching Song" at the Nora Bayes Theatre in NYC - 1937). According to Wikipedia: "Rex Ingram was born near Cairo, Illinois, on the Mississippi River; his father was a steamer fireman on the riverboat Robert E. Lee. Ingram graduated from the Northwestern University medical school in 1919 and was the first African-American man to receive a Phi Beta Kappa key from Northwestern University. He went to Hollywood as a young man where he was literally discovered on a street corner by the casting director for Tarzan of the Apes (1918), starring Elmo Lincoln. He made his (uncredited) screen debut in that film and had many other small roles, usually as a generic black native, such as in the Tarzan films. With the arrival of sound, his presence and powerful voice became an asset and he went on to memorable roles in The Green Pastures (1936), The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (the 1939 MGM version, opposite Mickey Rooney), The Thief of Bagdad (1940—perhaps his best-known film appearance—as the genie), The Talk of the Town (1942), and Sahara (1943). From 1929, he also appeared on stage, making his debut on Broadway. He appeared in more than a dozen Broadway productions, with his final role coming in Kwamina in 1961. He was in the original cast of Haiti (1938), Cabin in the Sky (1940), and St. Louis Woman (1946). He is one of the few actors to have played both God (in The Green Pastures) and the Devil (in Cabin in the Sky). In 1966 he played Tee-Tot in the movie Your Cheatin Heart. The Hank Williams Story...In 1962, he became the first African-American actor to be hired for a contract role on a soap opera, when he appeared on The Brighter Day. He had other minor work in television in the sixties, appearing in an episode each of I Spy and The Bill Cosby Show, both of which starred Bill Cosby, who used his influence to land him the roles..."
3738 Ives, Burl (Folksinger/actor): Forty-nine (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of actor and folksinger Burl Ives (entertaining at his NYC apartment with George Kleinsinger, Charles Driscoll, Jane Malver, Mrs. Joseph Darion, Marge Samuel, Joseph Darion, Eddie Albert, et cetera and backstage in his New York City Center dressing room for the stage play "She Stoops to Conquer") by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. And Mrs. Burl Ives" - October 1949). See, also, "Box 5, Folder 32" and "Box 16, Folder 12." According to Wikipedia: "Burl Ives (June 14, 1909 - April 14, 1995) was an American folk singer and actor of stage, screen, radio and television. He began as an itinerant singer and banjoist, and launched his own radio show, The Wayfaring Stranger, which popularized traditional folk songs. In 1942, he appeared in Irving Berlin's This Is the Army, and then became a major star of CBS radio. In the 1960s, he successfully crossed over into country music, recording hits such as 'A Little Bitty Tear' and 'Funny Way of Laughing.' A popular film actor through the late 1940s and 1950s, Ives's best-known roles in that medium included parts in So Dear to My Heart and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, as well as Rufus Hannassey in The Big Country, for which he won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor..."
3739 Jones, Jack (Nightclub and recording star): Three (color) photo negative strips (various sizes) of singer Jack Jones (with an unidentified actress) posing for publicity photos for an unidentified TV or film production (c. mid 1960s) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "John Allan "Jack" Jones (born January 14, 1938) is an American actor and jazz and pop singer, popular during the 1960s. He is the son of actor Allan Jones. Jones was primarily a straight-pop singer (even when he recorded contemporary material) whose ventures in the direction of jazz were mostly of the big band/swing variety. Jones has won two Grammy Awards. He continues to perform concerts around the world and remains popular in Las Vegas. Jones is widely known for his recordings of 'Wives and Lovers' (1964 Grammy Award, Best Pop Male Performance), 'The Race Is On,' 'Lollipops and Roses' (1962, Grammy Award, Best Pop Male Performance)..."
3740 Jones, Spike (Orchestra Leader and Comedian): Two 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips of bandleader Spike Jones (circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - " A Night at the Uproar"). See, also, "Box 5, Folder 34." According to Wikipedia: "Lindley Armstrong "Spike" Jones (December 14, 1911 - May 1, 1965) was an American musician and bandleader specializing in satirical arrangements of popular songs. Ballads and classical works receiving the Jones treatment were punctuated with gunshots, whistles, cowbells and outlandish vocals. From the early 1940s to the mid-1950s, Jones and his band recorded under the title Spike Jones and his City Slickers and toured the United States and Canada as The Musical Depreciation Revue..."
3741 Karloff, Boris (Film and stage actor): One 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photo negative of film and stage star Boris Karloff (backstage at a theatre in Baltimore, MD during a tour of ARSENIC AND OLD LACE - December 28, 1940) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 16, Folder 14." According to Wikipedia: "Boris Karloff...was widely known for his roles in horror films, particularly for his portrayal of Frankenstein's monster in Frankenstein (1931), Bride of Frankenstein (1935), and Son of Frankenstein (1939), which resulted in his immense popularity. His best-known non-horror role is as the Grinch, as well as the narrator, in the animated television special of Dr. Seuss's How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1966). He also had a memorable role in the original Scarface (1932). For his contribution to film and television, Boris Karloff was awarded two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame..."
3742 Kazan, Elia (Stage and film director): Twenty-three (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of playwright Arthur Miller (with his wife and family, actor Lee J. Cobb, director Elia Kazan, et cetera - circa 1949) by Martin Harris for various publications photo assignments - CUE MAGAZINE and COLLIER'S MAGAZINE). See, also, "Box 5, Folders 36-37 and 38," "Box 16, Folder 15" and Box 16, Folder 29." According to Wikipedia: "Arthur Asher Miller (October 17, 1915 - February 10, 2005) was an American playwright, essayist, and prominent figure in twentieth-century American theatre. Among his most popular plays are All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953) and A View from the Bridge (1955, revised 1956). He also wrote several screenplays and was most noted for his work on The Misfits (1961). The drama Death of a Salesman is often numbered on the short list of finest American plays in the 20th century alongside Long Day's Journey into Night and A Streetcar Named Desire. Miller was often in the public eye, particularly during the late 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s. During this time, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama; testified before the House Un-American Activities Committee; and was married to Marilyn Monroe. In 1980, Miller received the St. Louis Literary Award from the Saint Louis University Library Associates. He received the Prince of Asturias Award and the Praemium Imperiale prize in 2002 and the Jerusalem Prize in 2003, as well as the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Lifetime Achievement Award..."
3743 Lawrence, Gertrude (Stage actress and singer): Thirty-one (black and white) photo negative strips of actress Gertrude Lawrence (with her producer -husband Richard Aldrich and guests Joan Bennett, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, et cetera at her NYC apartment - 1950) by Martin Harris (for A CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Richard Aldrich" - April 5, 1950). See, also, "Box 6, Folder6" and "Box16, Folder 20." According to Encyclopedia Britannica: "Gertrude Lawrence, original name Gertrud Alexandra Dagma Lawrence Klasen (born July 4, 1898, London, Eng.—died Sept. 6, 1952, New York, N.Y., U.S.) English actress noted for her performances in Noël Coward's sophisticated comedies and in musicals. Lawrence was the daughter of music hall performers, and from an early age she was trained to follow their career. She made her stage debut in December 1908 in a pantomime Dick Whittington in Brixton. Subsequently she appeared in Babes in the Wood (1910) and other musicals and plays, and for a time she toured in minor revues. In 1916 she began appearing in André Charlot's intimate revues in London, and two years later she stepped into the lead when Beatrice Lillie fell ill. She appeared with Coward, whom she had known for 10 years, in his London Calling (1923) and in January 1924 made her New York debut as one of the stars of Charlot's Revue, with Lillie and Jack Buchanan. In 1926 she starred in George and Ira Gershwin's Oh Kay!, which moved to London the next year, and in 1928 in their Treasure Girl. In the latter year she played her first straight dramatic role in Icebound in London. Lawrence's greatest role was in Coward's Private Lives, written with her in mind, in which she opened opposite the author at the Phoenix Theatre, London, in September 1930. Both the play and the stars set the tone that would characterize comedies of manners for a decade or more: sophistication, brittle wit, and chic. Perhaps Lawrence's greatest triumph was as Liza Elliot in the Moss Hart-Kurt Weill musical Lady in the Dark (1941). Throughout her career, her singing and dancing, both accomplished but not exceptional, merely supported her compelling stage presence, what Coward called her 'star quality.' On the strength of it she remained for a quarter-century one of the most popular stars on the American and British stages. She spent the years following her 1940 marriage to Richard Aldrich, an American producer, in the United States. In 1945 she published an autobiography, A Star Danced. In March 1951 she opened on Broadway in Rodgers and Hammerstein's The King and I, during the run of which she died."
3744 Le Gallienne, Eva (Stage actress): Five 13.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of actress Eva Le Gallienne (painting in her library - circa 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). Se, also, "Box 16, Folder 21." According to her biography (by Gary Brumburgh) on the IMDb web site: "Legendary stage actress Eva Le Gallienne's life began just as grandly as the daughter of poet Richard Le Gallienne. Sarah Bernhardt was her idol growing up and, at age 18, was brought to New York by her mother. Making her London debut with 'Monna Vanna' in 1914, she proved a star in every sense of the word. She appeared on Broadway first in 'Liliom' in 1921 and lastly at the Biltmore Theatre in 1981 with 'To Grandmother's House We Go,' which won her a Tony nomination at age 82. Noted for her extreme boldness and idealism, she became a director and muse for theatre's top playwrights, a foremost translator of Henrik Ibsen, and a founder of the civic repertory movement in America. A respected stage coach, director, producer and manager over her six decades, Ms. Le Gallienne consciously devoted herself to the Art of the Theatre as opposed to the Show Business of Broadway and dedicated herself to upgrading the quality of the stage. She ran the Civic Repertory Theatre Company for 10 years (1926-1936), producing 37 plays during that time. She managed Broadway's 1100-seat Civic Repertory Theatre (more popularly known as The 14th Street Theatre) at 107 14th Street from 1926-32, which was home to her company whose actors included herself, J. Edward Bromberg, Paul Leyssac, Florida Friebus, and Leona Roberts. Her gallery of theatre portrayals would include everything from Peter Pan to Hamlet. Sadly, she almost completely avoided film and TV during her lengthy career. However, toward the end of her life, she did appear in a marvelous 1977 stage version of 'The Royal Family' on TV and rendered a quietly touching performance as Ellen Burstyn's grandmother in Resurrection (1980), for which she received an Oscar nomination."
3745 Lee, Gypsy Rose (Burlesque entertainer): One 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strip (2 images) of burlesque legend Gypsy Rose Lee (at work and promoting the "March of Dimes" - May 1940) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 16, Folder 22." According to Wikipedia: "Gypsy Rose Lee (January 8, 1911 - April 26, 1970) was an American burlesque entertainer famous for her striptease act. She was also an actress, author, and playwright whose 1957 memoir was made into the stage musical and film Gypsy..."
3746 Loren, Sophia (Film actress): Fourteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) and one 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative of actress Sophia Loren (with film director Vittorio De Sica, in Italy, filming SCANDAL IN SORRENTO aka BREAD, LOVE AND LADY SOPHIA - 1955) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Sophia in Sorrento" - September 16, 1955). See, also, "Box 2, Folder 4," "Box 6, Folder 10," Box 16, Folder 23" and "Box 23, Folder 15." According to Wikipedia: "Sophia Loren...is an Italian film actress. Encouraged to enroll in acting lessons after entering a beauty pageant, Loren began her film career in 1950 at age 15. She appeared in several bit parts and minor roles in the early part of the decade, until her five-picture contract with Paramount in 1956 launched her international career. Notable film appearances around this time include The Pride and the Passion, Houseboat, and It Started in Naples. Her talents as an actress were not recognized until her performance as Cesira in Vittorio De Sica's Two Women; Loren's performance earned her the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1962 and made her the first artist to win an Oscar for a foreign-language performance. She holds the record for having earned six David di Donatello Awards for Best Actress, the most ever received: Two Women; Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow; Marriage Italian Style (for which she was nominated for a second Oscar); Sunflower; The Voyage; and A Special Day. After starting her family in the early 1970s, Loren spent less time on her acting career and chose to make only occasional film appearances. In later years, she has appeared in American films such as Grumpier Old Men and Nine. Aside from the Academy Award, she has won a Grammy Award, five special Golden Globes, a BAFTA Award, a Laurel Award, the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival, and the Honorary Academy Award in 1991. In 1995, she received the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievements, one of many such awards. In 1999, Loren was acknowledged as one of the top 25 female American Screen Legends in the American Film Institute's survey, AFI's 100 Years...100 Stars..."
381 McCallum, David (Television and film actor): One 1.5 x 7.25 inch (black and white) photo negative strip (5 images) of actor David McCallum (with others on the set of an unidentified film production - c. mid 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "David Keith McCallum, Jr. is a Scottish actor and musician. He first gained recognition in the 1960s for playing Russian spy Illya Kuryakin in the television series The Man from U.N.C.L.E. and as interdimensional operative Steel in Sapphire and Steel. In recent years, McCallum has gained renewed international recognition and popularity for his role as NCIS medical examiner Dr. Donald "Ducky" Mallard in the American television series NCIS..."
382 McGuire, Dorothy (Film and stage actress): Twelve (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of actress Dorothy McGuire (with actor Donald Cook appearing in the Broadway production of "Claudia" - December 12, 1941) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Dorothy Hackett McGuire (June 14, 1916 - September 13, 2001) was an American actress. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for Gentleman's Agreement (1947) and won the National Board of Review Award for Best Actress for Friendly Persuasion (1956)..." "Donald Cook (September 26, 1901 - October 1, 1961) was an American stage and film actor who had a prolific career in Pre-Code Hollywood films and on Broadway. Cook is perhaps best known for his film roles in The Public Enemy (1931), Safe in Hell (1931), Baby Face (1933), and Viva Villa! (1934), as well as for his stage role as David Naughton in Claudia, which ran for a total of 722 performances on Broadway between 1941 and 1943. He was also one of the first actors to play Ellery Queen..."
383 McKenna, Siobhan (Stage and film actress): Twenty-eight (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of actress Siobhan McKenna (with others in the NYC/RCA Studios recording the LP version of "St. Joan' - 1956) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 16, Folder 26." According to Wikipedia: "...She is remembered for her English language performances at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin where she would eventually star in what many consider her finest role in the George Bernard Shaw play, Saint Joan. While performing at the Abbey Theatre in the 1940s, she met actor Denis O'Dea, whom she married in 1946. Until 1970 they lived in Richmond Street South, Dublin. They had one child, a son: Donnacha O'Dea, who swam for Ireland at the 1968 Summer Olympics and later won a World Series of Poker bracelet in 1998. In 1947, she made her debut on the London stage and on Broadway in 1955 in The Chalk Garden for which she would receive a Tony Award nomination for 'Best Actress in a Leading Role, Drama.' In 1956, she appeared in the Cambridge Drama Festival production of Saint Joan at the Off-Broadway Phoenix Theatre. Theatre critic Elliot Norton called her performance the finest portrayal of Joan in memory. Siobhán McKenna's popularity earned her the cover of Life magazine. She received a second Tony Best Actress nomination for her role in the 1958 play, The Rope Dancers in which she starred with Art Carney and Joan Blondell. Although primarily a stage actress, McKenna appeared in a number of made-for-television films and dramas. She also acted in several motion pictures including 1961's King of Kings, starring in the role of the Virgin Mary. In 1964, she performed in Of Human Bondage and the following year in Doctor Zhivago. McKenna was awarded the Gold Medal of the Éire Society of Boston, for having 'significantly fulfilled the ideals of the Éire Society, in particular, spreading awareness of the cultural achievements of the Irish people.' "
384 Massey, Raymond (Film and stage actor): Two 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of actor Raymond Massey (shaving - 1938) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Raymond Hart Massey (August 30, 1896 - July 29, 1983) was a Canadian/American actor, known for his commanding, stage-trained voice. For his lead role in Abe Lincoln in Illinois (1940), Massey was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor. He was also well known for playing Dr. Gillespie in Dr. Kildare (1961-1966)..."
385 Miller, Mitch (Musician and recording producer): Seventy (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of record producer and television personality Mitch Miller (with his Columbia Records staff and singer Johnnie Ray, et cetera - 1952) by Martin Harris (for two BUSINESS WEEK MAGAZINE photo assignments - "Miller Nurses the Talent" and "Mitch Miller Listening for Columbia" - October 18, 1952). See, also, "Box 6, Folder 23," "Box 17, Folder 1" and "Box 17, Folder 13." According to Wikipedia" "Mitchell William 'Mitch' Miller (July 4, 1911 - July 31, 2010) was an American oboist, conductor, recording producer and recording industry executive. He was involved in almost all aspects of the industry, particularly as a conductor, and AandR (artist and repertoire) man. Miller was one of the most influential people in American popular music during the 1950s and early 1960s, both as the head of AandR at Columbia Records and as a best-selling recording artist with an NBC television series, Sing Along with Mitch. A graduate of the Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester in the early 1930s, Miller began his musical career as an accomplished player of the oboe and English horn, making numerous highly regarded classical and popular recordings, but he is best remembered as a choral conductor on television and as a recordings executive..."
386 Mostel, Zero (stage and film actor) : Twenty-six (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) and thirteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of nightclub, stage and film star Zero Mostel (at Downtown Café Society in NYC, in Central Park, in a recording studio, painting in his studio and, with Gene Wilder, filming THE PRODUCERS) by Martin Harris (for various unidentified publications from 1942 to 67). See, also, "Box 6, Folders 25 and 26," "Box 7, Folder 4" and "Box 17, Folder 5." According to Wikipedia: "Samuel Joel 'Zero' Mostel (February 28, 1915 - September 8, 1977) was an American actor and comedian of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of comic characters such as Tevye on stage in Fiddler on the Roof, Pseudolus on stage and on screen in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, and Max Bialystock in the original film version of The Producers. Mostel was a student of Don Richardson, using an acting technique based on muscle memory. He was blacklisted during the 1950s, and his testimony before the House Committee on Un-American Activities was well-publicized. He was an Obie Award and three-time Tony Award winner..."
387 Murray, Arthur (Dancer and dance instructor): Eight (black and white) photo negatives(various sizes) of dance instructor Arthur Murray (in his NYC apartment, with his wife and dance partner, Kathryn Murray entertaining guests - Bert Parks, Dan Seymour, Henry Sell, Mary Dillon, et cetera - 1950) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Murray - January 7, 1950). See, also, "Box 6, Folder 27" and "Box 17, Folder 7." According to Wikipedia: "Arthur Murray (April 4, 1895 - March 3, 1991) was an American dance instructor and businessman, whose name is most often associated with the dance studio chain that bears his name. His pupils included Eleanor Roosevelt, the Duke of Windsor, John D. Rockefeller Jr., Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney, Barbara Hutton, Elizabeth Arden, Manuel L. Quezon, and Jack Dempsey. Television evangelist D. James Kennedy and Little House on the Prairie actress Katherine MacGregor were instructors of Murray's technique. Arthur Murray was inducted into the National Museum of Dance's Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney Hall of Fame in 2007..."
388 Murray Don (Stage and film actor): Six 2.5 x 2.5 inch (color) photo negatives of actor Don Murray (circa 1960) by Martin Harris. According to Wikipedia: "...Upon graduation from high school, he went on to study at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. After graduating, he soon made his Broadway debut in the 1951 play The Rose Tattoo, as Jack Hunter...Don Murray's role as Beauregard 'Bo' Decker in Bus Stop (1956) marked his film debut. He starred alongside Marilyn Monroe, who played Cherie, the object of his desire. His performance as the innocent cowboy who is determined to get Cherie was well received, and he was nominated for a BAFTA for Most Promising Newcomer and for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. In 1957, he starred as reserved, married bookkeeper Charlie Sampson in The Bachelor Party. The same year he starred in one of his most successful roles, that of Johnny Pope in the drama A Hatful of Rain. Despite director Fred Zinnemann's intention to typecast the actor as the comical brother Polo, Murray insisted on playing the lead. Thus he portrayed Johnny Pope, a morphine addicted Korean War veteran. The film was one of the first to show the effects of drug abuse on the addicted and those around him. He starred as a blackmailed United States senator in Advise and Consent (1961), a film version of a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Allen Drury. The movie was directed by Otto Preminger and cast Murray opposite Henry Fonda and Charles Laughton. He also co-starred with Steve McQueen in the film Baby the Rain Must Fall (1965) and played the ape-hating Governor Breck in Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972). In 1976, Murray starred in the film Deadly Hero..."
389 Murrow, Edward R. (CBS News reporter and commentator): Thirty-five (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) and one 2 x 6 inch (black and white) photo negative strip (4 images) of CBS News correspondent Edward R. Murrow (at home with his wife and family and at work with colleagues William S. Paley, Richard Hottelet, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Murrow Sticks to the News" - 1949). See, also, "Box 6, Folder 28" and "Box 17, Folder 9." According to Wikipedia: "Edward R. Murrow (April 25, 1908 - April 27, 1965) was an American broadcast journalist. He was generally referred to as Ed Murrow. He first came to prominence with a series of radio broadcasts for the news division of the Columbia Broadcasting System during World War II, which were followed by millions of listeners in the United States. During the war he assembled a team of foreign correspondents who came to be known as the Murrow Boys. A pioneer of television news broadcasting, Murrow produced a series of reports that helped lead to the censure of Senator Joseph McCarthy. Fellow journalists Eric Sevareid, Ed Bliss, Bill Downs, Dan Rather, and Alexander Kendrick consider Murrow one of journalism's greatest figures, noting his honesty and integrity in delivering the news..."
3810 Ormandy, Eugene (Conductor and violinist): Three 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of conductor Eugene Ormandy (backstage at Constitution Hall in Washington, DC - October 1, 1938) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Eugene Ormandy (November 18, 1899 - March 12, 1985) was a Hungarian-born conductor and violinist who became internationally famous as the music director and conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra. The maestro's 44-year-long association with the Philadelphia is one of the longest enjoyed by any conductor with a single orchestra. Under his baton, the Philadelphia had three gold records and won two Grammy Awards..."
3811 Picon, Molly (Stage and film actress): One 2 X 7 inch (black and white) photo negative strip (4 images) of Yiddish Theatre actress Molly Picon (at home - c. late 1930s /early 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Molly Picon (February 28, 1898 - April 5, 1992) was a U.S. actress of stage, screen and television, as well as a lyricist and dramatic story-teller. She was first and foremost a star in Yiddish theatre and film, but in time she turned to English-language productions..."
3812 Pons, Lily (Operatic soprano and actress): One 3 x 3 inch (black and white) photo negative of opera star Lily Pons (with her husband, orchestral conductor and arranger, Andre Kostelanetz in Naples, Italy - July 17, 1944) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Lily Pons (April 12, 1898 - February 13, 1976) was a French-American operatic soprano and actress who had an active career from the late 1920s through the early 1970s. As an opera singer she specialized in the coloratura soprano repertoire and was particularly associated with the title roles in Lakmé and Lucia di Lammermoor. In addition to appearing as a guest artist with many opera houses internationally, Pons enjoyed a long association with the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, where she performed nearly 300 times between 1931 and 1960..." "Andre Kostelanetz (December 22, 1901 - January 13, 1980) was a Russian-born American popular orchestral music conductor and arranger who was one of the major exponents of popular orchestra music..."
3813 Rank, J. Arthur (British film mogul): Twenty-seven (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) of British film producer J. Arthur Rank (arriving in NYC - March 11, 1948) by Martin Harris (for a PICTURE POST MAGAZINE photo assignment). See, also, "Box 7, Folder 9 and 10." According to Wikipedia: "Joseph Arthur Rank, 1st Baron Rank (1888 - 1972) was a British industrialist who was head and founder of the Rank Organization..."
3814 Reynolds, Sheldon (Television producer): Ninety-two (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of television producer Sheldon Reynolds (with actor Gary Cooper and others on the set of an unidentified production - possibly "Foreign Intrigue" - 1956) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Sheldon Reynolds (1923 - 2003) was an American television producer best known for his involvement in the Sherlock Holmes franchise. He began his career as producer, writer and editor of the syndicated television show Foreign Intrigue. In 1954, he produced one of the first television shows to feature the Holmes and Watson characters, which (except in two instances) did not directly adapt Conan-Doyle's original Holmes stories. It starred Ronald Howard as Holmes, and Howard Marion-Crawford as Watson. In the 1970s, Reynolds attempted to acquire a license to produce direct adaptations of the stories. At that time, the rights were in the hands of the Royal Bank of Scotland, which acquired them after the previous owner defaulted on a loan. Reynolds successfully formed a consortium which acquired the rights at auction. Much of the money for the consortium came from the family of Reynold's then-wife, Andrea Reynolds-Plunket. After their divorce in 1990, ..., but her claims were rejected..."
3815 Robeson, Paul (singer and actor): Four 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of singer and actor Paul Robeson (in uniform - entertaining at the Hollywood Canteen - circa 1942) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). See, also, "Box 18, Folder 1." According to Wikipedia: "Paul Leroy Robeson (April 9, 1898 - January 23, 1976) was an American bass singer and actor who became involved with the Civil Rights Movement. At Rutgers College, he was an outstanding American football player, and then had an international career in singing, with a distinctive, powerful, deep bass voice, as well as acting in theater and movies. He became politically involved in response to the Spanish Civil War, fascism, and social injustices. His advocacy of anti-imperialism, affiliation with communism, and criticism of the United States government caused him to be blacklisted during the McCarthy era. Ill health forced him into retirement from his career..."
3816 Robinson, Bill (Dancer and actor): Three (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of dance legend Bill "Bojangles" Robinson (with NYC Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia and city planner Robert Moses at Colonial Park in NYC - circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 10, Folder 23." According to Wikipedia: "Bill "Bojangles" Robinson (May 25, 1878 - November 25, 1949) was an American tap dancer and actor, the best known and most highly paid African American entertainer in the first half of the twentieth century. His long career mirrored changes in American entertainment tastes and technology, starting in the age of minstrel shows, moving to vaudeville, Broadway, the recording industry, Hollywood radio, and television. According to dance critic Marshall Stearns, 'Robinson's contribution to tap dance is exact and specific. He brought it up on its toes, dancing upright and swinging, giving tap a ...hitherto-unknown lightness and presence.' His signature routine was the stair dance, in which Robinson would tap up and down a set of stairs in a rhythmically complex sequence of steps, a routine that he unsuccessfully attempted to patent. Robinson is also credited with having introduced a new word, copacetic, into popular culture, via his repeated use of it in vaudeville and radio appearances..."
3817 Rodgers, Richard (Composer): Ten (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of composer Richard Rodgers (at work in his office and with his wife, Dorothy, at home - 1950) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rodgers" - May 6, 1950). See, also, "Box 7, Folder 15" and "Box 18, Folder 3." According to Wikipedia: "Richard Charles Rodgers (June 28, 1902 - December 30, 1979) was an American composer of music for more than 900 songs and for 43 Broadway musicals. He also composed music for films and television. He is best known for his songwriting partnerships with the lyricists Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. His compositions have had a significant impact on popular music up to the present day, and have an enduring broad appeal. Rodgers was the first person to win what are considered the top show business awards in television, recording, movies and Broadway—an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar, and a Tony—now known collectively as an EGOT. He has also won a Pulitzer Prize, making him one of two people (Marvin Hamlisch is the other) to receive each award..."
3818 Rosenthal, Jean (Theatrical lighting designer): Two 4 x 5 Inch (black and white) photo negatives of lighting designer Jean Rosenthal (backstage with Martin Harris at the Adelphi Theatre in NYC during the run of "Macbeth" - July 1936) by Martin Harris (and another photographer for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Jean Rosenthal (born Eugenia Rosenthal; March 16, 1912 - May 1, 1969) is considered a pioneer in the field of theatrical lighting design. She was born in New York City to Romanian-Jewish immigrants. In the early part of the 20th century, the lighting designer was not a formalized position. Rather the set designer or electrician handled the lighting of a production. Rosenthal helped make the lighting designer an integral member of the design team. She also said that lighting 'was a career in itself.' As well as particular lighting innovations, she created an atmosphere specific to the production, and she was in demand as a Broadway lighting designer. In 1929, she was introduced to Martha Graham at the Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre. She became Graham's technical assistant, which led to a lifelong collaboration with Graham. She worked with Graham on 36 productions. Rosenthal studied lighting design at the Yale School of Drama from 1931 to 1934 with Stanley McCandless. She returned to New York City, where she joined the Federal Theatre Project in 1935. This led to collaborations with Orson Welles and John Houseman. She would later follow Welles to the Mercury Theatre, where she was credited as a member of the board in addition to production and lighting manager, although not as lighting designer. Some of her major contributions were the elimination of shadows by using floods of upstage lighting and controlling angles and mass of illumination to create contrasts without shadows. 'Some of the signature lighting she did for Balanchine and the diagonal shaft of light she created for Graham (lovingly referred to by her as 'Martha's Finger of God'), are now in such widespread use by dance companies of every style that they have become standards of the lighting repertoire.' She was light designer for hundreds of productions, including Broadway, Martha Graham's dances, the New York City Ballet, and the Metropolitan Opera. On Broadway she lit musicals such as West Side Story (1957), The Sound of Music (1959), Take Me Along (1959), A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1962), Fiddler on the Roof (1964), Hello, Dolly! (1964), Cabaret (1966), and The Happy Time (1968)..."
3819 Rubenstein, Arthur (Concert pianist): Two 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of classical pianist Arthur Rubenstein (with others - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Arthur Rubinstein (January 28, 1887 - December 20, 1982) was a Polish American classical pianist. He received international acclaim for his performances of the music written by a variety of composers and many regard him as the greatest Chopin interpreter of his time. He was described by The New York Times as one of the greatest pianists of the twentieth century. He played in public for eight decades..."
3820 Savo, Jimmy (Broadway Star): Thirteen (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) of nightclub and vaudeville performer Jimmy Savo (at "Café Society Uptown" nightclub - May 9, 1943) by Martin Harris (for PM-NEW YORK - July 22, 1943). See, also, "Box 7, Folder 22" and "Box 18, Folder 4." According to the American Vaudeville Museum web site: "Savo was one of the top comics of vaudeville and the Broadway stage. Charlie Chaplin called him the 'best pantomimist in the world.' Like W.C. Fields, who inspired him, and Fred Allen, Savo began as a juggler and later added comedy, singing and magic to his act. Two of his most remembered songs were 'River Stay 'Way from My Door' and '(You Get No Bread with) One Meat Ball.' "
3821 Skinner, Cornelia Otis (Actress and author) - Part 1: Eighteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of actress Cornelia Otis Skinner (with her husband, son and her son's friend at home in her NYC apartment circa 1949) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Alden S. Blodget"). See, also, "Box 7, Folder 24' and Box 18, Folder 5." According to Wikipedia: "Cornelia Otis Skinner...was the daughter of the actor Otis Skinner and his wife, Maud Durbin. After attending the all-girls' Baldwin School and Bryn Mawr College (1918-1919) and studying theatre at the Sorbonne in Paris, she began her career on the stage in 1921. She appeared in several plays before embarking on a tour of the United States from 1926 to 1929 in a one-woman performance of short character sketches she herself wrote. She wrote numerous short humorous pieces for publications like The New Yorker. These pieces were eventually compiled into a series of books, including Nuts in May, Dithers and Jitters, Excuse It Please!, and The Ape in Me, among others. In a 'comprehensive study' of Skinner's work, G. Bruce Loganbill (1961) refers to Skinner's scripts as 'monologue-dramas,' which were extensions of the 'linked monologues' developed by Ruth Draper. Skinner's work differed in structure and content however, creating and performing full-length monologue-dramas that were based on the lives of historical figures. Such work was a 'unique' and important contribution to the one-person show in America. With Emily Kimbrough, she wrote Our Hearts Were Young and Gay, a light-hearted description of their European tour after college. Kimbrough and Skinner went to Hollywood to act as consultants on the film version of the book, which resulted in the film of the same name and starred Gail Russell playing Skinner. Skinner was portrayed by Bethel Leslie replaced by Gloria Stroock in the short-lived 1950 television series The Girls, based upon Our Hearts Were Young and Gay. In 1952, her one-woman show Paris '90 (music and lyrics by Kay Swift) premiered on Broadway. An original cast recording was produced by Goddard Lieberson for Columbia Records, now available on compact disc. In later years Skinner wrote Madame Sarah (a biography of Sarah Bernhardt) and Elegant Wits and Grand Horizontals about the Belle Epoque. She appeared with Orson Welles on The Campbell Playhouse radio play of The Things We Have on May 26, 1939. In a 1944 conversation with Victor Borge, Skinner reportedly told the Danish comedian that she decided to drop the term 'diseuse' from her act after reading in a Scottish newspaper: 'Cornelia Otis Skinner, the American disease, gave a program last night.' "
3822 Skinner, Cornelia Otis (Actress and author) - Part 2: Twelve (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of actress Cornelia Otis Skinner (with her husband, son and her son's friend at home in her NYC apartment circa 1949) by Martin Harris (for a CUE MAGAZINE photo assignment - "New Yorkers at Home - Mr. and Mrs. Alden S. Blodget"). See, also, "Box 7, Folder 24' and Box 18, Folder 5." According to Wikipedia: "Cornelia Otis Skinner...was the daughter of the actor Otis Skinner and his wife, Maud Durbin. After attending the all-girls' Baldwin School and Bryn Mawr College (1918-1919) and studying theatre at the Sorbonne in Paris, she began her career on the stage in 1921. She appeared in several plays before embarking on a tour of the United States from 1926 to 1929 in a one-woman performance of short character sketches she herself wrote. She wrote numerous short humorous pieces for publications like The New Yorker. These pieces were eventually compiled into a series of books, including Nuts in May, Dithers and Jitters, Excuse It Please!, and The Ape in Me, among others. In a 'comprehensive study' of Skinner's work, G. Bruce Loganbill (1961) refers to Skinner's scripts as 'monologue-dramas,' which were extensions of the 'linked monologues' developed by Ruth Draper. Skinner's work differed in structure and content however, creating and performing full-length monologue-dramas that were based on the lives of historical figures. Such work was a 'unique' and important contribution to the one-person show in America. With Emily Kimbrough, she wrote Our Hearts Were Young and Gay, a light-hearted description of their European tour after college. Kimbrough and Skinner went to Hollywood to act as consultants on the film version of the book, which resulted in the film of the same name and starred Gail Russell playing Skinner. Skinner was portrayed by Bethel Leslie replaced by Gloria Stroock in the short-lived 1950 television series The Girls, based upon Our Hearts Were Young and Gay. In 1952, her one-woman show Paris '90 (music and lyrics by Kay Swift) premiered on Broadway. An original cast recording was produced by Goddard Lieberson for Columbia Records, now available on compact disc. In later years Skinner wrote Madame Sarah (a biography of Sarah Bernhardt) and Elegant Wits and Grand Horizontals about the Belle Epoque. She appeared with Orson Welles on The Campbell Playhouse radio play of The Things We Have on May 26, 1939. In a 1944 conversation with Victor Borge, Skinner reportedly told the Danish comedian that she decided to drop the term 'diseuse' from her act after reading in a Scottish newspaper: 'Cornelia Otis Skinner, the American disease, gave a program last night.' "
3823 Slezak, Walter (Film and stage actor): Two (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of actor Walter Slezak (with actress Ina Claire - 1937) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Walter Slezak (German pronunciation: (1902 - 1983) was an Austrian-born character actor and singer who appeared in German films before migrating to the US in 1930 and featuring in numerous Hollywood productions. Slezak often portrayed villains or thugs, most notably the German U-boat captain in Alfred Hitchcock's film Lifeboat (1944), but occasionally he got to play lighter roles, as in The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (1962). He also played a cheerfully corrupt and philosophical private detective in the film noir Born to Kill (1947) and appeared as Squire Trelawney in Treasure Island (1972)..." "Born Ina Fagan in 1893 in Washington, D.C., Claire began her career appearing in vaudeville. In 1909, she appeared in a vaudeville act entitled 'Dainty Mimic,' which include an imitation of actor Harry Lauder. A booking agent described this act as 'one of the best single Acts' he had seen that season and remarked that 'She possesses a great deal of magnetism [sic] and is a big hit.' She performed on Broadway in the musicals Jumping Jupiter and The Quaker Girl (both 1911) and Lady Luxury, and starred on Broadway in plays by some of the leading comic dramatists of the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s, including the roles of Jerry Lamarr in Avery Hopwood's The Gold Diggers (1919), Mrs. Cheyney in Frederick Lonsdale's The Last of Mrs. Cheyney (1925), Lady George Grayston in W. Somerset Maugham's Our Betters (1928), and Enid Fuller in George Kelly's Fatal Weakness. Between 1929 and 1931, she was married to screen actor John Gilbert, her second husband..."
3824 Stevens, Inger (Television and film actress): Six 2.25 x 2.25 inch (color) photo negatives of actress Inger Stevens (circa 1967) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Stevens appeared on television series, in commercials, and in plays until she received her big break in the film Man on Fire, starring Bing Crosby. Roles in major films followed, but she achieved her greatest success in the ABC television series The Farmer's Daughter, with William Windom. Previously, Stevens had appeared in episodes of Bonanza, Route 66, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, The Eleventh Hour, Sam Benedict and The Twilight Zone. Following the cancellation of The Farmer's Daughter in 1966, Stevens appeared in several films: A Guide for the Married Man (1967), with Walter Matthau; Hang 'Em High, with Clint Eastwood; 5 Card Stud, with Dean Martin and Robert Mitchum; and Madigan with Henry Fonda and Richard Widmark. Stevens was attempting to revive her television career with the detective drama series The Most Deadly Game when she died..."
3825 Swanson, Gloria (Film actress): Twenty-one (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) and thirty-four (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) of film legend Gloria Swanson (promoting her classic comeback film SUNSET BOULEVARD - 1950) by Martin Harris (for various publication photo assignments). See, also "Box 8, Folders 39, 40, 41, 42 and 43" and "Box 18, Folders 8 and 9." According to Wikipedia: "Gloria May Josephine Swanson (March 27, 1899 - April 4, 1983) was an American actress and producer best known for her role as Norma Desmond, a reclusive silent film star, in the critically acclaimed 1950 film Sunset Boulevard. Swanson was also a star in the silent film era as both an actress and a fashion icon, especially under the direction of Cecil B. DeMille. She starred in dozens of silent films and was nominated for the first Academy Award in the Best Actress category. She also produced her own films, including Sadie Thompson and The Love of Sunya. In 1929, Swanson transitioned to talkies with The Trespasser. Personal problems and changing tastes saw her popularity wane during the 1930s when she moved into theater and television..."
3826 Traubel, Helen (Metropolitan Opera and concert singer) - Part 1: Forty (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of opera singer Helen Traubel (at home, rehearsing, with opera singer Lawrence Tibbett, with major league pitcher Bucky Walters at a baseball game, at a circus, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for a SATURDAY EVENING POST photo assignment - circa 1950). See, also, "Box 9, Folder 5" and "Box 19, Folder 3." According to Wikipedia: "Helen Francesca Traubel (June 16, 1899 - July 28, 1972) was an American opera and concert singer. A dramatic soprano, she was best known for her Wagnerian roles, especially those of Brünnhilde and Isolde. Born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, she began her career as a concert singer and went on to sing at the Metropolitan Opera from 1937-53. Starting in the 1950s, she also developed a career as a nightclub and cabaret singer as well as appearing in television, films and musical theatre. Traubel spent her later years in Santa Monica, California, where she died at the age of 73..."
3827 Traubel, Helen (Metropolitan Opera and concert singer) - Part 2: Thirty-two (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of opera singer Helen Traubel (at home, rehearsing, with opera singer Lawrence Tibbett, with major league pitcher Bucky Walters at a baseball game, at a circus, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for a SATURDAY EVENING POST photo assignment - circa 1950). See, also, "Box 9, Folder 5" and "Box 19, Folder 3." According to Wikipedia: "Helen Francesca Traubel (June 16, 1899 - July 28, 1972) was an American opera and concert singer. A dramatic soprano, she was best known for her Wagnerian roles, especially those of Brünnhilde and Isolde. Born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, she began her career as a concert singer and went on to sing at the Metropolitan Opera from 1937-53. Starting in the 1950s, she also developed a career as a nightclub and cabaret singer as well as appearing in television, films and musical theatre. Traubel spent her later years in Santa Monica, California, where she died at the age of 73..."
3828 Waller, Fats (Jazz pianist and singer): One 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative of entertainer Fats Waller (at his piano - circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Thomas Wright 'Fats' Waller (May 21, 1904 - December 15, 1943) was an American jazz pianist, organist, composer, singer, and comedic entertainer. His innovations to the Harlem stride style laid the groundwork for modern jazz piano. His best-known compositions, 'Ain't Misbehavin' and 'Honeysuckle Rose.' were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1984 and 1999..."
3829 Welles, Orson (Director/producer/writer/actor): Seventeen 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of film, radio and stage legend Orson Welles (shaving and directing an unidentified stage production circa 1940s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 19, Folder 6." According to Wikipedia: "George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 - October 10, 1985) was an American actor, director, writer, and producer who worked in theatre, radio, and film. He is remembered for his innovative work in all three: in theatre, most notably Caesar (1937), a Broadway adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar; in radio, the 1938 broadcast 'The War of the Worlds,' one of the most famous in the history of radio; and in film, Citizen Kane (1941), consistently ranked as one of the all-time greatest films. Welles directed a number of high-profile stage productions for the Federal Theatre Project in his early twenties, including an innovative adaptation of Macbeth with an entirely African American cast, and the political musical The Cradle Will Rock. In 1937 he and John Houseman founded the Mercury Theatre, an independent repertory theatre company that presented an acclaimed series of productions on Broadway through 1941. Welles found national and international fame as the director and narrator of a 1938 radio adaptation of H. G. Wells' novel The War of the Worlds performed for his radio anthology series The Mercury Theatre on the Air. It reportedly caused widespread panic when listeners thought that an invasion by extraterrestrial beings was occurring. Although some contemporary sources claim these reports of panic were mostly false and overstated, they rocketed Welles to notoriety. His first film was Citizen Kane (1941), which he co-wrote, produced, directed, and starred in as Charles Foster Kane. Welles was an outsider to the studio system and directed only 13 full-length films in his career. He struggled for creative control on his projects early on with the major film studios and later in life with a variety of independent financiers, and his films were either heavily edited or remained unreleased. His distinctive directorial style featured layered and nonlinear narrative forms, innovative uses of lighting such as chiaroscuro, unusual camera angles, sound techniques borrowed from radio, deep focus shots, and long takes. He has been praised as a major creative force and as 'the ultimate auteur.' "
3830 West, Mae (Film and stage actress): Four (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of actress Mae West (c. late 1930s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Mary Jane 'Mae' West (August 17, 1893 - November 22, 1980) was an American actress, singer, playwright, screenwriter, comedian, and sex symbol whose entertainment career spanned seven decades..."
3831 Whiteman, Paul (Bandleader): One 2 x 7 inch (black and white) photo negative strip (5 images) of 'The King of Jazz" Paul Whiteman (backstage at the NYC Hippodrome Theatre during the run of the Broadway production JUMBO - 1935) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication phot assignment). See, also, "Box 19, Folder 5." According to Wikipedia: "Paul Samuel Whiteman (March 28, 1890 - December 29, 1967) was an American bandleader, composer, orchestral director and violinist. Leader of one of the most popular dance bands in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s, Whiteman produced recordings that were immensely successful, and press notices often referred to him as the 'King of Jazz.' Using a large ensemble and exploring many styles of music, Whiteman is perhaps best known for his blending of symphonic music and jazz, as typified by his 1924 commissioning and debut of George Gershwin's jazz-influenced 'Rhapsody in Blue.' Later, Whiteman's work on Symphonic Jazz influenced many jazz musicians - directly or indirectly - as diverse as Miles Davis, Gil Evans, the Modern Jazz Quartet, Wynton Marsalis and other modern artists..."
3832 Wright, Teresa (Film and stage actress): Seventy (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of stage and film actress Teresa Wright (at home, shopping and at dance class - 1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 19, Folder 10" and "Box 23, Folder 22." According to Wikipedia: "Teresa Wright (October 27, 1918 - March 6, 2005) was an American actress. Her first Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress nomination came in 1941 for her debut work in The Little Foxes. She received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in 1942 for her performance in Mrs. Miniver. That same year, she received an Academy Award for Best Actress nomination for her performance in Pride of the Yankees opposite Gary Cooper. She is also known for her performances in Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt (1943) and William Wyler's The Best Years of Our Lives (1946). Wright received three Emmy Award nominations for her performances in the Playhouse 90 original television version of The Miracle Worker (1957), in the Breck Sunday Showcase feature The Margaret Bourke-White Story, and in the CBS drama series Dolphin Cove (1989). She earned the acclaim of top film directors, including William Wyler, who called her the most promising actress he had directed, and Alfred Hitchcock, who admired her thorough preparation and quiet professionalism..."



PHOTO NEGATIVES: PERFORMING ARTS SUBJECTS AND THEATRICAL PRODUCTIONS

Photo Negatives by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by subject.



Box Folder
391 Amahl and the Night Visitors (NBC - TV): Five 2.25 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips of the rehearsal for the NBC - TV production of AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS (April 15, 1952 starring Chet Allen, Rosemary Kuhlman, Andrew McKinley, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - "There Were Three Kings" - December 27, 1952). See, also, "Box 4, Folder 4," "Box 20, Folder 1" and "Box 23, Folders 1 and 2." According to Wikipedia: "Amahl and the Night Visitors is an opera in one act by Gian Carlo Menotti with an original English libretto by the composer. It was commissioned by NBC and first performed by the NBC Opera Theatre on December 24, 1951, in New York City at NBC studio 8H in Rockefeller Center, where it was broadcast live on television from that venue as the debut production of the Hallmark Hall of Fame. It was the first opera specifically composed for television in America. Menotti wrote Amahl with the stage in mind, even though it was intended for broadcast. 'On television you're lucky if they ever repeat anything. Writing an opera is a big effort and to give it away for one performance is stupid.' The composer appeared on-screen in the premiere to introduce the opera and give the background of the events leading up to its composition. He also brought out director Kirk Browning and conductor Thomas Schippers to thank them on-screen. Amahl was seen on 35 NBC affiliates coast to coast, the largest network hookup for an opera broadcast to that date. An estimated five million people saw the live broadcast, the largest audience ever to see a televised opera..."
392 American Federation of Labor (AFL) - Part 1: Thirty 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of various performers (including Frederic March, Edward Arnold, Wayne Morris, Ralph Morgan, Henry Hull, Binnie Barnes, Mischa Auer, Lucille Gleason, Tallulah Bankhead, Katherine Hepburn, Harry Richman, et cetera) arriving and taking part in a n American Federation of Labor (AFL) meeting in Atlantic City (1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 20 , Folder 2." According to Wikipedia: "The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was a national federation of labor unions in the United States. It was founded in Columbus, Ohio, in May 1886 by an alliance of craft unions disaffected from the Knights of Labor, a national labor association. Samuel Gompers of the Cigar Makers' International Union was elected president of the Federation at its founding convention and was reelected every year except one until his death in 1924. The AFL was the largest union grouping in the United States for the first half of the 20th century, even after the creation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) by unions that were expelled by the AFL in 1935 over its opposition to industrial unionism. While the Federation was founded and dominated by craft unions throughout the first fifty years of its existence, many of its craft union affiliates turned to organizing on an industrial union basis to meet the challenge from the CIO in the 1940s. In 1955, the AFL merged with its longtime rival, the Congress of Industrial Organizations, to form the AFL-CIO, a federation which remains in place to this day. Together with the new union, the AFL has comprised the longest lasting and most influential labor federation in the United States..."
393 American Federation of Labor (AFL) - Part 2: Sixteen 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of various performers (including Frederic March, Edward Arnold, Wayne Morris, Ralph Morgan, Henry Hull, Binnie Barnes, Mischa Auer, Lucille Gleason, Tallulah Bankhead, Katherine Hepburn, Harry Richman, et cetera) arriving and taking part in a n American Federation of Labor (AFL) meeting in Atlantic City (1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 20 , Folder 2." According to Wikipedia: "The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was a national federation of labor unions in the United States. It was founded in Columbus, Ohio, in May 1886 by an alliance of craft unions disaffected from the Knights of Labor, a national labor association. Samuel Gompers of the Cigar Makers' International Union was elected president of the Federation at its founding convention and was reelected every year except one until his death in 1924. The AFL was the largest union grouping in the United States for the first half of the 20th century, even after the creation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) by unions that were expelled by the AFL in 1935 over its opposition to industrial unionism. While the Federation was founded and dominated by craft unions throughout the first fifty years of its existence, many of its craft union affiliates turned to organizing on an industrial union basis to meet the challenge from the CIO in the 1940s. In 1955, the AFL merged with its longtime rival, the Congress of Industrial Organizations, to form the AFL-CIO, a federation which remains in place to this day. Together with the new union, the AFL has comprised the longest lasting and most influential labor federation in the United States..."
394 Anti - Nazi Rally (Madison Square Garden - NYC): Twenty-seven 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of a New York City anti-Nazi rally in Madison Square Garden (November 21, 1938 - featuring performer Paul Robeson, radio broadcaster and journalist Dorothy Thompson, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Harry Hopkins and others as speakers) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 20, Folder 3." No additional information available.
395 Ballet (School of American Ballet - NYC): One-hundred (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the New York City School of American Ballet and director George Balanchine (in rehearsal and performance - 1949) by Martin Harris (for a PM-NEW YORK photo assignment). See, also, "Box 20, Folder 4." According to Wikipedia: "The School of American Ballet (SAB) is one of the most famous classical ballet schools in the world and is the associate school of the New York City Ballet, a leading international ballet company based at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City. The school trains students from the age of six, with professional vocational ballet training for students aged 11-18. Graduates of the school achieve employment with leading ballet companies worldwide, most notably in the United States with New York City Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, Boston Ballet, and San Francisco Ballet. The school was founded by the renowned Russo-Georgian-born choreographer George Balanchine, and philanthropists Lincoln Kirstein and Edward Warburg in 1934. Balanchine's self- prescribed edict, 'But first, a school,' is indicative of his adherence to the ideals of the training that was fostered by the Imperial Ballet School where he received his training. He realized that most great dance companies were fed by an academy closely associated with it. This practice afforded scores of dancers, well versed in the specifics of his technique and choreographic style. Among the teachers there were many Russian emigres who fled the Russian Revolution: Pierre Vladimiroff, Felia Doubrovska, Anatole Oboukhoff, Hélène Dudin, Ludmilla Schollar, Antonina Tumkovsky, and Alexandra Danilova. Their intention was to establish a major classical ballet company in America, which would lead to the formation of today's New York City Ballet. The school was formed to train and feed dancers into the company. It opened at 637 Madison Avenue with 32 students on January 2, 1934, and the students first performed that June. Seventy-five years later, the School was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President Barack Obama..."
396 Barretts of Wimpole Street, The (USO tour): Ten 2.35 x 10 inch (black and white) photo negative strips of a USO tour of "The Barretts of Wimpole Street" ( with an unidentified cast in Italy - 1944) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 1." According to Wikipedia: "The Barretts of Wimpole Street is a play written by Rudolf Besier in 1930, based on the romance between Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett, and her father's unwillingness to allow them to marry. The play was Besier's only real success as a playwright. He had been turned down by two London producers, but managed to have it staged in Malvern, directed by Sir Barry Jackson. He then turned to the United States, but was rebuffed by no fewer than 27 producers, before the actress Katharine Cornell took a personal interest in the play and had it staged at the Hanna Theatre in Cleveland, Ohio in 1931. The role of Elizabeth Barrett worked so well for Cornell that it became her signature role. The Barretts of Wimpole Street then went to Broadway, where it opened on 9 February 1931 at the Empire Theatre, starring Katharine Cornell and Brian Aherne. It was revived there in 1934 and 1945..."
397 Buck's County Playhouse (New Hope, PA): Seven 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives and twelve 2.25 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips of rehearsals and back stage activities for "Springtime for Henry" (the opening night performance starring Edward Everett Horton) at the Buck's County Playhouse (New Hope Pennsylvania - July 1939) by Martin Harris. See, also, the Al Hirschfeld sketch in Box 44. According to Wikipedia: "The Bucks County Playhouse is the State Theater of Pennsylvania, and is located in New Hope, Pennsylvania. When the Hope Mills burned in 1790, the grist mills were rebuilt as the New Hope Mills by Benjamin Parry. The town was renamed for the mills. The building was saved from demolition in the 1930s and purchased and run by a group including playwrights Moss Hart and Kenyon Nicholson. Renovations converting the building into a theatre began in 1938. The first show opened there on 1 July 1939, Springtime for Henry featuring Edward Everett Horton. The Bucks County Playhouse became a summer theater. It was the starting point for many actors and became a place where plays slated for Broadway were tried out. Neil Simon's Barefoot in the Park had its premiere at the theater in 1963, starring Robert Redford and Elizabeth Ashley. Other notable actors who performed at the theater over the years include Bela Lugosi, Dick Van Dyke, Tyne Daly, Grace Kelly, Angela Lansbury, and Walter Matthau. The Bucks County Playhouse Conservancy, a public/private partnership, raised sufficient funds to regain the property following a 2010 foreclosure. Following an extensive renovation, the theater reopened on July 2, 2012..."
398 Burlesque (Performers): Seventeen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of burlesque performers (including Gypsy Rose Lee) from the 1940s (on stage and in dressing rooms) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 16, Folder 22" and "Box 37, Folder 45." According to Wikipedia: "Burlesque is a literary, dramatic or musical work intended to cause laughter by caricaturing the manner or spirit of serious works, or by ludicrous treatment of their subjects. The word derives from the Italian burlesco, which, in turn, is derived from the Italian burla - a joke, ridicule or mockery. Burlesque overlaps in meaning with caricature, parody and travesty, and, in its theatrical sense, with extravaganza, as presented during the Victorian era. 'Burlesque' has been used in English in this literary and theatrical sense since the late 17th century. It has been applied retrospectively to works of Chaucer and Shakespeare and to the Graeco-Roman classics. Contrasting examples of literary burlesque are Alexander Pope's The Rape of the Lock and Samuel Butler's Hudibras. An example of musical burlesque is Richard Strauss's 1890 Burleske for piano and orchestra. Examples of theatrical burlesques include W. S. Gilbert's Robert the Devil and the A. C. Torr - Meyer Lutz shows, including Ruy Blas and the Blasé Roué. A later use of the term, particularly in the United States, refers to performances in a variety show format. These were popular from the 1860s to the 1940s, often in cabarets and clubs, as well as theatres, and featured bawdy comedy and female striptease. Some Hollywood films attempted to recreate the spirit of these performances from the 1930s to the 1960s, or included burlesque-style scenes within dramatic films, such as 1972's Cabaret and 1979's All That Jazz, among others. There has been a resurgence of interest in this format since the 1990s..."
399 Café Society Downtown (NYC nightclub): Four 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of Café Society Downtown owner Barney Josephson and others at nightclub tables (May 9, 1943) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, Box 6, Folder 7," "Box 6, Folder 25 and 26," "Box 20, Folder 5" and "Box 21, Folder 3." According to the Night Lights web site: "Cafe Society was New York City's first integrated nightclub and a cultural flashpoint for artists, jazz musicians, intellectuals, and activists of the 1940s." According to Wikipedia: "Barney Josephson (1902-1988) was the founder of Café Society in Greenwich Village, New York's first integrated nightclub. It was opened in 1938 by, among others, Billie Holiday and it was here that the singer first publicly performed the song Strange Fruit in 1939..."
3910 Cheesecake Photographs (Miscellaneous): Twenty-two 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives and twelve 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of unidentified nude and semi-nude women ("cheesecake" or pin-up images) by Martin Harris (circa 1930s/40s). See, also, "Box 20, Folder 6." According to the definition on the Free Dictionary by Farlex web site: " Cheesecake: Images, especially photographs, of sexually attractive, scantily attired women..." According to Wikipedia: "A pin-up model (known as a pin-up girl for a female and less commonly male pin-up for a male) is a model whose mass-produced pictures see wide appeal as popular culture. Pin-ups are intended for informal display, i.e. meant to be 'pinned-up' on a wall. Pin-up models may be glamour models, fashion models, or actors. These pictures are also sometimes known as cheesecake photos. The term pin-up may refer to drawings, paintings, and other illustrations as well as photographs (see the list of pin-up artists). The term was first attested to in English in 1941; however, the practice is documented back at least to the 1890s. The pin-up images could be cut out of magazines or newspapers, or on a postcard or lithograph. Such pictures often appear on wall or desk calendars. Posters of pin-ups were mass-produced and became popular from the mid 20th century. Male pin-ups were less common than their female counterparts throughout the 20th century, although a market for homoerotica has always existed as well as pictures of popular male celebrities targeted at women or girls. Examples include James Dean and Jim Morrison..."
3911 Earrings of Madame de..., The (French film): Thirty-five (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the 1953 French film THE EARRINGS OF MADAME DE...directed by Max Ophuls and starring Charles Boyer, Danielle Darrieux and Vittorio De Sica (production and rehearsal photos) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 20, Folder 7" and "Box 23, Folder 9." According to Wikipedia: "The Earrings of Madame de... is a 1953 drama film directed by Max Ophüls, adapted from Louise Leveque de Vilmorin's period novel by Ophüls, Marcel Archard and Annette Wadement. The film is considered a masterpiece of the 1950s French cinema. Andrew Sarris called it 'the most perfect film ever made.' Ophüls said the story's construction attracted him, stating 'there is always the same axis around which the action continually turns like a carousel. A tiny, scarcely visible axis: a pair of earrings." The film's different titles reflect on the fact that the surname of the Madame in question - the same as that of her husband's - is never heard nor seen onscreen. The few times in the film when it might be revealed, it is elided by noise or a camera trick...The film received mixed reviews when first released, but its reputation has grown over the years. It was revived in England in 1979, where it was rediscovered as a masterpiece. Derek Malcolm called it 'a supreme piece of film-making which hardly puts a foot wrong for 2 hours...a magnificent and utterly timeless dissection of passion and affection, the game of life and love itself.' Lindsay Anderson criticized the film, stating 'the camera is never still; every shot has the tension of a conjuring trick. The sleight of hand is dazzling, but fatally distracting...With a supple, ingenious, glittering flow of images that is aesthetically the diametric opposite of Mme. de Vilmorin's chaste prose, he has made the film an excuse for a succession of rich, decorative displays...In all this visual frou-frou it is not surprising that the characters become lost and the interior development of the drama is almost completely unobserved." François Truffaut wrote that the film was very similar to Ophüls' earlier film Liebelei, stating that 'the last half hour, the duel and the finale, is a remake pure and simple.' Jacques Rivette praised the film, calling it 'a difficult work, in the fullest sense of the word, even in its writing, one in which everything aims to disconcert, distract the viewer from what is essential through the accumulation of secondary actions, wrong turns, repetitions and delays; a work in which the picturesque tries hard to conceal the pathetic." Molly Haskell has called the film a masterpiece with a cult following that grows every year. Haskell has asserted that the film is usually not as revered as other, more male-oriented films because it is a female-oriented film. Richard Roud has stated that Ophüls made film about 'women. More specifically, women in love. Most often, women who are unhappily in love, or whom love brings misfortune of one kind or another...' "
3912 First Time, The (Film) : Six (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) of the cast and crew of the 1969 Mirisch Company/United Artists production of THE FIRST TIME directed by James Neilson and starring Jacqueline Bisset, Wes Stern, Ricky Kelman, Wink Roberts, et cetera (production and publicity photos) by Martin Harris. See, also, "Box 21, Folders 1 and 2." According to Wikipedia: "The First Time (1969) is a coming of age film directed by James Neilson and starring Jacqueline Bisset."
3913 Hollywood Canteen (Service club): Five 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of Pvt. George Mazie with various film stars (including Marlene Dietrich (at the Hollywood Canteen - October 25, 1942) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). See, also, "Box 15, Folders 22, 23 and 24," "Box 16, Folder 24" and "Box 18, Folder 1." According to Wikipedia: "The Hollywood Canteen operated at 1451 Cahuenga Boulevard in Hollywood, California, between October 3, 1942, and November 22, 1945 (Thanksgiving Day), as a club offering food, dancing and entertainment for servicemen, usually on their way overseas. Even though the majority of visitors were U.S servicemen, the canteen was open to servicemen of allied countries as well as women in all branches of service. A serviceman's ticket for admission was his uniform, and everything at the canteen was free of charge. The East Coast counterpart was the NY based Stage Door Canteen, which featured Broadway stars and was also celebrated in a film, Stage Door Canteen..."
3914 House of Mystery (Radio show): Seventeen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the radio show HOUSE OF MYSTERY (circa 1949) with behind the scenes images of the unidentified female producer (and others in a radio studio) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 21, Folder 4." No additional information available.
3915 Information Please (Radio show): Eight 2.25 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips of the cast (Clifton Fadiman, et cetera) of the radio panel show "Information, Please" (on a USO tour in Paris - circa 1943) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). See, also, "Box 6, Folder 35," "Box 10, Folders 1 and 16," "Box 15, Folders 17 and 27," "Box 34, Folder 12" and "Box 37, Folder 1." According to Wikipedia: "Information Please was an American radio quiz show, created by Dan Golenpaul, which aired on NBC from May 17, 1938 to April 22, 1951. The title was the contemporary phrase used to request from telephone operators what was then called 'information' but is now called 'directory assistance.' The series was moderated by Clifton Fadiman. A panel of experts would attempt to answer questions submitted by listeners. For the first few shows, a listener was paid two dollars for a question that was used, and five dollars more if the experts could not answer it correctly. When the show got its first sponsor (Canada Dry), the total amounts were increased to five and ten dollars respectively. A complete Encyclopædia Britannica was later added to the prize for questions that stumped the panel. The amounts went up to ten and twenty-five dollars when Lucky Strike took over sponsorship of the program..."
3916 Lamb's Club (NYC): Thirty-six (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of activities at the Lamb's Club (a theatrical, professional and social club in NYC) by Martin Harris (for THE SATURDAY EVENING POST - "All-Star Hangout" - a 3-page (incomplete) article - April 22, 1950) with photographs (of comedian Bobby Clark, Broadway star Jimmy Savo, radio star Phil Baker, musical comedy star William Gaxton, et cetera). Text (by Maurice Zolotow): "The wittiest and highest-priced talent in show business can be found at The Lambs club, where famous actors like Danny Kaye, Fred Astaire and Spencer Tracy meet for offstage fun and an annual show that may include Toscanini leading a ragtime band..." According to Wikipedia: "The Lambs, Inc. (aka The Lambs Club) is a social club in New York City for actors, songwriters, and others involved in the theater. It is America's oldest theatrical organization. 'The Lambs' is a registered trademark of The Lambs, Inc.; and the club has been commonly referred to as The Lambs Club and The Lambs Theater since 1874..."
3917 Marching Song (Stage production): Four 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of rehearsals for "Marching Song" (a 1937 Theatre Union production - NYC) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Marching Song is a play about the legend of abolitionist John Brown, written in 1932 by Orson Welles and Roger Hill. It is most notable for its narrative device of a journalist piecing together a man's life through multiple, contradictory recollections—a framework that Welles would famously employ in his 1941 film, Citizen Kane. Although the play has never been published or professionally performed, an abridged version of Marching Song was presented in June 1950 at the Woodstock Opera House in Woodstock, Illinois, a world-premiere benefit production by the Todd School for Boys..."
3918 Miracle Worker, The (Stage production): Two (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) for the 1959 Broadway production of THE MIRACLE WORKER (cast on stage) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 21, Folder 6." According to Wikipedia: "The Miracle Worker is a three-act play by William Gibson adapted from his 1957 Playhouse 90 teleplay of the same name. It is based on Helen Keller's autobiography The Story of My Life...The play premiered on Broadway at the Playhouse Theatre on October 19, 1959, and closed on July 1, 1961, after 719 performances. The production was directed by Arthur Penn with scenic and lighting design by George Jenkins and costumes by Ruth Morley. The cast starred Anne Bancroft as Anne Sullivan and Patty Duke as Helen Keller. Featured in the cast were Torin Thatcher as Captain Keller, Patricia Neal as Kate Keller, Michael Constantine as Anagnos and Beah Richards as Viney. Patty Duke remained with the play for its entire run. Suzanne Pleshette eventually replaced Anne Bancroft..."
3919 N.Y.P.D. (ABC - TV drama): Eleven 2.5 x 2.5 inch (color) photo negatives taken on the NYC set of "N.Y.P.D." (ABC-TV starring Frank Converse, Robert Hooks and Jack Warden - 1967) by Martin Harris . According to Wikipedia: "N.Y.P.D. is the title of a half-hour American television crime drama of the 1960s set in the context of the New York City Police Department. The program appeared on the ABC network during the 1967-68 and 1968-69 television seasons. In both seasons, the program appeared in the evening, 9:30 p.m. time slot. During the second season, N.Y.P.D was joined by The Mod Squad and It Takes a Thief to form a 2½ hour block of crime dramas..."
3920 New Theatre (Communist publication): Twelve (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) of various NYC/Broadway celebrities (including Ethel Waters - others unidentified) reading NEW THEATRE MAGAZINE (circa 1935) BY Martin Harris (for a NEW THEATRE MAGAZINE photo assignment). See, also, "Box 21, Folder 7." According to Wikipedia: "New Theatre (magazine), a communist magazine dedicated to the dramatic arts..."
3921 Odd, Couple, The (Film): Twenty-one (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau filming NYC street and rooftop scenes (for the 1968 Paramount Pictures production THE ODD COUPLE) by Martin Harris (with typed photo captions by the photographer). See, also, "Box 21, Folder 8." According to Wikipedia: "The Odd Couple is a 1968 American comedy Technicolor film in Panavision, written by Neil Simon, based on his play The Odd Couple, directed by Gene Saks, and starring Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau. It is the story of two divorced men—neurotic neat-freak Felix Ungar and fun-loving slob Oscar Madison—who decide to live together, even though their personalities clash. The film was successful with critics and audiences, grossing over $44.5 million,[2] making it the fourth highest-grossing picture of 1968. The success of the film was the basis for the ABC television sitcom of the same name, starring Tony Randall as Felix and Jack Klugman as Oscar..."
3922 Pinocchio (Federal Theatre Project): Thirty-eight (black and white and color) photo negatives (various sizes) of rehearsals for Pinocchio (1939) by Martin Harris (for a LIFE MAGAZINE photo assignment: "WPA - WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION - Stages a Children's Classic.") Text (by an unidentified author): "Nobody knows just how the legend of Pinocchio began. Probably, like FAUST, it came out of morality plays acted in medieval churchyards. A retired Florentine soldier snatched it from oblivion in 1880 and made of it a universal children's classic. Now dramatized into English verse by Yasha Frank, the wistful tale of the little wooden puppet who, after many a heartbreak on land and sea, became a human boy, is converted by the Federal Theatre into one of Broadway's most charming productions..." See, also, "Box 6, Folder 39").
3923 Passion Play (Stage production): One 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (two images) of rehearsals for the "Passion Play" (unknown location and date) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The Passion Play or Easter pageant is a dramatic presentation depicting the Passion of Jesus Christ: his trial, suffering and death. It is a traditional part of Lent in several Christian denominations, particularly in Catholic tradition..."
3924 President's Analyst, The (Film): Seven 1,5 x 7.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (5 images on each strip) of James Coburn and Godfrey Cambridge (with the production crew) filming NYC street scenes (for the 1967 Paramount Pictures production of THE PRESIDENT'S ANALYST) by Martin Harris. See, also, "Box 22, Folder 1." According to Wikipedia: "The President's Analyst is an American satirical comedy film written and directed by Ted Flicker, starring James Coburn. The cinematography was by William A. Fraker, and Lalo Schifrin provided the film's musical score. The film has elements of political satire and science fiction. The film's themes include modern ethics and privacy concerns, specifically regarding the intrusion of the Telecom system, working with the U.S. Government, into the private lives of the country's citizens. it was released theatrically on December 21, 1967..."
3925 Red, Hot and Blue (Stage production): Four 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of Bob Hope, Ethel Merman and Jimmy Durante rehearsing for the Broadway production 0f RED, HOT AND BLUE (1936) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 26" and Box 22, Folder 3." According to Wikipedia: "Red, Hot and Blue is a stage musical with music and lyrics by Cole Porter and a book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse. It premiered on Broadway in 1936 and introduced the popular song 'It's De-Lovely,' sung by Ethel Merman and Bob Hope. The musical has no connection to the 1949 film musical of the same name with songs by Frank Loesser...During the out-of-town tryouts, according to Cole Porter's biography, Cole Porter: A Biography by Charles Schwartz, the book was too long and did not blend with the music. Further the producer Vinton Freedley made 'numerous suggestions for overhauling the show,' which were accepted by all except Porter. Porter initially told Freedley to communicate through his agent, but finally relented. Additional conflict had arisen before the show's tryouts, when Freedley had assembled the cast and creative team behind the musical Anything Goes, hoping to repeat that show's success. William Gaxton was part of that cast, but withdrew because Ethel Merman's part was so large and Bob Hope was cast. The next conflict came over billing for Jimmy Durante and Merman, which was resolved by having their names crisscrossed above the title. The musical was first titled But Millions! and then Wait for Baby!. Porter had written the song 'It's De-Lovely' for the film Born to Dance but it was not used. He turned it into a romantic duet for Merman and Bob Hope, in which they trace their romance from first kiss to marriage to a baby..."
3926 Rob Roy: The Highland Rogue (Film): Two 1.5 x 7.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (5 images on each strip) of Richard Todd and Glynis Johns (with production crew filming and promoting the 1953 Walt Disney production of ROB ROY: THE HIGHLAND ROGUE) by Martin Harris. See, also, "Box 22, Folder 4." According to: "Rob Roy, the Highland Rogue is a 1953 British-American action film, made by Walt Disney Productions. This film is about Rob Roy MacGregor, and it is also the final Disney film released through RKO Radio Pictures...Disney had enjoyed success with its first live action movie, Treasure Island, shot in England. He followed it up with two more costume adventure tales, The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (starring Richard Todd) and The Sword and the Rose both directed by Ken Annakin. When the Rank Organization refused to loan Annakin out to Disney again, Disney chose Harold French who had worked with Annakin on some Somerset Maugham portmanteau films to direct the film which was filmed just as Sword and the Rose was released. Rob Roy was shot on location in Scotland. Richard Todd related in his autobiography that the extras were soldiers of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders who had just returned from the Korean War. Todd said as well as providing thrilling battle scenes for the viewers, the soldiers used the opportunity to enthusiastically get back at their non-commissioned officers. Todd also sheepishly admitted that his first scene leading a charge led to an injury when he stepped in a rabbit hole..."
3927 Sandhog (Stage production): Seventeen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of rehearsals (in the design shop) for the 1954 off-Broadway musical production of SANDHOG starring Jack Cassidy, Leon Bibb, David Brooks, Eliot Field, Alice Ghostly, et cetera (directed by Howard Da Silva and produced at the Phoenix Theatre in NYC) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 22, Folder 5." No additional information available.
3928 Seeing is Believing (Stage production): Eight 4 x 5 inch (color) photo negatives of rehearsals for the Tamiment Summer Theatre (Pennsylvania) production of "Seeing is Believing" (starring Joey Faye, Connie Sawyer, Lavina and Lucas Hoving, Lee Grant, et cetera - circa 1950) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Tamiment, first known as Camp Tamiment, was an American resort located in the Pocono Mountains of Pike County, Pennsylvania, which existed from 1921 through 2005. Originally established by the Rand School of Social Science in New York City as a Socialist camp and summer school, Tamiment developed into a regular resort and later fell under private ownership. The Tamiment Playhouse entertained guests with weekly revues and served as a training ground for many prominent Broadway and TV performers and writers. Playhouse alumni have included Danny Kaye, Imogene Coca, Jerome Robbins, Carol Burnett, Woody Allen, Neil Simon, and many others. Tamiment was a popular resort for Jewish singles and has been referred to as 'a progressive version of the Catskills...' and '...a pillar of the Poconos tourist industry.' Max Liebman became theater director at Tamiment in the early 1930s and created an original stage revue every Saturday night during the 10-week summer season. His shows combined music and dance with comedy, and the people Liebman hired included Danny Kaye, Sylvia Fine, Imogene Coca, Betty Garrett, Jules Munshin, Herbert Ross, and Jerome Robbins.The Broadway musical The Straw Hat Revue was based on his Tamiment revues from the 1939 season and had a large cast of Tamiment players. In the 1950s Liebman directed the TV variety show Your Show of Shows, utilizing his Tamiment experience to put on a weekly live revue. He stated, 'I was really preparing myself for television at Tamiment. I was doing what you might call television without cameras...' After Liebman left Tamiment, the playhouse continued to present weekly summer revues until 1960, when audiences were dwindling. Tamiment Playhouse was referred to as the 'Poconos boot camp for Broadway writers and performers.' Broadway and TV producers watched the shows there and recruited new talent. Performers Barbara Cook, Carol Burnett, Bea Arthur, Larry Kert, and others gained experience at Tamiment. Cook considered the playhouse to be a 'very important step' for her, as she developed the confidence to perform on Broadway. Noted choreographer Robbins learned the importance of timing and acquired the skill to quickly assemble material at Tamiment. Composer Jerry Bock spent three summers there which he said helped prepare him for the experience of reworking a musical in pre-Broadway tryouts. Bock stated, '...How do you get to Broadway? Practice, at Tamiment!' Neil Simon's first theater work were the sketches he wrote with his brother Danny Simon for Tamiment Playhouse shows. Woody Allen acted and directed for the first time at Tamiment, where he also went from writing jokes to writing sketch comedy. Authors Willis Hall and Keith Waterhouse wrote, 'Allen bemoaned the fact that he was not able to sell any of his Tamiment material, yet many of the ideas and themes formulated at Tamiment were seminal in terms of his later work...' Once Upon A Mattress was originally presented as a one-act musical at the Tamiment Playhouse in August 1958. The show had been written by resident Tamiment writers and was designed to accommodate the lead players there. After being a hit with hotel guests, Once Upon A Mattress was significantly expanded for Off-Broadway, later moved to Broadway, and became one of the most frequently produced musicals in the United States...."
3929 Sing Me No Lullaby (Stage production): Sixty-three (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the rehearsals for the 1954 off- Broadway production of SING ME NO LULLABY starring Beatrice Straight, Richard Kiley, Jack Warden, Michael Lipton, Marian Winters, Jessie Royce Landis, John Fiedler and John Marley (Directed by Paul Stewart and produced at the Phoenix Theatre in NYC) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 7, Folder 23," "Box 18, Folder 7" and "Box 22, Folder 6." According to Wikipedia: "Sing Me No Lullaby is a 1954 play by Robert Ardrey. It is about the treatment of accused communists in post-Cold War America. It was originally presented at the off-Broadway Phoenix Theatre in New York City...Sing Me No Lullaby received praise for its political content. The New York Times asserted that 'The third act of Sing Me No Lullaby constitutes the most forceful statement anyone has made in the theatre for ages.' Richard Watts wrote that Ardrey was 'striving with the most obvious sincerity to probe the unhealthy and hysterical political climate of America in the wake of the cold war...Mr. Ardrey doesn't solve the problem. But the contribution he has made in the last act is a clear and perceptive statement of this nameless, formless situation and an estimation of what it is doing to America. ... Mr. Ardrey ... is a man of principle and taste. In Sing Me No Lullaby he has performed the function of a writer. He has found the words to describe something that is vague and elusive but ominous. And he has got far enough away from political recriminations to state it in terms of character and the life of the spirit.' In a later New York Times review, Atkinson wrote that 'After the triviality of a theatre that normally aims low and is satisfied with technical competence, it is heartening to see a play that is as adult, if not more adult, than the world outside the theatre.' "
3930 Stage door Canteen (Paris service club) : Ten 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives (2 images on each strip) of various unidentified performers (with soldiers) at the Stage Door Canteen ("Cabaret Des Troupes Alliees") in Paris (circa 1942) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). See, also, "Box 15, Folder 23" and "Box 22, Folder 7." No additional information available.
3931 Symphony Orchestra (NY Philharmonic): Twenty-eight (black and white)photo negative strips (various sizes) of the conductor and musicians of the NY Philharmonic (behind the scenes and in performance- 1958) by Martin Harris (for an unpublished book proposal). See, also, "Box 22, Folder 2." According to Wikipedia: "The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc., globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the 'Big Five.' The Philharmonic's home is David Geffen Hall, known as Avery Fisher Hall until September 2015, located in New York's Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the "Big Five" orchestras. Its record-setting 14,000th concert was given in December 2004. The orchestra's current music director is Alan Gilbert, since 2009. Matthew VanBesien is the orchestra's current President..."
3932 United Service Organization (USO): Three 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (2 images on each strip) of unidentified performers (with soldiers) on a USO tour of Europe (circa 1942) by Martin Harris (for a STARS AND STRIPES photo assignment). See. also, "Box 22, Folder 19." According to Wikipedia: "The United Service Organizations Inc. (USO Show) is a nonprofit organization that provides programs, services and live entertainment to United States service members and their families. Since 1941, it has worked in partnership with the Department of Defense (DoD), relying heavily on private contributions and on funds, goods, and services from various corporate and individual donors. Although congressionally chartered, it is not a government agency. The USO operates 160 centers worldwide. During World War II, the USO became the G.I.'s 'home away from home' and began a tradition of entertaining the troops that continues today. Involvement in the USO was one of the many ways in which the nation had come together to support the war effort, with nearly 1.5 million Americans having volunteered their services in some way. After it was disbanded in 1947, it was revived in 1950 for the Korean War, after which it also provided peacetime services. During the Vietnam War, USOs were sometimes located in combat zones. The organization became particularly famous for its live performances called Camp Shows, through which the entertainment industry helped boost the morale of its servicemen and women. Hollywood in general was eager to show its patriotism, and many famous celebrities joined the ranks of USO entertainers. They entertained in military bases at home and overseas, sometimes placing their own lives in danger, by traveling or performing under hazardous conditions. The USO has over 160 locations around the world in 14 countries (including the U.S.) and 27 states. During a gala marking the USO's 75th anniversary in 2016, retired Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr., the current chairman of the USO Board of Governors, estimated that the USO has served more than 35 million Americans over its history. Its motto is 'Until everyone comes home.' "
3933 What's So Bad About Feeling Good?(Film): Thirteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of NYC street filming (1967) of scenes for the 1968 Universal Pictures production of WHAT'S SO BAD ABOUT FEELING GOOD? (starring Mary Tyler Moore and George Peppard) by Martin Harris. See, also, "Box 22, Folder 10." According to Wikipedia: "What's So Bad About Feeling Good? is the title of a 1968 comedy film, starring George Peppard, Mary Tyler Moore, Jeanne Arnold, Dom DeLuise and Gillian Spencer. A box-office disappointment, it was directed by George Seaton, whose next film, Airport, would become the second highest-grossing film of 1970...The film was the first in a three-picture deal between Seaton and Universal. The script was written by Seaton and Robert Pirosh who had last worked together on A Day at the Races (1937). Filming was meant to start in 1966 but was pushed back until the following year. 'For those of us who've been in analysis, it'll be a lot of fun,' said George Peppard, who signed to play the male lead. His so-star was Mary Tyler Moore, then under long term contract to Universal. 'This picture is now comedy, influenced by the new wave,' said Seaton. 'There's not so much emphasis on the story and everything tying in anymore. Sometimes there's a scene almost extraneous but if it is entertaining or extraneous audiences accept this. Today's comedy writing mirrors the times. It's much harder to make people laugh today because of the world conditions. The young certainly don't have much to laugh about. So humor in film has to be so wild, so outlandish, that you can't help but laugh. The sophisticated humor of 20 years ago, the Noel Coward type of thing is not today. Not now.' The film was shot entirely on location in New York. The co operation of Mayor John Lindsay meant it was the first film to be shot in New York City Hall..."
3934 Works Progress Administration (WPA): Two (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of an unidentified string quartet performing as employees of the Works Progress Administration (WPA - 1937) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The Works Progress Administration (renamed in 1939 as the Work Projects Administration; WPA) was the largest and most ambitious American New Deal agency, employing millions of unemployed people (mostly unskilled men) to carry out public works projects, including the construction of public buildings and roads. In a much smaller but more famous project, Federal Project Number One, the WPA employed musicians, artists, writers, actors and directors in large arts, drama, media, and literacy projects...Directed by Nikolai Sokoloff, former principal conductor of the Cleveland Orchestra, the Federal Music Project employed over 16,000 musicians at its peak. Its purpose was to establish different ensembles such as chamber groups, orchestras, choral units, opera units, concert bands, military bands, dance bands, and theater orchestras that gave an estimated 131,000 performances and programs to 92 million people each week. The Federal Music Project performed plays and dances, as well as radio dramas. In addition, the Federal Music Project gave music classes to an estimated 132,000 children and adults every week, recorded folk music, served as copyists, arrangers, and librarians to expand the availability of music, and experimented in music therapy. Sokoloff stated, 'Music can serve no useful purpose unless it is heard, but these totals on the listeners' side are more eloquent than statistics as they show that in this country there is a great hunger and eagerness for music.' "
3935 World of Sholem Aleichem, The (Stage production): Thirty-one (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of rehearsals for the 1956 Broadway production of THE WORLD OF SHOLEM ALEICHEM starring Jack Gilford, Sally-Jane Heit, Mitchell Jason, Morris Carnovsky and Renee Lippin (Written by Arnold Perl, conceived by Howard Da Silva, directed by Milton Moss and produced at the Rialto Theatre in NYC) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 22, Folder 11." According to Wikipedia: "Solomon Naumovich Rabinovich, better known under his pen name Sholem Aleichem during the Soviet era was a leading Yiddish author and playwright. The musical Fiddler on the Roof, based on his stories about Tevye the Dairyman, was the first commercially successful English-language stage production about Jewish life in Eastern Europe. The Hebrew phrase Shalom Aleichem literally means 'Peace be upon you' and is a greeting in traditional Hebrew and Yiddish..."
3936 Yokel Boy (Stage production): Eleven (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of rehearsals and opening night of the 1939 Broadway musical production of YOKEL BOY starring Phil Silvers, Buddy Ebsen, Judy Canova, Dixie Dunbar, et cetera (directed by Lew Brown and produced at the Majestic Theatre in NYC) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 22, Folder 12." According to Wikipedia: "Phil Silvers... made his Broadway début in the short-lived show Yokel Boy in 1939. Critics raved about Silvers, who was hailed as the bright spot in the mediocre play..."



PHOTO NEGATIVES: SECOND WORLD WAR

Photo Negatives by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by subject.



Box Folder
401 African-American Soldiers: Six 2.25 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (2 images on each strip) of the "8th Infantry Division Negroes" (circa 1943-44) by Martin Harris (For STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "During World War II, most male African American soldiers still served only as truck drivers and as stevedores (except for some separate tank battalions and Army Air Forces escort fighters). African American women in uniform answered the call of duty by tending the wounded as nurses, riveters, mail clerks, file clerks, typists, stenographers, supply clerks, or motor pool drivers. In the midst of the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944, General Eisenhower was severely short of replacement troops for existing all-white companies. Consequently, he made the decision to allow 2000 black servicemen volunteers to serve in segregated platoons under the command of white lieutenants to replenish these companies. These platoons would serve with distinction and, according to an Army survey in the summer of 1945, 84% were ranked 'very well' and 16% were ranked 'fairly well.' No black platoon received a ranking of 'poor"' by those white officers or white soldiers that fought with them. Unfortunately, these platoons were often subject to racist treatment by white military units in occupied Germany and were quickly sent back to their old segregated units after the end of hostilities in Germany. Despite their protests, these brave African American soldiers ended the war in their old non-combat service units. Though largely forgotten after the war, the temporary experiment with black combat troops proved a success - a small, but important step toward permanent integration during the Korean War. A total of 708 African Americans were killed in combat during World War II..."
402 Badoglio, Pietro (Prime Minister of Italy): Three (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the 28th Prime Minister of Italy Pietro Badoglio (circa 1944-45) by Martin Harris (for STARS ANS STRIPES0. According to Wikipedia: "Marshal Pietro Badoglio, 1st Duke of Addis Abeba, 1st Marquess of Sabotino (1871 - 1956), was an Italian general during both World Wars and a Prime Minister of Italy, as well as the first viceroy of Italian East Africa..."
403 Dolittle, James (U.S. Army Air Corps General): One 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative of Lt. General/Commander of the 8th Air Force (with Colonel Walter "Cappy" Wells - 1942) by Martin Harris (for Stars and Stripes). According to Wikipedia: "James Harold "Jimmy" Doolittle (December 14, 1896 - September 27, 1993) was an American aviation pioneer. A Reserve officer in the United States Army Air Corps, Doolittle was recalled to active duty during World War II and awarded the Medal of Honor for his valor and leadership as commander of the Doolittle Raid, a bold long-range retaliatory air raid on the Japanese main islands weeks after the Attack on Pearl Harbor. He was eventually promoted to lieutenant general and commanded the Twelfth Air Force over North Africa, the Fifteenth Air Force over the Mediterranean, and the Eighth Air Force over Europe..." According to the Find A Grave Web site: "Walter Herbert Wells was born on Staten Island, the son of Albert W. Wells and Eleanor Crocheron Wells, who was a member of a well-known Staten Island family. In 1914 he enlisted as a Second Lieutenant in the Forty-seventh Infantry Regiment of the National Guard. During World War I, he served in France with the 104th and 106th Machine Gun Battalions of the Twenty-seventh Division. In 1919 he became a First Lieutenant in the Regular Army. In the 1920s he was assigned to the Panama Canal Zone, in recruiting posts in the New York area and in public relations at Governors Island. From 1928 to 1933, he was the public relations officer of the United States Military Academy. He was known for improving press relations, especially for football and was called the Boswell of West Point football. After West Point he served at Fort Hamilton in Brooklyn and Fort Knox in Kentucky. Before World War II he became Chief of the Information Office at the War Department. During World War II he was Chief of Staff in the South Atlantic Theatre and later became an intelligence officer in China. His awards included the Legion of Merit and the Bronze Star. In 1946 he retired with the rank of full Colonel. From 1946 to 1948 he was Chief Inspector in China of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration..."
404 France (Miscellaneous): Seventeen 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives and eleven 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (2 images on each strip) of the Liberation of Paris, USO girls and various unidentified American Forces Network entertainers (in Paris 1944-45) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "The Liberation of Paris (also known as the Battle for Paris) was a military action that took place during World War II from August 19, 1944 until the German garrison surrendered the French capital on August 25,1944. Paris had been ruled by Nazi Germany since the signing of the Second Compiègne Armistice on 22 June 1940, after which the Wehrmacht occupied northern and western France..."
405 Germany (Miscellaneous): Twenty-eight (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of Duren, Germany (civilians, the city in ruins, et cetera), Allieds occupation and signage and GIs frisking German prisoners of war (1945) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "US policy in post-war Germany from April 1945 until July 1947 had been that no help should be given to the Germans in rebuilding their nation, save for the minimum required to mitigate starvation. The Allies' immediate post-war 'industrial disarmament' plan for Germany had been to destroy Germany's capability to wage war by complete or partial de-industrialization. The first industrial plan for Germany, signed in 1946, required the destruction of 1,500 manufacturing plants to lower German heavy industry output to roughly 50% of its 1938 level. Dismantling of West German industry ended in 1951. By 1950, equipment had been removed from 706 manufacturing plants, and steel production capacity had been reduced by 6.7 million tons. After lobbying by the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Generals Lucius D. Clay and George Marshall, the Truman administration accepted that economic recovery in Europe could not go forward without the reconstruction of the German industrial base on which it had previously been dependent. In July 1947, President Truman rescinded on 'national security grounds' the directive that had ordered the US occupation forces to 'take no steps looking toward the economic rehabilitation of Germany.' A new directive recognized that '[a]n orderly, prosperous Europe requires the economic contributions of a stable and productive Germany.' From mid-1946 onwards Germany received US government aid through the GARIOA programme. From 1948 onwards West Germany also became a minor beneficiary of the Marshall Plan. Volunteer organizations had initially been forbidden to send food, but in early 1946 the Council of Relief Agencies Licensed to Operate in Germany was founded. The prohibition against sending CARE Packages to individuals in Germany was rescinded on June 5, 1946..."
406 Goering, Hermann (Capture): Fifteen 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of the President of the Reichstag Hermann Goering (Captured prisoner of war - May 6, 1945) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES - "Conquered Hero" - May 15, 1945). See, also, Box 8, Folder 31." According to Wikipedia: "...In his last will and testament, Hitler expelled Göering from the party and formally rescinded the decree making him his successor. He then appointed Karl Dönitz, the Navy's commander-in-chief, as president of the Reich and commander-in-chief of the armed forces. Hitler and his wife, Eva Braun, committed suicide on April 30, 1945, a few hours after a hastily arranged wedding. Göering was freed on May 5 by a passing Luftwaffe unit, and he made his way to the American lines in hopes of surrendering to them rather than to the Russians. He was taken into custody near Radstadt on May 6 by elements of the 36th Infantry Division of the United States Army. This move likely saved Göering's life; Bormann had ordered him executed if Berlin had fallen...Göering was the second-highest-ranking Nazi official tried at Nuremberg, behind Reich President (former Admiral) Karl Dönitz. The prosecution levelled an indictment of four charges, including a charge of conspiracy; waging a war of aggression; war crimes, including the plundering and removal to Germany of works of art and other property; and crimes against humanity, including the disappearance of political and other opponents under the Nacht und Nebel (Night and Fog) decree; the torture and ill-treatment of prisoners of war; and the murder and enslavement of civilians, including what was at the time estimated to be 5,700,000 Jews...Göering was found guilty on all four counts and was sentenced to death by hanging...Göering made an appeal asking to be shot as a soldier instead of hanged as a common criminal, but the court refused. Defying the sentence imposed by his captors, he committed suicide with a potassium cyanide capsule the night before he was to be hanged..."
407 Halifax, Lord (British Ambassador to the U.S.): Eighteen 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of British Ambassador to the United States, Lord Halifax (addressing a Russian War Relief rally at Madison Square Garden in NYC - October 27, 1941) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 25, Folder 4" and "Box 33, Folder 11." According to Wikipedia: "Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax (1881 - 1959), styled Lord Irwin from 1925 until 1934 and Viscount Halifax from 1934 until 1944, was one of the most senior British Conservative politicians of the 1930s. He held several senior ministerial posts during this time, most notably those of Viceroy of India from 1925 to 1931 and of Foreign Secretary between 1938 and 1940. He is regarded as one of the architects of the policy of appeasement prior to the Second World War, although after Hitler's occupation of the rump of Czechoslovakia in March 1939 he was also one of those who pushed for a new policy of attempting to deter further German aggression by promising to go to war to defend Poland. On Neville Chamberlain's resignation early in May 1940, Halifax effectively declined the position of Prime Minister despite widespread support across the political spectrum, as he felt that Churchill would be a more suitable war leader (his membership of the House of Lords was given as the official reason). A few weeks later, with the Allies facing apparently catastrophic defeat and British forces falling back on Dunkirk, Halifax favored approaching Italy to see if acceptable peace terms could be negotiated, but was overruled by Churchill after a series of stormy meetings of the War Cabinet. From 1941 to 1946, he served as British Ambassador in Washington..."
408 Italy (Miscellaneous): Seventeen 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (2 images on each strip) of British and U.S. troops in Italy, the ruins of the Gallerian Umberto in Naples, a refugee camp in Aversa, an Allied memorial plaque on a Salerno chapel, and post battle scenes of Cassino, et cetera (19440 by Martin Harris (for STARS ANS STRIPES). See, also, "Box 5, Folder 31" and "Box 25, Folder 6." No additional information available.
409 London (Miscellaneous): Twenty-two (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of wartime London street scenes and unidentified British noblemen with unidentified members of the STARS AND STRIPES London staff (circa 1943-45) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). No additional information available. No additional information available.
4010 Naples (Miscellaneous): Twenty (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the ruins of Galleria Umberto in Naples, Italy (1944-45 ) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). See, also, "Box 26, Folder 1." According to Wikipedia: "Naples was the most-bombed Italian city during World War II. Though Neapolitans did not rebel under Italian Fascism, Naples was the first Italian city to rise up against German military occupation; the city was completely freed by 1 October 1943, when British and American forces entered the city. Departing Germans burned the library of the university, as well as the Italian Royal Society. They also destroyed the city archives. Time bombs planted throughout the city continued to explode into November. The symbol of the rebirth of Naples was the rebuilding of the church of Santa Chiara, which had been destroyed in a United States Army Air Corps bombing raid...Galleria Umberto I is a public shopping gallery in Naples, southern Italy. It is located directly across from the San Carlo opera house. It was built between 1887-1891, and was the cornerstone in the decades-long rebuilding of Naples — called the risanamento (lit. 'making healthy again') — that lasted until World War I. It was designed by Emanuele Rocco, who employed modern architectural elements reminiscent of the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan. The Galleria was named for Umberto I, King of Italy at the time of construction. It was meant to combine businesses, shops, cafes and social life — public space — with private space in the apartments on the third floor..."
4011 Overseas Press Club (Reunion Dinner): Eight 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of the Overseas Press Club post-war reunion dinner (February 28, 1946) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to Wikipedia: "The Overseas Press Club of America (OPC) was founded in 1939 in New York City by a group of foreign correspondents. The wire service reporter Carol Weld was a founding member, as was war correspondent Peggy Hull. The club seeks to maintain an international association of journalists working in the United States and abroad, to encourage the highest standards of professional integrity and skill in the reporting of news, to help educate a new generation of journalists, to contribute to the freedom and independence of journalists and the press throughout the world, and to work toward better communication and understanding among people. The organization has approximately 500 members who are media industry leaders..."
4012 Peace (Themed photo assignment): Three 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of unidentified civilians, soldiers and sailors posed holding a copy of STARS AND STRIPES announcing "PEACE" (1945) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). See, also, "Box 26, Folder 5." According to Wikipedia: "Victory in Europe Day, generally known as V-E Day, VE Day or simply V Day was the public holiday celebrated on 8 May 1945 to mark the formal acceptance by the Allies of World War II of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces. It thus marked the end of World War II in Europe. The term VE Day existed as early as September 1944, in anticipation of victory. On 30 April 1945, Adolf Hitler, the Nazi leader, committed suicide during the Battle of Berlin. Germany's surrender, therefore, was authorized by his successor, Reichspräsident Karl Dönitz. The administration headed by Dönitz was known as the Flensburg Government. The act of military surrender was signed on 7 May in Reims, France and on 8 May in Berlin, Germany. The former Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc countries have historically celebrated the end of World War II on 9 May. However, the Baltic countries now commemorate VE day on 8 May. In Ukraine from 2015, 8 May was designated as a day of Remembrance and Reconciliation, but it is not a public holiday..."
4013 Rome (Miscellaneous): Forty-nine (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the fall of Rome, the Allied occupation, the Colosseum, "Feet of Rome" (soldiers and civilians) and "Post hostilities" (for STARS AND STRIPES - 1944) by Martin Harris. See, also, "Box 26, Folder 8." According to Wikipedia: "..."It took four major offensives between January and May 1944 before the line was eventually broken by a combined assault of the Fifth and Eighth Armies (including British, American, French, Polish and Canadian Corps) concentrated along a twenty-mile front between Monte Cassino and the western seaboard. In a concurrent action, American General Mark Clark was ordered to break out of the stagnant position at Anzio and cash-in on the opportunity to cut off and destroy a large part of the German 10th Army retreating from the Gustav Line between them and the Canadians. But this opportunity was lost on the brink of success, when General Clark disobeyed his orders and sent his U.S. Forces to enter the vacant Rome instead. Rome had been declared an open city by the German Army so no resistance was encountered. The American forces took possession of Rome on 4 June 1944. The German Tenth Army were allowed to get away and, in the next few weeks, were responsible for doubling the Allied casualties in the next few months. General Clark was hailed as a hero in the United States. The Canadians were sent through the city without stopping at 3:00AM the next morning..."
4014 Second World War (miscellaneous): Twelve 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives and sixteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of unidentified military personnel and activities (for STARS AND STRIPES) by Marin Harris (circa 1943-45). See, also, "Box 1, Folder 11" and "Box 26, Folder 11." No additional information available.
4015 Stars and Stripes (Reunion dinner - 1946): Ten 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of the 1946 STARS AND STRIPES reunion dinner (1946) by Martin Harris. See, also, "Box 27, Folder 4." According to Wikipedia: "Stars and Stripes is a U.S. newspaper that reports on matters affecting the members of the United States Armed Forces. It operates from inside the Department of Defense, but is editorially separate from it, and its First Amendment protection is safeguarded by the United States Congress, to whom an independent ombudsman, who serves the readers' interests, regularly reports. As well as a website, Stars and Stripes publishes four daily print editions for the military service members serving overseas; these European, Middle Eastern, Japanese, and South Korean editions are also available as free downloads in electronic format, and there are also seven digital editions. The newspaper has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. During World War II, the newspaper was printed in dozens of editions in several operating theaters. Again, both newspapermen in uniform and young soldiers, some of whom would later become important journalists, filled the staffs and showed zeal and talent in publishing and delivering the paper on time. Some of the editions were assembled and printed very close to the front in order to get the latest information to the most troops. Also, during the war, the newspaper published the 53-book series G.I. Stories. After Bill Mauldin did his popular 'Up Front' cartoons for the WWII Stars and Stripes, he returned home to a successful career as an editorial cartoonist and two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize..."
4016 Stars and Stripes (Personnel): Eight (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of various STARS AND STRIPES personnel (including Bill Mauldin of "Up Front" cartoon fame) by Martin Harris (photos taken during the Second World War years). See, also, "Box 27, Folder 4." According to Wikipedia: "Stars and Stripes is a U.S. newspaper that reports on matters affecting the members of the United States Armed Forces. It operates from inside the Department of Defense, but is editorially separate from it, and its First Amendment protection is safeguarded by the United States Congress, to whom an independent ombudsman, who serves the readers' interests, regularly reports. As well as a website, Stars and Stripes publishes four daily print editions for the military service members serving overseas; these European, Middle Eastern, Japanese, and South Korean editions are also available as free downloads in electronic format, and there are also seven digital editions. The newspaper has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. During World War II, the newspaper was printed in dozens of editions in several operating theaters. Again, both newspapermen in uniform and young soldiers, some of whom would later become important journalists, filled the staffs and showed zeal and talent in publishing and delivering the paper on time. Some of the editions were assembled and printed very close to the front in order to get the latest information to the most troops. Also, during the war, the newspaper published the 53-book series G.I. Stories. After Bill Mauldin did his popular 'Up Front' cartoons for the WWII Stars and Stripes, he returned home to a successful career as an editorial cartoonist and two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize..."
4017 Taylor, Myron (Personal Envoy to Pope Pius VII): Eight 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of Myron Taylor (Personal Envoy to Pope Pius VII) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES in Rome - August 1944). See, also, "Box 27, Folder 4." According to Wikipedia: "Myron Charles Taylor (January 18, 1874 - May 5, 1959) was an American industrialist, and later a diplomatic figure involved in many of the most important geopolitical events during and after World War II. In addition he was a philanthropist, giving to his alma mater, Cornell University, and a number of other causes..."
4018 United Nations (Hunter College Session Meeting): Four 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of unidentified diplomats at the Hunter College (NYC) United Nations session meeting (April 5, 1946) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). According to the Hinges of History web site: "Hunter College was established in 1870 as part of New York City's public university system. It was located on the Upper East Side of New York City. The Bronx campus (now known as Lehman College) first opened in the 1930s; by this time Hunter had locations in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island as well. The Bronx campus remained under Navy jurisdiction until 1945. Then it briefly housed the United Nations, before being returned to the Hunter College system in 1946..."
4019 U.S. Soldiers (Miscellaneous): Four 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of soldiers embarking on an unidentified ship at an unidentified location (for STARS AND STRIPES - circa 1943-45) by Martin Harris. No additional information available.
4020 Yugoslavian Soldiers (Miscellaneous): Six 1.5 x 9 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (6 images on each strip) of miscellaneous images of Yugoslavian soldiers and locations (for STARS AND STRIPES) by Martin Harris (circa 1944). See, also, "Box 9, Folder 25" and "Box 27, Folder 8." According to Wikipedia: "Military operations in World War II on the territory of Yugoslavia started on April 6, 1941, when the kingdom was swiftly conquered by Axis forces and partitioned between Germany, Italy, Hungary, Bulgaria and client regimes. Subsequently, a guerrilla liberation war was fought against the Axis occupying forces and their locally established puppet regimes, including the Independent State of Croatia and the Government of National Salvation in Serbia, by the Communist-led republican Yugoslav Partisans. Simultaneously, a multi-side civil war was waged between the Partisans, the Serbian royalist Chetniks, Croatian nationalist Ustaše and Home Guard, as well as Slovene Home Guard troops..."



PHOTO NEGATIVES: TRANSPORTATION

Photo Negatives by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by subject.



Box Folder
411 Airplane Preparation (Pilot checklist): Seven 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of an unidentified pilot preparing his plane for takeoff from an unidentified New York airport (for a Coney Island aerial photo shoot with Martin Harris - July 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
412 Autogyro (Aircraft) : Four (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of an autogyro flight and airport passengers and onlookers (at a suburban NYC airport - circa 1930s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 28, Folder !." According to Wikipedia: "An autogyro (from Greek - self-turning), also known as gyroplane, gyrocopter, or rotaplane, is a type of rotorcraft that uses an unpowered rotor in autorotation to develop lift, and an engine-powered propeller, similar to that of a fixed-wing aircraft, to provide thrust. While similar to a helicopter rotor in appearance, the autogyro's rotor must have air flowing through the rotor disc to generate rotation. Invented by the Spanish engineer Juan de la Cierva to create an aircraft that could fly safely at slow speeds, the autogyro was first flown on January 9, 1923, at Cuatro Vientos Airfield in Madrid. De la Cierva's aircraft resembled the fixed-wing aircraft of the day, with a front-mounted engine and propeller in a tractor configuration to pull the aircraft through the air. Under license from Cierva in the 1920s and 1930s, the Pitcairn and Kellett companies made further innovations. Late-model autogyros patterned after Etienne Dormoy's Buhl A-1 Autogyro and Igor Bensen's designs feature a rear-mounted engine and propeller in a pusher configuration. The term Autogiro was a trademark of the Cierva Autogiro Company, and the term Gyrocopter was used by E. Burke Wilford who developed the Reiseler Kreiser feathering rotor equipped gyroplane in the first half of the twentieth century. The latter term was later adopted as a trademark by Bensen Aircraft..."
413 Bus Trip (Transcontinental): Fifty-six (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of a transcontinental bus trip (NYC to LA - March 1938) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
414 Chrysler Airflow (Automobile): Two 3 x 4.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of the Chrysler Airflow automobile (circa 1937) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "The Chrysler Airflow is a full-size car produced by Chrysler from 1934 to 1937. The Airflow was one of the first full-size American production car to use streamlining as a basis for building a sleeker automobile, one less susceptible to air resistance. Chrysler made a significant effort at a fundamental change in automotive design with the Chrysler Airflow, but it was ultimately a commercial failure. Chrysler also marketed a companion model under the DeSoto brand, the DeSoto Airflow..."
415 Flying Newsboys/Flying Clubs: Five 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (2 images on each strip) of the "Flying Newsboys" and other flying clubs in the NYC area (circa 1930s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, Box 28, Folder 3." No additional information available.
416 Kim (Russian ship): Ten 2.5 x 3.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of unidentified crew members and dignitaries aboard the Russian ship Kim (circa 1930s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
417 Pan American Story - Part 1: Thirty-five (black and white) phot negative strips (various sizes) of the Pan American pilots and crew (1968) by Martin Harris and Esther Bubbley (for a children's book THE PAN AMERICAN STORY published in 1968). See, also, "Box 28, Folders 6 through 9." According to Wikipedia: "Pan American World Airways, known from its founding until 1950 as Pan American Airways and commonly known as Pan Am, was the principal and largest international air carrier in the United States from 1927 until its collapse on December 4, 1991. Founded in 1927 as a scheduled air mail and passenger service operating between Key West, Florida, and Havana, Cuba, the airline became a major company credited with many innovations that shaped the international airline industry, including the widespread use of jet aircraft, jumbo jets, and computerized reservation systems. It was also a founding member of the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the global airline industry association. Identified by its blue globe logo ('The Blue Meatball'), the use of the word 'Clipper' in aircraft names and call signs, and the white pilot uniform caps, the airline was a cultural icon of the 20th century. In an era dominated by flag carriers that were wholly or majority government-owned, it was also the unofficial overseas flag carrier of the United States. During most of the jet era, Pan Am's flagship terminal was the Worldport located at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City..."
418 Pan American Story - Part 2: Forty-two (black and white) photo negative strips of Pan American stewardess training (1968) by Martin Harris and Esther Bubbley (for a children's book THE PAN AMERICAN STORY published in 1968). "Box 28, Folders 6 through 9." According to Wikipedia: "Pan American World Airways, known from its founding until 1950 as Pan American Airways and commonly known as Pan Am, was the principal and largest international air carrier in the United States from 1927 until its collapse on December 4, 1991. Founded in 1927 as a scheduled air mail and passenger service operating between Key West, Florida, and Havana, Cuba, the airline became a major company credited with many innovations that shaped the international airline industry, including the widespread use of jet aircraft, jumbo jets, and computerized reservation systems. It was also a founding member of the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the global airline industry association. Identified by its blue globe logo ('The Blue Meatball'), the use of the word 'Clipper' in aircraft names and call signs, and the white pilot uniform caps, the airline was a cultural icon of the 20th century. In an era dominated by flag carriers that were wholly or majority government-owned, it was also the unofficial overseas flag carrier of the United States. During most of the jet era, Pan Am's flagship terminal was the Worldport located at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City..."
419 Piper, William T.: One 2.45 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photo negative of airplane manufacturer William T. Piper ("Maker of the largest selling ship - the cub" - 1940 ) by Martin Harris (for a FORBE'S MAGAZINE photo assignment - May 1940). See, also, Box 7, Folder 1" and "Box 28, Folder 10." Folder According to Wikipedia: "William Thomas Piper Sr. (January 8, 1881, Knapps Creek, New York U.S. - January 15, 1970, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania) was an American airplane manufacturer, aviation businessman, oil industry businessman, and engineer. He was the founding president of the Piper Aircraft Corporation and led the company from 1929 until his death in 1970. He graduated from Harvard University in 1903 and later became known as 'the Henry Ford of Aviation.' The William T. Piper Memorial Airport in Lock Haven is named in his honor. Piper served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, in the latter as a captain in the Corps of Engineers. In 1980, he was posthumously inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame."
4110 Queen Mary (British ocean liner): Six 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (2 images on each strip) of passengers arriving in NYC aboard the RMS Queen Mary (1948) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication phot assignment). According to Wikipedia: "RMS Queen Mary is a retired ocean liner that sailed primarily on the North Atlantic Ocean from 1936 to 1967 for the Cunard Line (known as Cunard-White Star Line when the vessel entered service). Built by John Brown and Company in Clydebank, Scotland, Queen Mary along with her sister ship, RMS Queen Elizabeth, were built as part of Cunard's planned two-ship weekly express service between Southampton, Cherbourg, and New York City. The two ships were a British response to the superliners built by German and French companies in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Queen Mary was the flagship of the Cunard Line from May 1936 until October 1946 when she was replaced in that role by Queen Elizabeth..."
4111 Three-Wheeled Automobile : Three 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of a three-wheeled automobile (c. late 1930s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.



PHOTO NEGATIVES: TRAVEL

Photo Negatives by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by subject.



Box Folder
421 Brussels World's Fair (Belgium) : One hundred and thirty-three (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of various attractions at the Brussels (Belgium) World's Fair (Edward Stone, Fair architect - 1958) by Martin Harris (for a BUSINESS WEEK photo assignment). See, also, "Box 20, Folder 4" and "Box 29, Folders 1- 4." According to Wikipedia: "Expo 58, also known as the Brussels World's Fair, was held from April 17 to October 19, 1958. It was the first major World's Fair after World War II...The site is best known for the Atomium, a giant model of a unit cell of an iron crystal (each sphere representing an atom). More than 41 million visitors visited the site, which was opened with a call for world peace and social and economic progress, issued by King Baudouin I. Notable exhibitions include the Philips Pavilion, where 'Poème électronique,' commissioned specifically for the location, was played back from 425 loudspeakers, placed at specific points as designed by Iannis Xenakis, and Le Corbusier. Another exhibition at the Belgian pavilion was the Congolese village that some have branded a human zoo..."
422 England (London) - Part 1: Fourteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of political speech making at "Speakers' Corner" in London's Hyde Park (1953) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 29, Folder 5" and "Box 29, Folder 7." According to Wikipedia: "Hyde Park was created in 1536 by Henry Vlll for hunting. He acquired the manor of Hyde from the canons of Westminster Abbey, who had held it since before the Norman Conquest; it was enclosed as a deer park and remained a private hunting ground until James I permitted limited access to gentlefolk, appointing a ranger to take charge. Charles I created the Ring (north of the present Serpentine boathouses), and in 1637 he opened the park to the general public...Sites of interest in the park include Speakers' Corner (located in the northeast corner near Marble Arch), close to the former site of the Tyburn gallows, and Rotten Row, which is the northern boundary of the site of the Crystal Palace. South of the Serpentine is the Diana, Princess of Wales memorial, an oval stone ring fountain opened on 6 July 2004. To the east of the Serpentine, just beyond the dam, is London's Holocaust Memorial. The July 7 Memorial in the park commemorates the victims of 7 July 2005 London bombings...."
423 England (London) - Part 2: Four 1.5 x 7.5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (5 images on each strip) of activities in the London Underground (mass - transit subway system - 1953) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo shoot). See, also, "Box 29, Folder 6." According to Wikipedia: "The London Underground (also known simply as the Underground, or by its nickname the Tube) is a public rapid transit system serving Greater London and some adjacent parts of the counties of Buckinghamshire, Essex and Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom. The world's first underground railway, the Metropolitan Railway, which opened in 1863, is now part of the Circle, Hammersmith and City and Metropolitan lines; the first line to operate underground electric traction trains, the City and South London Railway in 1890, is now part of the Northern line. The network has expanded to 11 lines, and in 2015-16 carried 1.34 billion passengers, making it the world's 11th busiest metro system..."
424 France - Part 1: Three (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of Paris street scenes, Bastille Day and Allies in Paris (circa 1944-45) by Martin Harris (for STARS AND STRIPES). See, also, "Box 26, Folder 3" and "Box 30, Folders 1" According to Wikipedia: "...The population of Paris did not return to its 1936 level until 1946, and had grown to 2,850,000 by 1954, including 135,000 immigrants, mostly from Algeria, Morocco, Italy and Spain. The exodus of middle-class Parisians to the suburbs continued. The population of the city declined during the 1960s and 1970s (2,753,000 in 1962, 2.3 million in 1972) before finally stabilizing in the 1980s (2,168.000 in 1982, 2,152,000 in 1992)..."
425 France - Part 2: Twenty-five (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of street scenes in Paris (1955) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 30, Folders 2-4." According to Wikipedia: "...France emerged from World War II to face a series of new problems. After a short period of provisional government initially led by General Charles de Gaulle, a new constitution (October 13, 1946) established the Fourth Republic under a parliamentary form of government controlled by a series of coalitions. The mixed nature of the coalitions and a consequent lack of agreement on measures for dealing with colonial wars in Indochina and Algeria caused successive cabinet crises and changes of government. The war in Indochina ended with French defeat and withdrawal in 1954. Algeria was no mere colony. With over a million European residents in Algeria (the Pied-Noir), France refused to grant independence until a bloody colonial war (the Algerian War of Independence) had turned into a French political and civil crisis; Algeria was given its independence in 1962, unleashing a massive wave of immigration from the former colony back to France..."
426 France - Part 3: Six (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of street scenes in Paris (1959) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 30, Folders 2-4." According to Wikipedia: "...France emerged from World War II to face a series of new problems. After a short period of provisional government initially led by General Charles de Gaulle, a new constitution (October 13, 1946) established the Fourth Republic under a parliamentary form of government controlled by a series of coalitions. The mixed nature of the coalitions and a consequent lack of agreement on measures for dealing with colonial wars in Indochina and Algeria caused successive cabinet crises and changes of government. The war in Indochina ended with French defeat and withdrawal in 1954. Algeria was no mere colony. With over a million European residents in Algeria (the Pied-Noir), France refused to grant independence until a bloody colonial war (the Algerian War of Independence) had turned into a French political and civil crisis; Algeria was given its independence in 1962, unleashing a massive wave of immigration from the former colony back to France..."
427 Germany (Berlin): Twelve (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of street scenes and social gatherings in Berlin (March 1959) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). No additional information available.
428 Indonesia (High school activities): Forty-two (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of the daily activities at an unidentified high school in Indonesia (April 1960) by Martin Harris (for a SCOPE ASSOCIATES photo assignment). See, also, "Box 31, Folder 3." No additional information available.
429 Ireland (Tour): Eighty-one (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of, what is described as, the "O'Sullivan Irish Tour" - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified photo project). See, also, "Box 31, Folders 1 and 2." No additional information provided or available.
4210 Israel - Part 1: Thirty-eight (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of life in Israel (markets, beaches, military, buildings, et cetera - circa 1949/1950s) by Martin Harris (for a SCOPE ASSOCIATES photo assignment). See, also, "Box 31, Folders 4 and 5." No additional information available.
4211 Israel - Part 2: Twenty-two (black and white) photo negative strips of the King David Hotel, school children and archeologist Yigael Yaden (for a SCOPE ASSOCIATES photo assignment circa 1949/1950s). See, also, "Box 31, Folders 4 and 5." According to Wikipedia: "Yigael Yadin (1917 - 1984) was an Israeli archeologist, politician, and the second Chief of Staff of the Israel Defense Forces..."
4212 Israel - Part 3: Sixty-eight (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of life in Israel (markets, beaches, military, buildings, et cetera - circa 1949/1950s) by Martin Harris (for a SCOPE ASSOCIATES photo assignment). See, also, "Box 31, Folders 4 and 5." No additional information available.
4213 Israel - Part 4: Twenty-fourt (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of life in Israel (markets, beaches, military, buildings, et cetera - circa 1949/1950s) by Martin Harris (for a SCOPE ASSOCIATES photo assignment). See, also, "Box 31, Folders 4 and 5." No additional information available.
4214 Israel - Part 5: Nineteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of life in Israel (markets, beaches, military, buildings, et cetera - circa 1949/1950s) by Martin Harris (for a SCOPE ASSOCIATES photo assignment). See, also, "Box 31, Folders 4 and 5." No additional information available.
4215 New York City - Part 1: Eighteen 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negatives and five (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of New York City in the 1940s and 1950s (nightclubs, the United Nations, aerial views of Coney Island, rooftop scenes, Hudson River Esplanade, West Side docks, the ocean liner S.S. France, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for various publication photo assignments and projects). See, also, "Box 31, Folders 6 and 7." No additional information available.
4216 New York City - Part 2: Seven (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of New York City in the 1940s and 1950s ( Hudson River Esplanade, various street scenes, et cetera) by Martin Harris (for various publication photo assignments and projects). See, also, "Box 31, Folders 6 and 7." No additional information available.
4217 Puerto Rico (Miscellaneous): One Hundred and twenty-seven (black and white/color) photo negatives (various sizes) of life in Puerto Rico (U.S. Army bombers in flight over Puerto Rico, Pan Am Yankee Clipper, William D. Leahy - Governor of Puerto Rico, et cetera - 1940.) by Martin Harris (for unidentified publication photo assignments).
4218 St. Paul, Minnesota (Miscellaneous): Fifty-seven 3.5 x 5.5 (black and white) photo negatives of daily life in St. Paul, Minnesota (circa 1920s/early 1930s) by Martin Harris (probably his earliest photo essay for an unidentified publication). According to Wikipedia: "Saint Paul (abbreviated St. Paul) is the capital and second-most populous city of the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of 2015, the city's estimated population was 300,851.Saint Paul is the county seat of Ramsey County, the smallest and most densely populated county in Minnesota. The city lies mostly on the east bank of the Mississippi River in the area surrounding its point of confluence with the Minnesota River, and adjoins Minneapolis, the state's largest city. Known as the 'Twin Cities,' the two form the core of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, the 16th-largest metropolitan area in the United States, with about 3.52 million residents..."
4219 West Point Military Academy (New York): Six (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) and two 4 x 5 inch (color) photo negatives of daily activities at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York (1948) by Martin Harris (for a THIS WEEK MAGAZINE photo assignment - "Revolution at West Point" - April 4, 1948 with text by Bob Deindorfer). See, also, "Box 9, Folder 16" and "Box 31, Folder 10." According to Wikipedia: "The United States Military Academy (USMA), also known as West Point, Army, The Academy, or simply The Point, is a four-year coeducational federal service academy located in West Point, New York in Orange County. It sits on scenic high ground overlooking the Hudson River, 50 miles (80 km) north of New York City. The Academy traces its roots to 1801, when President Thomas Jefferson directed, shortly after his inauguration, that plans be set in motion to establish the United States Military Academy at West Point. The entire central campus is a national landmark and home to scores of historic sites, buildings, and monuments. The majority of the campus's Norman-style buildings are constructed from gray and black granite. The campus is a popular tourist destination complete with a large visitor center and the oldest museum in the United States Army..."



PHOTO NEGATIVES: WORLD LEADERS and POLITICIANS

Photo Negatives by Martin Harris. Filed alphabetically by name of subject.



Box Folder
431 Briscoe, Robert (Mayor of Dublin, Ireland): One 1.5 x 9 inch (black and white) photo negative strip (6 images) of Dublin, Ireland Mayor Robert Briscoe (in NYC - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Robert Briscoe...served in Dáil Éireann for 38 years and was elected 12 times in the Dublin South and from 1948, Dublin South-West constituencies - from the 6th Dáil to the 17th Dáil. He retired at the 1965 election being succeeded by his son, Ben who served for a further 37 years. In 1956, Briscoe became the first Jewish Lord Mayor of Dublin, although he was not the first Jewish Mayor in Ireland. That title belongs to William Annyas, who was elected Mayor of Youghal, County Cork in 1555. Briscoe was Dublin's first Jewish Lord Mayor, although Lewis Wormser Harris was elected Lord Mayor in 1876, but died before assuming office. Briscoe served a one year term and was re-elected in 1961. After learning of a Jewish Lord Mayor from Dublin, Yogi Berra allegedly said, 'Only in America!' His son Ben Briscoe was also a Fianna Fáil TD, and he too served as Lord Mayor of Dublin from 1988-1989. His memoir, 'For the Life of Me,' was published in 1958. The Emerald Isle Immigration Center in New York has devoted a special award in his name called the Robert Briscoe award. The group celebrates the close relationship between Jewish and Irish communities in New York and honors Jewish New Yorkers who have helped support immigration in the United States. The 2016 Award Winners were Queens Borough President Melinda Katz and Deborah King, director of SEIU 1199's training and employment funds. Previous winners have included former New York Mayor Ed Koch, former Gov. Eliot Spitzer and U.S. Senator Charles Schumer..."
432 Broz, Jovanka (First Lady of Yugoslavia): Four 1.5 x 9 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (6 images on each strip) of Jovanka Broz (wife of Yugoslav leader Josip Bros Tito at an August 1953 diplomatic reception with her husband and others) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment). See, also, "Box 32, Folder 2." According to Wikipedia: "Jovanka Budisavljevi? Broz (December 7, 1924 - October 20, 2013) was First Lady of Yugoslavia as the wife of Yugoslav leader Josip Broz Tito. She was a lieutenant colonel in the Yugoslav People's Army. She was married to Tito from 1952 until his death in 1980. Following her husband's death, all of her property was seized and she moved to a state-owned villa, where she reportedly lived under virtual house arrest..."
433 Eisenhower, Dwight D. (President of the U.S./Army General): Twenty-three (black and white) photo negatives (various sizes) of General Dwight David Eisenhower (Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces) at the 1944 Bastille Day celebration in Paris (with General Charles De Gaulle), in Paris, saying farewell to the press in 1945, at his first Inaugural Parade as President in 1953 and at the White House (with staff) in the mid 1950s. All photos by Martin Harris (for various unidentified publications). See, also, "Box 2, Folder." According to Wikipedia: "Dwight David 'Ike' Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 - March 28, 1969) was an American politician and general who served as the 34th President of the United States from 1953 until 1961. He was a five-star general in the United States Army during World War II and served as Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe. He was responsible for planning and supervising the invasion of North Africa in Operation Torch in 1942-43 and the successful invasion of France and Germany in 1944-45 from the Western Front. In 1951, he became the first Supreme Commander of NATO. Eisenhower was of Pennsylvania Dutch and a lesser amount of Irish ancestry, and was raised in a large family in Kansas by parents with a strong religious background. He graduated from West Point in 1915 and later married Mamie Doud and had two sons. After World War II, Eisenhower served as Army Chief of Staff under President Harry S. Truman and then accepted the post of President at Columbia University. Eisenhower entered the 1952 presidential race as a Republican to counter the non-interventionism of Senator Robert A. Taft, campaigning against 'communism, Korea and corruption.' He won in a landslide, defeating Democratic candidate Adlai Stevenson and temporarily upending the New Deal Coalition. Eisenhower was the first U.S. president to be constitutionally term-limited under the 22nd Amendment..."
434 Fish, Jr., Hamilton (Congressman - NY): Two 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photograph of Republican U.S. Congressman (NY) Hamilton Fish, Jr. (shaving) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 32, Folder 7." According to Wikipedia: "Hamilton Fish III (born Hamilton Stuyvesant Fish and also known as Hamilton Fish, Jr.; December 7, 1888 - January 18, 1991) was a soldier and Republican politician from New York State. Born into a family long active in the state, he served in the United States House of Representatives from 1920 to 1945 and during that time was a prominent opponent of United States intervention in foreign affairs and was a critic of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. When Fish celebrated his 102nd birthday in 1990, he was the oldest living American who had served in Congress..."
435 La Guardia, Fiorello H. (NYC Mayor): One 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photograph of New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia (at a political banquet- circa 1940) by Martin Harris (for a PM NEW YORK photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Fiorello Henry La Guardia (December 11, 1882 - September 20, 1947) was an American politician. He is best known for being the 99th Mayor of New York City for three terms from 1934 to 1945 as a Republican. Previously he had been elected to Congress in 1916 and 1918, and again from 1922 through 1930. Irascible, energetic, and charismatic, he craved publicity and is acclaimed as one of the greatest mayors in American history. Only five feet, two inches tall, he was called 'the Little Flower' (Fiorello is Italian for 'little flower')..."
436 Lange, Oskar (Economist/Diplomat): One 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative of Polish economist and diplomat Oskar R. Lange (reading a newspaper at an unidentified location - circa 1950s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Oskar Ryszard Lange (1904 - 1965) was a Polish economist and diplomat. He is best known for advocating the use of market pricing tools in socialist systems and providing a model of market socialism. During his stay in the United States, Lange was a sought-after academic teacher and researcher in mathematical economics. Later in communist Poland, he was a member of the Central Committee of the Polish United Workers' Party and a believer in centrally-managed economy..."
437 Leahy, William D. (Governor of Puerto Rico): Four 2.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative strips (2 images on each strip) and four 4 x 5 inch (color) photo negatives of the Governor of Puerto Rico William D. Leahy (with other unidentified associates in Puerto Rico - 1940) by Martin Harris (for a FORTUNE MAGAZINE photo assignment). See, also, "Box 32, Folder 3." According to Wikipedia: "Fleet Admiral William Daniel Leahy (May 6, 1875 - July 20, 1959) was an American naval officer who served as the senior-most United States military officer on active duty during World War II. He held multiple titles and was at the center of all the major military decisions the United States made in World War II...From September 1939 to November 1940, Leahy served as Governor of Puerto Rico. He oversaw the development of military bases and stations across the island while serving as governor. He took an open stance of not intervening directly in local politics, attempted to understand and respect local customs, and initiated various major public works projects in the island. While given the unflattering sobriquet Almirante Lija ("Admiral Sandpaper") by locals, based on his family name, he was regarded as one of the most lenient American governors of the several that served Puerto Rico in the first half of the 20th century...."
438 Meyner, Robert B. (NJ Governor): Six (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of New Jersey Governor Robert B. Meyner (on a local news interview show SEARCHLIGHT - November 15, 1959) by Martin Harris (for a SCOPE ASSOCIATES photo assignment). See, also, Box 32, Folder 17." According to Wikipedia: "Robert Baumle Meyner (July 3, 1908 - May 27, 1990) was an American Democratic Party politician, who served as the 44th Governor of New Jersey, from 1954 to 1962. Before being elected governor, Meyner represented Warren County in the New Jersey Senate from 1948 to 1951...The ailing New Jersey Democratic Party chose him as its gubernatorial candidate in 1953, and he achieved a surprise victory, boosted by a minor scandal surrounding his opponent, Paul L. Troast. Meyner's first term was marked by strong support for state education and a general restructuring of the government. While in his first term as governor, Meyner uncovered Employment Security Division Director (and former governor) Harold G. Hoffman's massive corruption scam, and suspended Hoffman on March 18, 1954. Meyner defeated Malcolm Forbes handily in 1957 in his bid for re-election. In 1958, Time Magazine recognized Meyner as a potential candidate for the 1960 Democratic presidential nomination, and featured him on the cover of their November 24 edition of that year (along with five other noteworthy Democrats, including John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson). At the 1960 Democratic National Convention Meyner received 43 votes for president, finishing fifth behind John F. Kennedy (806 votes), Lyndon Johnson (409 votes), Stuart Symington (86 votes) and Adlai Stevenson (79.5 votes) and just ahead of Hubert Humphrey who received 41 votes. At the time, New Jersey's constitution prohibited governors from serving more than two consecutive terms, but did not place a limit on the total number of terms. After his Democratic successor, Richard J. Hughes had served two terms and was unable to run for a third, the Democratic Party turned back to Meyner as their gubernatorial candidate in 1969. But after 16 years of Democratic administrations, Republican William T. Cahill won election over Meyner..."
439 Michael I (King of Romania): Seven 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of King Michael I of Romania (arriving in NYC with the Queen Mother of Romania - March 11, 1948) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 32, Folder 18." According to Wikipedia: "Michael I (born 25 October 1921) reigned as King of Romania from July 20, 1927 to June 8, 1930 and again from September 6, 1940 to December 30, 1947. In 1925, Michael's father Prince Carol had renounced his rights to the throne and moved to Paris in exile. In 1927, Michael ascended the throne following the death of his grandfather, Ferdinand I. In 1930, his father returned to Romania from exile and replaced his son as king, the regency ruling on behalf of his son dissolved. Carol II was deposed in 1940, and Michael once again became king. In 1944, Michael participated in a coup against the military dictator Ion Antonescu and subsequently declared an alliance with the Allies. He was forced to abdicate in 1947 by the government controlled by the Communist Party of Romania, forced into exile, and was stripped of his citizenship a year later. He married Princess Anne of Bourbon-Parma in 1948 with whom he had five daughters: Margareta, Elena, Irina, Sophie, and Maria. His citizenship was restored in 1997 and he currently resides in Romania. He is the last surviving monarch or other head of state from the Interwar period, and the oldest of only three surviving heads of state from the Second World War, the others being the former King Simeon II of Bulgaria and Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet..."
4310 Reynolds, Robert Rice (U.S. Senator - North Carolina): Sixteen 4 x 5 inch (black and white) photographs of Democratic U.S. Senator (North Carolina) Robert Rice Reynolds ( shaving, wearing a fedora with a feather in the hatband, et cetera - circa 1938-39) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Robert Rice Reynolds (June 18, 1884 - February 13, 1963) was a Democratic U.S. senator from North Carolina between 1932 and 1945. Almost from the outset of his Senate career, 'Our Bob,' as he was known among supporters back home, acquired distinction as a passionate isolationist and increasingly as an apologist for Nazi aggression in Europe. Even after America's entry into World War II, according to a contemporary study of subversive elements in America, he 'publicly endorsed the propaganda efforts of Gerald L. K. Smith,' whose scurrilous publication The Cross and the Flag 'violently assailed the United States war effort and America's allies.' Reynolds and Smith, one of the nation's most influential fascists, likewise collaborated on The Defender, an anti-Semitic newspaper partly owned by Reynolds. Reynolds on occasion turned over his Senate office facilities to subversive propagandists and allowed them to use his franking privilege to mail their literature postage-free..."
4311 Rockefeller, Nelson (Governor of New York): Four (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller (campaigning - c. mid 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 - January 26, 1979) was an American businessman, philanthropist, public servant, and politician. He served as the 41st Vice President of the United States (1974-77) under President Gerald Ford, and as the 49th Governor of New York (1959-73). He also served in the administrations of Presidents Franklin Roosevelt regarding Latin America and Dwight Eisenhower regarding welfare programs. A member of the wealthy Rockefeller family, he was also a noted art collector, as well as administrator of Rockefeller Center..."
4312 Smith, Al (Governor of New York): One 3.5 x 5 inch (black and white) photo negative of former New York Governor Al Smith at a Catholic Mass for Pope Pius XI (deceased) at St. Vincent Ferrer Church on Lexington Avenue in NYC (February 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Alfred Emanuel 'Al' Smith (December 30, 1873 - October 4, 1944) was an American statesman who was elected Governor of New York four times and was the Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. He was the foremost urban leader of the efficiency-oriented Progressive Movement and was noted for achieving a wide range of reforms as governor in the 1920s. He was also linked to the notorious Tammany Hall machine that controlled New York City's politics; was a strong opponent of Prohibition, which he did not think could be enforced, and was the first Catholic nominee for President. His candidacy mobilized Catholic votes—especially of women, who had only recently received federal suffrage. It also brought out the anti-Catholic vote, which was strongest among white conservative Democrats in the South. As a committed 'wet' (anti-Prohibition) candidate, Smith attracted not only drinkers but also voters angered by the corruption and lawlessness that developed alongside prohibition. Many Protestants feared his candidacy, including German Lutherans and Southern Baptists, believing that the Catholic Church and the Pope would dictate his policies. Most importantly, this was a time of national prosperity under a Republican Presidency. Smith lost in a landslide to Republican Herbert Hoover, who gained electoral support from five southern states. Four years later Smith sought the 1932 nomination but was defeated by Franklin D. Roosevelt, his former ally and successor as New York Governor. Smith entered business in New York City and became an increasingly vocal opponent of Roosevelt's New Deal..."
4313 Stevenson, Adlai (Governor of Illinois/UN Ambassador): Fifteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of Illinois Governor and Democratic presidential nominee Adlai Stevenson (at a Democratic fundraising dinner with John F. Kennedy, Eleanor Roosevelt, emcee Bud Collyer, cartoonist Al Capp, Margaret Truman, W. Averell Harriman, et cetera - 1956) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, Box 33, Folder 4." According to Wikipedia: "Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (1900 - 1965) was an American politician and diplomat, noted for his intellectual demeanor, eloquent public speaking, and promotion of progressive causes in the Democratic Party. He served as the 31st Governor of Illinois, and received the Democratic Party's nomination for president in 1952 even though he had not campaigned in the primaries. John Frederick Martin says party leaders selected him because he was "more moderate on civil rights than Estes Kefauver, yet nonetheless acceptable to labor and urban machines—so a coalition of southern, urban, and labor leaders fell in behind his candidacy in Chicago...' "
4314 Tito, Josip Bros (President of Yugoslavia): Six 1.5 x 9 inch (black and white) photo negative strips of the President of Yugoslavia Josip Broz Tito (at a diplomatic reception in Bled Yugoslavia - August 1953) by Martin Harris (for a COLLIER'S MAGAZINE photo assignment). See, also, "Box 33, Folder 5." According to Wikipedia: "Josip Broz Tito (1892 - 1980) was a Yugoslav revolutionary and statesman, serving in various roles from 1943 until his death in 1980. During World War II he was the leader of the Partisans, often regarded as the most effective resistance movement in occupied Europe. While his presidency has been criticized as authoritarian, and concerns about the repression of political opponents have been raised, Tito was 'seen by most as a benevolent dictator' due to his economic and diplomatic policies. He was a popular public figure both in Yugoslavia and abroad. Viewed as a unifying symbol, his internal policies maintained the peaceful coexistence of the nations of the Yugoslav federation. He gained further international attention as the chief leader of the Non-Aligned Movement, working with Jawaharlal Nehru of India, Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt and Sukarno of Indonesia..."
4315 Truman, Harry (President of the United States): Six (black and white) photo negative strip (various sizes) of President Harry S. Truman (at his birthday celebration with wife Bess and daughter Margaret in Washington, DC - circa 1946) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 33, Folder 6."According to Wikipedia: "Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 - December 26, 1972) was an American politician who served as the 33rd President of the United States (1945-53). He served as a United States Senator from Missouri (1935-45) and briefly as Vice President (1945) before he succeeded to the presidency on April 12, 1945 upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. He was president during the final months of World War II, making the decision to drop atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Truman was elected in his own right in 1948. He presided over an uncertain domestic scene as America sought its path after the war and tensions with the Soviet Union increased, marking the start of the Cold War..."
4316 Wagner, Robert F. (U.S. Senator - New York): Seven 3 x 4 inch (black and white) photo negatives of New Jersey Senator Robert F. Wagner (interviewed by Seward Brisbane at the Lido Country Club - Long Beach, Long Island (NY). Topic "The Hatch Bill" - August 1939) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 33, Folder 7." According to Wikipedia: "Robert Ferdinand Wagner I (June 8, 1877 - May 4, 1953) was an American politician. He was a Democratic U.S. Senator from New York from 1927 to 1949. Working closely in the state legislature with fellow New York City Democrat Al Smith, Wagner embraced reform in the 1910s and 1920s, especially to the benefit of their core constituency, the working class. They built a coalition for these reforms that embraced unions, social workers, some businessmen, and numerous middle-class activists and civic reform organizations across the state.[3] As Senator, Wagner was a leader of the New Deal Coalition putting special emphasis on supporting the labor movement. He sponsored three major laws: the National Labor Relations Act of 1935, the Social Security Act of 1935, and the Public Housing Act of 1937. His son, Robert F. Wagner, Jr. was mayor of New York from 1954 through 1965..."
4317 Wagner, Jr., Robert F. (Mayor of New York City) - Part 1: Eleven (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of NYC Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. (with various "administrative figures" - circa 1956) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 33, Folder 8." According to Wikipedia: "Robert Ferdinand Wagner II (April 20, 1910 - February 12, 1991), usually known as Robert F. Wagner Jr. served three terms as the mayor of New York City, from 1954 through 1965. When running for his third term, he broke with the Tammany Hall leadership, ending the reign of clubhouse bosses in city politics..."
4318 Wagner, Jr., Robert F. (Mayor of New York City) - Part 2: Eighteen (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of NYC Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. travelling in Israel (c. early 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 33, Folder 9." According to Wikipedia: "Robert Ferdinand Wagner II (April 20, 1910 - February 12, 1991), usually known as Robert F. Wagner Jr. served three terms as the mayor of New York City, from 1954 through 1965. When running for his third term, he broke with the Tammany Hall leadership, ending the reign of clubhouse bosses in city politics..."
4319 Wagner, Jr., Robert F. (Mayor of New York City) - Part 3: One hundred and two (black and white) photo negative strips of NYC Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. travelling in Europe (England - with the Lord Mayor of London Sir Seymour, Ireland - with the Lord Mayor of Dublin Alfie Byrne, John Huston and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Germany - at the birthplace of his father, France, Israel, Greece and Italy - c. early 1960s) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). See, also, "Box 33, Folder 9." According to Wikipedia: "Robert Ferdinand Wagner II (April 20, 1910 - February 12, 1991), usually known as Robert F. Wagner Jr. served three terms as the mayor of New York City, from 1954 through 1965. When running for his third term, he broke with the Tammany Hall leadership, ending the reign of clubhouse bosses in city politics..."
4320 Wallace, Henry (Vice President of the United States): Twenty-four (black and white) photo negative strips (various sizes) of Vice President of the United States and 1948 Progressive Party Presidential nominee Henry Wallace (at a Madison Square Garden campaign rally in NYC - October 27, 1948) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According Wikipedia: "Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 - November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941-45), the Secretary of Agriculture (1933-40), and the Secretary of Commerce (1945-46). Wallace was a strong supporter of New Deal liberalism, rapid desegregation, and softer policies towards the Soviet Union. His public feuds with other officials caused significant controversy during his time as Vice President under Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the midst of World War II, and resulted in Democrats dropping him from the ticket in the 1944 election in favor of Senator Harry S Truman. In the 1948 presidential election, Wallace left the Democratic Party to run unsuccessfully as the nominee of the Progressive Party against Truman, Republican Thomas E. Dewey, and States' Rights Democrat Strom Thurmond. He won 2.4% of the popular vote and no electoral votes, and finished fourth..."
4321 Weizmann, Chaim (First President of Israel): Seven 2.5 x 2.5 inch (black and white) photo negatives of the first President of Israel Chaim Weizmann (departing for Israel, from NYC, on the RMS Mauretania - May 1948) by Martin Harris (for an unidentified publication photo assignment). According to Wikipedia: "Chaim Azriel Weizmann (1874 - 1952)...was a Zionist leader and Israeli statesman who served as President of the Zionist Organization and later as the first President of Israel. He was elected on February 16, 1949, and served until his death in 1952. Weizmann convinced the United States government to recognize the newly formed state of Israel. Weizmann was also a biochemist who developed the acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation process, which produces acetone through bacterial fermentation. His acetone production method was of great importance for the British war industry during World War I. He founded the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel and was instrumental in the establishment of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem..."



AL HIRSCHFELD ORIGINAL (JULY 1939) SKETCH.

Oversize (single) flat storage box.



Box Folder
441 Bucks County Playhouse Grand Opening- Springtime for Henry: One 12 x 24 inch (22 x 32 inch with matting) pen and ink sketch of the "Bucks County Playhouse Grand Opening - Springtime for Henry" (July 1939) by famed theatrical artist Al Hirschfeld. The sketch (which includes a caricature of LIFE MAGAZINE photographer Martin Harris) was presented to Mr. Harris, by the artist, in 1939. Notables (in addition to Martin Harris), represented in the sketch, include Florence McGee, John Terrell, Don Walker, Kenyon Nicolson, Jack Kirkland, Roger Davis, Moss Hart, Beatrice and George Kaufman, Richard Bennett and "Townspeople " who are depicted as they "crowd the Bridge to gape at the opening of Bucks County Playhouse" (Hirschfeld's description). The play "Springtime for Henry" starred Edward Everett Horton, Gordon Richards, Haila Stoddard and Julie Haydon (all, also, depicted in the sketch). According to Wikipedia: "The Bucks County Playhouse is the State Theater of Pennsylvania, and is located in New Hope, Pennsylvania. When the Hope Mills burned in 1790, the grist mills were rebuilt as the New Hope Mills by Benjamin Parry. The town was renamed for the mills. The building was saved from demolition in the 1930s and purchased and run by a group including playwrights Moss Hart and Kenyon Nicholson. Renovations converting the building into a theatre began in 1938. The first show opened there on July 1, 1939 with "Springtime for Henry" featuring Edward Everett Horton. The Bucks County Playhouse became a summer theater. It was the starting point for many actors and became a place where plays slated for Broadway were tried out. Neil Simon's "Barefoot in the Park" had its premiere at the theater in 1963, starring Robert Redford and Elizabeth Ashley. Other notable actors who performed at the theater over the years include Bela Lugosi, Dick Van Dyke, Tyne Daly, Grace Kelly, Angela Lansbury, and Walter Matthau. The Bucks County Playhouse Conservancy, a public/private partnership, raised sufficient funds to regain the property following a 2010 foreclosure. Following an extensive renovation, the theater reopened on July 2, 2012..."



Selected Subjects and Access Terms

Celebrities
Harris, Martin, 1908-71
Photography
Photojournalism
World War (1939-1945)




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